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GW Voice
Vol. 19
19,, No. 7 – July 2015
P.O. Box 70
70,, Millstone
Millstone,, N.J. 0851
085100
PRSRT STD
ECRWSS
U.S. Postage
PAID
EDDM Retail
Monroe Twp., NJ
08831
A Monthly Periodical Serving Greenbriar at Whittingham
PRESENTED BY THE RESIDENTS CIVIC CLUB OF GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM
Money Talks:
Vote Vote
Based on the number of votes
already cast, additional votes
are needed to reach the 1071
yes vote total required to amend
the WHOA by-laws. At the request of WHOA president Paul
Klarman, WHOA attorney
Donna Shahrabani of the firm
Buckalew Frizzell & Crevina
LLP, declared an “adjournment
of the proceedings” in order to
save those “yes” votes already
cast in anticipation of scheduling
another vote next month. A mailing will be sent to every homeowner either thanking them for
voting, or urging those who had
not voted to exercise their right
to vote when the next voting
period is announced.
To refresh people’s memories, the reasons for the bylaws
changes, as explained in previous issues of the GW VOICE,
are: 1. re: election of WHOA
board members, when there are
the same number of seats open
as there are candidates, there is
no need for an election and up
to $7500 could be saved. 2.
eliminate the need for a “runoff”
Vote!
if there are multiple candidates
running for each available seat.
In other words candidates with
the higher number of votes win,
and up to $8000 is saved.
These changes, which must be
approved by a certain percentage of the homeowners, will
simplify electoral procedures.
(The following has been extracted from Roberts Rules of
Order.)
“The Effect upon Unfinished
Business of an adjournment,
unless the assembly has adopted
rules to the contrary, is as follows:
(a.) When the adjournment does
not close the session, the business that it interrupted is the first
in order after the reading of the
minutes at the next meeting and
is treated just as if there had
been no adjournment, an adjourned meeting being legally
the continuation of the meeting
of which it is an adjournment.” In
the case of the recent adjourned
WHOA special voting meeting,
another session of the special
voting meeting must be convened
at a date yet to be determined.
Tamburro in for Pucci: Town in Good
Shape, Perrineville Road To Close
By Ruth Banks
Although the June meeting
of the Residents Civic Club is
traditionally when the Mayor
gives a report on the Township, this month the task was
left to Council President Gerry
Tamburro due to the Mayor’s
recurring back problems.
After a review of the township’s tax rate and costs for
the varied public services,
such as police, library, court
and senior center, he informed
the audience that the township’s reserve fund was solid
due to good budgetary procedures.
As a result of a recent
house fire, he issued a warning to all homeowners: when
disposing of 9 volt batteries,
do not toss them casually into
a recycling bucket which could
cause a spark and subsequent
fire. First tape over the tops
and don’t mix them with com-
bustible materials.
Mr. Tamburro also reminded
the audience that Perrineville
Road will be closed for six to
nine months from Federal Rd.
south to Dey Rd., for repairs to
the culverts along the Cranbury Creek. It will also involve
widening the road, and when
finished with this first section,
will continue further south towards Rt. 33
He briefly touched on the
various developments which
are in the process of being
planned, approved and built.
He reminded the audience that
it could take 10 years or more
for some of the developments
to actually come to fruition and
not to panic at the thought of
so many more children suddenly filling the schools.
The audience responded
with many questions, including
an explanation of the Community Garden which made its
Council Pres. Gerry Tamburro
debut on May 28. In the works
for several years, the land was
donated to the town for the
purpose of giving residents an
opportunity to farm a small plot
of land and plant vegetables or
(Continued on page 3)
Greenbriar This Month
At the polls
WHOA This Month
By Paul Klarman,
WHOA President
APATHY!!!
I have heard that when residents are happy with the way
their senior community is being
run that they become apathetic.
They do not attend Board meetings and they do not vote in
Board elections.
I guess then that the Boards
in Greenbriar at Whittingham
must be doing a great job.
Intricate Henna pattern on foot
(Courtesy Wikipedia)
See GW Connections Book
and Author Luncheon story
inside on page 4.
Specifically, the WHOA Board
scheduled a Special Meeting on
June 17 that was for the passage of two Amendments to our
By-laws. These are designed to
potentially save money during
election time. I can personally
remember four times (there may
have actually been more) when
our Boards needed elections
that would have been unnecessary if the Amendments had
been in place. These extra elections cost us approximately
$30,000. What a waste of
money!
The meeting was cancelled
because there were only 793
votes cast from 1,607 residences, less than 50 percent.
Ballots totaling 1071 Yes votes
are necessary to amend the bylaws. I understand that those
votes cast to date were counted
and showed overwhelming support for the Amendments. It
showed that residents realized
that they could save money but,
(Continued on page 2)
By Arnie Riback,
GWCA President
It’s July and our GWCA
election amendments have
been duly voted upon and
adopted.
With the advent of the summer, our Rust Removal program has begun. No results
are guaranteed but we are
hopeful the process will result
in diminishing rust stains.
The decommissioning of the
Trent Road Dam, as we have
talked about in our discussions, is still in the permit approval stages. The next step is
the removal of fish and other
pond wildlife and their relocation to a new home in the Manalapan Brook. This removal
process can only take place in
the spring or fall when the
weather is not too cold or too
hot. Thus, our removal action
will probably take place in
September. The actual decommissioning of the Dam
(that is, its demolishment) will
follow the fish removal process, assuming all State approvals have been received.
The drought and thus lack of
water has caused us to delay
the replanting of trees and
shrubs on our berms until the
fall. These plantings have
been necessitated by the past
severe winter snows and cold.
The drought has also affected
the water level and the conditions of our ponds. The three
governing bodies through the
Storm Water Management
Committee have taken extra
steps to control algae growth
and odor fumes resulting from
low water levels and poor surface movement.
The Gazebo on our common property if not already
repainted, will be shortly.
Many residents with pets use
this area as a pet walk and
bathroom facility. We want our
residents to understand that
this activity is forbidden on our
common areas by our By(Continued on page 2)
Reflections: Taken for Granted?
By Ben Baum
When my computer printer
failed and required replacement, I was reminded of our
collective reaction to the deprivation that occurred as the
result of Hurricane Sandy. It
never ceases to amaze me
how we appreciate things
more when they are not accessible or are removed from
our rather convenient life style.
Just like the electricity and
telephone service that we lost
during the Hurricane, the
printer is something that I tend
to take for granted. Speaking
of our convenient lifestyle, it is
difficult to list the myriad examples of the way life within
the gates is beyond the norm.
In many locations in the country, living conditions are less
than ideal, let alone sanitary.
In our own county there are
(Continued on page 3)
FIRE PREVENTION FOR SENIORS
Presented by
Monroe Township Fire District 3
Peter Gasiorowski
Chief/Administrator
Brought to you by
The Residents Civic Club
WEDNESDAY, JULY 8
7:30 PM IN THE BALLROOM
All Residents Are Welcome
Refreshments Will Be Served
JULY 2015 – PAGE 2
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
WHOA
Greenbriar
(Continued from page 1)
(Continued from page 1)
for whatever reason, most did
not take the few minutes to cast
their ballot. Was it apathy?
Fortunately, we realized that
we did not have sufficient votes
cast and we adjourned the Special Meeting (a technicality) to
save the votes for a continuance
of the meeting at a later date.
We will be sending out new ballots to those who did not vote
and a note thanking those who
did. Please…don’t miss the second opportunity to vote. We will
be scheduling a new Special
Meeting sometime in July but
there will be the opportunity to
vote before the meeting.
