ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN

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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL
SECONDARY PLAN
Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
Prepared for:
Town of New Tecumseth
Prepared by:
Stantec Consulting Ltd.
300 – 675 Cochrane Drive West Tower
Markham, ON L3R 0B8
November 2008
606 10290
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
Table of Contents
1.0
1.1
1.2
1.3
1.4
1.5
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................1.5
BACKGROUND ..................................................................................................................1.5
RELATED STUDIES...........................................................................................................1.5
SECONDARY PLAN...........................................................................................................1.6
MASTER SERVICING PLAN..............................................................................................1.7
CLASS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCESS ....................................................1.7
2.0 BASIS OF THE PLAN ........................................................................................................2.1
2.1 LAND USE PLAN................................................................................................................2.1
2.2 SERVICING OPTIONS .......................................................................................................2.3
3.0 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM...........................................................................................3.1
3.1 NETWORK CONSIDERATIONS ........................................................................................3.1
3.1.1
Near Future Configurations..................................................................................3.2
3.2 TRAFFIC ASSESSMENT ...................................................................................................3.3
3.2.1
Basis of the Analysis............................................................................................3.3
3.2.1.1 Horizon Year and Time Periods for Analysis.......................................3.3
3.2.1.2 Traffic Generation................................................................................3.3
3.2.1.3 Existing Traffic Patterns ......................................................................3.3
3.2.2
Traffic Volumes ....................................................................................................3.4
3.2.2.1 Background Traffic ..............................................................................3.4
3.2.2.2 Site Generated Traffic .........................................................................3.4
3.2.2.3 Future Total Traffic Volumes ...............................................................3.6
3.2.3
Traffic Analysis.....................................................................................................3.6
3.2.3.1 Gross Roadway Capacity....................................................................3.6
3.2.3.2 Current Roadway Operations..............................................................3.7
3.2.3.3 Future Traffic Conditions .....................................................................3.7
3.3 ROAD NETWORK SYSTEM ..............................................................................................3.8
3.3.1
Regional Road System ........................................................................................3.8
3.3.2
Arterial Road System ...........................................................................................3.9
3.3.3
Collector Road System ......................................................................................3.10
3.4 LOCAL ROADS ................................................................................................................3.11
3.5 TRUCK TRAFFIC .............................................................................................................3.11
3.6 TRAIL SYSTEM ................................................................................................................3.11
3.7 OTHER MODES OF TRAVEL ..........................................................................................3.11
3.7.1
Rail Service........................................................................................................3.11
3.7.2
Bus Service........................................................................................................3.12
3.8 ROAD SYSTEM COSTS ..................................................................................................3.12
4.0 WATER SUPPLY & DISTRIBUTION .................................................................................4.1
4.1 OVERVIEW.........................................................................................................................4.1
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
4.2
4.3
4.4
4.5
4.6
SUPPLY OF WATER..........................................................................................................4.1
STORAGE ..........................................................................................................................4.2
DISTRIBUTION...................................................................................................................4.6
OTHER INITIATIVES..........................................................................................................4.8
WATER SYSTEM COSTS..................................................................................................4.8
5.0 SEWAGE COLLECTION & TREATMENT.........................................................................5.1
5.1 SYSTEM OVERVIEW.........................................................................................................5.1
5.1.1
System Layout .....................................................................................................5.1
5.1.2
Design Criteria .....................................................................................................5.2
5.2 SEWAGE COLLECTION SYSTEM ....................................................................................5.2
5.2.1
Southeast Quadrant.............................................................................................5.2
5.2.2
Southwest Quadrant ............................................................................................5.3
5.2.3
Northeast Quadrant .............................................................................................5.3
5.2.4
Northwest Quadrant.............................................................................................5.4
5.2.5
Additional Comments...........................................................................................5.4
5.3 PUMPING STATIONS ........................................................................................................5.5
5.4 SEWAGE TREATMENT .....................................................................................................5.7
5.5 OTHER INITIATIVES..........................................................................................................5.8
5.5.1
Grey Water Distribution System...........................................................................5.8
5.5.2
Reduced Water Use Industries ............................................................................5.9
5.5.3
Other Directions ...................................................................................................5.9
5.6 CAPITAL COSTS FOR SANITARY SYSTEM ....................................................................5.9
6.0 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT.......................................................................................6.1
6.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................6.1
6.2 WATER RESOURCE ISSUES ...........................................................................................6.2
6.2.1
Overview of Receiving Water Courses ................................................................6.2
6.2.2
Watercourse Release Targets .............................................................................6.3
6.2.3
The Role of Infiltration..........................................................................................6.5
6.2.4
Environmental Objectives ....................................................................................6.6
6.3 DRAINAGE SYSTEM OVERVIEW .....................................................................................6.6
6.4 SOURCE CONTROLS FOR RUNOFF ...............................................................................6.7
6.5 MINOR SYSTEM DRAINAGE ............................................................................................6.9
6.5.1
Creating a Viable Network – A Matter of Balance................................................6.9
6.6 MAJOR SYSTEM DRAINAGE............................................................................................6.9
6.6.1
The Road System ................................................................................................6.9
6.6.2
A Separate Open Channel Waterway................................................................6.10
6.7 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT .............................ERROR! BOOKMARK NOT DEFINED.
6.7.1
Multiple Levels of Control...................................................................................6.12
6.7.2
Site Control ........................................................................................................6.13
6.7.3
Area-Wide Control .............................................................................................6.14
6.7.3.1 Catchment A – Spring Creek Pond ...................................................6.15
6.7.3.2 Catchment B – Southern Community Pond ......................................6.16
6.7.3.3 Catchment C – Northern Residential Pond .......................................6.17
6.7.3.4 Catchment D – Southern Residential Pond.......................................6.18
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
6.7.3.5 Catchment E – C.W. Leach Pond .....................................................6.19
6.7.3.6 Catchment F – Regional WWTP Pond..............................................6.20
6.8 CAPITAL COSTS FOR STORMWATER MANAGEMENT ...............................................6.20
6.8.1
Bearing the Cost of the System .........................................................................6.20
6.8.2
Estimated Public Sector Capital Works .............................................................6.21
7.0 URBAN DESIGN ISSUES ..................................................................................................7.1
7.1 INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................7.1
7.2 ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT ..................................................................................7.1
7.2.1
Natural Resource Base........................................................................................7.1
7.2.1.1 Inventory of the Resource Base ..........................................................7.1
7.2.1.2 Summary of Ecological Constraints ....................................................7.3
7.2.2
Management Guidelines ......................................................................................7.4
7.3 URBAN STREETSCAPE ....................................................................................................7.5
7.3.1
Gateways .............................................................................................................7.5
7.3.2
Trail System .........................................................................................................7.7
7.3.3
Streetscape Elements..........................................................................................7.8
7.3.4
Built Form.............................................................................................................7.9
7.4 THE COST OF URBAN ENHANCEMENT PROPOSALS ................................................7.10
7.5 NOISE CONCERNS .........................................................................................................7.12
7.5.1
Nature of the Concern........................................................................................7.12
7.5.2
Traffic Noise.......................................................................................................7.12
7.5.3
Site Noise...........................................................................................................7.12
7.4.4
Noise Strategy ...................................................................................................7.13
7.6 LIGHT POLLUTION ..........................................................................................................7.15
7.6.1
Concerns............................................................................................................7.15
7.6.2
Extent of the Problem ........................................................................................7.15
7.6.2.1 Theoretical Assessment ....................................................................7.15
7.6.3
Approaching a Solution......................................................................................7.16
8.0 CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ..................................................................8.1
8.1 CONCLUSIONS..................................................................................................................8.1
8.2 RECOMMENDATIONS.......................................................................................................8.5
9.0 REFERENCES ...................................................................................................................9.1
LIST OF TABLES
Table 1-1 - Integration of the Planning and Class EA Processes ..............................................1.9
Table 2-1 - Land Use Areas in the Secondary Plan...................................................................2.2
Table 3-1 - Estimated Trip Generation by the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan .3.5
Table 3-2 - Normal Link Capacities Used for Planning Purposes ..............................................3.6
Table 3-3 - Capital Costs of Selected Road Works* ................................................................3.12
Table 4-1 - Design Water Demands (m3/d)................................................................................4.2
Table 4-2 - Storage Capacities Required (m³) ...........................................................................4.3
Table 4-3 - Staged Development of Water Storage (m3/d) ........................................................4.4
Table 4-4 - Additional Water Storage (m3/d) ..............................................................................4.5
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
Table 4-5 – Selected System Improvements Required for Secondary Plan Area .....................4.6
Table 5-1 - Staged Sanitary Design Flows* ...............................................................................5.5
Table 5-2 - Staged Development of the Pumping Stations ........................................................5.6
Table 5-3 - Preliminary Pumping Station Design Criteria ..........................................................5.6
Table 5-4 - Projected Treatment Requirements.........................................................................5.7
Table 5-5 - Projected Wastewater Flows to Regional WWTP....................................................5.7
Table 5-6 - Capital Costs of Selected Sewage Infrastructure*.................................................5.10
Table 7-1 - Costs of Selected Urban Enhancement Works* ....................................................7.10
Table 7-2 - Impact of Development on Ambient Night Light Levels .........................................7.16
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure 1-1 – Location Plan.......................................................................................................1.11
Figure 2-1 - Land Use Plan........................................................................................................2.4
Figure 3-1 - Area Road Network ..............................................................................................3.14
Figure 3-2 – Transportation Plan .............................................................................................3.15
Figure 3-3 – Background Traffic (2003) ...................................................................................3.16
Figure 3-4 – Background Traffic (2015) ...................................................................................3.17
Figure 3-5 – Background Traffic (2026) ...................................................................................3.18
Figure 3-6 – Background Traffic (± 2035) ................................................................................3.19
Figure 3-7 – Site Generated Traffic (2015) ..............................................................................3.20
Figure 3-8 – Site Generated Traffic (2026) ..............................................................................3.21
Figure 3-9 – Site Generated Traffic (Ultimate ± 2035) .............................................................3.22
Figure 3-10 – Future Traffic Volumes (2015)...........................................................................3.23
Figure 3-11 – Future Traffic Volumes (2026)...........................................................................3.24
Figure 3-12 – Future Traffic Volumes (± 2035) ........................................................................3.25
Figure 3-13 – Road Requirements...........................................................................................3.26
Figure 3-14 – Typical Urban Arterial Section (36 m ROW) ......................................................3.27
Figure 3-15 – Typical Urban Collector Section (26 m ROW) ...................................................3.28
Figure 3-16 – Typical Urban Local Section (22 m ROW).........................................................3.29
Figure 3-17 – Typical Trail Section ..........................................................................................3.30
Figure 4-1 – Water System ........................................................................................................4.7
Figure 5-1 – Proposed Sanitary Collection and Treatment System ........................................5.11
Figure 7-1 – Natural Environment Management Guidelines .....................................................7.6
Figure 7-2 – Urban Design Enhancements..............................................................................7.11
Figure 7-3 – Noise Environment ..............................................................................................7.14
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
1.0
Introduction
1.1
BACKGROUND
The Town of New Tecumseth has been limited in its growth by the availability of basic
infrastructure. To a large extent, this obstacle was reduced by the construction of new water
and wastewater infrastructure over the last five years. The Town has experienced increasing
opportunities for new employment growth, but is currently limited in capitalizing on those
opportunities by its limited availability of designated industrial and commercial land.
With this in mind, the Town undertook an Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan comprising a
land area in the order of 450 ha (1000 acres) situated east of the Community of Alliston, as
shown in Figure 1.1. It was clear that the lands currently available for industrial and commercial
use, as designated by the Town’s Official Plan, would not be sufficient to accommodate the
anticipated demand over the long term (i.e. 20+ years), especially when consideration is given
to the need to provide a selection of parcel size and configuration.
1.2
RELATED STUDIES
The Simcoe County Official Plan sets out specific requirements for the expansion of urban
areas, some of which are addressed by the Town of New Tecumseth’s Growth Management
Study. The Growth Management Plan defined the anticipated growth for the area. It should be
noted that the study was completed prior to the release of the provincial policy limiting growth in
the Oak Ridges Moraine area of the province. Although it has not been specifically
documented, there is a common impression that the restrictions will place more pressure on
growth north of the moraine area, such as Alliston. The development projections may therefore
be conservative.
The Town’s own Official Plan (Office Consolidation November 2003) identifies “a major intent
of the Town is to move towards the assessment ratio of 60/40” residential to
industrial/commercial development (Policy 4.1). As such, the Plan indicates that, “in order to
develop a diverse and sufficient economic base, positive actions will be taken to preserve and
extend the Town’s industrial base”.
Other policies of the Simcoe County Official Plan call for water conservation, natural heritage
preservation, traffic studies, odour and noise studies, and the requirements of the Secondary
Plan. The policies also call for the development of a serving strategy for any municipal growth
areas.
The Town of New Tecumseth’s Official Plan directs all new major industrial developments to the
Alliston Community. The plans for expansion require a balance between the provision of
adequate municipal services now and the commitment for services for community expansion.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
Through the planning process, several concurrent and recently completed studies were
referenced, including:
•
Alliston Residential Secondary Plan’s Master Servicing Plan
•
Class EA for the Collingwood /Alliston Trunk Transmission Main
•
Beeton/Alliston Trunk Water Transmission Main study
•
Class EA for Wastewater Treatment in the Town of New Tecumseth
•
Development plans for the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant
•
MTO’s Simcoe County Transportation Strategy Plan
1.3
SECONDARY PLAN
The Town’s Official Plan sets out a policy framework for the preparation of the Secondary Plan.
Specifically, it indicates:
“All expansions to the existing boundaries for the designated urban areas shall require
an amendment to the Plan” and that “… amendment shall be in the form of a Secondary
Plan”.
The Official Plan further denotes that:
“Secondary Plans will deal in detail with the following factors for each Secondary Plan
area:
•
community population projections and their resulting impact on the Town’s overall
population projections;
•
pattern of land use;
•
distribution and density of housing types;
•
establishment of neighbourhood focal points;
•
road patterns and engineering standards for arterial, collector, local roads and
pedestrian and bicycle paths;
•
provision for commercial facilities, schools, parks, open space and other community
facilities;
•
urban design including standards for buffering, landscaping, signs, lot layout, etc.;
•
servicing strategy; and;
•
phasing.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
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Introduction
“In addition to the above requirements, a Secondary Plan which contemplates expansion
to an existing community boundary shall consider the following criteria in delineating
appropriate growth area(s):
•
reasonable growth scenarios for the community to be expanded;
•
whether the development can be adequately serviced;
•
the completion of existing neighbourhoods, the orderly development of new
neighbourhoods, and compatibility with existing urban development;
•
the logical and economical extension of infrastructure and road networks;
•
opportunities provided by existing arterial road connections;
•
the financial capabilities of the Town;
•
the agricultural and environmental policies of this Plan;
•
support to the commercial core; and
•
the location of natural boundaries.”
The points highlighted in bold text are specific issues to be addressed by the Master Servicing
Plan study.
1.4
MASTER SERVICING PLAN
While it is the purpose of the Secondary Plan to set out the land uses and policies necessary to
control the development of the designated lands, the planning process is also important in that it
investigates how the designated lands can be efficiently serviced. The Master Servicing Plan is
a complementary document directing private and public infrastructure funds in an effective
manner to meet the overall needs of the developing areas of the community.
The Master Servicing Plan was completed in concert with the Secondary Plan to establish an
efficient road pattern to service the new area. At the same time, the Master Servicing Plan
Study attempts to locate land uses that minimize capital servicing costs.
1.5
CLASS ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT PROCESS
The completion of this Servicing Master Plan has followed the principles of the Municipal Class
Environmental Assessment (MEA, June 2000), which was passed under the auspices of the
provincial Environmental Assessment Act and has set out the planning process for the study.
The planning process for master plans and the prescribed process for preparing secondary
plans are very similar. The Environmental Assessment Act requires the completion of a
planning process incorporating input from the public and various provincial and federal
agencies. This planning process closely mirrors the process for the development of Official and
Secondary Plans. It is therefore appropriate that the two planning efforts be amalgamated into
a single effort. In fact, recent changes to the Class EA for municipal infrastructure reinforce this
coordinated effort.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
In 2000, the Municipal Engineers Association of Ontario completed a Municipal Class of
Environmental Assessments (MEA, June 2000). This updated study of typical municipal
projects established a specific process for the integration of the land use planning process,
completed under the Planning Act, with the requirements to complete environment assessments
(EA) under the Environmental Assessment Act. The planning process established by the Class
EA is specific and aims to consider the effects of each alternative on all aspect of the
environment, providing for a systematic process of evaluation and a traceable decision-making
protocol. It also sets a process for public and agency input in the evaluation.
The most recent version of the Municipal Class EA includes specific provision for the integration
of the study processes of the Secondary Plan with the Master Plan for Municipal Servicing.
Specific requirements set out in the Municipal Class EA, along with the general manner by
which these were satisfied, are described in Table 1.1.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
Issue
Requirement
Type of
application
under Planning
Act
Table 1-1 - Integration of the Planning and Class EA Processes
Means Used to Satisfy Requirement
Applies to Official Plans, Official Plan
Amendments, secondary plans adopted as Official
Plan Amendments, community improvement
plans, plans of condominium and subdivisions,
which come into effect or are approved following
the coming into force of the Class EA (A.2.9.1)
The planning application is a secondary plan that
was adopted by the Town of New Tecumseth in
November 2003.
Apply or define the environment as per the EA Act
(A2.9.2 A)
The Master Servicing Plan, together with the
Secondary Plan, has specifically dealt with issues of
air (i.e. noise), land (i.e. topography, soils, land use,
etc) and water (groundwater, stormwater, and
potable water).
Definition of Environment
Plant and animal life were reviewed as part of the
baseline studies and were addressed in policies of
the Official Plan Amendment.
The social, economic, and cultural conditions of the
community were specifically addressed in
consideration of the plan. Factors relating to these
issues are also addressed in consideration of the
options in the servicing studies.
The structural and built form of the area is a subject
of the planning document; issues relating to the built
form of the Secondary Plan are addressed in the
Master Servicing Plan.
The policies of the Secondary plan consider the
issues of odour and noise emanating form the site.
The Master Servicing Plan deals with noise and light
emissions from the study area.
Environmental Planning Principles
The interrelationships of the various systems and the
interaction of the land use and the infrastructure of
the development area have been considered.
Incorporate principles of (A.2.9.2 B):
•
Consultation with potentially affected parties.
•
Identification and evaluation of the impact of
alternatives on the environment.
•
Traceable documentation.
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Principles satisfied through a process of:
•
Meeting with landowners, major adjacent
landowners, public meetings, workshops for
agencies, and general circulation of planning
information.
•
The infrastructure plan’s impacts were
evaluated on the basis of a broad range of
considerations based on the definition of the
environmental in a systematic manner.
•
A series of reports set out each stage in the
process and document the findings of the work.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Introduction
Issue
Requirement
Incorporate the following steps:
•
Planning Process
•
Means Used to Satisfy Requirement
These steps were completed as follows:
Identify Problem or Opportunity.
•
Need and opportunity are defined in the Growth
Management Study and re-emphasized in the
Secondary Plan. Issues and opportunities are
set out in the Work Program document.
•
Carried out at two levels: the Secondary Plan
reviews the overall need for the development,
while the Options Report for the Master
Servicing Plan details more specific ranges of
solutions to the infrastructure needs of the Plans
developed.
•
The Background phase of the Master Servicing
Plan inventoried the natural environment. The
Secondary Plan inventoried the social
environment. Both documents address
economics of the area and of the site-specific
environment.
•
Issues were raised throughout the process and
final documents provide specific
recommendations regarding the mitigation of
residual impacts.
•
Evaluation performed at various levels and
preferences defined on an iterative basis
leading to the selected Plan.
•
Extensive consultation process provided
integrating Planning reviews together with the
Master Planning Process.
•
The final Secondary plan, adopted by an Official
Plan Amendment, and the Master Servicing
Plan (this document) set out the preferred
solution (i.e. project).
Identify alternative solutions to problem.
•
Inventory natural, social and economic
environment.
•
Identify impacts and mitigating measures.
•
Evaluation and identify preferences.
•
Mandatory consultation with review agencies
and public.
•
Determine preferred solution
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
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Introduction
The resulting Master Servicing Plan will have carried the planning and design of the
infrastructure projects to at least the second level of a five-phase process in implementing the
capital works.
For projects that would have been defined as Schedule B under the Municipal Class EA, the
mandatory notification completes the Class EA Planning Process upon review of the
documentation by the public and by review agencies.
Projects that would have been defined as Schedule C may still need to proceed with further
detailed study as defined by the Municipal Class EA.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Basis of the Plan
2.0
Basis of the Plan
2.1
LAND USE PLAN
The Secondary Plan for the study area was completed in a parallel, concurrent planning
process to this Master Servicing Plan study. The result of that study was the preparation of a
land use plan establishing designated activities for the area covered by the Plan. The
Secondary Plan was adopted by way of an Amendment to the Town’s Official Plan.
The stated purpose of the amendment (i.e. Secondary Plan) was:
a)
“To amend the Town’s Official Plan to provide for the logical expansion of the Town’s
existing industrial area by designating sufficient lands to accommodate the future
industrial and related commercial lands required for the growth of the Town of New
Tecumseth to 2026;
b)
“Establish a comprehensive land use plan for a logical area of future urban growth of
Alliston located east of the existing industrial area that includes the Alliston Honda
Plant and west of the developing “Briars” residential community."
The basis of the Secondary Plan was set out in the preamble to the amendment. Several of the
more relevant points include:
a.
“A growth management study undertaken for the Town estimates that an additional
165 ha. of employment land is required within the Town to 2021. (Town of New
Tecumseth Growth Management Study, March 13, 2002) Projecting this estimate to
2026 identifies the need for approximately 210 ha. of employment land of which
approximately 150 ha. is projected for industrial employment purposes;
c.
“The proposed secondary plan area constitutes a logical planning area with distinct
boundaries within which planning should occur in a logical and comprehensive
manner. Planned land use in the area comprises the following approximate areas:
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Basis of the Plan
Table 2-1 - Land Use Areas in the Secondary Plan
Land Use
Gross Area
in ha.
Local Road
in ha.
Net Area
in ha.
General Industrial
174.4
26
148.4
Light Industrial
88.8
12
76.8
General Commercial
40.9
5.7
35.2
Service Commercial
28.3
5.2
23.1
District Park
8.5
1.5
7.0
Mixed Use
13.4
1.7
11.7
Sub total
354.3
52.1 ha
302.2
Hazard Lands
18.6
n/a
n/a
9.3
31
n/a
n/a
23
15
(52.1)
n/a
n/a
451.2 ha.
n/a
n/a
Special Use
SWMP
WWTP
Roads
Arterial
Collector
Local
Total
Note: Net area includes approximately 11.7 ha required for storm water channels.
The Goals and Objectives of the Secondary Plan area were further set out in the Amendment
itself. These included the following general goals:
“1.1
General
“The Alliston Industrial Secondary Plan area is intended to accommodate the future
industrial and business requirements of the Town to the year 2026. Development in the
area is intended to complement the existing high quality employment uses and provide
sensitive transition to the residential neighbourhoods in the surrounding areas. The
following Goals and Objectives will be pursued:
a)
“To provide for the development of a high quality industrial area which is
designed sensitively and accommodates a broad range of employment uses;
b)
“To provide employment opportunities for the residents of the growing Town
of New Tecumseth and surrounding areas of Simcoe County;
c)
“To direct industrial uses to a comprehensively planned area with supporting
sanitary, water and transportation infrastructure;
d)
“To maximize the benefits occurring from the existing and planned County
and Provincial transportation system and from the investments made by the
Town and the Province with respect to water supply and sanitary treatment
facilities;
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e)
“To phase development through the implementing planning process to ensure
the orderly allocation of water and sewer capacities;
f)
“To provide a long term plan to guide the installation and sizing of hard
services.”
The land use plan incorporated in the Secondary Plan is shown in Figure 2.1.
2.2
SERVICING OPTIONS
An extensive process was undertaken to review options for each infrastructure element in this
Master Servicing Plan and is documented in the previous volumes of this planning process.
The strategy embodied in the Plan represents the best-reasoned solution to the issues raised
during the planning process and should serve as a guide to the implementation of the
development area. Modifications to the proposals may be desirable at the time of
implementation; however, such alternative options must be completed as amendments to this
Plan and must consider the interdependencies present in the Serving Master Plan. Detailed
amendments may be accommodated at the detailed design stage.
