No.15 | May 2012

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No.15 | May 2012
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012
Scan QR-Code
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Fleet News at
www.laeisz.de
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
MV POWHATAN AT HANSAPORT
NEWBUILDINGS PROGRESSING
FINANCE DEPARTMENT
Coal for Hamburg
See page 2
Chartermarket on the rise
See page 3
Money makes the world go round
See page 8
EDITORIAL
CONGRATULATIONS
MR. PRESIDENT
On the 18th of March
2012 the 11th President
of Germany has been elected and we at F. Laeisz
send our heartfelt wishes
to Berlin. That President
Gauck is from Rostock is
not the only matter we
share. His father, also
named Joachim has been
sailing as officer on our
vessels until 25.5.1946.
In his book “Winter in
summer, spring in autumn” he describes the
marriage of his parents as
follows:
“My mother seems to
have shanghaied him
when coming ashore. In
the family the story goes
that young Olga Warremann met the 31 year old
at the offices of Laeisz
after he returned from
Kamerun and asked him:
“Did you get my letter?”
My Father did not, so she
continued: “Then you are
not aware that we are getting married tomorrow?”
My father did not have to
think twice.”
DEAR FRIENDS OF F. LAEISZ
Well into the fourth year of the crisis
still little seems to happen on the
surface but the undercurrent is
strong. The good news is that the
Industry appears to adopt what is
best for its own good: strive for
mutual survival. Liner companies
finally lift the boxrates, tonnage
providers stretch cost consciousness to the limit and banks remain
considerably patient.
We at Laeisz are confident that our
strategy will pay off: mixed sizes,
mixed types of vessels and a varied
group of great customers.
Yours truly,
N. H. Schües
BOOK REVIEWS
Published by
Marine Money,
Inc., 2011
Matt McCleery
THE SHIPPING MAN
More book reviews on page 8
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 2
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
MV POWHATAN FOR THE FIRST
TIME ON THE RIVER ELBE
Our Panamax bulkcarrier MV POWHATAN called in January - almost 17 years after its delivery
from the shipyard Sumitomo Heavy Industries - loaded with 63 340 tons of hard coal from
Russia, which she loaded in the Latvian port of Ventspils, at Hansaport, Hamburg.
STOWAWAY GIVES VESSEL
MV PIRO SEAL OF APPROVAL!
An injured New Zealand fur seal was spotted on
the rudder of our MV PIRO during her call at
Port Kembla in January.
The animal’s peculiar choice of refuge sparked
the interest of many locally concerned about its
fate as it appeared to be recovering from a
shark bite. The National Parks and Wildlife Service opted against removing it from the rudder
saying:
‘‘We ask people to keep in mind that shark
attacks are a natural occurrence and, yes, they
may inflict wounds on an animal but if you start
interfering with natural processes, you are
going to interrupt the balance of things.’’
exhausted fur seals, even though this one’s choice
of location may have been a tad unconventional.
The seal is believed to have climbed onto the
rudder when the ship was lower in the water.
It seems the seal is otherwise healthy and the
wound on its back was not weeping. Resting out
of water is common behaviour for sick, injured or
We are pleased that the seal instinctively knew
the vessel was a safe and suitable haven in its
time of need.
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 3
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
FROM THE CRADLE TO THE GRAVE
Selling our 2600 TEU ship MV PALERMO for recycling in January this year did not pass by without emotions.
Beached after some twenty years of reliable service she looks like a stranded wale. That most of her parts, her steel
and equipment shall now be recycled to be used for new products gives some relief, and that taking vessels out of
the water is good for the ailing market goes without saying.
MV PALERMO beaching at Alang
FOUR CARCARRIERS JOINING THE LAEISZ FLEET IN 2012
RESCUE OPERATION MV ASTERIX
The second series of four carcarriers (PCTCs) are scheduled to join the Laeisz Fleet this year,
two vessels during the first half, two vessels during the second half of 2012. We are happy to see
these vessels being delivered into a market with a commercially positive momentum and good
medium term outlook as the eight carcarriers in the fleet will form a key element of our fleet.
Our MV POLAR was on her way from
Australia to Korea when its crew received
an emergency call from the MV ASTERIX,
an Indonesian flagged ship in distress.