And while you are thinking
about what just occurred, why
don’t more of you attend our
meetings? The WHOA Board
has scheduled only about five
regular open meetings a year on
the third Wednesday of the
month and have open workshop
meetings on the Monday prior to
the third Wednesday every
month. See how your Board
works. Try to help us make GW
a community that is still better
and one that may even improve
your own agenda.
To change the subject these
are some of things that the
WHOA Board has scheduled for
this month:
· The ballroom renovation
work will be ready to start.
· A WHOA show featuring
Robert Klein & Susi Cruz will
be performing at the Monroe
Twp High School on July,
15.
· The new pickleboard courts
should be ready.
· The paving on Rutland Road
should be ready to start.
· We will have received
estimates for paving a
portion of the parking area
at the clubhouse.
Laws. Although this is a petfriendly community, no dog park
facilities were provided by the
developer. Dog walk and dog
bathroom facilities are provided
in Thompson Park across the
street from our community.
If the streets are used as a
bathroom facility, fecal material must be picked up and
deposited in home disposal
toilet facilities and not in our
street sewer system. In no
way are dogs to be walked on
residents’ lawns, or GWCA
common areas, or left
unleashed when being walked
through the community.
This may seem harsh to pet
owners, but we now have some
residents driving to the common
areas on Chichester Road,
parking their cars, and then letting their dogs out to do their
business. To be fair, most residents do pick up after their
dogs; however, the common
area was meant as a community recreation and scenic appreciation area — not a dog
park. Please use the extensive
dog park facility provided at
nearby Thompson Park. We
have not used a surveillance
system, tickets, or a fine approach to date, but we can.
We appeal to pet owners to
take the extra effort and use
the off-site provided dog park
facilities. Thank you in advance for your cooperation in
this serious matter.
Our next Greenbriar Workshop meeting is Wednesday,
July 15 at 9:30 am in the New
Board Room; and our next Public Open meeting is Monday,
July 20 at 7:30 pm in the Towne
Centre Ballroom. Please try to
attend our meetings.
G REENBRIAR at W HITTINGHAM VOICE
Staff Members
S. Alexander Banks, Editor-in-Chief
Amy P. Appleman
Ruth Banks
Ben Baum
Ellen Chmiel
Joan Freeman
Eileen Giacalone
Art Gordon
Dick Herlands
Dawn Horowitz
Freddy Howard
Arlene Lazar
Harvey Lazar
Gloria Montlack
Olga Naccarella
Dianne Pinkowitz
Martin Rich
Larry Sheppard
Editorial Board
Alex Banks
Ruth Banks
Helen Oxenberg
Bert Herling
GWCA Rep. Arnold Riback
Ben Baum
Arthur Gordon
Advertising Office
Princeton Editorial Services
P.O. Box 397
Cranbury, NJ 08512
(732) 761-8534
e-mail: [email protected]
Editorial Office
Greenbriar Whittingham VOICE
100 Whittingham Drive
Monroe Twp., NJ 08831
(609) 655-4791
e-mail: [email protected]
Publisher
Princeton Editorial Services
P.O. Box 397, Cranbury, NJ 08512 · (732) 761-8534 or 8535
[email protected]
Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is a monthly periodical presented by the
residents of Greenbriar at Whittingham, Monroe Township, New Jersey.
All editorial material for publication should be submitted on or before the 3rd
of the month prior to publication month to the Editorial Office.
Greenbriar at Whittingham residents may deliver material to The GW VOICE
mail box located at the Concierge Desk in the Towne Centre.
Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is not liable for any typographical or
printing errors that may appear, including in its display or classified advertising,
over the cost of the space of the advertisement.
Note: The advertisements in Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE are, to the
best of The VOICE’s and Princeton Editorial’s knowledge, accurate
representations of the products and services offered. However, no
endorsement by The VOICE or any other party is intended or implied.
Acceptance of all materials is at the discretion of the publisher.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL MATERIALS
© 2015, PRINCETON EDITORIAL SERVICES
The Whitticism –
Village 1 Update
Rita Pearlman,
Whittingham Condo
Association
Hopefully, all residents are
enjoying the new heated pool. It
is a wonderful way to spend the
dog days of summer relaxing
with friends, catching up on the
programs and activities that are
available to us.
This year two trimmings of
bushes will take place. For those
units who perform their own trimming, please be sure to show a
white flag on the shrubs to alert the
landscaping people not to trim.
We were beyond budget for
the last season clean-up, with
$450,000 spent on snow removal. We have $2.5 million in
reserve. Budget time is the end
of September. For any resident
who would like to review our
budget, a copy of the audit is
available. Just contact Peggy
Swanger in the finance office.
Power washing and concrete
repair is underway in Village 1.
Please call me if you are interested in having your deck and
fence power washed and
sealed. I am contacting several
companies to see if we can get
a group rate.
Please don’t forget to mark
your calendars for the wonderful
shows sponsored by WHOA:
101 Years of Broadway on July
18, Robert Klein on August 15.
Tickets are always on sale at
the concierge desk.
The next General Meeting for
the Condo Association will be
Wednesday, August 26 at 7 pm
in the Ballroom. Program TBA.
Thank You
Notes
To all my dear friends at
Greenbriar/Whittingham:
I am so thankful and appreciative for all your love and
support during the illness and
loss of my sister, Charlotte.
Your expressions of sympathy,
phone calls, visits and donations were a great comfort for
me. Thank you so much.
Fondly,
Nancy Feuerstein
***
The family of Arthur Goldstein thanks the GW community as well as the Minyan
Committee for their caring,
support and outpouring following Arthur’s death.
With much appreciation,
Ruth Goldstein
***
A special thanks to our
friends, neighbors and staff at
Greenbriar. Your memories of
Joe were heartwarming and
we appreciate sharing the anecdotes with us.
Sandy Morris and Family
***
Thank you so very much for
your kind expressions of comfort and sympathy on the
passing of my beloved Barry.
It is truly a blessing to be living
in such a caring and generous
community. Thank you all.
Marge Geffner and Family
***
I wish to thank the Ceramics
Class for their kind expressions of sympathy for my husband Fred. It is deeply appreciated and gratefully acknowledged.
Beverly Baxter, Ceramics Class
***
The family of the late Robert
Goodstein, our dear husband,
(Continued on page 5)
Message from The
Manager’s Office
B
y William H. Hinkle,
General Manager
The summer months allow
many of our outdoor projects to
take place. Throughout the
community, expect to see concrete repairs, storm drain repairs
and/or replacements, etc. In
Village I, the first of two annual
shrub and tree trimmings has
taken place, additionally some
privacy fence replacements
have been completed; concrete
work, door painting, power
washing, chimney cap replacements, and we are accessing
those driveways that may require seal coating which will
occur throughout the summer.
All projects will continue
throughout the summer and late
into the fall as weather permits.
Greenbriar has successfully
completed the paving of three of
their streets, experiencing few if
any disruptions of daily activities, keeping in line within the
present guidelines in their reserve studies. Whittingham is
under contract for repairs, milling and paving throughout Village I, Section 1, which hopefully will get under way during
June, if the weather cooperates.
The first phase of this project
will be repairs and modifications
of street basins as necessary.
All notices on the project will be
forthcoming well in advance.
Weather has delayed the reconstruction of tennis court #4 for
pickle ball, which we hope to get
underway during June. In the
interim, arrangements have
been made to utilize the allotted
area in the upper parking lot.
Outdoor Heated Pool: Our
outdoor pool is open from 7 a.m.
to 8:45 p.m. daily for resident
enjoyment and will remain so
until Sunday, September 13.
Resident hours begin at 7 a.m.
and continue through 12 noon,
with guest hours from 12 noon
to closing. Additionally, our outdoor pool is now equipped with
two gas heaters, which are set
at 84 degrees, which as the
summer progresses may or
may not be needed! All residents and their guests must
display a pool badge upon entering the pool area, which will
be logged by the lifeguard staff.