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3.0
Transportation System
3.1
NETWORK CONSIDERATIONS
Notice to Reader:
Please be advised that due to alterations within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan subsequent to its approval by the County of Simcoe on November 22, 2005, this Report
has included Section 10 – ADDENDUM, which describes the road network and servicing
adjustments resulting from the alterations within the Plan boundary. It is recommended the
Reader references Section 10 in conjunction with their review of this Section.
The community of Alliston is served by a road system that is dominated by the east/west
provincial Highway 89, classified as a special controlled access highway (CAH). The historical
county road layout dominates the north/south road network in town. Figure 3.1 and Figure 3.2
illustrates the area road network and the Transportation Plan for the Study Area.
Victoria Street serves as the main street through the commercial core and is the connecting link
for Highway 89 through the community. This road forms the northerly limit of the study area.
This road is largely a two-lane facility through the core area, but includes additional lanes along
various stretches.
Tottenham Road bordered the study area along its western boundary at the time OPA 29 was
approved in November 2005. This was a four-lane facility between Victoria Street and Industrial
Parkway. It provided a major link in the County’s transportation network in the south portion of
the County. This section of road was closed in 2006 due to the County’s recent initiative of
planning a realignment of the roadway through the study area (i.e. County Road 10
Realignment Class EA by McCormick Rankin). The goal of the realignment was to provide a
continuous right-of-way to support the County road network. The road closure is identified as
an alteration subsequent to Plan approval and is discussed within Section 10 – Addendum.
Industrial Parkway is a relatively new, four lane rural roadway following the alignment of 14th
Concession Road, west of Tottenham Road. This was built to facilitate the traffic created by the
Honda Manufacturing Canada plant located west of Tottenham Road and the additional
industrial traffic located on the southerly boundary of the urban area. It is currently designated
and signed as a truck bypass of the core area of the community. The roadway narrows to two
lanes west of the Honda plant.
14th Concession Road was a two lane rural road situated east of Tottenham Road at the time
OPA 29 was approved in November 2005. This road formed part of the original land division
when the province was first surveyed for land grants. This road provided a significant east –
west link through the town, south of Alliston. It provides a crossing of the Nottawasaga River,
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south of Highway 89. It also provides a road link to Sideroad 10 east of the Study Area. As part
of the County Road 10 Re-Alignment project in 2006, a section of 14th Concession Road from
Tottenham Road to approximately 800m easterly was conveyed to the County and now forms
part of the realigned County Road 10.
Town of New Tecumseth Sideroad 10 provides another significant north – south link for the
Town. The road, south of Highway 89, provides a connection to the community of Beeton in the
southern portion of the Town. This is currently a rural, two lane facility.
3.1.1
Near Future Configurations
This Master Servicing Plan document was prepared in support of OPA 29, which was adopted
by the Town of New Tecumseth in 2003 and approved by the County of Simcoe in November
2005. Since that time, the realignment of County Road 10 has been adjusted by the County;
however, this adjustment has not changed the tenets and recommendations of this study.
Additional future modifications can be considered provided: a) updated traffic data can
demonstrate that the proposed changes are beneficial to the road network b) all necessary
approvals are obtained and c) any future upgrades to Highway 89 required by the modifications
will be the financial responsibility (100%) of the Town and/or the Developer.
For example, the developer of the lands generally bounded by Highway 89, Mackenzie Pioneer
Road, Realigned County Road 10 and C. W. Leach Road has proposed an additional northsouth municipal road between Highway 89 and McKenzie Pioneer Road. A preliminary analysis
of this proposal was undertaken by the developer and peer reviewed by the Town in 2007 and
concluded that it would benefit the road network. Based on this, the Town will support the
proposal; however detailed analysis and design work will have to be completed to obtain
necessary approvals.
The Town acknowledges that MTO has advised that Highway 89 is classified as a special
controlled access highway (CAH) and as such, no direct access from OPA 29 development to
Highway 89 are permitted as a result of approving the Master Plan document. This does not
preclude the future approval by MTO of the proposed future municipal road connection provided
traffic analysis can demonstrate its benefit and provided any necessary upgrades to Highway
89, County Road 10 and surrounding road network, as a result of the additional municipal road
connection, are constructed.
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3.2
TRAFFIC ASSESSMENT
3.2.1
Basis of the Analysis
3.2.1.1 Horizon Year and Time Periods for Analysis
It is anticipated that it will take more than twenty years to fully occupy the development lands
within the Secondary Plan. Therefore, a number of time horizons were examined in the traffic
analysis. The first is associated with substantial construction of a first phase of the Secondary
Plan. It was assumed that the first phase would be 80% built out in 2015. The second time
horizon was selected to correspond to the horizon date for the Secondary Plan (i.e. 2026). At
that point, it was assumed that the secondary plan area would be constructed to 80% of its
ultimate capacity. Finally, traffic implication for the ultimate build out of the entire Secondary
Plan area was assumed. For the purpose of this analysis this was taken to be 2035.
The time period of analysis for the Secondary Plan is the weekday PM peak hour of the
adjacent street. This typically represents the peak hour of traffic of traffic generated by
industrial developments.
3.2.1.2 Traffic Generation
The future traffic generation was derived from information provided by the Draft Alliston
Residential Secondary Plan (MHBC Planning Ltd. 1999). The four major residential areas near
the study area (named Northeast, Northwest, Southwest and South within the Residential
Secondary Plan) as well as the development in the adjacent residential areas east of the realignment of County Road 10 and the Industrial areas in the south.
Traffic generation estimates were prepared for the Secondary Plan land uses, as per the
development information available at the time of the preparation of this report (2003). These
employ the traffic generation estimates published in ITE’s Trip Generation (6th edition, 1997of
the ITE Trip Generation; the latest publication available at the time).
3.2.1.3 Existing Traffic Patterns
Traffic for the existing roads was based on previous data collected from various sources and
compiled in the Alliston Residential Secondary Plan.
The traffic analysis has taken into account the general increased growth in traffic through the
community of Alliston. Based on the Town’s Growth Study (2000), information on historical
traffic growth shows an increase of some 2% per annum. The traffic counts were projected to a
common time base for the current analysis. The future background traffic volumes utilized a
historical growth factor over each of the planning horizons. The annual compound growth
factors used were:
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Growth to 2003
2.0%
Growth 2003 to 2015
2.0%
Growth 2015 to 2026
1.5%
Growth 2026 to 2035
1.0%
The numerous trends over the next two decades are expected to modify the growth and
distribution of traffic on the local road network. This study therefore encourages the reexamination of the issue of updates and changes to the future traffic pattern and road network
over time.
Added to the background traffic projections was the traffic generated by other developments
currently approved or identified in the Alliston Residential Secondary Plan. This included the
traffic volumes from six residential developments (Brymar, Nielson, McCague, Metrus, Rizzardo,
Town Lands at King Street and Industrial Parkway) and one commercial expansion (Frum
Developments, Zeller’s Plaza). This traffic projection was presented in the Alliston Residential
Secondary Plan’s Master Servicing Plan.
Standard ITE trip generation rates (available at the time of analysis) were used to project these
traffic volumes, and the distribution was based on existing traffic patterns.
3.2.2
Traffic Volumes
3.2.2.1 Background Traffic
The background traffic counts for area roads, normalized to a 2003 date, are given in Figure
3.3.
3.2.2.2 Site Generated Traffic
Trip Generation
The estimated traffic volumes generated during the AM and PM peak hours of the adjacent
street for the ultimate development and for the two phases are shown in Table 3.1.
It is estimated that at completion, the proposed Secondary Plan area will generate a total of
approximately 92,700 vehicle trips per day and approximately 7,200 trips in the AM peak hour
(vph) and approximately 11,400 vph in the PM peak hour.
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Table 3-1 - Estimated Trip Generation by the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan
2015 Traffic
Land Use
ITE Land
Use Code
2026 Traffic
Ultimate Traffic
AM
Peak
PM
Peak
Daily
AM
Peak
PM
Peak
Daily
AM
Peak
PM
Peak
Daily
WWTP
n/a
5
5
20
5
5
20
5
5
20
SWM Ponds
n/a
1
1
15
1
1
15
1
1
15
Open Space
(Nottawasaga
River)
n/a
1
2
20
1
2
20
1
2
20
Open Space (South
Draw Area)
n/a
0
0
0
1
1
10
1
1
10
Open Space
(Spring Creek)
n/a
0
1
8
0
1
8
0
1
11
Residential
262-Single
Dwelling
217
292
2,766
217
292
2,766
217
292
2766
Service
Commercial
820-Shopping
Center
226
820
9,399
362
1311
15,038
608
2,207
25,322
General
Commercial
820-Shopping
Center
400
1,452
16,659
639
2,322
26,654
799
2,903
33,318
Light Industrial
110-Industrial
Park
279
287
1,730
784
807
4,861
2,315
2,384
14,363
General Industrial
140Manufacturing
944
1062
4,933
1,552
1,746
8,109
3,227
3,628
16,856
2073
3,922
35,550
3,562
6,488
57,501
7,174
11,424
92,701
Total
Note: land use areas are shown within Table 2.1
Trip Distribution and Assignment
The previous studies noted a general traffic pattern with the following distribution pattern:
•
50% to/from the east (i.e. toward Highway 400)
•
35% to/from the west (i.e. west of Alliston)
•
15% to/from the remainder of the Alliston Community
It is anticipated that there will be a shift in that pattern for the Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan whereby more north/south movements will be experienced. The distribution of trips in and
out of the Secondary Plan area was based on the existing traffic patterns and developments in
the study area as noted previously, with some consideration for the site location and the
improvements to County Road 10 that has now been approved by the County. It is estimated
that the distribution will be:
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•
45% to/from the east (i.e. toward Highway 400)
•
30% to/from the west (i.e. west of Alliston)
•
5% to/from the north (i.e. using County Road 10)
•
5% to/from the south (i.e. using County Road 10)
•
15% to/from the remainder of the Alliston Community
The mature, site-generated traffic volumes are illustrated on Figure 3.9.
Traffic was assigned to the road network based on the most accessible route to the Secondary
Plan from the desired origin/destination. Based on this method, traffic volumes on the major
road links presented on the Secondary Plan was estimated.
3.2.2.3 Future Total Traffic Volumes
Total future traffic volumes were derived by adding the background traffic volumes to the sitegenerated traffic volumes. Since the Secondary Plan area is expected to take considerable
time to complete, the site-generated traffic was estimated for each time horizon based on the
Phasing Plan developed for the Secondary Plan. The year 2015 total traffic volumes, consisting
of the background traffic volumes and the site-generated traffic volumes are shown on Figure
3.10. The year 2026 total traffic volumes, consisting of the background traffic volumes and the
site-generated traffic volumes are shown on Figure 3.11. The ultimate (± year 2035) total traffic
volumes, consisting of the background traffic volumes and the site-generated traffic volumes are
shown on Figure 3.12.
3.2.3
Traffic Analysis
3.2.3.1 Gross Roadway Capacity
Table 3.2 provides a summary of link capacities typically used in planning studies.
Table 3-2 - Normal Link Capacities Used for Planning Purposes
Function Classification of Roadway
Highway
Arterial
Collector
Local
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Sub-Class
Capacity (vehicles/hr/lane)
Main roadway
1850
Ramps
1300
Rural
1100
Class 1
900
Class 2
800
Class 1
650
Class 2
500
350
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3.2.3.2 Current Roadway Operations
It is estimated that Highway 89, east of the Alliston residential community’s limits (west of C.W.
Leach and east of the re-aligned Country Road 10), currently has a capacity of approximately
1100 vehicles/hour/lane (vph /lane). As the traffic volumes are ±890 vph /lane in the PM peak
hour, this roadway section is currently operating at 80% of its capacity in the 4-laned sections
and at capacity in the further 2-lane sections. In town, this roadway is currently operating at an
acceptable level of service. It is anticipated that there is some distribution of traffic to cross
roads out of town, but the remainder of the road is operating near capacity over the remainder
of the distance to Cookstown and further east towards Highway 400. The additional climbing
lane helps the flow of traffic at the drumlin outside of town. The current PM peak is also likely to
be short in duration due to the nature of the traffic movements.
Within the community’s boundaries, east of approximately Boyne Street, Highway No. 89
(Victoria Street East) operates as an arterial roadway with a link capacity of 900 vph. Current
traffic volumes are in the range of 620 to 690 vph per direction. This results in volume to link
capacity ratios of 70% to 75%.
In the core area, the roadway is constrained by the narrower traffic lanes and the amount of side
friction caused by the existing parking and the elevated level of activity in the area. The link
capacities are likely to be in the range of 650 vehicles per hour. Current traffic is approaching
this limit.
The volumes on Industrial Parkway are 1300 to 1400 vph per direction (refer Figure 3.3) and the
roadway is estimated to be operating at 85% of its capacity.
Prior to its closure in 2006, Tottenham Road was operating at 50% to 65% of its current peak
capacity in the PM peak traffic hour for the overall town. The traffic is very peaked due to the
characteristics of the shift change at the Honda plant.
Normally a roadway at 90% of its capacity is at a critical level and mitigative measures should
be taken (such as adding an additional lane/widening the roadway).
3.2.3.3
Future Traffic Conditions
Background Traffic Conditions
It is anticipated that the existing industrially zoned lands in town will add 145 to 335 vph in the
PM peak hour to the road system. Full development of the approved residential development
could add a further 230 to 360 vph on the southern roads and up to 840 vph westbound trips
onto Highway 89 in the PM peak hour.
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2015 Traffic Operations
Upon development of the initial phase of Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area there is an
anticipated need for extra road capacity on Victoria Street/Highway 89 of up to six lanes east of
Tottenham Road. It is also anticipated that the first phase of the County Road 10 Realignment
should be constructed as a four-lane facility north of the extension of C.W. Leach Road. The
14th Concession Road between new County Road 10 and Tottenham Road will need to be a
four-lane facility. Widening of Industrial Parkway by a lane in each direction may also be
required. East of new County Road 10, 14th Concession Road will need to be rebuilt to a new
two-lane facility.
In order that road upgrade projects proposed by this document are phased in concert with
actual development rates, it will be important to monitor the impact of the development and
determine the rate of traffic growth from the new employment areas. As noted in Section
3.2.2.2, the realignment and improvements to Country Road 10 will favor more north/south
traffic movement and will reduce the east-west capacity needs.
2026 Traffic Operations
Further growth in the 2015 to 2026 period will stretch the capacity of Victoria Street to handle
the peak traffic periods. Travel Demand Management (TDM) techniques should also be
adopted in the future to reduce anticipated traffic volumes and to divert traffic away from this
downtown-connecting link. Proper phasing of road network upgrades along with TDM
techniques will have to be implemented on other roads as well in the future.
Operations beyond 2026
Depending on the type of development that occurs in the OPA #29 areas, traffic demands may
continue to stretch the capacity of localized sections of the road network, and based on the
future considerations, may require localized road improvements to address the future localized
capacity issues. Widening of C.W. Leach Road would be a typical example of such required
improvements.
The short term (2015) and ultimate (2035) road requirements based on initial planning analysis
are illustrated in Figure 3.13.
3.3
ROAD NETWORK SYSTEM
3.3.1
Regional Road System
The traffic analysis indicates that provincially owned Highway 89 will continue to provide a
significant road link for future traffic accessing the Town and specifically the
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area. The preliminary analysis also indicates that the
existing Highway 89 (4 lane sections) are roughly operating at 80% of the operating capacity, as
given is section 3.2.3.2.
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A Study Design Report (SDR) for Highway 89 between Rosemount and Hwy 400 is being
conducted in 2007 by Ministry of Transportation (MTO). The study limits extend 28.7 kilometers
along Hwy 89 including the communities of Rosemount, Alliston and Cookstown. The purpose
of the SDR is to identify the needs and justification for Highway 89 improvements, and to
determine the nature of corridor improvements required to address traffic operations, capacity
and safety needs on this section of the Hwy 89 corridor.
According to the information presented in the Highway 89 Study Design during the 2nd Public
Information Centre (PIC), it is noted that the existing road network in the Alliston area between
C.W. Leach Road and County Road 50 is sufficient to handle demand. The SDR indicates that
no additional capacity is required between County Road 50 and C.W. Leach Road, to beyond
2025.
However, the SDR recommends need for additional capacity within the Highway 89 corridor
between C.W. Leach Road to Cookstown and further up to Highway 400 by 2010. Further, it
suggests that this need should be addressed through the Class EA approval process.
The proposed road improvements along 14th Concession Road, eastward to Sideroad 10 will
help reduce any traffic increases during peak hours along the sections of Victoria
Street/Highway 89 and may serve as an alternate route. In addition, the projected construction
of Mackenzie Pioneer Road eastward to C.W. Leach will also reduce traffic on Victoria
Street/Highway 89.
3.3.2
Arterial Road System
There are three roads in the Study Area that should be classified as Arterial Road. Victoria
Street/Highway 89 is controlled by the province east of re-aligned County Road 10 and by the
Town west of that point (as a connecting link roadway). The County controls County Road 10
(realigned Tottenham Road). Industrial Parkway is under the control of the Town, but was
financed largely by the province. This acts as a bypass to the core area of the community and
is designed to accommodate significant truck traffic. Each of these roadways has the potential
to carry significant through traffic. They serve as external links for the community.
County Road 10 has recently been studied, approved and constructed in 2007 for its
realignment through the Secondary Plan area. This road was originally planned for a two-lane
section but the ultimate configuration anticipates a four-lane facility.
Industrial Parkway, under Town ownership and jurisdiction, was constructed from Tottenham
Road to Highway 89 west of the community. The design of this road also anticipated the longterm extension of the road eastward. This would provide a bypass of the downtown commercial
core (i.e. Victoria Street). The development of this Secondary Plan provides a significant
impetus to this proposal. The roadway should be extended along the alignment of 14th
Concession Road to Sideroad 10. Industrial Parkway can be maintained as a four-lane rural
road in the immediate future. However, the traffic volumes using this municipal route should be
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monitored as commuter traffic may use it as an alternative to bypass Highway 89 / Victoria
Street section.
External to the Study Area, Sideroad 10 constitutes a significant Town owned north-south link.
Due to the anticipated future traffic volume increases along 14th Concession Road, which
terminates intermittently at Sideroad 10 at its easterly limit, it is recommended the Town
undertake a detailed traffic study for Sideroad 10, from 14th Concession to Highway 89. The
detailed study should be undertaken in the prior to year 2026 to determine future traffic demand
and potential road widening requirements. While this Report has not undertaken a detailed
review of the future traffic volumes along Sideroad 10, a cost allowance for widening Sideroad
10 from its existing 2-lane rural section to 4-lane rural section has been carried in Table 3-3,
resulting from consultation with the Town.
The right-of-way for these arterials within the Study Area should provide for six-lane, urban
roadways. Figure 3.14 illustrates the typical arterial road cross section. Additional right-of-way
(ROW) widths, over the standard of 36 m, will be required to provide turning lanes at significant
intersections.
3.3.3
Collector Road System
The Secondary Plan area is well served by the arterial network. To adequately service the
traffic demands several collector roads are required.
Tottenham Road provided a link between Victoria Street and the new County Road 10
alignment. This road link provided the connection to the Honda Canada main entrance. It also
provided access to the properties fronting the road on its east side. Major industrial uses are
anticipated to occupy this area. As noted in Section 3.1, Tottenham Road between Albert Street
and Industrial Parkway was closed in 2006.
Albert Street serves a collector function west of Tottenham Road. It is proposed that this road
be projected eastward to C.W. Leach Road, along the Mackenzie Pioneer Road R.O.W. This
will reduce traffic on Victoria Street and provide an alternate access to the commercial land
uses located on Victoria Street.
A new collector road is proposed to service the central portion of the Secondary Plan area. This
road provides a connection between the new County Road 10 and Highway 89 via an east/west
alignment to C.W. Leach Road. It then follows this road north to the junction with Highway 89.
The north/south leg of this road abuts the existing golf course community. Significant concerns
were raised about the impact of the traffic on the community. Added care needs to be taken in
the design of this road link. The streetscape design of the area needs special attention.
As a collector road, this link provides both site access and a through road connection to the
arterial road system. The right-of-way for these collectors should provide for four to six-lanes,
urban roadways. Figure 3.15 illustrates the typical four-lane, collector road cross section.
Additional right-of-way (ROW) widths, over the standard of 26 m, will be required to provide
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turning lanes at principal intersections. Cross sections provided depict the ultimate scenario.
Interim road conditions and resulting sections shall be determined at detailed design stage.
3.4
LOCAL ROADS
The remaining roads will be of a local nature. The plan indicated on Figure 3.2 is schematic in
nature, showing the general intent of the Plan. The final configuration of the local road system
will be determined at the time Draft Plan stage. The right-of-way width for the local roads
should provide for two-lane, urban industrial roadways. Figure 3.16 illustrates the typical local
road cross section. Additional right-of-way (ROW) widths, over the standard of 22 m, will be
required to provide turning lanes at principal intersections.
3.5
TRUCK TRAFFIC
It is anticipated that there will be a considerable component of truck traffic to the Secondary
Plan area as it develops. The design of the road system should incorporate the needs of such
truck traffic. The primary truck route into the area will incorporate Highway 89 to County Road
10 and then connect to Industrial Parkway. This route should be signed as the primary truck
route.
The design of C.W. Leach should also provide for truck traffic. This should not be signed for
trucks due to the priority use by personal automobile traffic from the adjacent residential
community.
3.6
TRAIL SYSTEM
The Town has initiated the planning and development of a separate trail system. This system
will satisfy the needs for both recreational and work oriented trail uses. This initiative could also
reduce street traffic congestion if people are encouraged to use other modes of transportation
when employed in the area. This system will be designed as a separate facility constructed on
the road ROW or on a separate alignment as shown on the Plan.
The facility will consist of a 2.5 m wide asphalt path. Figure 3.17 illustrates the typical trail cross
section.
3.7
OTHER MODES OF TRAVEL
3.7.1
Rail Service
Considerations should be made for the extension of the rail siding through the Honda Canada
site to the Secondary Plan area. The new siding, if required by industry, would extend along the
southern boundary of the Honda Canada lands. It would cross the existing Tottenham Road
and could extend north midway between Tottenham Road and the new County Road 10
alignment. This siding would provide rail access to the General Industrial lands bordered by
Tottenham Road, MacKenzie Pioneer Road, County Road 10 and 14th Concession Road.
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Transportation System
This facility should only be pursued if there is a defined need by a specific new industry locating
in the area that needs such a connection. The investigations and the costs associated with
such a proposal should be the responsibility of that company. Preliminary discussions with
Honda Canada on this matter would be prudent in the near future. The Industrial Park should
not be actively promoted as having rail access. Further consideration of a transshipment
terminal in the vicinity of the existing rail line might also be investigated to supply rail services to
all local industries.
3.7.2
Bus Service
The Town currently does not have a public bus service. It is not foreseeable that such a service
would be provided within the planning horizon of this study. The Secondary Plan area should
still be designed to allow for the operation of a bus through the area. It is possible that an intercity bus company will operate on Highway 89 and possibly on the arterial or collector streets
within the Secondary Plan area.
3.8
ROAD SYSTEM COSTS
It is anticipated that the arterial road system will be constructed by a combination of local,
county and provincial efforts. In addition, several sections of the collector road system will need
to be constructed by the municipality. These sections incorporate existing municipal rights-ofway. It is anticipated that the appropriate landowners will construct local streets and collector
roads on new rights-of-way.
A summary of capital costs for these items are presented in Table 3.3. These costs are
exclusive of land costs. The cost estimates represent 2007 values and have not been escalated
for future construction. Additionally, the limits of the proposed road construction reflect the
sections of roadways in the condition subsequent to OPA 29 approval in November 2005, as
described in Section 3.1 and Section 10 – Addendum. Therefore, the cost table should be
reviewed in conjunction with Figure A3-2 Transportation Plan, of the addendum Section 10.