Immediately the MV POLAR changed her
course and rushed to the site. On arrival
the MV ASTERIX already listed heavily
and sank within minutes. The swift rescue operations done jointly with another
vessel saved all 17 crewmembers of MV
ASTERIX. The moral obligations between
seafarers in emergency situations have
always and will always play an important
role in our life at sea.
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 4
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
Picture Credits: Alfred- Wegener-Institut für Polar- und Meeresforschung
HAPPY BIRTHDAY RV POLARSTERN
THIS YEAR THE ALFRED WEGENER INSTITUTE
CELEBRATES THE 30TH BIRTHDAY OF RV POLARSTERN, 30 YEARS OF SERVICE IN THE ICE
– A GREAT ACHIEVEMENT BY ANY STANDARDS.
“We are proud about this ship and about the
results of its research. RV POLARSTERN has
substantially contributed to Germany’s leading
role in maritime research” said Prof. Dr. Karin
Lochte, Director of the Institute. And her colleague Dr. Heike Wolke added: “We are happy to
have Reederei F. Laeisz as a professional manager for both the RV POLARSTERN and the Neumayer-Station. It is because of that competent
shipowner that RV POLARSTERN is still fulfilling
all expectations.” We wish RV POLARSTERN, its
crew and scientists many more happy returns.
Top: RV POLARSTERN discharging
construction material...
Right: ...for the new Neumayer-Station
CONGRATULATIONS ALFRED WEGENER
Congratulations to Alfred Wegener. He was the
man who relocated the continents, he discovered what moves the world – and people laugh­
ed at him.
In January 1912 – 100 years ago – Alfred Wegener
held his famous lecture in Frankfurt. The 31 year
old proclaimed a scientific revolution – his
audience named him a dreamer, the British ‘Geological Magazine’ called him “blind and deaf”.
Only in the 1960’s, or fifty years later and long
after he passed away, the world recognized: His
theory of continental displacement is correct.
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 5
NEVER GIVE UP
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
RIVER CRUISE VESSEL MV ISAR
ONE YEAR AFTER THE EARTHQUAKE
AND THE TSUNAMI
From the letter of our Representative in
Japan, Mikuni Komatsu, one year after:
“Several days after the Tsunami, what
surprised us was the reaction of the local
people of Tohoku (North East area where
actually all of them encountered some of
the damages).
Some of them lost their wives or husbands and also children and their houses
were completely destroyed by earthquake
and swept away by Tsunami, nevertheless, they were never desperate nor giving
up a hope for the future.
Whenever they were offered some food
or any kind of help, they showed sincere
gratitude and appreciation and they have
never claimed nor accused anybody. By
such behavior, we were given an encouragement by those people who were terribly damaged.
Then they have taken the steps slowly
and steadily for the recovery always with
a hope and a dream with the spirit of
“Never Give Up”. They also helped and
supported each other beyond normal
business sense. A president of a rival
company offered a production machinery
to the president of damaged factory etc.
We were very touched and encouraged by
sincere good will of those people in the
damaged area. Yes, it was those people
of Tohoku encountered by earthquake
and Tsunami who have given a hope and
encouragement to the rest of Japanese
people.
They have inspired and encouraged average Japanese with the spirit of “Never
Give Up” by their diligent deed for human bondage called “Kizuna” although it
is true that they also have been offered
warm-hearted help domestically and internationally.”
Since 1995 the HAMBURGISCHE SEEHANDLUNG successfully initiates investments in the
business segments of shipping. At present, the
HAMBURGISCHE SEEHANDLUNG offers an investment in the booming tourism sector of river
cruise vessels. The closed-end fund “FLUSSFAHRT ISAR” invests in a river cruise vessel
travelling through Europe. The HAMBURG­
ISCHE SEEHANDLUNG expects a return of approximately 205% within 12 to 13 years. Minimum investment sum is 10,000 Euros. There
are already six river cruise vessels in the fleet of
the HAMBURGISCHE SEEHANDLUNG that all
perform on return assumption or even better.
STRONG FOR F. LAEISZ
NEW MARKETING CAMPAIGN
FOR HSH NORDBANK
Here’s the new ad campaign for the HSH Nordbank. This campaign is created for Daily
Newspapers in northern Germany and for the
accompanying handout for the conference
“Marine Money Istanbul”. The photo shows the
model of the MV PAGANELLA.