Please adhere to the posted
rules and regulations for the
outdoor pool area.
Residents are reminded food
and beverages (other than water in clear plastic containers)
are not to be consumed at or
around the pool: There are
plenty of tables in both the
shade and sun just outside the
perimeter of the pool for you to
enjoy these items. An additional
reminder is that no pool furniture
may be moved without prior
lifeguard permission and it is
preferred that you allow the lifeguard staff to move the furniture
for you.
Our indoor pool remains open
during the summer season with
hours from 7 a.m. to 8:45 p.m.,
Monday through Friday, with
weekend hours from 7 a.m. to
5:45 p.m. Guest hours for the
indoor pool commence at 1 p.m.
Again, pool badges will be
checked and logged. For clarification purposes, the WHOA
Board has established lap times
for both the indoor and outdoor
pools. These hours are as follows:
Monday – Friday – 7 a.m. - 12
noon and 6 p.m. – 8 p.m.
Saturday – Sunday – 7 a.m. –
12 noon
~ Except during aquacise
classes and water volleyball ~
Summer Heat: As our summer months begin, it is important for everyone enjoying outdoor activities to stay hydrated.
If you are heading out for a bike
ride or a walk, be sure to take a
bottle of water with you. Additionally, it is advisable to keep
your cell phone along with identification in your possession in
case you find yourself, or someone you are walking with, feeling faint, you have the ability to
call for help immediately.
Hurricane season began on
June 1 and remains in effect
through November 30. Early
expectations/predictions call for
below normal occurrences this
season, though with the
changes we’ve recently experienced in weather patterns,
every effort should be made
towards personal preparedness.
Our Towne Centre generator
tests every Monday morning at
9am for thirty minutes, along
with a contracted quarterly service agreement that we had
entered into with the Manufacturer. Take a moment to inventory your home to see if you
have the following items in case
of a severe tropical storm and/or
hurricane: a three-day supply of
food and water (1 gallon per
person per day), seven day
supply of medicine, flashlight
and extra batteries, personal
hygiene items, cell phone and
charger, copies of personal
documents (including medical
and emergency contact information), pet supplies (collar, leash,
food, medicine), to name a few.
For a more detailed list, one is
available
at
http://
www.redcross.org/www-files/
Documents/pdf/Preparedness/
checklists/ Hurricane.pdf.
Master Key Program: As a
reminder, the community offers
a Master Key Program. Anyone
wishing to participate should
contact Alen Locksmith at 1-800
-215-ALEN. When you contact
Alen Locksmith, please give
them your address and the Village that you reside in within the
Greenbriar at Whittingham community. If locks are keyed to the
Master Key for your Village,
Security would be able to enter
your home (only with a Monroe
Township official, such as Police
Officer, Fire Department Member, or First Aid Squad Member)
if there were an emergency or
alarm activation at your home
and you were either not able to
open the door or not home to
allow the authority access rather
than the emergency services
gaining access however necessary. Please note that Security
will not accept personal house
keys. Security only registers
those addresses which participate in the Master Key program.
This would also provide you with
a “lock-out” service from Security should you ever misplace
your house key. Village I residents who have not changed
their lock are currently a part of
the program. The cost for rekeying the locks is a resident
responsibility. Unsure if your
home is keyed with the Master
Key? Contact Security, and they
will stop by at a mutually con(Continued on page 3)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Reflections
(Continued from page 1)
pockets of poverty that make
our homes appear as mansions.
And within the gates and within
the Township, we are fortunate
to have one of the lowest crime
rates in the state. The next time
you feel that it doesn’t matter if
you participate, and or vote,
consider the profound quote
from the teenaged youngest
ever Nobel Prize laureate,
Malala Yousafze, “When the
whole world is silent, even one
voice becomes powerful.” It is
easy to theorize about the way
Tamburro
(Continued from page 1)
flowers or whatever. Some 86
plots have been blocked off
and rented, and next year the
number of plots will increase.
Plans also call for additional
amenities. The Community
Gardens committee is headed
by Len Baskin.
Additional questions related
to the large piece of open space
across from the Stop n Shop,
which is actually partly-owned
by the state and the rest is part
of Thompson Park; the Hindu
Temple which is being built in
the vicinity of Routes 535 and
522 across from the Cannon
building; the attempt by a Chabad group to acquire land for a
permanent building; the question of shared services and the
different ways to implement this
concept; traffic lights; the Community Center and the role it
plays in the community for
adults as well as children and
youth.
the world should be, but sometimes day to day realities conflict
with the way things should be.
Many of us agree that women
should receive equal pay and
have opportunities equivalent to
men. But in many sectors of the
economy-especially at the administrative end-women comprise a small percentage of
company leaders-CEO’s. But
when our irrigation system was
serviced in May, I realized that
there is hope for gender equality
because for the first time our
service was performed by a
young lady who was most competent. When I asked her why I
had never seen her before, she
indicated she had been working
for the company for almost three
years but was not on the job
recently because she gave birth
to her first child. When I asked
her about her son, I could read
the love in her eyes. It appears
that she is another woman who
has found the balance between
family and employment.
In the past, as the result of
reading to third graders at the
Brookside School, I have
shared with you the promise for
the future that was apparent in
interacting with these vibrant
eight-year-olds. Now I have the
privilege of sharing with you
feedback from the excellent
students at the other end of the
continuum. For on May 21 I
presented the Residents Civic
Club Scholarships to the two
Monroe township Seniors who
were selected from a group of
nine. Each of the nine students
was worthy of selection, a nice
challenge for the committee;
216 seniors received awards
from 82 donors on May 21.
There was a total of $75,000 in
scholarships awarded, plus one
Greenbriar at Whittingham
Residents’ Civic Club
We Invite You to Join Us
Our purpose is to inform Greenbriar at Whittingham
residents through public meeting presentations about issues that are relevant to your quality of life in Greenbriar
at Whittingham, Monroe Township, Middlesex County, the
State of New Jersey and the United States.
The Club makes contributions from dues collected in
support of the following Monroe Township charities: First
Aid Squad, Public Library, Senior Center, Historic Preservation Commission, Education Foundation, Cultural Arts
Commission-Patrons of the Arts and the Food Bank. Each
year we award scholarships to Monroe Township High
School Seniors; we are the chief supporter of the GW
Voice, our independent GW publication. This past year
the Residents’ Civic Club dues collection resulted in a
total of $5000 contributed to these charities.
We conduct an annual Holiday Fund to provide all community employees with a monetary gift as an expression
of gratitude and appreciation from the residents.
On the second Wednesday evening of each month, we
provide an informative, educational, and/or entertaining
program for you and our community.
THIS YEAR, JOIN US IN SUPPORTING ALL OUR
CHARITIES, AND TO BECOME AN INFORMED RESIDENT.
Membership Application
Annual Dues: June 1, 2015 – May 31, 2016
_____ $16 per couple ____ $8 per individual
PLEASE PRINT
Name(s) ________________________________________
Address _________________________________________
Phone ____________________ Cell __________________
E-Mail Address ___________________________________
Please make your check payable to the “Residents’ Civic
Club.” Deliver your check to the Clubhouse and place in
Lockbox #4, or mail to:
Residents’ Civic Club, Box #4, 100 Whittingham Drive
Monroe Township, N.J. 08831
student who received a full
ROTC scholarship and another
who was accepted to the Naval
Academy. If the 216 students
are at all representative of the
next generation, the future continues to look promising.