Table 3-3 - Capital Costs of Selected Road Works*
Item
Description
2015
2026
Ultimate
Studies
1.1.1
MacKenzie Pioneer Road Class EA
(from Tottenham Road to approx. 400m east of C.W. Leach Rd)
$85,000
1.1.2
14th Concession Road Class EA
(from County Rd. 10 Re-alignment to east limit of OPA 29)
$102,000
1.1.3
14th Concession Road Class EA – Widening
(from County Rd. 10 Re-alignment to Sideroad 10)
1.1.4
Victoria Street Class EA – Widening
(from Tottenham Rd. to County Rd. 10 Re-alignment)
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$67,000
$115,000
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Transportation System
1.1.5
C.W. Leach Road Class EA – Reconstruction N-S
(from South of Highway 89 to bend)
$70,000
1.1.6
C.W. Leach Road Class EA – Widening E-W
(from bend to County Road 10 re-alignment)
1.1.7
Tottenham Road Class EA – Intersection Improvements /
widening (b/w Albert Street & Victoria Street)
$79,000
1.1.8
Sideroad 10 Detailed Impact Study
(from Highway 89 to 14th Concession)
$83,000
1.1.9
Trail System Preliminary Design Road Improvements
$70,000
$37,000
Road Improvements
1.2.1
1.2.2
Urbanization of County Road 10
Assumes there will be no cost to Town
1
MacKenzie Pioneer Road Construction
$9,310,000
(from Tottenham Rd. to approx. 400m east of C.W. Leach Rd.)
1.2.3
14th Concession Road/Nottawasaga River Bridge Replacement
$4,130,000
1.2.4
14th Concession Road Reconstruction (2 lanes –Rural)
(from County Rd. 10 Re-alignment to east limit of OPA 29)
$3,810,000
1.2.5
14th Concession Road Widening (4 lanes – Urban)
(from east limit of OPA 29 to Sideroad 10)
1.2.6
Victoria Street Widening
(from Tottenham Rd. to County Rd. 10 re-alignment)
$2,270,000
1.2.7
C.W. Leach Road Reconstruction N-S/ Widening E-W
(from Highway 89. to County Rd 10 re-alignment)
$2,910,000
1.2.8
Tottenham Road - Intersection improvements/ widening
$3,350,000
$3,330,000
$440,000
(b/w Albert Street & Victoria Street)
1.2.9
Sideroad 10 Widening (2 lanes to 4 lanes )
(from Highway 89 to 14th Concession) 2
1.2.10
Theatre Road Local Road Construction
(from 430m north of 14th Conc. to 14th Conc.)
$3,670,000
$690,000
Trail Improvements
1.3.1
Trail System Construction
$915,000
$915,000
* Limits of proposed road works to be reviewed in conjunction with Figure A3.2-Transportation Plan, Section 10 Addendum. Road improvements cross sections are based on planning analysis for the purpose of cost estimation
and should be confirmed through detailed studies/design process.
1
Road improvement cost in item 1.2.2. for MacKenzie Pioneer Road Construction includes the crossing of Spring
Creek.
2
Road improvements cost in item 1.2.9. for Sideroad 10 is approximate based on preliminary overview of traffic
patterns and requires detailed analysis to confirm the works required and associated costs.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
4.0
4.1
Water Supply & Distribution
OVERVIEW
Notice to Reader:
Please be advised that due to alterations within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan subsequent to its approval by the County of Simcoe on November 22, 2005, this Report
has included Section 10 – ADDENDUM, which describes the road network and servicing
adjustments resulting from the alterations within the Plan boundary. It is recommended the
Reader references Section 10 in conjunction with their review of this Section.
The Master Servicing Plan has addressed a number of individual elements in the water system
that relate to water supply, local treatment, storage, and distribution.
The water system involves works both in the Secondary Plan area and external to that area.
Water originates from Georgian Bay at Collingwood and is conveyed to the Parson’s Road
Reservoir facility, where addition chlorination can be administered. The Parson’s Road facility
serves as the basic supply to the remainder of the Town. Additional pumping facilities are
proposed together with new storage capacity in the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area.
From this point, water will be distributed in a balanced manner to the eastern end of the
community.
4.2
SUPPLY OF WATER
The main water supply to the Town will continue to be the transmission main from Collingwood,
which should continue to supply the Parson’s Road facility. Centralizing the supply point
reduces the infrastructure needed to monitor and treat, if necessary, the incoming water. A
single source point reduces the potential for water lingering in the system.
The 600 mm diameter watermain from the Town of Collingwood currently supplies a minimum of
6,000 m3/d of potable water. The transmission main is designed to supply up to 23,500 m3/d in
the near future. With modifications to the treatment plant and pumping facilities, this can be
increased to 60,000 m3/d; however, only 45,000 m3/d is proposed for delivery as far as Alliston.
An alternate connection to the Collingwood transmission main might be considered as a
redundant connection; however, the amount of redundancy offered by this alternative is minor
compared to the length of the transmission main. The extra connection would, however, allow a
second connection to the community. This connection is not proposed at this time.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
For the foreseeable future, the Town’s well system will supply the community with an additional
water source to manage its peak demands and to reduce the dependency on the transmission
main and forestall capital works in the Town of Collingwood. The well system provides a
capacity of approximately 14,540 m3/day. This system also affords the Town a limited supply if
the main transmission main is out of service.
The projected demand for the year 2020 is presented in the Alliston Residential Secondary
Plan. Subsequent demands associated with the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan have
been added to those projections and are presented in Table 4.1. This assumes a linear
absorption rate of the developable land.
Table 4-1 - Design Water Demands (m3/d)
Honda
Baxter
(assumed) (assumed)
Infill
Industrial
Secondary
Plan
Total
1,300
0
0
6,799
1,818
1,868
0
0
12,484
0
1,100
1,300
0
0
6,756
8,711
0
1,818
1,868
0
0
12,397
2015 - avg. day
4,399
3,905
3,000
1,650
385
5,085
18,424
- max. day
8,358
7,420
6,000
2,170
686
10,169
34,803
2020 - avg. day
4,399
5,053
3,000
1,650
500
6,578
21,180
- max. day
7,918
9,095
6,000
2,260
850
14,600
40,723
2026 - avg. day
4,399
5,053
3,000
1,650
500
8,372
22,974
- max. day
7,918
9,095
6,000
2,260
850
15,903
42,026
Year
Exist. Res.
Future
1
Res.
1998 - avg. day
4,399
0
1,100
- max. day
8,798
0
2001 - avg. day
4,356
- max. day
Note:
1. These volumes do not include Briar Hill or Bel Terra Developments
The Town had examined the supplying of water to the Bradford West Gwillimbury system. This
proposal has now been re-assessed and Bradford West Gwillimbury will not draw water from
the Town of New Tecumseth.
4.3
STORAGE
The existing water storage capacity in Alliston is approximately 9,990 m3. The current
population (2001 Census) of the Alliston community is noted as 9,700 persons in the Town’s
Growth Management Study (as reported on the Town’s website), and the project population of
the approved Residential Secondary Plan is 9,640 persons. There is a further equivalent
population of 11,765 persons in the existing industrial development within the Town. This
represents a total equivalent population of approximately 31,100 persons.
MOE guidelines for storage facilities indicate that the current storage should consist of:
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Water Supply & Distribution
Fire storage
=
339 L/s for 5 hours = 6,102 m3
(for fire fighting needs based on an equivalent
population of 31,100 persons)
Equalization
=
25% of Maximum Day Demand = 3,121 m3
(to serve variations in flow on daily and seasonal basis)
Emergency
=
25% of Fire Storage & Equalization = 2,306 m3
Considering these guidelines, the storage requirements should be those set out in Table 4.2.
The current storage capacity is inadequate for any community growth; as such, added capacity
is required immediately.
Table 4-2 - Storage Capacities Required (m³)
Scenario
Equivalent
Population
Fire
Storage
Equalization
Emergency
Total
For Entire Community
3
Current (2001) with full
development of Alliston
Residential Secondary
Plan area 1,2
31,100
6,102
3,121
2,306
11,529
Year 2015 2
>40,000
6,804
8,701
3,876
19,381
2
>40,000
6,804
9,725
4,132
20,661
Year 2026 2
>40,000
6,804
10,507
4,328
21,639
>40,000
6,804
14,145
5,237
26,186
0
0
0
0
0
Year 2020
Ind./Com. Area
Ultimate
2
Current (2001)
Year 2015 2
6,890
2,988
2,542
1,383
6,913
Year 2020
2
11,817
3,744
3,194
1,735
8,673
Year 2026
2
17,730
4,590
7,614
3,101
10,708
19,300
4,788
7,614
3,101
15,503
Ultimate Ind/Comm 2
Sources: 1.
2.
3.
2002 Growth Management Study as reported on Town of New Tecumseth web site
after MOE Guidelines
uses 50 person/ha in Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area
There is currently a shortage of (11,529 – 9,990 =) 1,539 m3 of water storage in Alliston for full
development of the Residential Secondary Plan area and infill industrial development. The
storage options identified in the Alliston Residential Secondary Plan would satisfy the
anticipated shortage when all the residential development is completed.
The development of the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan would, by itself, need 6,913 m3
of storage by year 2015 and could ultimately require 15,500 m3 of storage. There are, however,
some economies of scale when the Alliston Community is taken as a whole. The incremental
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Water Supply & Distribution
storage requirements over the other committed uses in the community is 3,177 m3 by 2015,
3,992 m3 by 2020, 5353 m3 by 2026, and ultimately could require an additional 9,517 m3 at
some future date when the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area is entirely built out.
A review of several storage options was undertaken as part of this study. The distribution
network provides adequate supplies from the centrally located Parson’s Road facility, with the
modifications noted in the Master Servicing Plan for the Residential Secondary Plan. The
existing core and northern portions of the existing and proposed community are satisfactorily
serviced by a second supply from the elevated tank on Fletcher Crescent, which is located north
of the Boyne River. The system, however, is weak in the east end of the community, and its
continued growth will increase the head losses in the connection to this area. As a result, a new
facility with the ability to bolster the pressures and reinforce the supply of water, particularly
during periods of demand and under emergency flow conditions, should be located in the east
end of the community.
It is not practical to expand the Fletcher Crescent facility. To provide for immediate needs, there
is additional land area available to expand the Parson’s Road facility. Furthermore, economies
in scale and in pumping capacity favor an initial expansion of the Parsons Road site by a further
4,500 m3.
The Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan facility should be staged to the area’s development
with an initial volume of 5,200 m3, beginning construction by year 2015. Until that point, the
recommended expansion of 4,500 m3 at the Parson’s Road facility should provide adequate
supply for initial development in the Town.
Table 4-3 - Staged Development of Water Storage (m3/d)
Year
Existing
Facilities
Expansion at
Parson’s Rd
Ind/Com
Expansion
Total Storage
Forecasted
Needed
2001
9,990
4,500
0
16,491
11,529
2015
9,990
4,500
5,200
21,705
19,381
2020
9,990
4,500
10,400
26,910
20,661
2026
9,990
4,500
10,400
26,916
21,639
Under the staging proposal identified above, the storage facility previously identified in the
Alliston Residential Secondary Plan for north of the Boyne River near Sir Fredrick Banting Road
should no longer be considered. The new Industrial/ Commercial Secondary Plan facility will
provide the extra storage in the same general direction of the community and will be better
located to service future demands east of town.
In this situation, the Parson’s Road facility should be constructed first to allow the
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area to begin development. The staging plan
concentrates the facilities until the demand increases from the new employment area.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
With the conversion of the water supply to a surface-based system, consideration should be
given to maintaining a minimum supply in the community in case the transmission line is
disrupted. If the transmission main from Collingwood suffers a break, it could take time to repair
the line. As such, a minimum of 24 hours of peak supply should be considered, as this is the
minimum time the transmission line could be out of service. This is also the minimum time
required to instigate emergency rationing or to trim back the demand within the community.
Historical experience suggests that the transition main could be out of service even longer (i.e.
up to a week).
A fire supply equal to that of the MOE guideline needs to be maintained. In addition, the full
capacity of the well system could be employed in the event of any transmission line break. At
some point in time, the well system might not be operated on a continual basis and at that time
it will be more difficult to bring the added capacity back online quickly in an emergency situation.
Added storage capacity should be at least equal to the maximum day demand minus the well
capacity. This implies (34,803 – 14,540 =) 20,263 m3 of additional new storage might be
needed over the required MOE guidelines for storage by 2015 (see Table 4.3).
Table 4-4 - Additional Water Storage (m3/d)
Year
Max. Day
Demand
Exist. Well
Capacity
Minimal
Additional
Storage
Required
2001
2001
14,540
n/a
2015
34,803
14,540
20,263
2020
40,723
14,540
26,183
2026
42,026
14,540
27,486
In the Master Servicing Plan, one storage facility has been located in the Industrial/ Commercial
Secondary Plan area. It is proposed that the volume of this facility be equivalent to the Fire
Storage/Flow Equalization/Emergency volume associated with the Secondary Plan area taken
alone, amounting to an ultimate storage at 15,500 m3. The increment of storage volume
needed for the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, when considering the entire
community, is only 9,517 m3. The difference between the two volumes (i.e. ±6,000 m3) can be
assessed to the storage required in the system due to the “far distance source” inherent in the
Town’s water system.
The Residential Secondary Plan noted that the Parson’s Road facility needed to be expanded
by at least 4,500 m3 in the immediate future. Implementations of a “far distant source” policy will
add substantially to this requirement, and various scenarios have been examined in this context.
The Town needs to finalize its policy in this regard. It appears that the total volume required is
in the order of 23,000 m3 to 42,000 m3. Of this, 6,000 m3 could be located in the Industrial/
Commercial Secondary Plan area. The remaining 17,000 m3 to 36,000 m3 should be located at
the Parson’s Road site, which would require an expansion of the land base at the site. The
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
Town needs to further review this policy direction. A further engineering study of the need for
this initiative and to determine what the appropriated level of risk that the Town is willing to
accept will also need to be undertaken.
4.4
DISTRIBUTION
To ensure the Secondary Plan area could be serviced without significantly impacting the
remainder of the community, it is proposed to construct a system capable of supplying average
day flows to the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan storage facilities. Pumps associated
with this facility would ensure sufficient pressure and flow to that area and the developing
community east of the core area. This approach requires that several pipes leading to the east,
from Parson’s Road, be enlarged. A number of these pipes were already identified for
replacement in previous studies. A summary of the improvements and extensions are
illustrated on Figure 4.1.
External to the Study Area ,construction of the proposed 450 mm diameter watermain on Albert
Street will help to reinforce the water distribution system in this area. The 450 mm diameter
main will extend to the new pumping facility. Several sections of this larger main are also
needed between the pumping stations and between Victoria Street and 14th Concession Road.
It is recommended that the minimum size of watermain in the industrial and commercial areas
be 300 mm in diameter to allow for the larger variations in water use that may be required. The
sizes and locations of the distribution network have been designed to respect the staging of
development in the Secondary Plan.
Other system improvements include the refurbishing of the pumps in the Parson’s Road facility
to meet the volume and pressure concerns of the expanded development.
Table 4-5 – Selected System Improvements Required for Secondary Plan Area
Improvement
Description
Timing
Increase Pumping
Capacities at Parson’s
Road
The existing pumps will need to be
replaced/refurbished to meet the
increased demands and to maintain line
pressures as the community expands.
Required in the next five years.
Should be integrated with
construction of new storage facilities.
Construct 450 mm
watermain on Albert Street
Construct 450 mm watermain from
Parson’s Road to Tottenham Road along
Albert Street.
To be constructed together with
current planning for Albert Street
reconstruction. Needed in advance
of significant development in the
Secondary Plan area.
Construct 450 mm
watermain on MacKenzie
Pioneer Road
Construct 450 mm watermain from
Tottenham Road to new County Road 10
and then east to C.W. Leach Road and
MacKenzie Pioneer Road.
To be constructed together with
improvements to MacKenzie Pioneer
Road. Needed in advance of
significant development in the
Secondary Plan area.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
4.5
OTHER INITIATIVES
The proposal to construct a “grey water system” within the Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan area could reduce the demands for water in the study area. There are no extensive
examples of this initiative by which to judge the impacts; however, there may be an impact of
storage and pumping facilities. At this time, the grey water system has not been considered in
the current Master Planning exercise. Any study for the implementation of the grey water
system should address these concerns.
The restriction of industries and commercial establishments to favour “dry industries” was
considered. There is sufficient planned water supply to fully develop the area. The nature of
the dry industries does not favour locations such as Alliston without a symbiotic relationship to a
primary industry such as Honda. To a certain extent, this has already occurred. The capacity of
one industry to support further dry establishments is limited.
The reduction of water use by individual establishments should be encouraged. Education and
support during the building permit program should be increased to promote less water use and
increased water recycling at individual or groups of sites.
4.6
WATER SYSTEM COSTS
The cost of constructing the Water Distribution System will be borne largely by the individual
land developer as the area is converted from farmland to its proposed land use. There are,
however, a number of items within the system that would involve the cooperation of numerous
landowners and the Town.
It will be in the Town’s interest to control and direct the construction of some of this
infrastructure through the use of a Development Charges By-Law with area-specific charges for
the infrastructure development. The “Far Distant Storage” facilities service the interest of the
entire Town (including delivery of water to the Beeton and Tottenham areas), as would some of
the improvements to pumping facilities at the Parson’s Road facility. These costs should
therefore be added to the General Development Charges for the entire Town. The Area
Specific By-Law for Alliston would also include the remainder of the pumping improvements at
the Parson’s Road facility and watermains on existing road rights-of-way as well the new
storage and pumping facilities in Alliston.
A summary of capital costs for these items is presented in Table 4.6. The cost estimates
represent 2007 values and have not been escalated for future construction. Additionally, the
limits of the proposed watermain construction reflect the updates to the existing and proposed
road network, revised subsequent to OPA 29 approval in November 2005, as described in
Section 3.1 and Section 10 – Addendum. Therefore, the cost table should be reviewed in
conjunction with Figure A4-1 Water Distribution System, found in Section 10.
With respect to the New Storage Tank, land costs have not been considered within the cost
estimate.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Water Supply & Distribution
Table 4-6 - Capital Costs of Selected Water Infrastructure*
Item
Description
2015
2026
Ultimate
Studies
2.1.1
Albert Street 450mm dia. Watermain Class EA
$40,000
2.1.2
New Storage Tank Class EA
$97,000
2.1.3
Storage Risk Assessment Study
$50,000
2.1.4
Collingwood Supply Improvement Study
$81,000
2.1.5
Transient Pressure Surge Analysis
$55,000
Water Storage
2.2.1
Parson's Road Pump Upgrading
$780,000
2.2.2
Parson's Road Storage Expansion
$2,060,000
2.2.3
New Storage Tank Construction/Future Expansion
$2,360,000
2.2.4
Far Distant Storage
$2,380,000
This has not been estimated at this time until a
Town Policy on the matter has been established.
Water Distribution
2.3.1a
Albert Street 450mm dia. Watermain Construction
(from ex. Pumping Station to Tottenham Road)
$1,440,000
2.3.1b
Mackenzie Pioneer Rd 450mm dia. Watermain Construction
(from Tottenham Road to C.W. Leach Rd.)
$1,020,000
2.3.2
Victoria Street/Hwy.89 350mm dia. Watermain Construction
(from Sir Fredrick Banting Rd. to C.W. Leach Rd.)
$1,360,000
2.3.3
C.W. Leach Road 450mm dia. Watermain Construction
(from Hwy.89 to Mackenzie Pioneer Rd.)
$210,000
2.3.4
Re-aligned County Road 10 450mm dia. Watermain Constr.
(from Highway 89 to 14th Concession)
$990,000
* Limits of proposed watermains to be reviewed in conjunction with Figure A3.2-Transportation Plan, Section 10Addendum.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
5.0
Sewage Collection & Treatment
5.1
SYSTEM OVERVIEW
Notice to Reader:
Please be advised that due to alterations within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan subsequent to its approval by the County of Simcoe on November 22, 2005, this Report
has included Section 10 – ADDENDUM, which describes the road network and servicing
adjustments resulting from the alterations within the Plan boundary. It is recommended the
Reader references Section 10 in conjunction with their review of this Section.
5.1.1
System Layout
The sewage system serving the Secondary Plan area is composed of several components
(sewage collection sewers, pumping stations, and the wastewater treatment facilities), each of
which is described in further detail in this section. In general, the system is defined by the
nature of the land uses proposed in the Secondary Plan and by the flat nature of the Subject
Lands. Figure 5.1 shows the originally proposed sanitary collection and treatment system for
the Secondary Plan area at the time of OPA approval in November 2005.
The most significant constraint for the collection system is the flatness of the site. The proposed
sewage collection system envisions four catchment areas that generally divide the Secondary
Plan area into four roughly equal quadrants. Based upon the original design concept at OPA
approval, each quandrant was serviced by an independent pumping station. The original intent
for the southeast quadrant incorporated a pump as part of the equalization works at the head of
the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant (WWTP), based on the Class EA for Wastewater
Treatment Report (Stantec, February 2005). However, based on current detailed design of the
WWTP expansion by the Town’s consultant, external equalization at the headworks has not
been incorporated. The revised sanitary conveyance scenario is described in greater detail
within Section 10 – Addendum.
As part of the Regional WWTP expansion project, sewage can only reach the facility by
pumping, i.e. no gravity outlet is available at the WWTP. It was originally intended to pump all
sewage directly to the equalization tank, which in turn would pump to the Regional WWTP. The
revised scheme does not allow for equalization but continues to pump directly to the WWTP.
The four quadrants allow for some flexibility in staging the development of the Secondary Plan
area. Lands north of the Honda Plant entrance can be developed in two stages, permitting
development centered on 14th Concession Road to proceed independently.
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Sewage Collection & Treatment
Ideally, each pumping station would be constructed to its 2026 configuration with provisions to
accommodate expansion to the ultimate configuration to eliminate excess costs. However, the
pumps could initially be installed undersized for expansion/modification at a later date.
5.1.2
Design Criteria
Sewage generation has been estimated on the basis of MOE design criteria together with local
Town of New Tecumseth standards. Specifically, the following criteria were used:
Wastewater Generation Criteria
General Industrial (heavy industry)
3
55 m /day/ha
(MOE guideline)
Light Industrial
3
35 m /day/ha
(MOE guideline)
Commercial
28 m3/day/ha
(MOE guideline)
Residential
450 L/cap/day
(assuming on a residential
density of 50 person/ha)
Wet Weather Infiltration Rate
20 m3/day/ha
(Town standards)
In keeping with the Town’s design criteria, the sewers have been planned on the basis of a
minimum grade of 0.5%. Drops in the manholes and other variations in the slopes have been
allowed for in the initial layout of the system by employing an additional 0.2% allowance for the
sewers in the service area.
Pumping stations have been sized on the basis of the MOE flow criteria, given above, and
employing a peaking factor of 2.0 plus the extraneous infiltration rate set by the Town
guidelines. The 2.0 value is slightly higher than rates currently observed at the existing stations
in the community (i.e., 1.68 for the Industrial Parkway PS), but it represents a reasonable
planning value for this type of system.
5.2
SEWAGE COLLECTION SYSTEM
5.2.1
Southeast Quadrant
The southeast catchment was originally intended to drain by gravity to a new equalization tank
at the head works to the Regional WWTP. The equalization tank scheme has been replaced
with a standard pumping station. Sewers range from a cover of 3 m at the extremities of the
system (i.e., at the new Country Road 10 alignment) to approximately 8.5 to 9 m at the
proposed pumping station.
It was also originally envisioned that the northwest and southwest quadrants would pump
directly into the equalization tank as part of the WWTP expansion works. According to the
detailed design of the WWTP expansion, an external equalization tank has not been
incorporated, see Section 10 – Addendum for the revised sanitary conveyance scheme.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
The northeast quadrant will drain into the local sewer located at the northerly limit of the
southeast quadrant (i.e. on the easterly north-south local road – Theater Road).
On the basis of initial design calculations, the sewers are likely to be of a nominal size even at
shallow grades (±0.5%), except for the gravity sewer carrying the flow from the northeast
quadrant. This main sewer will be located on the extension of Industrial Parkway (14th
Concession Road) and will follow the alignment of the current Theater Road to the north. The
cost of this sewer has been considered for Development Charges By-Law consideration.
The southeast quadrant is composed of a range of land uses including residential, service
commercial, and light industrial activities. It is anticipated that the area will generate an average
dry weather flow of 1,180 m3/d.
5.2.2
Southwest Quadrant
The southwest quadrant drains to a pumping station originally located approximately 300 m
west of proposed Country Road 10. The sewers draining to this point are anticipated to reach a
depth of approximately 13 m (at minimum grades). Sewage was intended to be conveyed by
forcemain to the originally proposed equalization tank at the Regional WWTP. On the basis of
initial design calculations, the gravity sewers are likely to be of a nominal size, even at minimum
grades (±0.5%).
A second analysis completed by relaxing the minimum grade criterion but maintaining the
minimum velocities (flowing full) indicated that the depth of the sewers could be reduced to
approximately 9 m at the pumping station, representing substantial capital cost savings. Town
staff should review this option and give consideration to refining the Town standard in this
regard.
The pumping station, oversized and/or deepened sewers to the pumping station, and the
forcemain have all been considered to be part of the Development Charges By-Law. All other
sewers are nominal in size.