The slogan “Strong for Entrepreneurs” underlines the new focus of HSH Nordbank, i.e. to be
the quality banking partner for medium sized
family owned companies. Having been closely
linked to HSH since its founding in 1937 (Hamburgische Landesbank), we at F. Laeisz look
forward to years of good cooperation. We are
proud to have been asked by HSH Nordbank to
support their campaign.
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 6
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
ANNIVERSARIES 2012 | CONGRATULATIONS!
BIRTHDAYS 2012 | CONGRATULATIONS!
ASHORE
ASHORE
10 years
Barbara Gebert
60 years
Monika Steinfurth, Marina Schäning,
Barbara Obermayer, Doris Medow
25 years
Hans-Wilhelm Propp, Regina Metzke, Katja Zosel,
Dorothea Fischer
65 years
Jürgen Fischer, Winfried Staker, Renate Stein,
Sigrid Rutenbeck
30 years
Gudrun Menkhaus, Brigitte Kuntze
40 years
Heinz Mengel, Jutta Mischinger
45 years
Gertrud Hagemann, Christian Kammin
ON BOARD
ON BOARD
10 years
Willfried Hering, Alexander Vogt, Frank Niehusen,
Frederik de Bruin, Tim Farysch, Felix Kentges,
Moritz Langhinrichs, Arne Niehusen, Markus Plehn,
Alfred Resch, Björn Brandt, Mario Rogge, Alex Fischer,
Maik Pahl
50 years
Igor Hering, Stefan Schwarze, Paulo Diego Lavagno,
Ronald Schirner, Michael Winkler, Jens Baasch,
Andreas Köhn, Kai Siemens, Holger Becker,
Lutz Peine, Jörg Reppenhagen, Torsten Kruszona,
Reiner Loidl
25 years
Franciszek Pytlik, Jens Grafe, Petra Dinse,
Rudolf Freitag
60 years
30 years
Bärbel Czyborra, Jörg Preußner
40 years
Hans-Peter Boldt, Andreas Deckner, Detlef Beth,
Egon Last, Wolfgang Starke, Dieter Reinhardt
45 years
Kurt Lewerenz, Bernd Wehder, Jens Krohn,
Burkhard Clasen, Heinz-Uwe Nierhoff, Siegfried Bräuer
Uwe Kretzschmar, Stefan Beer, Karl-Heinz Wrobbel,
Rainer Schaller, Siegfried Pohl, Günter Krohn,
Klaus Fiedler, Günter Fritz, Manfred Scholz,
Hans-Ulrich Minzlaff, Norbert Schütt, Peter Schacht,
Frank Krüger, Michael Hinz, Axel Bull,
Klaus-Rüdiger Chudoba, Reinhard Kunde, Ulrich Horn,
Horst Wolfrum, Hartmut Guse, Heinz Krüger,
Waldemar Murawski, Hermann Rademacher,
Hans-Joachim Muthwill, Reinhard Wippich,
Günter Pagels
65 years
Björn Schreiber, Kurt Lewerenz, Manfred Stolze,
Hans-Werner Genkel, Hartmut Huth,
Reinhard Woitschach, Arno Kaiser, Gerd Peters,
Uwe Pahl, Horst Hänchen, Helmut Muhle,
Günter Röseler, Wolfgang Mannack, Manfred Witt
45 YEARS ASHORE
Gertrud Hagemann
45 YEARS ON BOARD
Christian Kammin
Kurt Lewerenz
Bernd Wehder
Jens Krohn
Burkhard Clasen
Heinz-Uwe Nierhoff
Siegfried Bräuer
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 7
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
COMPANY HISTORY
REMINISCENCES OF AN OLD HAMBURG
CITIZEN – PART 5
At last, in May, long after the whole of Germany was at peace,
Hamburg was freed
from the hated enemy
too, and we could move
back into our old house
in town. My elder
brothers were demobilized and returned to
civilian life: the eldest went into book trade
and later founded the still well-known and esteemed bookshop A.B. Laeisz. The other became a watchmaker. My younger brother and
I were sent to the St. Nicolai School. However, the younger generation had so run wild
under the wartime conditions that it was difficult to get on with them at all. Full of energy
and high spirits, I was out of doors as much
as possible. Swimming and skating were my
favorite sports and, on a few occasions, they
proved to be fairly dangerous pastimes for
me. When at last I left school, my teacher
dismissed me, assuring me that I was a goodfor-nothing and would probably stay the way.