Mark your July calendar for
the following holidays: Canada
Day-1, Independence Day-4,
Amelia Earhart Day-24 and Parent’s Day-26. The July birthstone is the ruby, which represents, love, courage, passion,
devotion and strength; the
flower is the larkspur which
represents an open heart and
ardent attachment. I used to
refer to the some of the food
days for each month and share
that you wouldn’t want to celebrate each day if you were dieting. But as an example of our
national obsession with food,
the following are the Food Days
listed for July: Creative Ice
Cream Flavor-1, Fried Chicken6, Chocolate-7, Strawberry Sundae-7, Sugar Cookie-9, Pecan
Pie-12, Tapioca Pudding-15,
Fresh Spinach-16, Caviar-18,
Raspberry Cake-19, Lollipop20, Hot Dog-22, Lasagna-29
and Cheesecake-30. It would be
commendable if you observed
Cheer up the Lonely Day on 11
by visiting someone you know
who is alone and needs some
company. Another noteworthy
day is World Population Day on
11 that was started by the
United Nations World Population Fund to provide education
and awareness about reproductive health, reproductive choice
and family planning for youngsters under 25.
On July 22 I’ll be asking
around GW for where I can find
two mature trees relatively close
to each other so I can observe
Hammock Day! If I exhibit bizarre behavior on 3, that’ll be
because I’ll be involved in Disobedience Day. And I won’t be
available on 27 ‘cause I’ll be
observing Take Your Pants For
A Walk Day!
Manager
(Continued from page 2)
venient time to check their key
in your lock to see if you are!
Residents are reminded that if
they have not yet returned their
File Updates that were sent earlier this spring to Management to
do so as soon as possible.
Village I residents are reminded to submit the Declaration Page from their current
homeowners policy to Management as soon as possible if not
already done.
The staff wishes you a wonderful July 4th weekend and
hopes that you will take the opportunity to enjoy the ‘music
around the pool’ between 12
noon and 4 p.m., scheduled for
July 4. ‘Music around the Pool’,
weather permitting, will be at our
outdoor pool. If the weather
doesn’t cooperate, the DJ will be
moved into the Ballroom. Our
Towne Centre will be open its
regular hours of 6:30 a.m. to 11
pm.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 3
JULY 2015 – PAGE 4
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Yemenite Jewry and the Art of Henna
By Ruth and Alex Banks
The ancient art of “henna” to
decorate females in Yemen
was a key element in Henna
House, a novel by Nomi Eve,
which concentrated on the art
as used by Jewish women.
The author was the guest
speaker at the GW Connections group’s Annual Book and
Author Luncheon held June 18
at the Knob Hill Country Club.
The use of henna for decorative purposes, particularly prior
to a wedding, is so ancient
that its origins have been lost
in time. But the novel, Henna
House, is also the story of the
culture and life of the Jewish
community struggling to survive in Yemen in the early
years of the 20th century. Muslim rule, which assigned Jews
the lowest station of society,
often varied in harshness and
quirkiness depending on the
“ruler du jour.” Ms. Eve gave
the audience a memorable
glimpse of a forgotten way of
life both with her story and
with her PowerPoint presentation.
(The following details are
from the Wikipedia on-line
explanation of henna customs.)
Before a wedding, Yemenite
and other Eastern Jewish
communities perform the
henna ceremony, an ancient
ritual with Bronze Age origins.
The family of the bride mixes a
paste, derived from the henna
plant leaves, that is placed on
the palms of the bride and
groom, and their guests. After
the paste is washed off, a
deep orange stain remains
that gradually fades over the
next week.
Yemenites had a special
“Henna House” author Nomi Eve, center, flanked on the left by
Juliet Klein, past president of GW Connections, and on the right
by Ruth Banks, GW VOICE writer, will be teaching an adult fiction writing class at Drexel University in the fall. She is a storyteller by profession.
affinity for henna due to biblical and Talmudic references.
Henna, in the Bible, is Camphire, and is mentioned in the
Song of Solomon, as well as in
the Talmud.
“My Beloved is unto me as a
cluster of Camphire in the
vineyards of En-Gedi” … Song
of Solomon, 1:14
The Night of the Henna was
celebrated by most groups in
the areas where henna grew
naturally: Jews, Muslims,
Sikhs, Hindus, Christians and
Zoroastrians, among others,
all celebrated marriages and
weddings by adorning the
bride, and often the groom,
with henna.
Across the henna-growing
region, ethnic holidays such as
Purim, Eid, Diwali, Karva
Chauth, Passover, Nowruz,
Mawlid, and most saints’ days
were celebrated with some
henna. Favorite horses, donkeys, and salukis had their
hooves, paws, and tails hen-
naed. Battle victories, births,
circumcision, birthdays, as
well as weddings, usually included some henna as part of
the celebration. When there
was joy, there was henna, as
long as henna was available.
Henna was regarded as
having Barakah (“blessings”)
and was applied for luck as
well as joy and beauty. Brides
typically had the most henna,
and the most complex patterns, to support their greatest
joy, and wishes for luck. Some
bridal traditions were very
complex, such as those in
Yemen, where the Jewish bridal henna process took four or
five days to complete, with
multiple applications and resist
work.
Natural henna stains only a
rich red brown. Products sold
as “black henna” or “neutral
henna” do not contain henna,
but are instead made from
other plants, or from other
substances altogether.
The Monroe Township Cultural
Arts Commission
The Monroe Township Cultural Arts Commission is again
pleased to offer six free summer concerts at the Open
Grove Gazebo on the Lake,
Thompson Park, Monroe
Township on Thursday evenings from 6-8 PM for the
2015 Season. Your positive
response in the past has enabled us to bring quality performers for your enjoyment.
This year we hope to top all
records.
Our season begins on July 9
with the Jody Joseph Band,
playing current and classic
rock, from Janis Joplin to
Steve Nicks, a NJ favorite.
On July 16, we have Basement Musicians Guild performing Men in Black, The best of
Roy Oberson, Johnny Cash
and Elvis.
On July 23, The AfroPeruvian Ensemble, performing Afro-Peruvian drum music,
a favorite in the past.
On July 30, The New Jersey
Swingtones, conducted by
Joey Katz, features a Tribute
to Frank Sinatra in honor of
what would be his 100th Birthday.
On August 6, Rhythm ‘n
‘Sound, a musical trio playing
popular Doo-wop and Rock
and Roll music from the 40’s
to the 60’s.
On August 13, The Tigertown Dixieland Band will perform.
Bring your blankets, folding
chairs and/or a picnic basket
to enjoy before the concert.
Just come.
In the event of inclement
weather, the concerts will be
held at the Monroe Township
Senior Center, Applegarth
Road and Halsey Reed Road.
Visit our web site for lastm i n u t e
u p d a t e s :
www.MonroeTownshipCultural
Arts.com
All programs funded in part
by OceanFirst Foundation
with support from Mayor
Richard Pucci and the Monroe Township Council.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 5
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
THE COMMUNITY AROUND US
Civic Affairs
By Jerry Tamburro
Monroe Township
Council President
The results of the recent
primary voting, was very gratifying. GW support in particular
was overwhelming. Thank you
for your support. I look forward
to the general election in November.
At the June 3 Council meeting we recognized the Monroe
Township High School County
mock trial winners. We also
recognized those students
who were awarded the Human
Relations certificates.
The mock trial winners competed against all the high
schools in the County and
were declared the champions.
The human relations winners, students in pre K to high
school, were selected by their
teachers for the awards.
Judge Alan Rockoff was
invited to address the group
and told them to continue on
their early path to making a
difference in the world in which
they reside. He told them not
to be snowflakes. Snowflakes,
LWV to Explore Local
and State Issues
By Ruth Banks
The League of Women Voters of Monroe Twp. will hold its
regular monthly meeting on July
27 at 1 pm at the Township Municipal Building. As well as a
report on the recent state convention, a roundup of some pertinent state issues which have
surfaced, will be explored. For
example, will we need a special
primary in case the governor’s
office is vacated? The issue of
“one person, one vote” is now
on the Supreme Court’s
agenda; what is the implication?