This catchment drains approximately 113 ha and is anticipated to experience an average dry
weather flow of approximately 5,240 m3/day.
5.2.3
Northeast Quadrant
The northeast catchment drains to a pumping station proposed east of Country Road 10 on an
internal road. The catchment area is approximately 115 ha in size. The system is expected to
reach depths of approximately 12 m (based on 0.5% minimum grades).
A second analysis completed by relaxing the minimum grade criterion but maintaining the
minimum velocities (flowing full), showed the depth of the sewers could be reduced to
approximately 10 m at the pumping station. This represents a substantial capital cost savings.
Town staff should review the analysis and give consideration to refining the Town standard in
this regard.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
The pumping station, the sewer from the main sewer to the pumping station and the forcemain
have been considered to be part of the Development Charges By-Law. The sanitary sewer on
MacKenzie Pioneer Road will be constructed with the construction/reconstruction of that road.
This is anticipated to be a municipal project completed for the development of the entire area
and will therefore fall under the Development Charges Bylaw. All other sewers are nominal in
size.
When fully developed, this area will generate approximately 4080 m3/day of average dry
weather flow.
5.2.4
Northwest Quadrant
The final catchment, located in the northwest quadrant of the Secondary Plan area, drains
approximately 113 ha to a pumping station originally located within the quadrant on the local
road system south of MacKenzie Pioneer Road. The revised sanitary drainage scheme for the
northwest quadrant is described in Section 10 – Addendum.
The area will generate a dry weather flow of approximately 5,770 m3/day. The originally
planned pumping station intended to convey sewage to Country Road 10 and then south to the
intersection of Industrial Parkway, outletting to the originally proposed equalization tank at the
Regional WWTP.
The system is expected to reach depths of approximately 12.5 m (based on 0.5% minimum
grades) at the pumping station. A second analysis completed by relaxing the minimum grade
criterion but maintaining the minimum velocities (flowing full), showed the depth of the sewers
could be reduced to approximately 10 m at the pumping station. This is controlled by the need
to service the intersection of new County Road 10 and Victoria Street. Except for this area, the
remaining sewers would reach a depth of approximately 8 m, representing substantial capital
cost savings. Town staff should review the analysis and give consideration to refining the Town
standard in this regard.
The sanitary sewer on MacKenzie Pioneer Road and on new County Road 10 will be
constructed with the construction/reconstruction of that road. This is anticipated to be municipal
and county projects completed for the development of the entire area and will therefore fall
under the Development Charges By-Law. All other sewers are nominal in size.
5.2.5
Additional Comments
In the design of the servicing scheme, it is anticipated that there will be limited access onto
Country Road 10. Access to land adjacent to that roadway will be via the local cross streets
and from there to the county road. The orientation of the lot fabric will therefore favour these
local streets, and the servicing of the lots will also be directed to the local street. Servicing will
largely be directed away from the county road.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
With regards to the sanitary system, collection sewers will only be located on County Road 10
north of MacKenzie Pioneer Road to Victoria Street and from immediately north of 14th
Concession Road to Tottenham Road.
5.3
PUMPING STATIONS
The pumping stations will be sized to accommodate the full developed flow to that station;
however, given the timeframe for the full development of the area, the pumps may need to be
staged to suit the initial needs of the area. Table 5.1 indicates the projected flows for the
originally proposed pumping stations for three timeframes.
Table 5.1 - Staged Sanitary Design Flows*
Pumping
Station**
Average Flows (L/s)
Peak Flows (L/s)
2015
2026
Ultimate
2015
2026
Ultimate
B
18.2
35.6
60.3
44.0
86.6
146.5
C
16.2
25.5
47.2
42.7
66.5
122.4
D
11.7
22.4
66.7
28.6
54.3
159.4
*Based on Figure 5.1
Note: Pumping Station/Equalization Tank servicing Catchment ‘A’ is not included within Table 5.1 as this was
originally intended to form part of the Regional WWTP expansion works. See Section 10 – Addendum for updated
Pumping Station details.
The stations should be designed to meet the 20-year need for the wet well size. This can
subsequently be increased to meet ultimate needs as the area expands. Consideration should
be made to the design of the wet well to facilitate the expansion of its capacity through the
addition of a second chamber in the future.
The pump gallery should be designed to accommodate the ultimate complement of pumps. The
initial construction should provide sufficient pumping capacity for the 2015 timeframe; the
addition of further capacity will be based on the rate of build-out in the area. To optimize the
construction of new capacity, a monitoring program should be maintained to evaluate the
capacity in use and the rate of change. Monitoring to be undertaken based on the Town’s
Scada system or similar process.
It is recommended that variable speed pumps be used to suit the growth of the demand and to
optimize the operation of the facility as the demand expands. The pumps will also assist in
dealing with daily and weekly flow fluctuation.
Table 5.2 indicates the anticipated staging of the stations based on the current projections of
the build-out of the Secondary Plan area.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
Table 5-2 - Staged Development of the Pumping Stations
2015
Pumping
Station
Wet Well
Capacity (m3)
B
18.5
C
D
2026
Ultimate
Wet Well
Capacity
(m3)
Pumps
Wet Well
Capacity
(m3)
2 pumps
@ 125 L/s for
a head of ±55
m
36
3 pumps
@ 125 L/s for
a head of ±55
m
60.5
3 pumps
@ 180 L/s for a
head of ±55 m
16.5
2 pumps
@ 100 L/s for
a head of ±34
m
25.5
2 pumps
@ 150 L/s for
a head of ±34
m
47.5
3 pumps
@ 150 L/s for a
head of ±34 m
12
2 pumps
@ 75 L/s for a
head of ±57 m
22.5
3 pumps
@ 75 L/s for
a head of ±57
m
67
3 pumps
@ 200 L/s for a
head of ±55 m
Pumps
Pumps
The depths of the stations will depend on the design of the collection system. As indicated in
Section 5.2 (Sewage Collection System), the sewers will be substantially deeper if the 0.5%
minimum grade criterion is enforced. Comparable station inlet depths are indicated on Table
5.3.
Table 5-3 - Preliminary Pumping Station Design Criteria
Inlet Elevation1
Wet Well Invert2
Pump
Station
Based on
existing
minimum grade
criteria
Based on
existing
minimum
velocity criteria
only
Based on
existing
minimum grade
criteria
Based on
existing
minimum
velocity criteria
only
B
207.8
211.5
202.9
206.6
C
208.5
210.7
204.5
206.7
D
208.3
210.9
203.4
206.0
Notes
1. Elevations to be confirmed at time of sewer and pumping station design
2. Wet well depths will depend on pump selections
Final pumping station details and sizing of the proposed forcemains are to be the subject of
separate studies as noted within Table 5.6 – Capital Costs of Sewage Infrastructure.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
5.4
SEWAGE TREATMENT
The Town of New Tecumseth is currently undertaking a separate planning process oriented to
the treatment of sewage within the Town. Although there are two treatment facilities within the
Alliston community, the focus for any new treatment capacity is the Regional WWTP. The
facility is now being modified and expanded (Phase 1 expansion) to handle a capacity of 7,595
m3/day. The ultimate treatment needs for full development of the Industrial/Commercial
Secondary Plan is approximately 16,300 m3/day of average dry weather flow. Based on R.V.
Anderson’s Pre-Design Report (Dec. 2006) for the WWTP expansion, the ultimate planned plant
capacity to year 2021 is 23,000m3/day.
Other aspects of the expansion are addressed in the Class Environmental Assessment of the
Master Treatment Plan (Stantec, 2003). This Master Servicing Plan has relied upon the initial
version of this Master Treatment Plan to ensure there will be sufficient treatment capacity to
handle full development at the Secondary Plan area. The expansion of the plant could control
the staging and rate of development within the Secondary Plan area.
The staging for the current Secondary Plan envisions the average dry weather treatment
requirements indicated in Table 5.4.
Table 5-4 - Projected Treatment Requirements
Year
Projected Treatment Capacity
Required for the Secondary Plan Area
(m3/day)
2015
4,516
2026
7,912
Ultimate
16,235
The projected wastewater flows to the Regional WWTP were presented in Table 6.3 of the New
Tecumseth Class EA for Wastewater Treatment. This has been reproduced as Table 5.5
below.
Table 5.5 - Projected Wastewater Flows to Regional WWTP
Year
Regional
WWTP
Capacity
(m3/d)
Beeton
Average
Flow
(m3/d)
Tottenham
Average Flow
(m3/d)
Alliston
Average
Flow
(m3/d)
Regional
WWTP Peak
Dry Flow
(m3/d)
Regional
WWTP Wet
Peak Flow
(m3/d)
2001
5,063
1,171
0
3,892
20,950
23,441
2006
12,595
1,356
2,655
8,584
28,936
34,430
2011
17,595
1,546
3,150
12,899
38,874
47,129
2016
22,595
1,771
36,645
17,179
48,799
59,793
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
Year
Regional
WWTP
Capacity
(m3/d)
Beeton
Average
Flow
(m3/d)
Tottenham
Average Flow
(m3/d)
Alliston
Average
Flow
(m3/d)
Regional
WWTP Peak
Dry Flow
(m3/d)
Regional
WWTP Wet
Peak Flow
(m3/d)
2021
27,595
1,996
4,140
21,459
58,680
72,414
2026
32,595
2,146
4,590
25,859
68,425
83,682
2031
39,319
2,371
5,085
31,863
81,445
100,244
Source: Table 6.3 (Stantec, 2003)
5.5
OTHER INITIATIVES
5.5.1
Grey Water Distribution System
The Town has considered the re-use of the effluent waters from the sewage treatment plant as
part of a “grey water system”. This system would provide irrigation water for properties in the
Secondary Plan area and nearby to the plant, and the effluent would be used for industrial
cooling water or irrigation water. The proposal will reduce both the area’s water demand and
the effluent discharged to the Nottawasaga River, thereby lowering the nitrogen and
phosphorous loadings on the natural watercourse. The nutrients will be absorbed on the sites
and reduce the discharge quantities to the river. The proximity of the Industrial/Commercial
area to the WWTP makes it a good candidate for this proposal. Additional opportunities exist at
the nearby golf course, which could use the grey water for irrigation.
Implementation of this proposal will require the construction of a “grey water”-main through the
development area. Several issues need to be addressed in more detail before this proposal can
proceed. These include:
•
Health and safety concerns
•
Regulatory approval from the MOE
•
The cost and benefits to the Town
•
The acceptance of the concept by the industries and businesses locating in and around
the Secondary Plan area
•
The pricing structure for the water
•
The dependability of the supply
•
Storage of water at the WWTP
•
Capital costs and who will construct the distribution system
•
Standards for the design and construction of the distribution system
It is expected that these issues will be reviewed further in a subsequent detailed study.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
5.5.2
Reduced Water Use Industries
The prospect of limiting the uses in the Industrial/Commercial area to low water use occupants
has not been recommended in this plan. Planned expansions of the Regional WWTP indicate
that the plant can ultimately handle the projected flows from the area. Interim plant expansions
will serve to control the growth of the Secondary Plan area; the projected buildout for the 2015
and 2026 horizon years are within the plant’s projected expansion capacities. A single 5,000
m3/day expansion module will accommodate the development of the Secondary Plan area until
after 2015, and a second expansion at that time will accommodate the Secondary Plan area
until after 2026.
5.5.3
Other Directions
A number of other initiatives are presented in the Class EA for Wastewater Treatment. These
include:
•
Inflow/Infiltration Studies
•
Water Efficiency Audits and Per Capita Water Use Study
•
A Total Phosphorus Management Plan
•
Phosphorus Reduction Initiatives
•
A Study of Triggers to Identify Impact of WWTP Discharge on Receivers
•
Strengthening Existing Sewer Use Bylaws
These initiatives are discussed in greater detail in the Class EA document.
5.6
CAPITAL COSTS FOR SANITARY SYSTEM
The cost of constructing the sanitary sewage system will largely be borne by the individual land
developer as the area is converted from farmland to its proposed land use. There are a number
of items within the system that would involve the cooperation of numerous landowners and it will
be in the Town’s interest to control and direct the construction of the infrastructure through the
use of a Development Charges By-Law for the infrastructure. Included in the By-Law would be
the pumping stations and forcemains as well as common sections of sewer serving larger areas.
A summary of capital costs for these items are presented in Table 5.6. The cost estimates
represent 2007 values and have not been escalated for future construction. Additionally, the
limits of the proposed sanitary sewers and forcemains and pumping station construction reflect
the updates to the existing and proposed road network, revised subsequent to OPA 29 approval
in November 2005, as described in Section 3.1 and Section 10 – Addendum. Therefore, the
cost table should be reviewed in conjunction with Figure A5.1 Sanitary Collection and
Treatment System, found in Section 10.
With respect to the proposed pumping stations, land costs have not been accounted for within
their respective cost estimates.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Sewage Collection & Treatment
Table 5-6 - Capital Costs of Selected Sewage Infrastructure*
Item
Description
2015
2026
Ultimate
Studies
3.1.1
Collection System
3.2.1
Catchment A Sewers on 14th Concession Road
th
$550,000
3.2.2
Catchment B Sewers on 14 Concession Road
$760,000
3.2.3
Catchment C & D Sewers on MacKenzie Pioneer Road
$890,000
3.2.4
Catchment C Sewer on County Rd. 10
$220,000
3.2.5
Catchment D Sewers on C.W. Leach Road
$210,000
3.2.6
Catchment D Sewers on Local Roads
$570,000
$280,000
Pumping Stations & Forcemains
3.3.1a
Pumping Station A/B
3.3.1b
Forcemain (PS A/B to WWTP)
3.3.2a
Pumping Station C/D
3.3.2b
Forcemain (PS C/D to WWTP)
3.3.3
Twin Forcemain (PS C/D to WWTP)
$1,420,000
$38,000
$1,555,000
$366,000
$379,000
$900,000
* Limits of proposed sanitary sewers/forcemains and pumping stations based on updated sanitary servicing scheme
per Section 10 – Addendum and should be reviewed in conjunction with Figure A5.2-Sanitary Collection and
Treatment System.
The capital costs shown above do not include the cost of the current WWTP expansion. The
WWTP expansion costs are outlined in the Class EA for Wastewater Treatment and have not
been duplicated here.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Stormwater Management
6.0
Stormwater Management
6.1
INTRODUCTION
Notice to Reader:
Please be advised that due to alterations within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan subsequent to its approval by the County of Simcoe on November 22, 2005, this Report
has included Section 10 – ADDENDUM, which describes the road network and servicing
adjustments resulting from the alterations within the Plan boundary. It is recommended the
Reader references Section 10 in conjunction with their review of this Section.
The system developed to accommodate stormwater control, drainage and treatment involves
many integrated concerns. More than any other infrastructure system, the handling of
stormwater interacts with both the manmade and natural environments of the Secondary Plan
area and beyond. It also has a significant impact on the financial environment of this portion of
the community.
The purpose of the Stormwater Management (SWM) and Drainage portion of the Master
Servicing Plan is to establish an environmentally sensitive approach for the handling of
stormwater runoff/snowmelt from the urbanizing area. It sets out practical and environmentally
sound source, conveyance, and end-of-pipe mitigative controls. When refined at the final
design stage and implemented thereafter these strive to prevent adverse environmental impacts
on the quantity and quality of both surface water and groundwater.
The site conditions place substantial constraints on the storm drainage system. The extremely
flat terrain combines with the long distances, to reasonable outlets, to challenge the
development of the drainage system.
The principles of the plan begin with the control of runoff at its source. Without source control,
the drainage system would be prohibitively expensive and impractical. The major concerns with
source control are the maintenance and operation of the control measure. As a result, the
means of this control is particularly focused on several recommended techniques. Source
control aims to restrict runoff to match post development flows to a predetermined release rate
that will augment regional measures to ensure predevelopment flows are not exceeded at
outlets to stream networks.
The limited soils information was compiled to augment the desk top approach applied to the
study area to assess interaction of surface flows with the ground water table. Initial infiltration
estimates indicate that end-of-pipe infiltration basins may not be a viable option.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Stormwater Management
The conveyance system needs to accommodate the flows from the site without damage and
safety concerns to the adjacent land uses and activities. Concerns prevail that the road system
itself will not accommodate the major flow system and therefore a separate open channel
system has been incorporated into the Secondary Plan servicing scheme.
Despite the requirement for source control of runoff quality and quantity, it is apparent that there
is a need for added protection to the receiving waters. The Plan therefore calls for “end-of-pipe
controls” for the entire Secondary Plan area, in the form of centralized SWM facilities. These
are distributed at logically available outlets to the receiving waters.
6.2
WATER RESOURCE ISSUES
6.2.1
Overview of Receiving Water Courses
The study area contains three significant drainage features. The Nottawasaga River traverses
the southeast corner of the subject lands. One of its primary tributaries, the Boyne River and its
tributary, Spring Creek, are located in the north and northwestern portions of the study area,
respectively. Surface drainage is also apparently collected in a swale, which, north of 14th
Concession Road, is currently plowed through and cultivated; south of this road, the swale is
currently vegetated with naturally occurring wetland species.
Significant topographic features and ecological functions in the area of the Secondary Plan are
restricted to the valleys of the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers and along Spring Creek. All
contain high-quality coolwater or coldwater fish habitat; the Boyne and Nottawasaga River
valleys also have the potential to support area-sensitive forest bird species and act as corridors
for the movement of wildlife on a regional scale.
Recommended criteria for designating significant valleylands include prominence as a
distinctive landform, degree of naturalness, importance of its ecological functions, restoration
potential, and historical and cultural values. The valleys of the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers
have been identified as part of the Simcoe County Greenland system. Therefore, these valleys
should be considered as significant and development should not be permitted. The Spring
Creek valley also contains steep slopes, ground water discharge, coolwater and coldwater fish
habitat and future potential for restoration; as such, this valley should also be protected from
development.
The Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority (NVCA) regulates floodplains of the Boyne
River, Spring Creek and Nottawasaga River. These rivers have One-Zone Floodplain
Management Policies locally in the FSP area that prohibit all development within the area
defined by the Regional or “Timmins” Storm. Fill restrictions are also in place within the
boundaries of the valley system.
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ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/ COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Stormwater Management
6.2.2
Watercourse Release Targets
The release of urban runoff to the adjacent watercourses is the subject of several concerns.
The receiving stream must have the hydraulic capacity to accommodate the flows imposed on it.
The watercourse must not be subjected to velocities that will cause erosion of the watercourse.
Such erosion can cause capacity restrictions in the water system and can impair the quality of
the watercourse, thus impacting the aquatic and riparian habitat. Temperature differences can
also be a problem, especially where the flow in the receiving watercourse is not substantially
greater than the storm flow. The increases in water temperature will have significant impacts on
the aquatic life in the receiving watercourse.
To match the hydraulic capacity of the receiving system, it is typical to limit outflow from postdevelopment events to pre-development levels. The NVCA has established post development
targets for new development to meet predevelopment rates for all storm events ranging from the
2-year event to the 100-year storm event.
The main receiving streams have been historically modeled on a watershed basis using
Qualhymo. This Report has employed the Qualhymo model to determine proposed SWM facility
storage volumes and attempted to size the facilities to match existing flow conditions in the
receiving streams. The NVCA does not endorse the Qualhymo concept, rather the NVCA has
specifically requested that flow targets for the proposed SWM facilities shall be established
using the aforementioned post to pre methodology prior to discharging into the receiving stream.
These targets shall be determined at the Draft Plan/Site Plan stage of development.
Table 6.1 provides a summary of targeted release conditions based on the Preferred Master
Servicing Plan.
The typical policy for quantity control is to match predevelopment flows for a range of storm
events following development. Industrial and commercial siteplans utilizing parking lot and/or
rooftop controls will set a target release rate that will adhere to the intent of the policy but
recognizing the constraints of matching multiple release rates. End-of-pipe solutions should
focus on augmenting the onsite controls by addressing the watercourse requirements
(specifically extended detention for erosion control and water quality) While the NVCA will
support the use of on-site controls, it should be noted that parking lot and roof top storage will
only be permitted where it has been adequately demonstrated that no other control mechanisms
are available.
For erosion control and for water quality objectives, the SWM facilities should be designed to
retain the first flush and to release the runoff over a 24-hour period. This will reduce the
velocities of the discharges and mitigate the potential for erosion.
Temperature control is primarily a concern with Spring Creek. The flows are smaller than the
larger river systems and the amount of base flow from the adjacent watertable is less.
Temperature control measures should be incorporated into the Spring Creek SWM facilities.
The facility should incorporate bottom draw release structures and the provision of shade
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plantings around the release pools and the entire facility where possible. The facility should
encourage infiltration above the permanent pool to assist in reducing the temperature of the
stormwater.
Table 6.1 summarizes the release targets for each of the SWM facilities.
Table 6.1 Watercourse Release Targets
Facility
Quality Control
Quantity Control
Erosion Control
A
Spring Creek
SWM Pond
Enhanced Protection
Level (wetland)
assuming 85%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
B
Southern
Community
SWM Pond
Enhanced Protection
Level (wetland)
assuming 85%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
C
Northern
Residential
SWM Pond
Enhanced Protection
Level (wet pond)
assuming 79%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
D
Southern
Residential
SWM Pond
Enhanced Protection
Level (wet pond)
assuming 64%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
E
Leach SWM
Pond
Enhanced Protection
Level (wet pond)
assuming 85%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
F
WWTP SWM
Facility
Enhanced Protection
Level 1 (wet pond)
assuming 85%
imperviousness
Post to pre development
release rate for storms
up to and including the
100-year return period
Retain runoff from 25
mm rainfall for 24 hours
The final design of the SWM facility should examine the potential use of a cooling trench for the
lower flow events (i.e. for flows associated with the release of the first flush). The first flush
tends to wash off the roads and to cool the land surfaces. This in turn causes the initial rinse to
pick up the excess heat.
The design of the conveyance channels to the end-of-pipe facilities will be for flows that have
been reduced at source. The infiltration targets (see section 6.2.3) are being met with the atsource design. The extended detention proposed at the major outlets will ensure that the
downstream areas will not be subject to additional erosion impacts. Maintaining the water
balance will also help to respect the water supply for downstream and peripheral landowners.
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6.2.3
The Role of Infiltration
A shallow unit of silty sand to sandy silt with some interbedded layers of higher clay content
underlies the site. This layer varies in thickness from 4.5 to 28 metres. This shallow watertable
aquifer is the main soil unit in which the surface watercourses are located. Lateral groundwater
flow contributes to surface water base flows, however, it is also prone to surface contamination.
The hydrolithologic unit therefore has a significant influence on surface water quality. The
underlying Upper Clay Aquitard limits the downward flow of the water to deeper geological units.
There is a natural recharge situation on the existing site. Normally, a soil permeability of 2 x 10cm/s or higher is required for suitable infiltration. In addition, the clay content of the soils
should be less than 20%-30%.
4
The surficial sand in the Secondary Plan area is an unconfined watertable aquifer and the
relatively fine sandy conditions and low relief promote infiltration. Groundwater flow within this
unit is topographically controlled, dominated by lateral flow near by watercourses. Water levels
within the Shallow Watertable Aquifer are estimated to contribute to watercourse base flow in
the order of 16 L/s to 19 L/s (0.016 m3/s to 0.019 m3/s). The estimated range of lateral
groundwater flow is estimated to be 1.5 x 10-6 m/s or approximately 50 meters per year, based
on an average lateral hydraulic conductivity of 1.5 x 10-5 cm/sec, a gradient of 0.03 and a
porosity value for the sand unit of 0.3. This implies that changes in infiltration or contamination
of the central Secondary Plan area could take 19 to 20 years before they are observed at the
watercourses.
A hydrogeological investigation (Thurber Engineering Ltd – 19-1351-108 – Aug 15, 20060
prepared for the County Rd 10 realignment has confirmed that in summer conditions the water
table is at least 5 metres below the surface as encountered with the borehole piezometers
installed. One perched condition was encountered at Hwy 14 where the new County Rd 10
realignment turns northward. During dry periods however, this borehole location was also dry.
Although the soil permeability is marginally low, the groundwater dependence on infiltration is
important in the Secondary Plan area and in the adjacent watercourse. As individual
development proposals are brought forward, additional detailed studies should be required.
These studies should obtain more detailed and site specific geotechnical investigations. The
studies should evaluate the potential impacts to groundwater recharge for the development. It
should review and propose mitigation features. The study should incorporate detailed mitigation
strategies, at the site development level, to enhance “high-quality” groundwater recharge to the
Shallow Watertable Aquifer.