I left school at Easter 1815, fourteen and a
half year old, and wanted to go to sea, but, as
the number of shipping companies had diminished during the war, it was difficult to
find a ship for me, eventually, I managed to
find a job on board Blankenese schooner
ELIZABETH. I was on the high seas for only
a short time on board that ship as we had to
turn back due to damage, and that was the
end of my seafaring career. My parents insisted on my learning a trade, so I was ap-
prenticed to a book-binder named Cornelius,
where I had a rather bad time as the work did
not suit my lively imagination, all the more so, as
I remained the younger apprentice for many
years and did not have the opportunity to learn
much of the actual trade during that time. The
only time of the year I could really be of any use
was around Christmas when business flourished
and I had to work late into the night. The only
reward I received was a few biscuits on Christmas Day, for the rest of the year we had such
meager fare, that Mrs. Cornelius often complained that not even bread crusts were left over
– a sure proof of our hunger and need of food in
our teenage years. Added to that, we were badly
treated by our master, and even worse by our
mistress. I was not on good terms with them at
all and I enjoyed playing tricks on them. What
especially fascinated me was the attic, where
tasty hams and sausages were dried and cured.
By using a ladder which we fixed round the gable, we could climb through the garret window
and have a jolly good feast. Once our mistress
came up into the attic before I had a chance to
hide in an empty chest and, knowing how timid
she was, I started to growl. Terrified and screaming, she ran downstairs and I could then escape
over the roof and down the back of the house in
time to join in search for the alleged burglars.
The name Ferdinand was much too fine for an
apprentice, so they called me Heinrich. As I
had to run quite a few errands, I quite often
used the opportunity to go for a swim – my favorite sport – without asking permission, of
course. In the summer of 1818, I once caught
sight of an eleven-year-old boy who was nearly
drowning in the water near Hamburg ferry. Still
half-clothed, I jumped in after him and man-
aged to get hold of him but he clung on to
me so desperately that we both nearly went
under. Luckily, I could get free my right arm
and so swam with my burden to the shore.
The following day, the boy’s father came into
our shop to express his thanks and unluckily
met with my master. Then, on being asked if
I had been swimming the day before, I impudently denied it and had my ears boxed instead of receiving a medal for live-saving.
Because of my frivolous pranks, I probably
would have been dismissed after a very short
time if I had not been useful in other ways
to the business, mainly by noticing that the
book-keeping was being done in a slovenly
way. So I made my own list of the goods delivered. Then, in January the bills were due
to be sent out, I declared most of them to be
wrong and proved, with the aid of my list,
that we should collect 600 Marks more.
However, the reward promised me was soon
forgotten. When my apprenticeship came to
an end I did not receive any token of thanks.
I had saved enough money from tips during
my four years as an apprentice to pay the fees
of becoming a journeyman. The rest I used to
finance my travels as a journeyman bookbinder, and I set out in the spring of 1819 with
50 Marks in my pocket. I went mainly on foot
of course, to Bremen, Hannover and then to
Kassel, where I first found work. My first
week’s wages was 18 “Groschen”. Here I had
the depressing experience of realizing that the
apprentice knew more about the handicraft
than I, so I considered myself lucky to have
the opportunity of perfecting my knowledge.
To be continued in Fleet News no. 16
PUNTA ARENAS
Punta Arenas, south
Patagonia, often is
starting point for
RV POLARSTERN’s
expeditions into the
Antarctic. Not only
N.W. Schües shall
remember his visit
to the vessel in
March this year: Full
of expectations he arrived jointly with scientists
and crew when a biblical rain hit the area. A
river of not only water but sand, trees and trash
ran through the city and locked our people into
their hotels. N.W. Schües and his group had to
be saved by a swim-tank when electricity and
communication failed. What an experience on
the other side of the world!