Common core standards have
been in the news and both supported and castigated by various sources. And the issue of
privatization of our water systems is also on the burner .
At the League’s convention,
delegates approved two new
studies: one on redistricting and
one on sexual violence on college grounds. The Monroe Twp.
League is engaged in the issues
of campaign finance reform and
human trafficking, and is considering looking at on-line education materials created by forprofit companies. The Natural
Resources committee, having
had a successful meeting on
pipelines, will be continuing its
study of water and the environment in our community and
state, as well as policies affecting national water supplies.
The League meets monthly at
the Municipal Building at 1 pm,
and meetings are open to the
public. Men, as well as women,
are invited to join. The League
is a nonpartisan political organization which neither supports
Thank You Notes
(Continued from page 2)
father and grandfather, would
like to express our sincere
thanks to you, our friends and
neighbors. Thank you for all the
tributes in his honor, the donations, the meals sent in, the
cards and your presence at our
time of sorrow. You have made
a sad time in our lives easier to
bear as you shared with us.
The Goodstein Family
***
To our Greenbriar Whittingham family: At this very sad time
in my life, with the passing of my
beloved sister, Beverly Seltzer, I
have been surrounded and comforted with kindness. It is with
deep appreciation that I express
sincere thanks on behalf of the
family and myself for your visits,
your calls, your cards, your donations in her memory, and your
food platters and gifts.
Gloria Peyser
nor opposes candidates for
elective office. For more information on joining the League,
feel free to contact: Francine
Glass, 860-7890, Ruth Banks,
655-4791, Judy Perkus, 3951552, or Mary Ann Colgan,
490-0063.
From the Heart:
GW Chapter Jewish Federation
By Eddie Thompson
he said, look beautiful and are
quiet but disappear in the
heat. He also said good actions happen when good people prevail when the going
gets hot and not like snowflakes that disappear.
In other business we took
action to refinance about $30
million in short term bonds at a
rate more favorable than the
current rate.
In addition, we authorized
our professionals to pursue
our position on affordable
housing in the courts. Since
the State hasn’t provided
guidelines to the municipalities
each town has to present its
case before a judge assigned
by the State Supreme court.
The Township’s position is
that we have already met our
affordable housing obligation.
The affordable housing currently approved and the future
Township sponsored units for
veteran’s meets our total obligation.
More on this as it occurs!
Shalom Havarem (greetings
friends ),
We hope that everyone had
the opportunity to see the Ribs
& Briskets Revue on June 28. It
was a well-attended and enjoyable fun evening.
In case you missed the list of
Jewish Federation upcoming
trips, here they are for your
consideration:
Mission to Cuba—December
16-21, 2015. Space is limited for
this trip. Contact Elena at [email protected]
jewishmonmouth for details.
Adult March of the Living—Spring of 2016. Ten days that
you will never forget. The Mission
of March of the Living will bring
alive two of the most significant
events of Jewish history—the
Shoah (the Holocaust) and the
birth of the State of Israel. Taking
place on Holocaust Remembrance Day, this March of the
Living is designed to counterpoint
to the death marches that occurred towards the end of World
War II. Contact Keith at
[email protected] for
further info and details.
The Jewish Federation in the
Heart of New Jersey strives to
provide interesting, entertaining,
meaningful, and informative programs to serve our communities
from toddlers to seniors and we
can continue and also expand
and improve our programs with
your generous support by making your donations by calling
Jewish Federation at 732-5881800 and you will be advised as
how you may donate.
If you would like to learn
more about Jewish Federation
and our many programs or if
you may wish to become involved and serve on our local
Greenbriar Jewish Federation
Board or have any general
questions, call the Jewish Federation office at 732-588-1800
or you cmay call Dorothy
Thompson at 860-2664 or Judy
Brodman at 395-8171.
Please be advised that if we
have not received your donation
or pledge as yet, we will be making phone calls on Wednesday
and Thursday, July 8 and 9 to
give you the opportunity to do so.
At that time we will be happy to
answer any questions that you
may have.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 6
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
From Our Mayor
B
y Richard Pucci, Twp. of Monroe
Senior Center After Hours
Well before the new Senior
Center opened in late June
2013, the Township envisioned it as more than just the
new home for the Office of
Senior Services; it has become a much needed meeting
place for local organizations to
utilize at night and on the
weekends.
During the day, many of the
17,000 registered members of
the Senior Center take part in
the many classes, services,
and social activities provided
by our Office of Senior Services.
At night and on the weekends we open the doors to the
Halsey Reed Road facility to
many Monroe Township nonprofit organizations and
groups of all ages to hold
meetings, dinners and special
events.
The Senior Center’s main
meeting room was fittingly
dedicated to longtime Councilman Irwin Nalitt, who worked
tirelessly through his retirement for the betterment of all
Monroe residents, and I am
sure Councilman Nalitt is looking down happily at all of the
people using what he referred
to as “his room” for so many
special events since it opened.
Since opening, more than
200 nighttime and weekend
events have taken place at the
Halsey Reed Road facility,
with a wide range of groups
using the center, including the
Italian American Society, Monroe Township Hadassah,
Stonebridge Hadassah,
Knights of Pythias, ORT, and
the Knights of Columbus, who
hold monthly meetings at the
Senior Center. Also, the Indian
Cultural Association of Monroe
has held large gatherings at
the Center.
Furthermore, Bnai Brith of
Monroe Township, Congregation Etz Chaim, Chabad Jewish Center, Congregation Beit
Shalom, Chabad House of
Monroe, NJ Puja Association,
Masti Squad and BAPS have
all used the facility for events.
In addition, the Monroe
Township Chorus holds
weekly rehearsals during the
day and has held three evening concerts at the Center,
including two Salutes to the
Troops and one holiday program.
The Center was also the
perfect location for a Spaghetti
Dinner that was held to raise
money for Michael Nichols, the
MTHS alum who suffered a
spinal column injury during a
high school hockey game.
The Monroe Township Cultural Arts Commission held
Mighty Oak Players rehearsals
and other performances on the
stage at the Senior Center.
Also, Cub Scouts Pack 3 has
held its Blue and Gold dinners
at the center for the last two
years.
The location is ideal, especially for residents and organizations that are located in the
Southern section of Monroe.
The facility has become the
meeting place for residents in
that end of town, just as the
Community Center is in the
north and the Library in the
center of the Township.
It is important to note that
we do not charge local nonprofit organizations in the
Township that hold monthly
meetings on weeknights at the
Senior Center. However, there
is a charge for all weekend
events, as well as special
events and catered events
during the week.
If an event is catered, an
organization can only use caterers that have Satisfactory
Sanitary Inspection Approval
from the Middlesex County
Board of Health.
Organizations interested in
using the facility should contact Randy Beverly at (732)
521-4400 ext. 163 or Pamela
Broskie at (732) 521-4400 ext.
177.
Teaching Opportunities
Community Education
Instructor Positions Still Available!!
Monroe Township School District
Turn your skills and knowledge into a rewarding Community Education position.
Seeking candidates with experienced skills, talents, and
passion willing to share
through lecture, demonstration, and/or hands-on workshops. FALL classes run on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings from Tuesday, September 8th through Thursday, December 10, with the exception
of the following dates: September 10, 15, 22, November
5, 26, December 1, and 3.
Please indicate when you
would be available to teach
during our course schedule.
Classes or courses of particular interest are: Beginner
Bridge, Microsoft Excel, Tai
Chi Intermediate and Advanced, iPhone use, iPhone
App Development, Understanding Stock Markets, Advanced Ballroom Dancing,
Monroe Twp. Fire
District #3
Meeting
Schedule for 2015
Business meetings are held
at the Fire House located at 16
Centre Point Drive, Monroe
Twp., NJ 08831 at 7 pm on the
following dates.