Targets for infiltration should aim to duplicate the existing situation. Currently, ±183mm of a
total annual rainfall plus snowmelt budget of 838mm flows into either the shallow or deep
aquifer (i.e. ±22% of the total precipitation). Typical infiltration values for the predominant land
use and soil type are around 240 to 260 mm (Table 3.1 MOE SWMM manual 2003). Factoring
in flat terrain, agricultural practices and soils reduces this infiltration to values ranging from 160
to 180 mm. On-site controls should be developed in a manner that will help address this 183
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mm threshold. By introducing roof water subsurface on a prorated basis will help address this
requirement (see section 6.4)
6.2.4
Environmental Objectives
Development plans and stormwater management design should attempt to mimic the existing
water balance as closely as possible. With the introduction of impermeable surfaces, this will
result in an emphasis on maximizing stormwater infiltration. Stormwater management facilities
that discharge into the Spring Creek, Boyne River or Nottawasaga River must provide
Enhanced Level Protection.
For the significant fish habitat on lands adjacent to the primary study area, a minimum setback
of 30 m from the watercourse or the edge of natural riparian vegetation should be implemented,
whichever is greatest. As well, the NVCA’s natural hazard policies must be taken into
consideration. Geotechnical studies may determine that larger setbacks are required,
depending on local slope stability conditions.
6.3
DRAINAGE SYSTEM OVERVIEW
Based on an initial review of the drainage pattern and the conceptual road system set out in
Section 3, the preferred drainage scheme was proposed. The Storm Drainage System is shown
in Figure 6.1 and the overall drainage watershed plan with subcatchments references to the
original Qualhymo modelling is shown in Figure 6.2.
Six catchments have been identified within the Secondary Plan areas.
Catchment F comprises WWTP lands only. An onsite drainage system, with its own SWM
pond, will drain the limits of the site to the Nottawasaga River.
Catchments C and D each represent mixed land use areas, likely incorporating substantial
residential components, on the east border of the Secondary Plan area. Each catchment also
incorporates a smaller sized SWM Pond. Each catchment drains to a natural outlet on the
Nottawasaga River. Shallow, conventional sewers will be needed to service these areas. The
presence of the drumlin landform should help to facilitate conventional drainage of this area.
Catchment E drains the areas immediately south of Highway 89 (Victoria Street) and a section
of C.W. Leach Road, south of MacKenzie Pioneer Road, along the east border of the
Secondary Plan Area. The ultimate sewer system will drain to a SWM pond that was originally
proposed on the south side of MacKenzie Pioneer Road. However, since the earlier industrial
subdivision has not been developed as of yet, this facility has not been constructed or approved.
This area drains to a watercourse that drains in turn to the Nottawasaga River.
Two larger drainage areas were identified. These correspond roughly to the natural drainage
catchments.
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The northern catchment (Catchment A) will drain to Spring Creek. The minor drainage system
will require a system of shallow sewers. The area will require the use of sump pumps to drain
foundation drains and basements with existing buildings. Slab on grade construction should be
promoted for future development in this area Alternatively, a system of foundation drain
collectors would be required throughout the area with an outlet north to the Boyne River.
The southern catchment (Catchment B) drains to a natural drainage feature diagonally crossing
the catchment. Through enhancements to the overland drainage system, stormwater runoff will
be conveyed to a SWM facility located immediately west of the Regional WWTP. Outflow from
the SWM pond will be conveyed to the Nottawasaga River near the Regional WWTP. A
controlled secondary outlet from the pond, however, will be required to maintain baseflow to this
natural drainage feature so that any downstream water takers are not affected. Similar to the
northern catchment, the minor drainage system will require a system of shallow sewers. The
area will also promote slab on grade construction more consistent with the type of land use
proposed.
6.4
SOURCE CONTROLS FOR RUNOFF
In simple terms, the proposed urbanization of the Secondary Plan will result in an increase in
runoff from undeveloped lands (with a runoff coefficient of 0.15) as these lands develop (runoff
coefficients of 0.75) into industrial/commercial land uses. This could result in a five-fold increase
in flows and runoff volumes translating into servicing costs that could be substantially higher.
The most effective solution is to establish efficient source controls with the proposed
development.
The types of source control to be implemented promote conditions that attempt to simulate the
drainage interface with the subsurface water table and reduce the runoff peaks thereby
optimizing the conveyance routes to regional facilities.
Infiltration potential must be evaluated on an individual site basis; however, a target of 22%
infiltration has been set for the entire area. For shallow sloped permeable areas, such as open
space and landscaped areas, the infiltrations characteristics should not vary considerably from
the pre-development values. For industrial and commercial sites, the target will be to convey
roof waters into infiltration galleries and similar features in sufficient quantities to meet this 22 %.
The roof area would infiltrate sufficient volumes to also match the requirement for the remainder
of each site. This is a source of reasonable clean water that should not pose a contamination
hazard to the watertable. To meet the requirements outlined in section 6.2.3, if the typical roof
area comprises 50% of an industrial/commercial lot, then the infiltration requirement will be 4
mm over the roof area. This is based on interevent times of three days between rainfall events
during the non-winter seasons. Residential lands should also be targeting a similar volume of
their roof waters directed to infiltration devices.
Other infiltration strategies may also be accepted if they achieve the same water balance. The
strategies for individual sites will also need to give consideration to managing the quality of the
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water discharge from each site, to both the groundwater system and to the surface or sewer
systems.
In order to set the overall strategy in place for the end-of-pipe measures and conveyance
strategy, it is important to determine a release rate to be applied for all development. Typically,
a particular return period storm for predevelopment conditions is used as a target. The
challenge with setting the release rate is whether it is based on meeting the conditions in the
receiving streams or viable municipal standards. For example, a 10-year predevelopment flow
rate from Catchment A produces a 1.0 cms flow using the 24 hr storm used in the Qualhymo
model for the receiving river systems.
This equates to an average release of 5.6 l/sec/ha for development resulting in onsite storage of
780 m3/ha. However, an individual site applying the Rational Method with a 30 min tc would
result in a 43.8 l/sec/ha release rate and 355 m3/ha storage in order to meet predevelopment
criteria on a site basis (based on NVCA design storm for local area).
Municipalities that typically apply a generic pro-rated release rate have developed a full range of
rates depending on whether the emphasis will be on placing the onus for control on individual
sites or at a municipally controlled facility at the end of the drainage system. These rates have
ranged from 35 l/sec/ha to over 100 l/sec/ha depending upon the circumstances. The rate may
also be determined by factoring in the percentage of the site that will be covered by roof or
parking lot. There are practical limitations to the amount of water that can be stored on the
surface on a parking lot. Figure 6.3 shows the anticipated parking lot storage on the parking lot
and landscaped areas based on the percentage of the site covered by roof. These values are
based on storm distributions typically applied in this geographic area.
Figure 6.3 – Relationship Between Roof Coverage and Parking Lot Storage
220
Parking Lot Storage Volume (m3)
43.8 l/sec/ha
200
52.8 l/sec/ha
180
160
140
120
100
30
35
40
45
50
55
60
% Roof Coverage
Figure 6.3: Relationship Between Roof Coverage and Parking Lot Storage
-- Generic Industrial Commnercial Site
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Site plan designers are able to easily store up to 200 m3 on parking lots on a 1 ha site. Future
site plans should be able to incorporate the 10-year pre-development rate determined for
individual sites. It is recommended that a preliminary release rate of 43.8 l/sec/ha be utilized as
a guide, however the final release rate shall be determined based on additional studies on a
catchment basis using hydrologic modeling acceptable to the NVCA at the Draft Plan/Site Plan
stage of development. This rate is similar to flows anticipated from roofs implementing typical
roof top controls that are applied throughout Ontario.
6.5
MINOR SYSTEM DRAINAGE
Controlling the flows at the source is important to reducing the cost and impact on the overall
drainage system. By the nature of the land uses in the Secondary Plan area there will be a
large increase in the impermeable area. Even with the implementation of at-source individual
controls, there can still be a significant accumulation in the drainage system and can result in
flows that will exceed the capacities of a traditionally designed minor system. Ideally the entire
system should be designed using simulation techniques that model the actual prorated flows to
the system and enable the designers to size components to match the needs.
6.5.1
Creating a Viable Network – A Matter of Balance
The philosophy for the design of the Minor Drainage System is to create a balanced drainage
system. The basic system of sewers will be designed based on a 5-year return period storm.
Within the system, relief points will be provided that drain to an overland system of “municipal
drain’-like drainage channels. These provide drainage routes to the centralized SWM facilities.
Higher hydraulic grade lines can be tolerated in the sewer system through this largely industrial
and commercial area. It will be permissible to design the sewer systems in Catchment A and B
to operate under hydraulic head, provided that the hydraulic grade lines not extend higher than
one metre from the centerline grade of the road. At strategic points, there should be overflow
pipes draining from the main sewers to the open channels. Parallel release points on the
overland drainage system will relieve the roads of excess water into the separate drainage
channel system.
6.6
MAJOR SYSTEM DRAINAGE
The Major Drainage System is designed to handle excess rainwater running off the land as a
result of less frequent storms. For the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan the major
system will be comprised of roads and separate open drains. The release rates established for
individual site plans will ensure that the majority of the major system flow will be resulting
directly from the road system and overland channels.
6.6.1
The Road System
The road system will provide the primary element in the Major Drainage System. The roads will
carry runoff that cannot be accommodated in the sewer system and link with the overland
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channels. The entire study area is very flat. There is no more than 1 metre relief for most of
each drainage area.
The grades on the road system are limited to 0.5% with reverse grading to meet overall grades
(alligatoring of road to allow for a very gradual change in elevation).The resulting roadway has
multiple low points that impact the overall capacity during major events. The overland distance
for any discharge to the boundary watercourses is approximately 1500 metres.
Additional standards have been indicated for local residential roads, since these were not
covered in the current Town standards (Ainley 1997). These are given in Table 6.2.
Table 6.2 Guidelines for Major System Drainage on Roads
Type of Road
5-Year
Return Storm
25-Year
Return Storm
100-Year &
Regional Storm
Local Residential Road1
0.10 m deep at low
point catch basins
0.10 m above crown of
road
0.30m max depth
Local Industrial Road
0.10 m deep at low
point catch basins
Up to crown of road
0.10 m above crown of
road
Collector Road
0.10 m deep at low
point catch basins
Up to crown of road
0.10 m above crown of
road
Arterial Road
0.10 m deep at low
point catch basins
One lane clear in each
direction
Up to crown of road
Notes: 1. Criteria to be confirmed with the Town & NVCA at the Draft Plan/Site Plan stage
6.6.2
A Separate Open Channel Waterway
Conveyance of major stormwater runoff will largely be along the road system and through open
channels. These channels will have shallow slopes ranging from 0.15% to 0.30%. Figure 6.1
illustrates the proposed drainage pattern as well as target elevations along the system. The
majority of the system would be located along rear lot lines to lessen the crossings of this
channel. The exception to this would be the channel located adjacent to the Country Road 10
ROW. Due to the limitation of access from Country Road 10, the crossings on this alignment
have been reduced. The drainage feature is also used to enhance the urban design of this
arterial road. The road system will require careful design to direct overland flow to the open
channel system.
The channels themselves will have to incorporate a range of flows depending on their proximity
to the end-of-pipe facility. In the upper reaches these channels may have to convey anywhere
from 20 to 30 hectares of development with a maximum flow of 1.3 cms. Closer to the outlet
these channels if consolidated may convey over 6 cms. The storm sewers should be designed
to accommodate the pro-rated flows from each lot and up to the 5-year flow directly on the road
section. At key points the sewer will discharge into the channel in order to provide an
economical balance between sewer size and channel land requirements.
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The channel system should be designed to include a means of overtopping road crossings and
containing the flows in a manner that an emergency overflow path is maintained. The local
buildings and access points should be set at elevations above the point where roads are
overtopped. This feature will be dealt with during detailed design for the industrial park and
individual site plans will establish finished floor elevations based on these criteria.
Aspects of natural channel designs must be incorporated into the details of this infrastructure.
The use of these measures can help open the flow conveyance as well as support objectives of
encouraging a treatment train addressing water quality issues. A typical section is shown in
Figure 6.4 for the open channel configuration. The channel dimensions shown in the figure are
based on using a Manning’s “n” value of 0.040 – 0.080 and 3H to 1V side slopes.
Manning’s “n” value of 0.040 represents a maintained channel section, while the “n” value of
0.080 represents a natural channel condition. Proposed channel widths are presented below to
illustrate the dimension requirements under each condition.
Fig 6.4: Typical Conveyance Channel
Riparian Planting to Include Native
Species – Shrubs and Shade Trees in
Upland Area
6
0.3m Freeboard
1
1
0.8
3
3
Typical Widths (Slope=0.3%)
Varies
0.20m to 12.0 m
Flow (cms)
Bottom Width* (m)
1.5
0.2 (2.0)
2.1
1.0 (3.4)
3.4
2.5 (6.3)
4.0
3.2 (7.5)
6.0
5.5 (12.0)
* Channel bottom widths 0.2m to 5.5m are based on Manning’s value of 0.040. Widths ranging from 2.0m to 12.0m
are based on Manning’s value of 0.080.
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In order to achieve an economical balance between land requirements for the proposed open
channels and ongoing maintenance costs, it is recommended that the Manning’s ‘n’ value be
reviewed with the Town and NVCA at the Draft Plan/Site Plan stage to determine the level of
commitment to future maintenance. To realize a narrower channel section, regular
maintenance of the open channels would be required to ensure appropriate flow conditions.
Preliminary channel design, including the perpetual maintenance of the channels if desired by
the Town, shall be the subject of a separate future study.
The County Rd 10 realignment will have no portion of the channel in the north south alignment
greater than 600 metres which would correspond to a 2.2 meter bottom width and a maximum
depth of flow of 0.8 m. There is more opportunity to introduce more natural features once
channels combine to service larger areas and a small meandering low flow area can be
introduced in the bottom of the channel configuration. The channel that runs between industrial
lots will contain a 6.0 m maintenance access strip on one side since the channel will not be
sufficiently wide enough to require access from both banks.
It is recommended that suitable easements in favor of the Town of New Tecumseth should be
established overtop the open channels and maintenance access roads. Alternatively, the Town
may decide to take full ownership of these sections to ensure proper long term function of the
open channels.
6.7
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
6.7.1
Multiple Levels of Control
No single SWM practice can alleviate all concerns for the protection of receiving waters. It will
be necessary to incorporate a combination of SWM practices to provide the desired water
quality protection. The preferred stormwater quality solution incorporates measures that will
need to be refined and adapted at the design level to meet the targets set out in this Master
Servicing Plan.
It will be important to manage the release of flows on each site to avoid overloading the
conveyance system. Individual site controls in the industrial and commercial areas will be set to
a standardized flow rate pro-rated on a per hectare basis augmented with an end-of-pipe
system. Residential areas will be serviced predominantly by end-of-pipe solutions.
The ‘end of the system’, SWM ponds will be used to complete the control of the release rates
into the receiving streams. These involve the design of wet ponds and constructed wetlands but
the latter will also incorporate deeper wet pond features to manage sediment collection and
temperature concerns.
It will also be important to incorporate quality control at steps along the open channel system.
Primary quality controls need to be constructed on development sites, prior to release into the
conveyance system. Additional sediment traps should be incorporated into the conveyance
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system in close proximity to road crossings, in order to facilitate maintenance. Finally,
Enhanced Level Protection controls should be incorporated into the end of system SWM
facilities.
Planting along the conveyance system and particularly where storage features are incorporated
into the system will assist in controlling effluent temperatures
Special attention to the design of the system to handle flows during the winter and during the
spring thaw; as there is a concern that snow and ice accumulations could impact the
conveyance of the melt water.
6.7.2
Site Control
There are a number of available strategies for handling stormwater on development sites. From
a water balance concern, the infiltration of water at individual sites helps to distribute percolation
over a larger area. This will be more successful in achieving meaningful infiltration, especially in
areas with marginally conducive soils. The costs, maintenance, and potential for problems is
reduced for any single stakeholder. This approach also more closely replicates existing
conditions. There are additional benefits of reducing runoff from individual sites that result in
lower costs for the entire infrastructure.
Based on available soils and water table information, the subject property may have a regional
and/or localized potential for infiltration facilities. It is, therefore, important to promote infiltration,
where soils are suitable; to help offset the reduction in infiltration resulting from a decrease in
pervious areas with development. Infiltration practices should be reviewed at the site plan stage
to determine viable lot level and conveyance controls, such as the following:
•
Reduced lot grading to promote ponding and infiltration
•
Roof leaders directed to ponding areas, soakaway pits, cisterns, rain barrels, etc.
•
Infiltration trenches
•
Infiltration basins
•
Grassed swales
•
Porous pavement
•
Pervious pipe systems
•
Vegetated filter strips
•
Stream and valley corridor buffer strips
Should soakaway pits and /or infiltration trenches be considered at the site plan stage, it must
be shown through additional soil testing that the soil percolation rate is greater than or equal to
15 mm/hr. In addition, both soakaway pits and infiltration trenches must be set back a minimum
of 4 meters from any building foundation. It should also be confirmed at the site plan stage that
ground water ponding would not be an issue where slope stability and/or a high water table is
encountered. Only roof runoff should be directed to the proposed enhanced infiltration facilities.
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Runoff from other impervious areas such as parking lots, which may be contaminated with
pollutants, should not be directed to the proposed enhanced infiltration facilities.
Given that only roof runoff shall be directed to soakaway pits and infiltration trenches, it is
anticipated that future maintenance will not be onerous. Roof runoff is very low in suspended
solids and, therefore, the potential for clogging and maintenance will be minimized.
Nonetheless, landowners should be encouraged to maintain these systems on their property by
the town (e.g. public education, notices).
Oil/grit separators are practical as part of an on-site detention approach for very small areas, as
well as pre-treatment devices for commercial and industrial blocks that will also be serviced by a
centralized SWM facility.
The use of porous pavements should be permitted only where there is no risk of contamination
from the activities located on that parcel.
Adjacent to open spaces and to stream /valley corridors and where drainage corridors are
located, the use should be made of buffer strips and naturalized planting areas.
The discharge from any site should be restricted to the target pro-rated release rate. The design
of each site should demonstrate that it has maximized its infiltration of “clean” water and
controlled the remaining discharge.
Furthermore, due to the significant volume of water expected to be conveyed by the road and
open channel systems, it is recommended that site development be flood proofed to an
elevation of 0.3m above the regulatory storm elevation from the channels and roadway. Flood
proofing details should be provided at the Draft Plan/Site Plan stage.
6.7.3
Area-Wide Control
Specific control and release rates have been set for each SWM facility based on the receiving
watercourse and the site conditions based on the Qualhymo model and attempting to match the
peak flows within the receiving watercourses. As noted within Section 6.2.2, the NVCA’s
preferred methodology for sizing the proposed SWM facilities shall be based on the pre to post
development concept to be determined at the Draft Plan/Site Plan stage. The SWM facilitiy
sizing and output presented within Table 6.3 below are not approved by the NVCA.
For the receiving watercourses, the water quality criteria are based on the protection of aquatic
life. The primary focus is the reduction in total suspended solids (TSS) concentrations. Another
measure of resource protection is the adoption of appropriate setbacks from the watercourses
to buffer those watercourses to maintain existing vegetation cover along the watercourse banks.
The MOE guidelines cover a wide variety of parameters with respect to aquatic habitat and
human health objectives. Within the Nottawasaga Valley Watershed, the current water quality
policies require Enhanced Level Protection. This implies 80% total suspended solids removal
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efficiency for any SWM facility, according to the 2003 MOE Stormwater Management Planning
and Design Manual.
For the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan, storage of the first flush (associated with
a 25mm rainfall volume-4 hour duration event) for twenty-four hours will be considered as the
“base level” for erosion control.
Based on the targets set out previously, the drainage areas for each catchment together with
their hydrological characteristics were used to model the SWM pond requirements for each
area.
A summary of required SWM pond volumes without source control is provided in Table 6.3. The
pond volumes provided in this table do not account for any on-site source controls that may be
implemented. This ensures that the maximum potential size of facility at each outlet is
accounted for in setting aside sufficient land to site each facility. A summary of required SWM
pond volumes for Catchment A and B (primarily industrial areas) is also provided in Table 6.3
assuming the implementation of on-site source controls that would restrict the discharge from
any site within these two catchments to 43.8 l/sec/ha.
Table 6.3 Summary of SWM Pond Specification
Required Storage (m3)
Pond
Pond Type
A
B
C
D
E
wetland (2-100 yr)
wetland (2-100 yr)
wet pond (2-100 yr)
wet pond (2-100yr)
wet pond (2-100 yr)
Perm.
Pool
Extended
Detention/Erosion
Quantity
Total
Active
17,600
12,500
2,400
2,700
11,200
37,500
27,000
2,400
2,600
11,500
66,500
39,000
3,100
3,500
11,500
104,000
66,000
5,500
6,100
23,000
36,500
17,750
74,000
44,750
Using 43.8 l/sec/ha source controls
A
B
wetland (2-100 yr)
wetland (2-100 yr)
17,600
12,500
37,500
27,000
The following expands on the requirements for the preliminary designs for the identified SWM
ponds in the preferred plan.
6.7.3.1 Catchment A – Spring Creek Pond
This pond serves approximately 176 ha in the northwest portion of the Secondary Plan Area.
The area draining to the pond is general industrial land with a portion of lighter industrial uses.
The catchment will be serviced by long sections of open channel conveyances and minor
sewers.
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These sewers can be designed to operate under a hydraulic head, whereby; the hydraulic grade
line for the 5-year return storm should not extend higher than one metre below the crown
elevation if the road.
Based on the Qualhymo modelling, the pond specifications are given in Table 6.4. As noted in
Section 6.2.2, new hydrologic calculations will be required at the Draft Plan/Site Plan Stage to
be completed in accordance with NVCA requirements.
Table 6.4 SWM Pond A Specifications
Post Development Peak Flows (cms)
Retention
Required
Pre-development
Flow (cms)
Required
Storage (m3)
Erosion
2 year
5 year
10 year
25 year
100 year
0.43
0.53
0.81
1
1.27
1.45
37,500
57,000
75,000
83,000
96,000
104,000
Uncontrolled
(Qin)
Controlled
(Qout)
4.97
6.46
7.45
8.69
9.54
0.53
0.78
1.00
1.26
1.44
The table shows a solution that is based on no controls at source. The solution, although
matching predevelopment release rates, causes a slight increase in flows at a downstream
nodes Spring Cr @ Highway 89 (Node 4), Boyne R d/s of Spring Cr (Node 6), and Boyne R d/s
of Spring Cr (Node 6A). In order to utilize this pond configuration without any at source controls,
the contributing drainage area would have to be reduced to 145.7 ha. A corresponding increase
in Catchment B would be required to 155.6 ha. The resulting storage requirement for Pond B
would then be 90,000 m3. Since the onsite storage strategy is to be employed, these sizes are
only provided to ensure that an appropriate envelope be reserved for the end-of-pipe facility in
each catchment.
6.7.3.2 Catchment B – Southern Community Pond
This pond serves approximately 125 ha in the southern portion of the Secondary Plan area. The
pond has been integrated with the existing wet meadow unit created by the drainage feature
located south of 14th Concession Road. The area drains general industrial lands with portion of
lighter industrial uses and some commercial uses. The catchment will be serviced by sections of
open channel conveyances and by a minor sewer system.
The pipe sizes are also likely to be substantial in order to drain the catchment. Discharge for the
pond will be directed across extremely flat farm land to the Nottawasaga River. As per the
preliminary design on Figure 6.1, an open channel of minimum grade (0.15%) shall be
designed to convey the flows to the River. Due to the sensitive nature of the valley system and
high valley wall, it is recommended the design of the outlet at the River include a drop inlet
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structure to be used with regulatory flow capacity to decrease release velocities and safely
convey major storms down the high banks to the River. Special attention should be provided
with respect to rehabilitating the areas of disturbance.
Based on the Qualhymo modelling, the pond specifications are given in Table 6.5. As noted in
Section 6.2.2, new hydrologic calculations will be required at the Draft Plan/Site Plan Stage to
be completed in accordance with NVCA requirements.
Table 6.5 SWM Pond B Specifications
Post Development Peak Flows (cms)
Uncontrolled
Controlled
Retention
Pre-development
Required
Required
Flow (cms)
Storage (m3)
(Qin)
(Qout)
Erosion
2 year
5 year
10 year
25 year
100 year
0.31
0.61
0.95
1.20
1.54
1.78
27,000
38,000
48,000
54,000
61,000
66,000
3.62
4.71
5.43
6.33
6.96
0.6
0.93
1.19
1.54
1.78
6.7.3.3 Catchment C – Northern Residential Pond
This pond serves approximately 12 ha in the east central portion of the Secondary Plan area.