Left: Christian und Nikolaus W. Schües, Top: Main road in Punta Arenas
ISSUE NO. 15 | MAY 2012 | PAGE 8
CORPORATE INFORMATION OF THE F. LAEISZ GROUP
GETTING TO KNOW EACH OTHER
BOOK REVIEWS
MONEY MAKES THE WORLD GO AROUND
Author Matt McCleery
Title THE SHIPPING MAN
Published by Marine Money, Inc., 2011
ISBN978-0-9837163-0-3
The finance department of Reederei F. Laeisz GmbH has to fulfill
different duties such as accounting, controlling/reporting and cashmanagement and is thus divided into different teams.
When restless New York City hedge fund
manager Robert Fairchild watches the
Baltic Dry Cargo Index plunge 97%, registering an all time high and a 25-year low
within the span of just six months, he gets
excited. It is time to buy a ship, he decides.
One of these teams takes care of the punctual payment of all invoices of the vessels in our management as well as of the office
and not least the monthly payment of the salaries for all employees
of the company. Overall Reederei F. Laeisz receives about 50.000
invoices yearly which have to be paid timely.
Almost all payments are being made by electronic payment transactions. Mrs. Dorothea Fischer and Mrs. Erika Foth take care of the
transfer of the electronic payment data to the banks by using an electronic payment system. Before a remittance can be released the necessary coverage on the bank accounts has to be checked. Thereby
our cash-management team, headed by Frank Hilmer and Willi Gäbel
has to dispose daily more than one hundred bank accounts. This
is however always the last step in a multi stage cash-management
planning-system which is installed in our company.
Even if electronic payment transactions are the most common method of payment cash is still necessary in daily business. Therefore Mrs.
Dagmar Tempel and Mrs. Dana Lorenz are responsible for the proper
running of a cash-box containing different currencies and which is
especially used by our superintendents and other colleagues travelling abroad.
Mrs. Sylvia Koch and Mrs. Doris Medow are well known to the masters of our vessels. If the vessel needs money for the cash-box on
board to provide salary-advance payments to the crewmember or to
pay smaller invoices they have to inform the cash-management team
in due time. It is always a challenge for the team to get clean USDbanknotes in all necessary ports around the world and to organize a
safe transport of the money to the vessel.
Immediately fantasizing about naming a
vessel after his wife, carrying a string of
worry beads and being able to introduce
himself as a “shipowner” at his upcoming
college reunion, Fairchild immediately embarks on an odyssey into the most exclusive, glamorous and high
stakes business in the world. From pirates off the coast of Somalia
and on Wall Street to Greek and Norwegian shipping magnates, the
education of Robert Fairchild is an expensive one. In the end, he
loses his hedge fund, but he gains a life – as a Shipping Man.
Part fast paced financial thriller, part ship finance text book, The
Shipping Man is required reading for anyone with an interest in capital formation for shipping.
Author Niels Jakobi, Holger von Neuhoff,
Barbara Springer
Title 25 JAHRE FS METEOR
Published by Hauschild, 2011
ISBN978-3-89757-507-3
The German research vessel RV METEOR
in 2011 celebrated its 25th anniversary
with the company. Despite her age, the
ship is due to its continuous modernization
of one of the most powerful in Germany
and worldwide. Almost every one of the
many fascinating documentaries about marine research knows from television. The
vessel is often present, as will be performed on her multidisciplinary expeditions to
all oceans. Reason enough for the editors and 24 authors from various fields of marine science and maritime, once to look behind the
scenes and the ship and its history (s) present. The contributions
show the entire spectrum of modern scientific methods at sea. This
ranges from standard units of marine research, which are already
used for several hundred years to the modern sea floor drill rig
and autonomous diving robots. Furthermore, an insight into the lab
work and daily life on board of scientists and crew in all weather is
mediated. This richly illustrated book is aimed at anyone interested
in the sea, the maritime and marine science.
PUBLISHED BY:
From left to right: Doris Medow, Willi Gäbel, Dagmar Tempel,
Sylvia Koch, Dana Lorenz, Erika Foth
Reederei F. Laeisz G.m.b.H.
Phone: +49 40 36808-229 · Fax: +49 40 36808-257
E-Mail: [email protected] · www.laeisz.de · Design & Layout: www.matrix-design.com