· July 14
· August 11
· September 8
· October 13
· November 10
· December 8
Square Dancing, and Intermediate Sewing.
Letters of interest are always accepted on an on-going
basis due to anticipated vacancies, and new course offerings. However, to ensure consideration for the Fall 2015
Program, communication
should be received by June
23rd - Graduation Day!
Interested? Have a course,
workshop, card game expertise, or lecture idea? Here’s
what to do now:
Contact the Director of
Community Education, Monroe Township Schools, 423
Buckelew Avenue, or…
[email protected]
or [email protected]
(Secretary)
MANAGEMENT
BUSINESS
HOURS
The Management Offices (on the second floor
of the Towne Centre) are
available weekdays only
during the hours of 9 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
During lunch, the office
is closed from 12:30 p.m.
to 1 p.m.
At all other times, please
see the Concierge.
We thank you in advance for your cooperation.
WHOA
Board of Trustees
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
CINEMA
By Larry Sheppard
FAR FROM THE MADDING
CROWD is the latest film version of the 1874 novel by Thomas Hardy. Bathsheba
(CAREY MULLIGAN) is portrayed as an independent selfreliant woman who is pursued
by three suitors. Having been
left a substantial farm by an
uncle, she has no need of a
husband and makes it clear by
refusing their proposals. One
is Oak (MATTHIAS SCHOENAERTS) , a rugged farmer
who continues to doggedly
serve her needs as an employee even as she doesn’t
return his devotion. Another is
rich land owner Boldwood
(MICHAEL SHEEN) who is
ready to marry her even if she
is not in love with him. Finally,
dashing Sergeant Troy ( TOM
STURRIDGE) sweeps her off
her feet to the dismay of the
rival suitors.
Troy is a scoundrel who
previously impregnated a town
girl Juno (FANNY ROBIN) but
their attempt to marry goes
awry. In all fairness, I never
read the book so I don’t know
if Hardy was portraying Bathsheba as an 1874 liberated
woman. I do know that she is
presented in the film as a very
much 21st century woman,
including wearing theatrical
makeup, giving orders like a
CEO and getting all heated up
by a rogue with a villain’s
moustache. Beautiful scenery,
a music score dripping with
pathos, and costumed actors
exuding 19th century dramatics
should have made FFTMC a
winner. Instead, it comes off
disjointed with a lack of certainty as events unfold without
clarity. I expect that PBS
would have done a better job.
RATING…C
PITCH PERFECT 2 is not
the type of film that seniors
would ordinarily go to see. I
saw the original PITCH a few
years ago on the recommendation of my college-age
granddaughter, and found myself liking it. With very few
films of interest showing locally, I decided to see PP2
although I did so with reservations. My apprehension was
well founded, as this new sequel seemed silly, amateurishly acted and did not have
the punch of the first version.
The plot concerns a major
world competition between a
cappella singing groups from
around the world. HAILEE
SEINFELD, at the urging of
her mother, KATEY SAGAL,
wants to join The Barden Bellas, her mother’s old a cappella group at Barden College.
Welcomed by the perky group
of girls, she fits right in as coleaders ANNE KENDRICK
and BRITTANY SNOW show
her the ropes. Most of the
laughs are provided by Fat
Amy (REBEL WILSON) especially when they meet their
main opponents, a German
team led by pseudo Nazi Valkyrie (BRIGETTE SORENSON) and her storm troopers .
Without giving away the outlandish plot with numerous
screw-ups, silly embarrassments and innocent hook-ups,
Nurse’s Notes
Stephanie Fitzsimmons
Sexton, RN, APN
Adult Screenings
In my observation, as a group
you are informed about your
health and wellness but I
thought a review of suggested
screenings would be a good
idea. I do not mention weight,
height, or cholesterol here; suffice it to say they are important.
Men and Women
Colon Cancer Testing
All men at average risk
should start testing at age 50.
There are several testing options. Talk with a healthcare
professional about which tests
are best for you and how often
testing should be done. If you
have a family member with a
history of colon cancer,
screenings will most likely occur at the age of 40 after discussing with your physician.
This is essential information
to share with children and
grandchildren.
Lung Cancer Testing
If you are age 55 or older,
talk to a doctor about your
smoking history and whether
you should get a low-dose CT
scan to screen for early lung
cancer. Screening may benefit
if you are an active or former
smoker (quit within the past 15
years), are between the ages
of 55 and 74, have no signs of
lung cancer, and have a 30
pack-year smoking history. (A
pack-year is 1 pack of cigarettes per day per year. One
pack per day for 30 years or 2
packs per day for 15 years
would both be 30 pack-years.)
You should discuss the benefits, risks, and potential costs
of screening
with a doctor
before testing is done. Insurance is beginning to cover this
very important test.
Blood Pressure Screening
Blood pressure is the measurement of the pressure or
force of blood pushing against
blood vessel walls. The heart
pumps blood into the arteries
(blood vessels), which carry
the blood throughout the body.
(Continued on page 8)
we know
who will
win
the
competition set in picturesque Copenhagen. Just for the record,
PP2 has taken in over 147
million dollars in its first three
weeks of screening, which
shows the cultural gap that
exists between our generation
and our grandchildren’s. On
the other hand, they never
heard of Jane Fonda or Robert
Redford, so there! If you like
your hip-hop music loud, the
girls innocently wild, the boys
cute but brainless, PP2 could
be for you. RATING…C
COMMENTARY…It seems
like the movie moguls are
catching on to the fact that
there is a growing audience of
seniors out there ready to fill
their pockets if they produce
the right product. A recent article in the New York Times
spelled out this latest trend
with the Indies cashing in on
the old folks. Films like ST.
VINCENT, DANNY COLLINS,
LOVE IS STRANGE and the
2013 Oscar winner AMOUR
are just a few of the offerings
that paid healthy profits on
relatively little investment. THE
BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD
HOTEL took in $46 million on
a $10 million cost which is
good business by any standard. Actors like
JUDY
DENCH, MAGGIE SMITH,
PENELOPE WILSON, HELEN
MIRREN, etc., are familiar to
us from series running on PBS
and have become box office
attractions on name recognition alone. Even 63-year-old
MICHAEL KEATON was up
for the Academy Award as a
disillusioned actor trying to
revive his aged image, while
JULIANNE MOORE won the
acting Oscar for her portrayal
of a woman with Alzheimer’s.
Another problem to be solved
is the lack of distribution for
these Indie films. They are
mostly shunted into small outof-the-way art theatres instead
of onto the bigger screens with
more convenient locations.
The senior population is growing and hopefully Hollywood
will do something about it.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 7
JULY 2015 – PAGE 8
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
The Green
Thumb
By Laura Resnick
Enjoy Your Cut Flowers
FOR ADVERTISING CALL:
Princeton Editorial Services
732-761-8534 or 8535
[email protected]
The best time to cut your
garden is in the early morning,
when the stems are filled with
water and carbohydrates, and
so are firm to the touch. Midday is the worst time, as flowers dehydrate and become
limp. When harvesting, place
the cut flowers in a bucket of
warm water immediately. Use
sharp knives, clippers or
shears – never ordinary
household scissors. Scissors
will crush their vascular systems, preventing proper water
uptake. Cut away all leaves
that would be submerged in
water, to prevent bacterial
growth and foul odor.
STEM TYPES: Flowers that
grow on individual stems
(marigold, aster, calendula,
chrysanthemum, dahlia, daisy,
sunflower, zinnia) should be cut
when fully open. When they go
into the vase, use the diagonal
cut to trim the stems, so they
can absorb maximum water.