The area draining to the pond is a combination of mixed use (likely residential), light industrial,
and commercial land uses. The catchment should be serviced by conventional sewers. The
pond outlets into an existing drainage feature that flows north through the golf course, under
Highway 89 and into the Nottawasaga River immediately upstream of the confluence with the
Boyne River. The culvert capacity of the crossings should be confirmed at the functional design
stage.
Due to the characteristics of the outlet channel and the existing downstream land uses, the
pond should be designed to match pre-development flows for all return periods. Riparian rights
of the downstream landowner(s) must be respected and considered at the final design stage. It
may be necessary to over control the release rates to match the capacity of the downstream
conveyance system due to the increased volume of water expected to be discharged from the
development. The NVCA’s development guidelines specifies the following with respect to
downstream riparian rights:
“It is the developer’s responsibility to demonstrate safe conveyance of the Regulatory Storm
(the greater of the 1:100 year design storm or Timmins storm event) through the development
site to a sufficient outlet, such that no adverse impacts will be incurred on up and downstream
landowners. A sufficient outlet typically constitutes a permanently flowing watercourse or lake.
A public right of way may also provide sufficient outlet provided the proponent has obtained
written permission from the land owner. In the case of privately owned land, the proponent
must obtain a legal right of discharge registered on title. Legal documentation, such as right of
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discharge, and/or written permission to discharge into a public right of way must be provided
with the design submission.”
Based on the Qualhymo modelling, the pond specifications are given in Table 6.6. As noted in
Section 6.2.2, new hydrologic calculations will be required at the Draft Plan/Site Plan Stage to
be completed in accordance with NVCA requirements.
Table 6.6 SWM Pond C Specifications
Post Development Peak Flows (cms)
Retention
Required
Pre-development
Flow (cms)
Required
Storage (m3)
Erosion
2 year
5 year
10 year
25 year
100 year
0.027
0.097
0.15
0.19
0.25
0.29
2,400
3,300
4,000
4,800
5,100
5,500
Uncontrolled
(Qin)
Controlled
(Qout)
0.36
0.47
0.55
0.65
0.71
0.095
0.15
0.18
0.24
0.28
6.7.3.4 Catchment D – Southern Residential Pond
This pond serves approximately 15.7 ha in the east south-central portion of the Secondary Plan
area. The area draining to the pond is primarily mixed (i.e. residential) use. Conventional sewers
should service the catchment.
The outlet from the pond discharges by way of a sewer on 14th Concession Road and into the
Nottawasaga River. Due to the sensitive nature of the valley system and high valley wall, it is
recommended the design of the outlet at the River include a drop inlet structure to be used with
regulatory flow capacity to decrease release velocities and safely convey major storms down
the high banks to the River. Special attention should be provided with respect to rehabilitating
the areas of disturbance.
Considering the pond outlet does not discharge directly to the River, riparian rights of the
downstream landowner(s) must be respected and considered at the final design stage. See
Section 6.7.3.3 for an excerpt from the NVCA’s development guidelines with respect to riparian
rights.
Based on the Qualhymo modelling, the pond specifications are given in Table 6.7. As noted in
Section 6.2.2, new hydrologic calculations will be required at the Draft Plan/Site Plan Stage to
be completed in accordance with NVCA requirements.
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Table 6.7 SWM Pond D Specifications
Retention
Required
Pre-development
Flow (cms)
Required
3
Storage (m )
Erosion
2 year
5 year
10 year
25 year
100 year
0.029
0.089
0.15
0.19
0.25
0.29
2,600
3,700
4,500
5,300
5,800
6,100
Post Development Peak Flows (cms)
Uncontrolled
Controlled
(Qin)
(Qout)
0.39
0.54
0.63
0.76
0.84
0.08
0.15
0.19
0.25
0.29
6.7.3.5 Catchment E – C.W. Leach Pond
This pond serves approximately 53.3 ha in the northeastern portion of the Secondary Plan area.
The original SWM facility proposed in this area, located south of MacKenzie Pioneer Road and
east of C.W. Leach Road, was intended to serve the neighbouring industrial developments.
However, the industrial sites developed to date have been piecemeal thereby incorporating
individual site plan controls. There is a development proposal presently under review for the
area (Alliston Industrial Area Smart Centres) that has proposed a full SWM facility within the
lands initially intended to accommodate the original pond for this area.
Once constructed, the pond outlets into an existing drainage feature that flows under
MacKenzie Pioneer Road, then north, under Highway 89, into the Boyne Rive immediately
upstream of the confluence of the Nottawasaga River. The culvert capacity of the crossings
should be checked at the functional design stage. The pond should be designed to match
predevelopment flows for all return periods, due to the characteristics of the outlet channel and
the downstream land uses.
Considering the pond outlet does not discharge directly to the River, riparian rights of the
downstream landowner(s) must be respected and considered at the final design stage. See
Section 6.7.3.3 for an excerpt from the NVCA’s development guidelines with respect to riparian
rights.
Based on the Qualhymo modelling, the pond specifications are given in Table 6.8. As noted in
Section 6.2.2, new hydrologic calculations will be required at the Draft Plan/Site Plan Stage to
be completed in accordance with NVCA requirements.
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Table 6.8 SWM Pond E Specifications
Post Development Peak Flows (cms)
Retention
Required
Predevelopment
Flow (cms)
Required
3
Storage (m )
Erosion
2 year
5 year
10 year
25 year
100 year
0.131
0.61
0.81
0.95
1.13
1.24
11,500
13,500
16,500
18,500
21,000
23,000
Uncontrolled
(Qin)
Controlled
(Qout)
1.54
2.01
2.31
2.7
2.97
0.58
0.79
0.93
1.12
1.21
6.7.3.6 Catchment F – Regional WWTP Pond
This pond serves only the lands of the Town’s WWTP, in the southeastern portion of the
Secondary Plan area. The pond will be integrated to the site’s development plan.
Discharge from the facility will be to the Nottawasaga River. This site already has an integrated
outfall into the valley that should be used if possible. The design of the pond should incorporate
the intent of extended detention and water quality measures where possible. The design should
also make use of the longer time to peak of the River system. The pond specifications were not
produced for this site. Area site-specific studies will be required as site development proceeds.
6.8
CAPITAL COSTS FOR STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
6.8.1
Bearing the Cost of the System
Implementing the policy of a higher HGL in the storm sewers where appropriate should reduce
the cost of the minor drainage system. The construction of local storm drainage infrastructure
will be borne by the developer of the land in conjunction with the construction of the roads and
other services. The cost of constructing the overland drainage routes is also seen to be a
responsibility of the individual developer.
Concerns for the provision of downstream sewer and drainage channels will likely arise during
the completion of the area. It will be the responsibility of the developer to construct the
downstream sewer and channel capacities. The Town will facilitate the reimbursements of the
costs for these facilities through the planning and Subdivision Agreement process, where
appropriate Cost Share Agreements and Oversizing Agreements will be needed.
These should be worked out between participating landowners, but the Town may utilize
Conditions of Subdivision Approval to help facilitate this process. This is considered a viable
option given the land ownership patterns of the area. There are several large land holdings and
the land tenure pattern is reasonably aligned with the catchments and the drainage systems.
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6.8.2
Estimated Public Sector Capital Works
The responsibility of constructing the Storm Drainage System will generally lie with the
individual landowner attempting to develop their parcel. There are several facilities that will be
common to a number of landowners or that represent a significant financial burden if only one
small landowner were to proceed. The construction of the SWM facilities represents such a
common facility, that the Town would undertake or help finance through Development Charges.
A summary of capital costs for these items is presented in Table 6.9. The cost estimates
represent 2007 values and have not been escalated for future construction. The estimates are
presented with contingencies, but do not include engineering fees, staff wages or taxes and
application fees.
With respect to the proposed stormwater management ponds, the cost estimates presented do
not include land costs.
Table 6.9 Capital Costs of Selected Drainage Infrastructure
Item
Description
2015
2026
Ultimate
Studies
4.1.1
Preliminary Design of Open Channel System
$102,000
Stormwater Management Ponds/Wetlands
4.2.1
Pond A – Spring Creek
$2,200,000
4.2.2
Pond B – Southern Community
$1,280,000
4.2.3
Pond C – Northern Residential
$360,000
4.2.4
Pond D – Southern Residential
$360,000
4.2.5
Pond E – C.W. Leach
$890,000
Open Channel Road Crossings (Culverts)
4.3.1
County Road 10 Re-alignment crossing
$500,000
4.3.2
14th Concession crossing
$450,000
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7.0
Urban Design Issues
7.1
INTRODUCTION
There are several issues that relate to the urbanization of the Secondary Plan area that need to
be addressed in the development of this new urban area. The preceding four sections helped to
define the system of roads and services to the area; other issues inherent in the development of
the area are the character of the streetscape and how existing policies of the Town can be
extended into the emerging portions of the community.
The Urban Design Guidelines (Brock McIlroy 2002) recently adopted by the Town provides
some guidance to the development of the Town’s evolving built form. The directions of the
Guidelines are expanded in the following section, which also outlines specific concerns raised
during the Planning Study’s public consultation process.
The level of activity associated with the new expansion to the community also brings increasing
levels of noise and light, the impacts of which are discussed later in this section.
7.2
ENVIRONMENTAL MANAGEMENT
7.2.1
Natural Resource Base
7.2.1.1 Inventory of the Resource Base
In general, the Secondary Plan area has been developed for agricultural uses in the past and
the natural resource base is minimal throughout most of the area. An inventory of the available
resources was completed and is summarized below.
Significant Wetlands
There are no provincially significant wetlands on or in the vicinity of the subject lands.
Habitat of Provincially Endangered or Threatened Species
No provincially endangered or threatened species of plants or wildlife were recorded on the
subject lands. The NHIC database contains no records of endangered or threatened species in
the vicinity.
Fish Habitat
The Nottawasaga River, Boyne River, and Spring Creek all provide good quality cool or
coldwater fish habitat.
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Areas of Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSIs)
There are no identified ANSIs in the study area.
North of the Secondary Plan study area, however, the valley of the Nottawasaga River
downstream of its confluence with the Boyne River is designated as the Nottawasaga River
Provincially Significant Life Science ANSI. The study area is located outside of the ANSI’s
“adjacent lands”, which are defined as those lands within 50 m (OMNR, 1999).
Significant Woodlands
The woodlands within the study area are minimal. None of the woodland resources in the study
area should be defined and designated as significant woodlands by the planning authority.
Significant Valleylands, Wildlife Habitat
Significant valleylands and significant wildlife habitat should be defined and designated by the
planning authority. General guidelines for determining significance of these features are
presented in the Natural Heritage Reference Manual for Policy 2.3 of the Provincial Policy
Statement (OMNR, 1999).
Recommended criteria for designating significant valleylands include: prominence as a
distinctive landform, degree of naturalness, importance of ecological functions, restoration
potential, and historical and cultural values. The valleys of the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers
have been identified as part of the Simcoe County Greenland system and should be considered
as significant; development should not be permitted. As the Spring Creek valley also contains
steep slopes, groundwater discharge, coldwater fish habitat, and good progress and future
potential for restoration, this valley should also be protected from development.
Significant wildlife habitat is one of the more complicated natural heritage features to identify
and evaluate. The Natural Heritage Reference Manual includes criteria and guidelines for
designating significant wildlife habitat. Two additional documents, the Significant Wildlife
Habitat Technical Guide and the Significant Wildlife Habitat Decision Support System, can also
be used to help identify areas and features that should be considered significant wildlife habitat.
These documents were used as reference material for this study (OMNR, 2000).
There are four general types of significant wildlife: seasonal concentration areas, migration
corridors, rare or specialized habitat, and species of conservation concern. All types of
significant wildlife habitat in relation to the subject lands are discussed in more detail below.
No potential seasonal concentration areas were identified during the fieldwork conducted for this
study.
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With respect to migration corridors, the riparian zones of the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers
contain mixed and coniferous forests, which shelter numerous deer, as evidenced by an
abundance of tracks. Deer and other wildlife likely use the riparian corridor to travel between
areas of suitable habitat. The floodplains of the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers also provide
habitat for breeding amphibians. These areas are preserved within the Simcoe County
Greenland designation.
Specialized habitats are microhabitats critical to some wildlife species. No specialized habitats
are known in the area; however, such areas as the groundwater seeps in the river valleys
should be preserved for their potential as rare or specialized habitat.
In summary, the Boyne and Nottawasaga River valleys of the secondary study area provide
wildlife habitat functions for area-sensitive and other species. These features are identified in
the Simcoe County Greenland system and should be considered significant valleylands and
wildlife habitat. Therefore, development should not be permitted in the valleys.
7.2.1.2 Summary of Ecological Constraints
There were no provincially significant wetlands or habitats of provincially endangered or
threatened species within the study area. No nationally or provincially significant plants or
wildlife were encountered in the study area. Fish habitat is present in the Boyne and
Nottawasaga Rivers and must be protected from indirect impacts of the proposed development.
The natural heritage features of the Secondary Plan area have been categorized into three
levels of ecological constraint based on provincial statutes, official plan designations, and
ecological attributes and functions. Constraint categories are shown on Figure 7.1 and are
described below.
Category 1
Category 1 lands include areas designated by the County of Simcoe as part of the Greenland
system. These areas are almost entirely in the study area and include significant valleylands,
significant wildlife habitat, and fish habitat.
Category 2
Category 2 lands pose a moderate constraint to development. Generally, development may
occur within these designations, subject to further study at the site plan stage. The Category 2
lands have been further subdivided into two levels:
•
2a, which generally consist of naturally vegetated communities located outside the core
Category 1 areas. These areas may have supporting functions to the core areas, such
as buffering, contributing area, enhancing community diversity, or providing a minor local
linkage. These functions and, if present, their preservation should be examined on a
site-specific basis.
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•
2b, which consist of intermediate to mature cultural plantations. These areas may also
support core areas; however, many are comprised of non-native species or species that
are unsuitable for the area, such as Scots pine or red pine. The plantation functions and,
if present, their preservation should be examined on a site-specific basis.
Category 3
The remainder of the study area falls under Category 3. These lands comprise active
agricultural land, hedgerows or early successional cultural meadows, savannah, or thicket.
There are no constraints to development, other than the application of Best Management
Practices for stormwater and sediment controls.
The hedgerows on site are comprised of single lines of non-native species such as Norway
spruce. As the understory was poorly developed, it did not provide effective vegetation or
wildlife corridors. Portions of some hedgerows may present tree retention opportunities, if
feasible from a grading and planning perspective.
7.2.2
Management Guidelines
To reflect provincial, county, and local concerns, a series of environmental objectives were
defined for the Secondary Plan area. These reflect Town policies for environmental protection
and enhancement. The guidelines also implement conservation authority policies for flood
protection and the protection of the area’s natural heritage.
Stormwater Management
Development plans and stormwater management design should attempt to mimic the existing
water balance as closely as possible. With the introduction of impermeable surfaces, this will
likely result in an emphasis on maximizing stormwater infiltration. Stormwater management
facilities that discharge into the Spring Creek, Boyne River, or Nottawasaga River must provide
Level 1 treatment.
Tree Preservation
Some of the hedgerows on site contain healthy specimen trees suitable for retention or
transplantation. Retained mature trees can provide visual screening between existing and new
development while creating a more mature landscape character. Candidate trees for
preservation must be carefully evaluated, and only trees exhibiting good overall health, vigor,
and structural integrity should be considered. Native trees should be given priority.
Setbacks and Buffers
For the significant fish habitat on lands adjacent to the primary study area, a minimum setback
of 30 m from the watercourse or the edge of natural riparian vegetation should be implemented,
whichever is greatest. As well, the NVCA’s natural hazard policies must be taken into
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consideration. Depending on local slope stability conditions, geotechnical studies may
determine that larger setbacks are required.
The width and type of buffers to Category 1 and retained Category 2 lands should be
determined at the site plan stage. The width and type of buffers will depend on the type of
development proposed, the nature of the existing edge, and the functions of the feature itself.
Environmental Monitoring Program
The NVCA requires the establishment of an Environmental Monitoring Program (EMP) through
the Secondary Plan process. The purpose of an EMP is to monitor the changes in stream
health and to evaluate the impacts of development on the natural environment. The NVCA has
provided terms of reference for the EMP, which includes objectives, detailed protocols, data
requirements, definitions of deleterious impacts, and recommended actions in the event of
deleterious impacts. The means for such a monitoring program will be established in
consultation with the NVCA as part of the Secondary Plan.
7.3
URBAN STREETSCAPE
The Town commissioned the preparation of an Urban Design Guidelines (Brock McIlroy 2002)
for the overall Town. That guide identified the unique character of each of the three principal
communities within the Town and presented a toolbox of techniques for addressing new areas.
This guide has been reviewed in specific reference to the development of the Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan.
7.3.1
Gateways
Town Gateways
The Urban Design Guidelines make specific reference to the creation of entry points to the
community at several levels. This portion of the Alliston Community is not located at a main
entry point to the overall Town, although the realignment of County Road 10 does offer a
renewed north/south connection through the County. A logical gateway for the Town is at, or
north of, the Boyne River on County Road 10, located north of the Secondary Plan area (see
Figure 7.2). The Town should aim to use the scenic views of the Boyne River Valley as an
attribute/focus to the Gateway.
Community Gateways
Similarly, County Road 10 also offers an entry point to the Alliston Community from the south.
Consideration should be given to the development of a community level gateway south of the
junction of County Road 10 and Tottenham Road. The remnant parcel of land resulting from the
realignment of Tottenham Road should be the focus of a structured entry point to be completed
in conjunction with the road reconstruction effort. Landscaping treatments should be intensified
to reinforce this gateway and should also seek to define the curving realignment of the county
road. This will assist to provide “positive guidance” for traffic using the roadway.
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Highway 89 provides another principal community entry point to Alliston. Again, the main
community gateway would be located outside the Secondary Plan. The logical gateway would
be at the Nottawasaga River or at Sideroad 10. Locating the Community gateway at the
Nottawasaga River incorporates the natural setting of the River into the gateway’s design, and
the river valley will continue to provide a natural transition point, even as the community grows.
Figure 7-1 – Natural Environment Management Guidelines
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Neighbourhood Gateways
The Secondary Plan will be contiguous with the existing industrial area west of Tottenham
Road. There are several opportunities for neighbourhood level gateways within the Plan.
The intersection of County Road 10 and Victoria Street represents a valuable neighbourhood
level gateway. This access point should be coordinated with the design of the town level
gateway located north of the intersection. Built form around the intersection should be used to
emphasize the definition of the gateway.
The construction of MacKenzie Pioneer Road east from Tottenham Road should seek to create
another neighbourhood level gateway. A combination of the Spring Creek Watercourse and the
proposed SWM pond can be used to expand the welcoming nature of this gateway. The major
focus of this design will be to differentiate the mixed residential area west of Tottenham Road
from the general industrial area east of Spring Creek.
A similar gateway is proposed west of 14th Concession Road’s crossing of the Nottawasaga
River. Again, the natural resources of the river valley can be used to differentiate the general
industrial community from the residential communities east of that point. The available frontage
of a minor SWM pond, the district park, and the Town’s lands, associated with the Regional
WWTP, can be used to enhance this local gateway.
Other Focal Points
The intersection of 14th Concession and County Road 10 promises to provide an important
focus for the Secondary Plan. Located central to the development area, the intersection does
not represent a Gateway; it does, however, merit special attention to its urban design potential.
The built form should emphasize this importance.
The importance of the north/south segment of C.W. Leach Road should be de-emphasized.
Traffic calming and streetscape design elements should enhance the aesthetics of the
streetscape but decrease its use as a prime transportation route.
7.3.2
Trail System
The Secondary Plan incorporates a long-term plan for the development of a trail system through
the area. This system is largely independent of the road system, due to the potential conflicts
anticipated to arise between the trail users and the heavy traffic movements that will include
substantial trucks and commercial vehicles. The trail provides an important link between the
residential areas located east and west of the Secondary Plan with the uses within the
Secondary Plan.
This trail system offers the Town an added opportunity to enhance the streetscape and to soften
the visual character of the industrial area. Added plantings along the trails will provide both a
more inviting environment for the trail users and a relief of the visual landscape for other users
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of the employment area. Where the trail is incorporated adjacent to or together with other road
facilities, its streetscape design should maximize the impact of the added facilities.
Aspects of the trail and the associated landscape treatment help to reinforce the ‘lifestyle’
advantages of the Town. This should assist the promotion of the Industrial/ Commercial
Secondary Plan area.
7.3.3
Streetscape Elements
The Urban Design Guidelines (Brock McIlroy 2002) provide some direction in the use of
streetscape elements within defined communities and neighbourhoods.
The location of natural features throughout the Secondary Plan should be used to enhance the
elements of the streetscape. Views of the Boyne River valley serve as a natural attribute to the
northern approach of the Secondary Plan area. Similarly, the Nottawasaga River Valley should
be used to enhance the entry point along 14th Concession Road. The Spring Creek Valley
offers the same opportunity, at a smaller scale, along Albert Street/MacKenzie Pioneer Road.
The location of the centralized SWM pond, which is immediately east of Spring Creek, provides
further opportunities for integration of natural themes into the entry point to the employment
neighbourhood. Similar opportunities are available to integrate SWM facilities into the local
streetscapes at C.W. Leach Road and MacKenzie Pioneer Road, on C.W. Leach Road as it
approaches the mixed-use area, and on 14th Concession Road west of the Nottawasaga River.
Several areas of enhanced streetscape have been indicated on Figure 7.2. These include:
•
County Road 10 (from the south)
The streetscape planting should define the turning nature of the arterial. Plantings
should aim to reduce speeds by passive traffic calming. The change of land use should
be reflected in the streetscape design, and will announce the change from the rural
countryside to the urban nature of the Secondary Plan area.
•
14th Concession Road (from the east)
The environment of the Boyne River valley should be carried west along the streetscape.
The street design should tie in the buffer on the Region WWTP grounds with the District
Park north of the road. The extent of the municipal lands available benefit the
development of this area.
•
MacKenzie Pioneer Drive (east of Tottenham Road)
The amount of municipal/public lands also benefit the streetscape development of the
MacKenzie Pioneer gateway. The natural character of this area should be reflected in
the streetscape design.
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•
County Road 10 (south of Victoria Street)
This is an important entry point to the employment area. The initial block between
Victoria Street and MacKenzie Pioneer Road should be structured to provide a strong
sense of arrival into the employment district.
The street design could incorporate widened central medians with structural elements,
and the boulevard areas should be structured to emphasize the themes of the entry
point. Coordination with the adjacent built form is essential to achieving a unified impact.
•
CW Leach Road
The north/south segment of this road should be designed to soften the border to the
employment area and the streetscape should minimize the intrusion of the commercial
uses on the adjacent recreational community. Again, this could use a divided roadway
with increased plantings to soften the transition.
The following two areas have been identified for further investigation and planning:
•
Tottenham Road provides the principal access to the Honda Canada Plant. The Town is
particularly concerned that the streetscape on this road reflects this premiere industry. A
special study of the streetscape and the long-term development of this frontage needs to
be undertaken with input from the management of Honda Canada.
•
The County Road 10 frontage between MacKenzie Pioneer Road and 14th Concession
Road provides another important face for the community. The integration of the
streetscape elements and the built form of this area needs to undergo further
consideration for the overall benefit of the community.
7.3.4
Built Form
The built form should strive to enhance the themes of the Secondary Plan. This can be done in
several ways.
Built form at County Road 10 and Victoria Street should emphasize the neighbourhood gateway
at this location. A strong presence to the intersection should be encouraged; buildings should
focus on the intersection, not one specific road. Site landscaping should further emphasize this
focus on the intersection.
Although an enhanced streetscape is proposed for C.W. Leach Road, the built form for the
intersection of C.W. Leach at Highway 89 should not emphasize the road’s collector nature.
The built form should address Highway 89 as a linear transportation facility. Corner
development should address Highway 89, rather than C.W. Leach Road. The Secondary Plan
does not encourage more use of C.W. Leach Road than necessary; rather, it provides access
for knowledgeable motorists. The County Road 10 route should be encouraged as the principal
access point to the employment area.
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The built form at the intersection of 14th Concession Road and County Road 10 should address
the prominence of this intersection. Both roads should be treated with equal importance and the
built form should address the intersection rather than one specific street. On-site landscaping
should reinforce this perspective.
Built form along County Road 10 needs special consideration, as access to County Road 10 will
be limited. Individual development will address to cross roads or will back onto the county road,
implying special attention to the site plan such that the back yard is not directed to the county
road.
7.4
THE COST OF URBAN ENHANCEMENT PROPOSALS
The costs associated with the streetscape initiatives set out in this Master Servicing Plan have
been estimated and are presented in Table 7.1. These costs, which are exclusive of land costs,
represent 2007 values and have not been escalated for future construction.
Table 7-1 - Costs of Selected Urban Enhancement Works*
Item
Description
2015
2026
Ultimate
Studies
5.1.1
Gateway Preliminary Design Study
$56,000
5.1.2
County Road 10 Streetscape Guidelines
$31,000
5.1.3
Tottenham Road Streetscape Guidelines
5.1.4
C.W. Leach Road Streetscape Guidelines
$31,000
$25,000
Gateway Construction
5.2.1
Gateway - County Road 10 North
$366,000
5.2.2
Gateway - County Road 10 South
$297,000
5.2.3
Gateway - Highway 89
$366,000
5.2.4
C.W. Leach Road Streetscape Construction
$522,000
5.2.5
14th Concession Road Gateway
$263,000
5.2.6
MacKenzie Pioneer Road Gateway
$263,000
* Limits of proposed streetscape should be reviewed in conjunction with Figure A3.2-Transportation Plan, Section 10-Addendum,
due to revised road configurations subsequent to OPA 29 approval in November 2005.
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7.5
NOISE CONCERNS
7.5.1
Nature of the Concern
The Secondary Plan area is located on an agricultural space between existing industrial uses
and a life-style retirement community; a regionally significant provincial highway borders the site
to the north. Two areas of noise concerns have been raised by the development.
Development of the Secondary Plan will be accompanied by substantial increases in traffic
volumes. The traffic on these existing and proposed roads will produce increased noise levels,
the impact of which is carried beyond the boundaries of the Study Area as the traffic travels
through areas beyond the Secondary Plan.
The land uses proposed for the Secondary Plan could also be a source of stationary generated
noise. Unabated, the noise can travel beyond the boundaries of the Secondary Plan.
Strategies and policies may be required to address these concerns. For this review, it was
assumed that the area surrounding Alliston was representative of a Class 2 Area (MOE 1997).
7.5.2
Traffic Noise
Traffic projections were prepared as part of the transportation section of this plan. Those
presented on Figure 3.12 are indicative of the ultimate development of the Secondary Plan.
For purposes of the noise impact assessment, only the arterial and collector roadways were
considered, consistent with MOE’s policies and publications for Noise Assessment in Land Use
Planning (MOE 1997).
The provincially sponsored noise prediction model, ORNAMENT, was used to predict the
potential road noise levels. Approximate noise contours were plotted on maps of the Study
Area (see Figure 7.3).
7.5.3
Site Noise
The province of Ontario set specific guidelines for the noise generated from individual industrial
sites. The guidelines indicate that noise levels generated by new operation should not exceed
an equivalent noise level of 50 dBA during normal daytime working hours (07:00 – 19:00) or
45dBA in the evening hours at the boundaries to that site.
The provincial policy also allows noise levels up to the ambient background levels. The ambient
levels are subject to creep over time. This is of concern, as the Town does not want to
encourage a gradual worsening of its auditory environment.
The site-generated noise levels have been combined with the predicted traffic noise levels to
create an envelope of potential future noise contours around the Secondary Plan area.
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7.4.4
Noise Strategy
Development of the Secondary Plan area will need to deal with both interim and long-term noise
impact concerns.
Interim Concerns
On a short-term basis, development must be respectful of the existing land uses, particularly
residential uses, which could be impacted by ongoing development. Noise impact statements,
which should be required for new development constructed near existing homes, identify any
potential sources of noise that may impact the homes in the vicinity of the development. Site
design should take into account the location of the existing uses when locating on-site noise
producers, such as dust collectors, fans, loading docks, or other activities of the new industry.
Where there is a potential for noise impacts, a complete impact study may be required. The
detailed study might be required to define the ambient noise exposures, and the study should
address the quality of the anticipated noise and information about the persistence and
magnitude of the noise. The study would also be required to address mitigation measures to
protect the quality of life for the existing residents.
Longer Term Strategies
On the longer-term basis, the Plan has to address the impact of full development.
To reduce the potential for auditory environment deterioration over time, the Town wants to
establish noise target limits. Bands of maximum acceptable noise contours have been set in
Figure 7.3. Any new development near the borders of this Secondary Plan should demonstrate
that they would not, in combination with the build out of the Secondary Plan, exceed these
limits.
The Town encourages industries with the potential to create higher noise levels to locate
centrally within the Secondary Plan area such that their impact at the boundaries of the area will
be lessened. To reinforce this land use solution to noise concerns, the Secondary Plan has
designated core areas, and those areas adjacent to existing industries, as “General Industrial”.
A band of light industrial and commercial uses surround the core area to provide a transition to
the land uses and minimize the potential for impacts.
Complementary to the location of the land uses, a major arterial road has been located central
to the Secondary Plan. Additionally, Highway 89 is expected to provide a major transportation
route. As the land uses in vicinity to Highway 89 have already adapted to this transportation
facility, they will suffer less impact than other facility options.
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7.6
LIGHT POLLUTION
7.6.1
Concerns
As an area develops, there are pressures to increase the level of ambient lighting in that area.
New residential areas bring the need to light streets for traffic and to mitigate safety concerns.
Individual residents light their homes, inside and outside, as part of their normal lives. Such
lighting increases the use of exterior spaces, provides for safety and security, and serves
aesthetic interests. Commercial developments’ lighting illuminates external areas, provides
signage, and features to attract patrons.
While some level of added lighting is to be expected from urban growth, it is important to
consider the point at which the level of lighting intrudes on the rights and enjoyment of others.
New Tecumseth is largely a rural area. The expansion of its urban centres and those of
adjacent municipalities raises the potential for added levels of ambient night-light, or “Urban
Glow”. New development can also increase potential for direct light intrusion on adjacent
properties resulting from poorly designed or improperly maintained lighting fixtures.
7.6.2
Extent of the Problem
7.6.2.1 Theoretical Assessment
The International Dark-Sky Association has developed a generalized model to evaluate the
contribution of various centres on the darkness of the night skies (Oesper 1996). Used to
evaluate and develop new sites for astronomical observatories, the model has also been used
by the British Astronomical Association to evaluate its “Dark Skies” initiative.
Two observation points were selected near the Secondary Plan area: the first point represents
residential development in the Briar Hill / Green Briar developments, a life-style community
designed to emphasize its rural ambience; and the second site represents a high point of land
overlooking Alliston, which is typical of rural residences in the area. These homes enjoy a
naturally dark sky associated with their rural location.
The latitude and longitude of the two observation points and those for various municipalities in
Southern Ontario were used to calculate distances used in the analysis.
The calculations for the urban glow illustrate that the closer the urban centre is to the
observation site and the larger the population, the greater the impact that the area will have on
the darkness of the sky at the observer. Due to its proximity, Alliston will account for 51% of the
increased light at the observation sites. As the community develops and increases its
population by 9640 persons, the urban glow is expected to increase by 45%.
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The darkness of local skies will not be impacted by growth of the Alliston Community alone. A
doubling of the population of Barrie (i.e.118,000 person increase), located approximately 33
kilometres from the site, will increase the ambient light by ±2.6%. A proposed 25,000 person
growth of Holland Landing will increase the ambient light by ±0.8%
Table 7-2 - Impact of Development on Ambient Night Light Levels
Observer Location
Nearby Rural Location
Briar Hill Location
Existing
Level of
Light
Pollution
(I)*
With Development
of Residential
Secondary Plan
Area
With Industrial/
Commercial
Secondary Plan
Area
9640 added
population
9640 + 22500
added equivalent
pop.
100,000 in
Brampton
50,000 in
Barrie
10.770
18.287
7.605
7.630
(42.66% increase)
(142.22% increase)
(0.74%
increase)
(1.06%
increase)
11.886
20.899
8.076
8.117
(48.12% increase)
(160.42% increase)
(0.64%
increase)
(1.15%
increase)
7.550
8.025
Other Development Alone
* I = Increase in Sky Glow (unitless)
7.6.3
Approaching a Solution
Development in Alliston alone will not significantly impact light pollution levels; nighttime light
pollution is a wider-based issue that must be dealt with on a provincial level. The solution to
nighttime light pollution can be mitigated through the adoption of stringent lighting design
standards for each municipality.
These standards must balance a number of concerns, including:
•
Community safety and security concerns
•
Access and travel concerns
•
Power usage and operational costs
•
Marketing issues
•
Community aesthetics
•
Property and personal impacts
The issues can also extend to employment and lifestyle trends as people make greater use of
nighttime hours for commerce, work, and entertainment.
The continuation of the existing practices toward light pollution will not mitigate future pollution
concerns. Once installed, little can be done to reduce lighting levels. Therefore, the long-term
solution lies with preventative or proactive measures.
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As previously discussed, the increase in light pollution levels due to the growth of the Alliston
community will impact the immediate adjacent area. Two actions should be taken to reduce
potential light pollution, as follows.
Review of Current Standards and Practices
A review of the current Town practices focused on road lighting standards and site development
standard should be undertaken.
For the road lighting standards, the following issues should be addressed.
1. Whether Road Lighting standards are excessive in terms of the Highway Traffic Act and
recognized standards for roadway lighting.
2. Whether light level standards can be reduced in such a way that safety is not
compromised.
3. Whether different standards can, or ought to be used in Industrial / Commercial areas
than in residential communities.
4. Whether there are fixture types that do not shed as much light above the horizontal
plane.
5. Whether road lighting standards can be modified to reflect ambient site lighting
standards.
6. Whether landscape can be used to reduce reflected light pollution.
The second part of the review should focus on site lighting design and should involve a review
of the current policy on site lighting design. The study needs to balance sight access/safety
concerns with pollution to night skies by site lighting. The review of the current guidelines
should review:
1. Current industry standards for safe community planning.
2. Trade offs of light pollution issues with site safety and protection.
3. Processes for Building Permits.
The current guide of site lighting practices should be reviewed to reflect emerging illumination
practices based on good design in use elsewhere, but it should also attempt to incorporate local
examples of good and poor lighting practices. For example, the Baxter Building on Dominion
Street provides good low levels of downward directed lighting providing adequate light for safety
and focuses on the architectural features of the site while reducing the impact on surrounding
areas and on general levels of light pollution. In contrast, the wall-mounted lights of the SPL
Terminal building eliminate large areas by flooding the areas with light. There is little concern in
the design to controlling the light to the site itself. Other sites, such as the Sobey’s store or the
roof lights on the McDonald’s store, actually create upward directed light that contributes
significantly to night sky light pollution.
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The potential for considerably more light pollution exists within the Industrial/Commercial
Secondary Plan. This is an appropriate time to reduce its impacts including training staff to be
sensitive to this issue and encouraging the on-going mitigation of this problem.
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Conclusions and Recommendations
8.0
Conclusions and Recommendations
8.1
CONCLUSIONS
The Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan provides the Town of New Tecumseth with a
plan to provide employment lands for the entire town over a long planning period and will assist
with the allocation of a variety of land uses and parcel selection for an estimated period in
excess of 20 years. This long-term planning of the area also enables the Town to develop a
long-term vision for the servicing of this urban expansion area. The purpose of this document is
to set out a Master Plan for the servicing of the designated area.
The Master Servicing Plan document was prepared in support of OPA #29, which was adopted
by the Town in 2003 and approved by the County in November 2005. Since that time,
numerous revisions have occurred within the Study Area, which are discussed in greater detail
within Section 10 – Addendum. The revisions do not affect the basic tenets and
recommendations set out within this document.
The Planning Process
The planning process employed for the Secondary Plan and this accompanying Master
Servicing Plan followed the integrated Class Environmental Assessment for the new
infrastructure. The planning also integrated its efforts with several other initiatives toward major
infrastructure in the Alliston area (e.g. Sewage Treatment Master Plan, Transportation Master
Plan, Class EA for County Road 10 Realignment).
The basis of the Master Servicing Plan is the land use plan developed in conjunction with the
Secondary Plan. This sets out a mix of uses, primarily of an employment nature (263.2 ha of
light and general industrial land use and 69.2 ha of commercial uses), together with minimal
residential land (13.4 ha) and hazard uses, roads, and municipal service lands. In total,
approximately 451.2 ha of land have been defined in the Secondary Plan area.
The Transportation Plan
Although serviced on the periphery by several arterial and provincial highways, the anticipated
traffic generated by the site (i.e. approximately 35,000 vehicle trips per day in 2015 and growing
to 93,000 vehicle trips per day upon ultimate development), will stretch the capacity of localized
sections of the road network. The traffic generated by the site over reasonable time frames is
more manageable. Awareness of the longer-term traffic potential will allow longer-range traffic
and transportation planning to be initiated, which should include Travel Demand Management
(TDM) techniques to reduce the anticipated growth in traffic volume in the future.
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The new alignment of County Road 10 provides a transportation link that is vital to the full
development of the Secondary Plan. The further development of Highway 89 (Victoria Street)
and 14th Concession Road reinforces the local arterial road network, while the extension of C.W.
Leach Road provides a collector function through the core of the Secondary Plan. The
development of an arterial/local road network within the Study Area will also assist in reducing
traffic growth along the Victoria Street/Highway 89 corridor. The proposed road system provides
a balance of access and movement and is adaptable to changes in travel patterns in the future.
Alternate transportation by way of a trail system is both proposed and encouraged to facilitate
pedestrian and cyclist movements and to reduce dependency of vehicular travel to promote a
sustainable transportation system within the Town. From the perspective of this plan, instigating
a transit option may not be feasible; rather, existing transit by way of highway coach should be
encouraged in the context of the employment area. While it is not anticipated that rail service
will play a significant role in the development of this area, there are options available in this
respect that could be pursued should specific needs arise.
Water Supply and Distribution
The Town has sufficient water supplies available through its agreements with the Town of
Collingwood to service the ultimate development of the Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan.
In the immediate future, the Town will still be served by the average day flow from the
Collingwood transmission main, and the well system will continue to supplement this supply to
meet peak period demands.
It is estimated that the Secondary Plan area will use an average of 5,085 m3/d by 2015, which is
slightly less than the current agreed minimum supply from the Collingwood transmission main
(i.e., 6,000 m3/d). An average day demand for the area is expected to increase by
approximately 1,500 m3/d by the end of the 20-year planning horizon.
The ‘Water Distribution and Storage Master Plan’ has been completed by MacViro (June 2007)
and should be referenced when applying the recommendations in this Report. The supply of
sufficient water storage capacity is essential to future growth. For full development of the
Alliston Residential Secondary Plan, approximately 1,539 m3 of storage is required. The
proposed development of the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan would see an
additional need of 3,177 m3 by year 2015, and requiring 3,992 m3 by 2020. The need for water
storage can be satisfied through the construction of the 4,500 m3 storage at the Parson’s Road
site immediately and later construction of an additional 5,200 m3 of storage in the
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area by approximately year 2015. This scheme
eliminates a storage facility previously planned for a location north of the Boyne River at Sir
Fredrick Banting Road.
The Town is becoming dependant on the transmission main from Collingwood, further
consideration on the reliability of the supply should be explored. In the case of a break in the
system, the Town will need to ensure there is sufficient water in Town to service the Town’s
needs while the pipeline is repaired.
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VOLUME 4 – MASTER SERVICING PLAN
Conclusions and Recommendations
The distribution of water to the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area will be from
the Parson’s Road centralized facility. A new feeder main constructed on Albert Street will
augment the supplies on Victoria Street and on Industrial Parkway. A new booster pumping
station in the employment area will be needed to address friction losses in to the area, and a
system of larger diameter watermains is proposed in the Secondary Plan area to meet the
area’s varied demands. The pumping capacities of the Parson’s Road facility will need to be
addressed as development proceeds and increased demands are placed on the Parson’s Road
facility.
The Sewage System
The flatness of the Secondary Plan area has a significant impact on the provision of sewers in
the development area. The lack of relief results in very deep sewers and/or the need for
numerous pumping facilities. The proposed plan services the Secondary Plan area in four
roughly equal quadrants. Originally, each of the quadrants was intended to be serviced by a
pumping station, with the southeast quadrant’s pumping facilities (equalization tank)
incorporated into the Regional Wastewater Treatment Plant. As a result of updates within the
Secondary Plan area, the number of pumping stations has been revised, see Section 10 –
Addendum. Due to the extended period of time over which the area is anticipated to develop,
the construction of the pumping facilities will need to be staged.
The depths of sewers will be significantly impacted by adherence to the Town’s minimum
grades criteria. Designing the sewers to meet velocity criteria, and not adhering strictly to the
minimum grades, will reduce the depths of the systems from two to four metres.
The ultimate treatment needs of the Secondary Plan area alone are ±16,300 m3/d of average
dry weather flow. Approximately 4,516 m3/d of treatment capacity will be required by year 2015.
The draft Wastewater Master Plan indicates that the Regional Wastewater Plant should be able
to meet these needs through plant expansions in 5,000 m3/d increments.
Other initiatives for handling wastewater effluent and for the reduction of sewage demand have
been examined. Several of these need further study before their feasibility can be ensured.
Stormwater Management
The Secondary Plan area is severely constrained by the flatness of the site and will be very
difficult to service. Source control of runoff will be crucial to the servicing scheme for the area.
Limited geotechnical data from the site indicates that infiltration may assist to reduce storm
runoff but this will be dependant on the site soil conditions.
An integrated approach to storm drainage will be required. A system of open channels
supplement the conventional piped sewer system. High hydraulic grade lines can be tolerated
in this area due to the absence of basements.
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Conclusions and Recommendations
The receiving watercourses are classified as cool and coldwater habitat requiring “Enhanced
Level Protection”. Release rates will restrict post to pre-development flows only for the 2 to 100year return periods on the Boyne and Nottawasaga Rivers, due to the relative times to the peak
of the flood flow. Complete controls will be required on the other watercourses. Standards
have also been followed for Quality and Erosion Criteria.
Natural Heritage Resources
The natural heritage study provides a necessary framework for viable land use and servicing
options. The resources of the site are primarily confined to the river valleys of the Nottawasaga
River, the Boyne River, and Spring Creek. The Nottawasaga River and Boyne River valleys are
designated in the County’s Greenlands System and are protected from development.
The Secondary Plan study area has been classified into three categories, as set out in Figure
7.1. Category 1 areas are part of the County’s Greenland system and are essentially
undevelopable due to the presence of fish habitat and steep slopes. Category 2 areas have not
been designated in any other policy documents but may provide some supportive or
supplemental functions to the core areas or to local wildlife populations. These areas require
further evaluation at the site plan stage. Category 3 areas represent no constraint to
development other than the application of Best Management Practices for stormwater and
sediment controls.
It was concluded that development of much of the subject lands is feasible from a natural
heritage perspective. A preliminary assessment of development opportunities addressed the
general requirements or options for stormwater management design, tree preservation,
setbacks and buffers, and monitoring of the natural environment.
Urban Design
A number of urban design issues from the new Urban Design Guidelines can be implemented
immediately in the development of the Secondary Plan. There are several levels of ‘gateways’
that are appropriate in the planning area. In addition, other focal points should be implemented
as part of the built component of the urban design. Landscape elements of the streetscape
should be used to enhance specific entry points. Landscape elements should also be used to
address concerns about the integration of various existing and future uses.
Noise Concerns
The development of the Secondary Plan has the potential to substantially increase the level of
noise pollution in the area. The noise is primarily a result of traffic, but also emanates from
stationary industrial activities.
The policies of the Secondary Plan need to consider both short-term and longer-term noise
impacts. On the immediate basis, the introduction of new activities needs to review the noise
impact on existing residents in the area. The development of the Secondary Plan’s land use
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Conclusions and Recommendations
plan addressed aspects of the longer-term noise environment and locates the loudest potential
uses away from the borders of the subject area. Road patterns are designed to minimize the
intrusion of noise on the quieter adjacent areas.
Light Pollution
The problem of light pollution is not just a local one. The impact of distant urban development
contributes approximately half the ambient nighttime light experienced just outside the
urbanized area of Alliston, and Alliston’s urban expansion is likely to increase the ‘urban glow’
substantially. Part of the local solution is the development of stricter site lighting standards.
The potential to lower lighting levels needs to be investigated further, and the capabilities of
Town staff to deal with these issues need to be improved. Good site lighting designs and
equipment need to be used to control the introduction of more light pollution.
8.2
RECOMMENDATIONS
The following recommendations are set out to facilitate implementation of this Master Servicing
Plan as a means of supporting and implementing the policies of the Secondary Plan. The
recommendations have been organized to correspond to the section headings of this report.
Transportation System
The Transportation System needs to be an integrated system including trail transit and Travel
Demand Management (TDM) techniques, not just relying heavily on a network of roads. The
success of the new urban area will largely depend on the ability of all layers of government to
create an efficient and sustainable transportation system with adequate road infrastructure. It is
recommended that the Town:
3.1
Implement the transportation system as set out in Figure 3.2 and Figure A.3.2 (Section
10) as the preferred road and trail system in the Secondary Plan and through the Official
Plan Amendment.
3.2
Promote further studies and planning efforts between the governing municipalities to
develop regionally based solutions including TDM methods, pedestrian/cycling and
transit plans to accommodate the emerging traffic patterns centered on Alliston.
3.3
Review and update the transportation components of this plan on a regular basis.
3.4
Re-examine and confirm the conclusion of this study five years following the adoption of
this Master Servicing Plan.
3.5
Protect and secure, through the planning process, road rights-of-way (R.O.W.)
compatible with the ultimate road lane requirements as set out in Figure 3.13 of this
Master Servicing Plan.
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Conclusions and Recommendations
3.6
Incorporate the costs of the common interest projects indicated herein in the
Development Charges By-Law for the Town.
Water Supply and Distribution
The water supply to the new employment area is heavily dependent on the centralized system
originate, in town, from the Parson’s Road facility. To expand on that system and service the
Secondary Plan area, it is recommended that the Town:
4.1
Implement the water supply and distribution system as set out in Figure 4.1 and Figure
A.4.1 (Section 10) as the preferred system in the Secondary Plan and through the
Official Plan Amendment.
4.2
Incorporate a new 450 mm diameter watermain into the design for reconstruction of Albert
Street to supply the main feed to the Secondary Plan area.
4.3
Increase the storage capacity of the Parson’s Road facility by 4,500 m3 immediately.
4.4
Monitor the need for the first stage (5,200 m3) of a new water storage facility in the
Secondary Plan area as development continues.
4.5
Undertake a review of the risks associated with the growing dependence on the ‘far
distant source’ represented by the Collingwood transmission main and assess whether a
policy of increased local storage is appropriate.
4.6
Secure adequate land for the development and construction of the pumping and storage
facility in the Secondary Plan area.
4.7
Incorporate the costs of the common interest projects indicated herein in the
Development Charges By-Law for the Town.
Sewage Collection and Treatment
The sewage collection system must address the flat terrain of the site, and the treatment of the
sewage needs to be integrated with the natural resource system that receives the effluent from
the treatment plant, as both impact the development of the Secondary Plan area. In an effort to
guide the servicing of the Secondary Plan, it is recommended that the Town:
5.1
Implement the sewage system as set out in Figure 5.1 and Figure A.5.1 (Section 10)
and as described in Section 5 of this report as the sanitary system in the Secondary Plan
and through the Official Plan Amendment.
5.2
Review Town standards to ensure the most economical design is achieved while
meeting operational concerns of the Town.
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Conclusions and Recommendations
5.3
Monitor the need for water and the resulting sewage flows from the Secondary Plan area
as development continues to confirm the generation rates that form the basis of this
Master Serving Plan. This Plan should be updated to reflect the trend in the actual
sewage generated from the area.
5.4
Consider undertaking a study of a “grey water” system to reduce sewage discharges and
water demand.
5.5
Secure adequate land for the development and construction of the pumping facility in the
Secondary Plan area.
5.6
Incorporate the costs of the common interest projects indicated herein in the
Development Charges By-Law for the Town.
Stormwater Management
An integrated approach to storm water drainage and management is required in the Secondary
Plan area. The preferred plan for stormwater makes use of extensive site controls and various
conveyances systems to handle the runoff. To manage this resource, it is recommended that
the Town:
6.1
Implement the stormwater system as set out in Section 6 of this report and as illustrated
on Figure 6.1 and Figure A.6.1 (Section 10).