For woody stemmed flowers
(lilac, dogwood, heather), split
the stems at the ends rather
than smash them. This will
keep vascular tissues intact
and create more surface area
to absorb water.
Spike flowers with multiple
buds (salvia, delphinium, gladiolus, snapdragon, larkspur) as
well as cluster flowers (baby’s
breath, lilac, phlox, verbena)
should have at least one bud
showing color and one bud
starting to open before you cut
them. If gathered too early—
while they are still tightly budded—these flowers will not
open in a vase of water.
Bulb flowers (hyacinth, iris,
tulip) have soft stems and do
better in a vase of cold water.
Milky stemmed flowers
(euphorbia, lobelia, poinsettia,
daffodil) secrete latex sap that
oozes into the water and clogs
the vascular system of other
flowers in the container. To stop
the oozing right away, dip the
cut end of the stem in boiling
water for 30 seconds, or burn
the stem end with a match
flame for a few seconds. Exception: This will not work with daffodils, so do not ever mix daffodils with other flowers in water.
Professional florists use
lukewarm water (100-110 degrees F.) for their cut flowers,
because warm water molecules move faster than cold
water molecules. Therefore
the warm water can be absorbed by flowers more easily.
SUMMER WATERING: Water thoroughly and deeply
each time, and let the soil dry
out between waterings. Deep
watering lets the plant’s roots
grow deeper, so they retain
moisture and can anchor the
plant into the ground better.
The best time is in the morning, because the leaves can
dry off before the hot sun hits
them. Evening watering is acceptable if the temperature is
warm enough for the leaves to
dry out before it cools down at
night. Wet foliage brings the
Nurse’s Notes
(Continued from page 7)
High blood pressure, also
called hypertension, means
the pressure in your arteries is
above the normal range. The
Cleveland Clinic recommends
having your blood pressure
checked at least once a year.
Blood Sugar Screening
Anyone older than age 45 is
advised to receive an initial
blood sugar screening, and
then, if the results are normal, to
be screened every three years
thereafter.( Mayo Clinic) At the
Health fair we offer Blood sugar
screenings and they are available in the health care center
too - feel free to drop in.
Hepatitis C Virus (HCV)
Get screened one time for HCV
infection if: You were born between 1945 and 1965. You have
ever injected drugs. You received
a blood transfusion before 1992.
(Agency for Healthcare Research
and Quality)
Osteoporosis
(Bone Thinning)
Have a screening test at
age 65 to make sure your
bones are strong. The most
common test is a DEXA
scan—a low-dose x-ray of the
spine and hip. If you are
younger than 65 and at high
risk for bone fractures, you
should also be screened. Consult with your health care team
about your risk for bone fractures.( Agency for Healthcare
Research and Quality )
Men
Prostate Cancer Testing
Starting at age 50, all men
at average risk should talk with
a doctor about the uncertainties, risks, and potential benefits of testing so they can decide if they want to be tested.
Women
Breast Cancer Testing
A clinical breast exam should
be done by a doctor or nurse
every year. Report any changes
in the way your breasts look or
feel to a doctor or nurse right
away. Get a mammogram every
year. If you are at higher risk for
risk of fungus and disease.
Your container plants may
need daily watering. Apply
water until it runs out the
drainage holes.
GIVE A BOOST. To produce the largest dahlia flowers, remove the side shoots,
letting only the main terminal
bud develop. Support the
plants against wind damage.
To help chrysanthemums
develop flower buds for the
fall, stop pinching them in midJuly. For ‘trophy size’ flowers
let only one or two main buds
develop. Remove all side
shoots as they appear.
Irises fade away unless they
are divided every three or four
years. Now is the best time to
dig up and divide the clusters of
old rhizomes. Plant them right
away, or else store them in a
cool place for several weeks.
The moment they get back into
the ground, they will start new
growth. Set the divided rhizomes on their sides, just below
ground level, all pointing in the
same direction so they don’t
grow into each other.
Now that you have cut,
trimmed, split, dug, divided and
watered, it is time to dust yourself off, sit back, observe and
enjoy the fruits of your labor.
Calendar reminder: The
Green Thumbs will meet at
11 am on Tuesday, July 14
at the Monroe Twp. Senior
Center.
breast cancer than most
women, talk to a healthcare
professional to find out if you
need other tests done with your
mammograms.
Cervical Cancer Testing
Have a Pap test and HPV
test every 5 years (preferred
approach) or Pap test alone
every 3 years.
Follow testing recommendations even if you have been
vaccinated against HPV.
No testing is needed after a
hysterectomy that removed
the uterus and cervix if it was
done for reasons not related to
cervical cancer.
BRCA 1 and 2 Genes
If you have a family member
with breast, ovarian, or peritoneal cancer, talk with your
health care provider about
your family history. Women
with a strong family history of
certain cancers may benefit
from genetic counseling and
BRCA genetic testing. This
information may help you as
well as family members.
(Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality)
In closing the only other
screening that I should mention is screening for depression. If you are feeling blue or
down and it is not going away,
I strongly suggest that you
speak with your healthcare
provider. There is help for depression and you should not
struggle alone. I hope you find
this review helpful, and I wish
you the best.
Lecture, July 6, 1pm: Happy
Feet, Healthy Feet, Dr. Justin
Cohen, a local podiatrist. Foot
pain and risk of developing foot
related issues could be due to
improper shoe wear, age, medical issues, trauma, and heredity.
Taking proper and proactive
care of one’s feet can minimize
foot problems and minimize the
risk of foot pain, resulting in happier, healthier feet that can carry
older adults through a high quality independent life. Please register with the Concierge. Light
refreshments will be served.
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Finance and Investing
By Irwin Kaplan
“Soon, maybe not tomorrow, But soon ...” (from the
song “Soon”, composed by
George Gershwin and lyrics by
Ira Gershwin, for the 1927
musical “Strike Up The Band” even then they knew.)
Economic Comment
I’m still under the influence
of the acronym I created,
T.H.U.D. (Taxes, Housing,
Unemployment, Deficit), as I
have been for the last five
years. The U.S. Government
has not taken “real” actions to
mitigate the deficiencies in
these areas, which hold back
the growth and prosperity of
the United States. These economic moves need strong immediate action to prolong the
U.S. standing in the economic
world and enhance life for U.S.
citizens.
At this point in the economic
cycle a new U.S. predicament
has been irking investors when will U.S. interest rates
rise? I’m predicting interest
rates will rise sometime in
2015, or before the U.S. Presidential elections. These are
my guesses! No one knows!
The Stock Market
Meanwhile, the stock market
is waiting to see the outcome
of two key variables:
1) Will the Federal Reserve
act to increase interest rates
this year?
2) Will the near-term effects
impact stock prices upward?
Until we get answers to
these key questions the stock
market will move up and down
at the slightest bit of worldwide
economic news, still waiting for
the Fed to act.
If interest rates begin to rise
as the Government attempts to
goose up the economy in order
to get a rise before the presidential elections, the stock market
gyrations will continue and investors may be misguided
about the real needs of rising
interest rates.
The problem is there are so
many conflicting opinions about
“when” and “why”, that investors
become confused and worry
about the future.
It’s no different than any other
important action the Fed will
take. You will know about the
interest rise when you hear
about it or when you read
about it.
SO MEANWHILE ... Review
your personal investment plan.
If you do not have a written
Senior
Solutions
By Helen Oxenberg,
MSW, ACSW
(Helen Oxenberg’s column,
Senior Solutions is syndicated
and appears in several states)
Dear Solutions: Almost
every time that I invite my husband’s older son and family to
a holiday dinner or father’s day
or something he finds an excuse not to come. I’m sure my
husband feels bad about this
and it makes me angry but he
never says anything. We’re in
a second marriage so I don’t
say anything to his son or to
him. Should I say something to
my husband or just stay out of
it?