6.2
Encourage and require the infiltration of clean precipitation back into the watertable. Any
development shall review how the water balance for the site can be maintained following
construction of the land.
6.3
Designate community based Stormwater Management Facilities that will be designed to
mitigate impacts on the adjacent cool and coldwater fisheries.
6.4
Further investigate, through the development process, the hydraulic requirements for the
combined sewer and open channel conveyance system.
6.5
Set aside adequate land for the construction and maintenance of the open channel
conveyance system.
6.6
Use the target flows and pond data to regulate the design and development of storm
drainage infrastructure.
6.7
Monitor and re-evaluate all elements of the plan as development proceeds.
Environmental Management
Significant natural heritage resources of the Secondary Plan are minimal and generally
restricted to the valley systems of the major watercourses. To protect the available resources
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Conclusions and Recommendations
and enhance the environmental management of the Secondary Plan area, it is recommended
that the Town:
7.1
Permit no development in the Spring Creek, Boyne River, and Nottawasaga River
valleys, except as approved by the Simcoe County Greenland policies and the policies
of the Nottawasaga Valley Conservation Authority.
7.2
Recognize and adhere to the constraints and environmental policies set out for the
environmental classifications shown on Figure 7.1 for any new development in the
Secondary Plan area.
7.3
Complete detailed studies of natural heritage resources for any development impacting
Category 2 lands, shown on Figure 7.1.
7.4
Direct all efforts to ensure that Best Management Practices are followed at the time of
site development.
7.5
Encourage stormwater planning and design to mimic existing water balances as closely
as possible.
7.6
Require tree preservation studies for all new developments.
7.7
Implement and maintain a minimum setback of 30 m from major watercourses or from
the edge of natural riparian vegetation, whichever is greatest, to protect significant fish
habitat.
7.8
Determine the width and type of buffers to Category 1 and retained Category 2 lands at
the site plan stage.
7.9
Implement an Environmental Monitoring Program in conjunction with the Nottawasaga
Valley Conservation Authority for Nottawasaga River, Boyne River and Spring Creek
watercourses.
Urban Streetscape
The development of this new employment district presents an opportunity to implement urban
design principles that will create and enhance the asset for the Town. To implement the
development of a superior urban design of the Secondary Plan area, it is recommended that the
Town:
7.10
Implement the system of gateways set out in this plan and shown on Figure 7.2 in the
design of the roads and the design of the detailed site plans.
7.11
Ensure the built form at specific locations address the issues raised in this Plan at the
detailed site plan stage of any project.
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Conclusions and Recommendations
7.12
Implement enhanced streetscape design for specific sections of roadway set out in this
Plan at the time of design and construction of these road links.
7.13
Implement the system of trails set out on Figure 3.2 with consideration to the integration
of the urban design principles noted herein.
7.14
Complete detailed streetscape studies for Tottenham Road and for County Road 10.
Noise Environment
Accompanying the development of this new employment area will be the generation of
additional noise. To mitigate the impact on the existing and future users of the area, it is
recommended that the Town:
7.15
Implement a requirement for noise statements to identify potential noise sources and
their impact on existing residential receivers.
7.16
Undertake detailed noise studies, where noise impact potentials exist, to investigate the
magnitude of any problems and address mitigating measure.
7.17
Control the location of high noise producing industries to the central portions of
Secondary Plan area where impact will be minimized.
Light Pollution
Also accompanying the development of this new employment area will be the generation of
increased ambient light levels. To mitigate this impact, it is recommended that the Town:
7.18
Undertake a review of current road lighting standards, with a view of decreasing the
required levels on roadways or decreased standards for the industrial areas.
7.19
Review and update the Town policy on lighting of site developments to reduce reflected
light.
7.20
Review opportunities for training staff to identify and prevent light oriented pollution
issues on new developments.
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References
9.0
References
Ainley & Associates. 1997. Town of New Tecumseth, Engineering Design Standard
Specifications and Drawings. New Tecumseth:
Brock McIlroy Planning + Urban Design. 2002. Urban Design Guidelines Town of New
Tecumseth. New Tecumseth:
New Tecumseth, Town of. 2003. Official Plan for the Town of New Tecumseth. New Tecumseth:
Oesper, David. 1996. More About Sky Glow Calculations Using Walker’s Law. International
Dark-Sky Association Information Sheet 112. Tucson, AZ:
Ontario Ministry of the Environment (MOE). 1997. Noise Assessment Criteria in Land Use
Planning, Publication LU-131. Government of Ontario. Toronto:
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Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
ADDENDUM
Table of Contents
A1.0
INTRODUCTION............................................................................................................ 1.1
A2.0
CHANGES WITHIN THE ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL SECONDARY
PLAN ............................................................................................................................. 2.1
A2.1
A2.2
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION .................................................................................... 2.1
COUNTY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM.................. 2.1
A3.0
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM ...................................................................................... 3.1
A3.1
A3.2
A3.3
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION .................................................................................... 3.1
COUNTRY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM ............... 3.1
A3.2.1 Closure of County Road 10 Between Industrial Parkway and Albert Street....... 3.2
A3.2.2 Widening of 14th Line to Four Lanes & Elimination of County Road 10 ReAlignment South of 14th Line ............................................................................. 3.2
TRAIL SYSTEM ............................................................................................................. 3.3
A4.0
WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION ....................................................................... 4.1
A4.1
A4.2
WATER SUPPLY ........................................................................................................... 4.1
WATER DISTRIBUTION ................................................................................................ 4.1
A4.2.1 Removal of 300mm dia. Watermain on Existing County Road 10...................... 4.1
A4.2.2 Removal of Watermains within Honda’s Expansion Lands ................................ 4.1
A4.2.3 Relocation of the 450mm dia.Trunk Watermain along County Road 10 ReAlignment ........................................................................................................... 4.2
A4.2.4 Adjustment of the 300mm dia. Watermain South of 14th Line ............................ 4.2
A5.0
SEWAGE COLLECTION AND TREATMENT ............................................................... 5.1
A5.1
A5.2
A5.3
A5.4
PUMPING STATION C/D............................................................................................... 5.1
PUMPING STATION A/B ............................................................................................... 5.2
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION .................................................................................... 5.2
COUNTY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM.................. 5.3
A6.0
STORMWATER MANAGEMENT .................................................................................. 6.1
LIST OF TABLES
Table A5-1 - Staged Sanitary Design Flows and Pumping Station Requirements ....................5.1
LIST OF FIGURES
Figure A3-2 – Transportation Plan Addendum
Figure A4-1 – Water Distribution System Addendum
Figure A5-1 – Sanitary Collection and Treatment System Addendum
Figure A6-1 – Stormwater Drainage and Management Addendum
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4.3
5.3
6.2
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Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
ADDENDUM
A1.0 INTRODUCTION
On November 22, 2005, the County of Simcoe approved (with modifications) the Town of New
Tecumseth’s Official Plan Amendment (OPA 29), the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary
Plan. The approved Land Use Plan is described within Chapter 2.0 ‘Basis of the Plan’ of the
Master Servicing Plan and is illustrated on Figure 2.1.
The Master Servicing Plan as presented within this report is based on the approved Land Use
Plan and road configuration.
The purpose of this Addendum is to address recent changes within the approved Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan to provide an update to the servicing alignments and
road network, where required, as a result of the changes.
The Master Servicing Report has not been directly revised to account for the recent changes
since the Report has been completed to support the Land Use Plan in its approved state.
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ADDENDUM
A2.0 CHANGES WITHIN THE ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL
SECONDARY PLAN
Following OPA 29 approval on November 22, 2005 certain developments came to fruition,
which directly influenced the locations of proposed servicing alignments and road network
shown within the Master Servicing Report.
The changes to the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area subsequent to
approval, which impact the Master Servicing Report, are discussed below.
A2.1
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION
In May 2006, Honda Canada announced their intention to construct a new manufacturing facility
adjacent to their existing facility located in the northeast quadrant of Industrial Parkway and
Tottenham Road.
Honda’s new facility is intended to occupy the majority of the western half of the Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, spanning across the existing County Road 10
(Tottenham Road) and connecting to their existing facility.
Based on land sales history provided by the website www.geowarehouse.ca, a land database
service from Teranet Enterprises Inc., Honda Canada has recently purchased several farms
within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, between the proposed County
Road 10 re-alignment and Tottenham Road. The extent of Honda’s land purchases are
identified within the Addendum’s servicing figures.
A2.2
COUNTY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM
In June 2002, the County of Simcoe’s Environmental Study Report (ESR) for the re-alignment of
County Road 10 was approved. The approved alignment connected the existing County Road
10, south of 14th Line to Highway 89, directly through the centre of the Alliston Industrial/
Commercial Secondary Plan area.
The proposed re-alignment of County Road 10 is the main north-south spine road within the
Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area. The June 2002 approved alignment forms
the basis for all traffic generation and distribution analysis completed within the Master Servicing
Report.
As details of Honda’s proposed facility expansion became known, Simcoe County re-visited the
approved County Road 10 re-alignment and completed an Addendum to their approved ESR,
prepared by McCormick Rankin Corporation, dated August 2006.
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ADDENDUM
CHANGES WITHIN THE ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL/COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
The Addendum proposes an adjusted configuration for the new County Road 10 re-alignment
through the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, as well as the closure of the
existing County Road 10 between Industrial Parkway and Albert Street.
The closure of existing County Road 10 enables Honda’s proposed expansion to spread across
the existing right-of-way unimpeded.
The implications of these new developments on the proposed servicing alignments and road
network within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area are discussed in the
following sections.
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ADDENDUM
A3.0 TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
Perhaps the greatest impact on any component of the Master Servicing Plan due to the
changes noted within Section A2.0 is the revision to the proposed road network.
This section describes the proposed changes with respect to the road network and trail system
within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area due to Honda Canada’s proposed
expansion and the County Road 10 – Environmental Study Report Addendum.
A3.1
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION
The recent land acquisitions undertaken by Honda Canada to facilitate their plant expansion has
a direct impact on the proposed local industrial road network shown within the Master Servicing
Plan.
Honda’s new land holdings now extend from existing County Road 10 to the west, new County
Road 10 re-alignment to the east, 14th Line to the south and MacKenzie Pioneer Road to the
north.
The large expanse of property owned by Honda negates the requirement for a local industrial
road network west of the County Road 10 re-alignment, which would otherwise be located within
Honda’s lands. Therefore, all local industrial roads west of County Road 10 re-alignment have
been removed with the exception of the local industrial roads not located within Honda’s lands,
see Figure A3-2.
The removal of these local industrial roads does not have a negative impact on overall traffic
circulation through the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area. Replacing the local
industrial roads west of County Road 10 re-alignment will be one road access serving Honda’s
expanded facility, approximately a third of the distance north of 14th Line, on the east side of
County Road 10 re-alignment. Preliminary design details and traffic generation/distribution
analysis can be found within the August 2006 ESR Addendum.
A3.2
COUNTRY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM
Based on the August 2006 Environmental Study Report Addendum, prepared by McCormick
Rankin, the following summarizes the proposed changes to the approved ESR and clarifies the
impact on the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area as a result of the changes.
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ADDENDUM
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
A3.2.1 Closure of County Road 10 Between Industrial Parkway and Albert Street
To facilitate Honda’s seamless plant expansion across the existing municipal right-of-way,
County Road 10 will be closed at the south side of Albert Street and at the north side of
Industrial Parkway. The intersections of County Road 10 / Industrial Parkway and County Road
10 / Albert Street will operate as T-intersections following the closure.
The analysis undertaken within the Master Servicing Report did not anticipate the closure of
County Road 10, thus traffic distribution results presented in the Report are representative of a
traffic network which includes County Road 10 as an open roadway.
The revised traffic distribution analysis has been completed within McCormick Rankin’s County
Road 10 Environmental Study Report Addendum, August 2006 to reflect the proposed road
closure. Therefore, this Master Servicing Report Addendum directs the reader to the above
noted ESR Addendum for details on the revised traffic analysis.
A3.2.2 Widening of 14th Line to Four Lanes & Elimination of County Road 10 ReAlignment South of 14th Line
The ESR Addendum proposes the widening of 14th Line from 2 lanes to 4 lanes between
existing County Road 10 and new County Road 10 re-alignment through the Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, for a distance of approximately 750m. The
proposed widening design replaces the section of new County Road 10 re-alignment previously
shown south of 14th Line by the approved ESR.
The widening of 14th Line to 4 lanes in concert with the elimination of the proposed section of
new County Road 10 re-alignment south of 14th Line forms the main change presented by the
ESR Addendum with respect to the re-alignment of County Road 10.
The Master Servicing Report presents the proposed road network and traffic distribution
analysis based on the approved County Road 10 re-alignment shown in the June 2002 ESR.
With respect to the details of the revised traffic analysis reflecting the updated road alignment
and widening, the reader is directed to McCormick Rankin’s County Road 10 Environmental
Study Report Addendum, August 2006.
The removal of County Road 10 re-alignment south of 14th Line provides for larger blocks of
land available for development. Depending on the nature and size of the potential industrial
developments within the lands south of 14th Line, a new local industrial road intersecting with
14th Line may be required to service these lands.
The recent changes to the design elements of County Road 10’s re-alignment and a schematic
local road alignment south of 14th Line are shown on Figure A3-2.
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ADDENDUM
TRANSPORTATION SYSTEM
A3.3
TRAIL SYSTEM
The Town’s trail system will typically be constructed within the municipal right-of-way or on a
separate alignment as shown within the Master Servicing Report. The trail system north of 14th
Line will remain unchanged.
Due to the relocation of County Road 10 re-alignment along 14th Line and the resulting
elimination of County Road 10 re-alignment south of 14th Line, the trail system has been
adjusted to follow the major roads.
The revised trail system configuration at the south portion of the Alliston Industrial/Commercial
Secondary Plan area is described below:
•
East-west alignment along 14th Line from the re-aligned County Road 10 to existing
County Road 10.
•
North-south alignment along existing County Road 10 from 14th Line/Industrial Parkway
to approximately 500m southerly.
•
East-west alignment extension along the southern limit of the Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area connecting to existing County Road 10.
The revised alignments noted above are recommended alternatives as a result of the
elimination of County Road 10 re-alignment south of 14th Line, see Figure A3-2. The final trail
system alignment shall be determined by the Town.
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3.3
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
ADDENDUM
A4.0 WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION
The Master Servicing Report analyzed the water supply and distribution options and presented
the preferred alternative based on the approved Land Use Plan (Nov. 2005) for OPA 29.
This section will examine the revisions to water supply and distribution scheme within the
Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, based on the changes described within
Section A2.0.
For detailed design purposes, the Town-wide ‘Water Distribution and Storage Master Plan’,
prepared by Genivar (formerly MacViro) on behalf of the Town in 2007 shall be referenced.
A4.1
WATER SUPPLY
The source of water for the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area is not affected
by the recent changes resulting from the Honda plant expansion and County Road 10
Environmental Study Report Addendum.
The proposed water storage facility located just east of the re-aligned County Road 10 and
south of MacKenzie Pioneer Road is not within Honda’s land holdings, therefore it should
remain in the location provided by the Master Servicing Report.
A4.2
WATER DISTRIBUTION
The water distribution alignments within the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area
were aligned within the right-of-ways to the proposed road network within the Plan. As a result
of the road alignment changes, the location of watermains within the Plan require revision as
well.
A4.2.1 Removal of 300mm dia. Watermain on Existing County Road 10
Due to the easterly expansion of Honda Canada’s facility across the existing municipal right-ofway for County Road 10 and up to the re-aligned County Road 10, the existing 300mm diameter
watermain along existing County Road 10 shall be removed between Albert Street to the north
and Industrial Parkway to the south. The watermain removal limits coincides with the proposed
road closure limits for existing County Road 10.
A4.2.2 Removal of Watermains within Honda’s Expansion Lands
The Master Servicing Report provided a water distribution network of 300mm diameter
watermains aligned within the right-of-ways of the proposed local industrial roads west of the
County Road 10 re-alignment.
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4.1
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 - MASTER SERVICING PLAN
ADDENDUM
WATER SUPPLY AND DISTRIBUTION
As a result of Honda’s land purchase and plant expansion into the western half of the Alliston
Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, the majority of the local industrial roads west of
County Road 10 re-alignment were removed along with the proposed 300mm diameter
watermain network associated with these, since they were no longer required.
A4.2.3 Relocation of the 450mm dia.Trunk Watermain along County Road 10 ReAlignment
With the removal of the 300mm diameter watermains west of County Road 10 re-alignment,
watermains to the east of the spine road no longer completed the looped water distribution
system as shown within the Master Servicing Report.
In order to provide a looped watermain system, the north-south 450mm diameter trunk
watermain is relocated from the internal local road to the east of County Road 10 re-alignment
to the spine road itself. The watermain along the internal local road to the east of County Road
10 re-alignment shall be replaced with the standard 300mm diameter watermain.
The addition of a new north-south watermain connecting MacKenzie Pioneer Road to 14th Line
replaces the interconnectivity lost by the removal of the existing 300mm diameter watermain
along existing County Road 10.
A4.2.4 Adjustment of the 300mm dia. Watermain South of 14th Line
The proposed 300mm diameter watermain located south of 14th Line as shown within the
Master Servicing Report followed the configuration of County Road 10 re-alignment.
As a result of the elimination of County Road 10 re-alignment south of 14th Line, the proposed
watermain requires adjustment to suit a revised local industrial road pattern.
This Addendum assumes that industrial development south of 14th Line will require a network of
standard 300mm diameter watermains. The location of the proposed watermains are
schematically aligned within the local industrial roads.
The revised watermain distribution plan is illustrated on Figure A4-1.
November 2008
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4.2
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
ADDENDUM
A5.0 SEWAGE COLLECTION AND TREATMENT
The Master Servicing Plan depicts four distinct sanitary drainage areas labeled Catchments ‘A’,
‘B’, ‘C’ and ‘D’. These catchments generally divide the Alliston Industrial/Commercial
Secondary Plan area into four equally sized areas.
The four Catchment areas direct sanitary drainage via gravity sewers to two proposed pumping
stations named ‘PS C/D’ and ‘PS A/B’. Both pumping stations direct sanitary drainage to the
headworks of the expanded Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility. Based on the recent
WWTF expansion design by R.V. Anderson, it should be noted the WWTF can only accept
sanitary drainage via forcemain, i.e. no gravity drainage can be accepted.
The following sections describe the revisions to the sanitary collection system due to the
changes described in Section A2.0.
A5.1
PUMPING STATION C/D
With the proposed expansion of Honda Canada manufacturing facility into the western half of
the Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area, it is proposed that pumping stations C
and D will be combined into one pumping station (PS C/D), which will be located within the
western half of Catchment D, as shown in Figure A5-1. PS C/D will collect sanitary flows from
Catchment Areas C and D. PS C/D will pump the sewage directly to the headworks of the
expanded Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility.
Combining the pumping stations would result in capital and annual cost savings for the pump
station, forcemains and gravity sewers. In order to accommodate one PS, the depth of the inlet
sewer will have to be increased by approximately 1.5m – 2.5m, but this increased cost will be
offset by the reduced length of forcemain that would have been required by 2 separate stations.
PS C/D will be sized to accommodate the full buildout flows to that station; however, given the
timeframe for the full development of the area, the pumps will need to be staged to suit the initial
needs of the area. Table A5-1 below shows the projected flows and the requirements for the
different stages of Pump Station C/D.
Table A5-1 - Staged Sanitary Design Flows and Pumping Station C/D Requirements
Stage
Peak Flow (L/s)
No. of Pumps
Duty / Standby
Min. Wet Well
Capacity (m3)
1 (2015)
71
2
1/1
11
2 (2026)
121
2
1/1
18
3 (Ultimate)
282
4
3/1
36
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5.1
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 - MASTER SERVICING PLAN
ADDENDUM
SEWAGE COLLECTION AND TREATMENT
PS C/D should be designed with two interconnected wetwells of equal size. Stage 1 and 2 will
use the first wetwell and stage three for the ultimate flow condition will use both wetwells. The
wetwell volume requirement is based on the largest pump size (121 (L/s)) with a minimum pump
cycle time of 10 minutes at the peak inflow rate. The pumps should be submersible with variable
frequency drives.
In order to meet the sanitary flow requirements, the PS will require a 300 mm diameter
forcemain for stages 1 and 2. Stage 3 will require a second parallel 350 mm diameter
forcemain.
To determine more accurate timing of stage 2 and 3, a monitoring program should be
implemented to monitor and evaluate the flow requirements.
A5.2
PUMPING STATION A/B
Based on recent detailed design of the Regional Wastewater Treatment Facility expansion by
R.V. Anderson Associates Ltd., the equalization tank discussed within the WWTF Class EA
(Stantec 2005) has not be included as part of the expansion plans. Therefore, the sanitary
drainage strategy within Catchments A & B has been revised to accommodate the
Catchments A & B shall direct sanitary flows via gravity sewer to Pumping Station A/B, which
replaces the previously proposed Pump Station B and Equalization Tank. Pump Station A/B
should be centrally located along the 14th Concession corridor and has been shown
schematically in the location of the previous Equalization Tank.
To accommodate the ultimate design discharge (peak flow) of 147 L/s, three 125L/s pumps will
be required. Pumping Station A/B will direct sanitary drainage directly to the headworks of the
expanded WWTF via a 300mm diameter forcemain.
Detailed design criteria, staging considerations and preferred location based on property
constraints/opportunities for the pumping station will be considered at the Draft Plan/Site Plan
stage.
A5.3
HONDA CANADA EXPANSION
The proposed expansion of Honda Canada’s manufacturing facility into the western half of the
Alliston Industrial/Commercial Secondary Plan area will occupy sections of both sanitary
Catchments ‘B’ and ‘D’. The dividing line separating ‘B’ and ‘D’ is aligned in an east-west
configuration, approximately 400m north of 14th Line, directly through Honda’s land.
As part of this Addendum, the alignment of the catchment boundary separating ‘B’ and ‘D’ will
not be revised to encapsulate Honda Canada’s land holdings within one catchment area.
Keeping the original sanitary division as presented within the Master Servicing Plan provides
Honda’s lands with the flexibility to direct sanitary drainage to both Catchments ‘B’ and ‘D’.
November 2008
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5.2
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
VOLUME 4 - MASTER SERVICING PLAN
ADDENDUM
SEWAGE COLLECTION AND TREATMENT
Should Honda’s expansion lands seek to direct all sanitary drainage to only one catchment
area, then consideration must be provided to ensuring the receiving pumping station is
appropriately sized.
The preferred routing for Honda’s sanitary drainage will be determined by the Developer’s
Consultant once the configuration of the proposed buildings are known within Honda’s
expansion area.
A5.4
COUNTY ROAD 10 – ENVIRONMENTAL STUDY REPORT ADDENDUM
The revisions to OPA 29 brought about by the August 2006 County Road 10 ESR Addendum do
not affect the sanitary drainage boundaries or collection system presented within the Master
Servicing Report, thus no revisions are proposed as a result of the ESR Addendum.
November 2008
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5.3
ALLISTON INDUSTRIAL / COMMERCIAL SECONDARY PLAN
Volume 4 - Master Servicing Plan
ADDENDUM
A6.0 STORMWATER MANAGEMENT
With the proposed expansion of the Honda operations in the study area and the realignment of
County Rd 10 there have been some impacts to the drainage strategy prepared for the Master
Servicing Plan (Refer to Figure A6-1). The Honda operation includes a significant portion of the
lands that comprise Catchment Area A. The main impact to the drainage strategy for these
lands involves the location of the main SWM facility proposed for this catchment. The facility is
best suited at the location that has been established in the Master Servicing Plan. A review of
other locations, i.e. at Re-aligned County Road 10 and Mackenzie Pioneer, result in a minimum
of three facilities and additional conveyance channels as well as additional outlets to the
watercourses.
The optimum solution is to maintain the one facility solution for Catchment Area A and there
would have to be an appropriate conveyance channel across the Honda property to reach this
facility. The maximum size of the facility is stipulated in the Master Servicing Plan. This size can
be adjusted as the appropriate detailed modelling is completed for detailed servicing strategies
for the area.
The realignment of County Rd 10 requires a realignment in conveyance channels to augment
the storm sewer network and overland flow routes. The north south orientation of the road
should allow for a small channel on one side of the road. The channel would consist of a 2 m
bottom width depending on the contributing drainage area. The maximum depth of the channel
should allow for at least 0.8 m depth of flow but should also allow for positive drainage from the
subgrade. The channel should follow the typical section illustrated in Figure 6-3 of the Master
Servicing Plan.
November 2008
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6.1

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