-JaniceDear Janice: Give your husband a chance to speak – and
then stay out of it. Ask him
what he’s thinking about this –
what he would like to say to
his son – and then stay out of
it. He may never say it to his
son but being able to express
it somewhere will help him to
get it out of his system. Try it –
and then stay out of it!
Dear Solutions: I was
trained when I was a kid to
always be on time so I am. I
have at least one friend who is
never on time, even though
she always has an excuse and
always promises to be on
time. I don’t want to give her
up but it’s so frustrating for me
when I’m waiting around for
her and embarrassing if she’s
supposed to meet other people with me. Any suggestions?
-LisaDear Lisa: So you’re the
“punctual” one. You must be
very lonely. After all, waiting
around alone for someone is
sad and infuriating I’m sure. I
don’t know that you can get
someone like that to change
but at least make it more comfortable for yourself. Reverse
the order. Figure out how late
she’s going to be and don’t get
there until you know she’s
there. Let her do the lonely
waiting. Also when you’re
meeting with other people and
she’s late introduce her as “the
late Ms. whatever” because
she is dead wrong!!
Dear Solutions: I am basically shy and also have a hard
time making a real commitment to someone. It seems I’m
always unsure. Now I met a
man who I really like but I’m
told by friends that he’s shy
also and also has trouble with
commitment. We’ve been seeing each other for quite a while
now and I know the feelings
are mutual but I don’t say anything and neither does he. I
want this relationship to move
forward seriously but I’m afraid
to say anything. We really get
along very well and seem to
have much in common. Do
you think it will spoil things if I
say something to him about
being serious?
-JoanDear Joan: Sounds like you
do have something in common
– fear. Sounds like you’re in a
race to see who won’t speak
first! If you want forward motion but won’t do anything the
winner will be the loser – you –
because this is a race where
everyone stands still. Move!
Take the risk. Say what you
want. If you’re sure of your
feelings and are pretty sure of
his you have nothing to lose
but your uncertainty. And if
you don’t get what you want?
Well – you’re not getting it now
are you?
Problems? Become part of
the Solution. Write to Helen
Oxenberg, Senior Solutions,
P. O. Box 346, Jamesburg, NJ
or email:[email protected]
plan, write one or get one, now.
If you need help writing one, get
professional help. It may prove
to be one of the wisest moves
you have ever made, and
money well spent. You will have
the benefits of a clear picture of
the long and short term investments you need to make. You
will also have a road-map for
your retirement, and investing
for it. Over all, you will be better
equipped to deal with market
swings and reaching your longterm and short-term investment
goals.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 9
JULY 2015 – PAGE 10
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
News from the Golf Course
The Golf Board is going to
change its meeting time. We
will meet the fourth Monday of
the month at 1:30 pm, in the
Annex. (Opposite the Nurse’s
office) The meeting is open to
everyone including nonresident members of the Golf
Course.
The Golf Course began taking non-resident members
several years ago as the community members were aging
and were no longer playing
golf. The membership dropped
from over 600 players, to less
than 300 in recent years. This
pattern was not unique to our
Golf Course. The same pattern was seen in community
golf courses all across the
country. In order to stem the
shrinking membership we began admitting non-resident
members from other senior
communities. This addition
worked well for the Golf
Course and for the nonresident players. Many of the
non-residents joined our
leagues and the combination
was very congenial. This past
year we dropped the age requirements and we currently
accept members of all ages.
This year we have increased our membership for
the first time in many years. As
of this writing, we have 290
members, which includes 60
non-residents. If this trend continues, we will have to establish
a cut-off point for membership.
We would probably limit the
number at 325, and create a
waiting list. If the membership
becomes too large it becomes
difficult to get tee times, and the
members we attracted will leave
for other courses that are not
overcrowded.
The Golf Course is also having Outings this year as it did
last year. The same groups
are coming again, with perhaps a slightly increased number of players. One group is
the Monroe Sports Center,
Central Jersey Hawks traveling basketball team. They play
basketball throughout New
Jersey, and on occasion play
in other parts of the country.
The other group is the Calvary
Christian School located in
West Windsor NJ. The outing
raises money for the school’s
athletic department. The outings are held at times when
the Golf Course does not typically get heavy use.
Reminder: The Golf Course is
sponsoring a Member Invitational Tournament on Saturday August 22. Any member of
the Golf Course can invite a
golfer who has never played
previously at Greenbriar. The
member pays for his golf cart,
while the guest pays nothing.
The purpose is to introduce golfers to The Greenbriar Golf
Course.
The Golf Board
Ladies Golf
By Carol Cooper and
Ruth Reich
On a beautiful Friday morning our opening breakfast was
a successful event, arranged
by Joan Ricci and catered by
the Tap Room. Audrey
Schwartz opened the meeting
introducing members of the
board and new members of
the league.
Kevin spoke about playing
“ready golf.” If one woman is
hitting, the other woman
should be on her way to her
ball, but not in front of the
woman who is hitting. In many
cases two women sharing a
cart usually wind up on opposite sides of the fairway. This
falls under Murphy’s law.
Kevin also said we should be
playing 9 holes in 2 hours and
15 minutes and 18 holes in 4
hours and 30 minutes. In addition, he asked we come down
to the Pro Shop 20 -30 minutes before our tee time and
have our gloves, balls, tees,
and markers ready to go. The
last word of advice was all
women should be out of the
carts and on the tee.
Tournament chair Myrna
Reiter asked us to announce
our scores once on the green,
and then putt. When finished
putting, hold your clubs and go
to the next tee where you
mark down the scores. Hopefully, this will keep the scores
accurate.
June 4 was Fun Day and
will be reported in the next
issue. Nancy Hynes spoke
about an ‘Over Night” but as of
this writing it is still up in the
air.
Doing what you love is freedom. Loving what you do is
happiness, so just keep playing golf.
Chip Ins: M. Reiter, D. Alte,
L. Paletz, A. Aiston, M. Littman, S. Strimpel, M. Weinfeld,
C. Cooper, J. Golden. Birdies:
P. Mizerek, S. Winters.
Pickleball
Club
By Lila Pollinger
Haven’t tried pickleball yet?
Want to get more exercise but
don’t feel like running on the
treadmill? Come down to our
new courts located behind the
pool and learn the game that
makes exercising so much fun
you’ll forget you’re exercising.
We are a fun group, always
happy to help newcomers to
the sport. Pickleball is a combination of tennis, badminton,
and ping pong. It’s played with
a hard paddle, using a perforated, hard plastic baseball,
over a net on a badmintonsized court. It’s easy to learn,
and you will enjoy it even on
your first day.
It can also be a fast-paced
and challenging game for experienced players, so come
and give it a try. Come for lessons on Monday or Thursday
nights from 5:30 to 6:30 pm.
You can take the game to any
level. We have novice players,
(Continued on page 11)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
The Barry
Geffner After
Hours Club
By Regina Haimer
It was a bittersweet evening
on Friday, May 29, when Joel
Schartoff presented a plaque
in honor and appreciation to
the Barry Geffner Family. This
plaque denoting the name
change of The After Hours
Club to The Barry Geffner After Hours Club was presented
to wife Marge Geffner, and
daughter Debbie Kramer and
son Dr. Stewart Geffner.
Joel’s tearful tribute to Barry
reminded our club members of
Barry’s strong and friendly
presence in our community.
He was a selfless and dedicated man and had a vision for
the club. As Past President,
his drive and dedication
brought the club to its success
today. His ideas of bus trips,
overnight stays, dinner
dances, many shows and of
course the wonderful Lip Sync
Shows are still talked about
today.
Following the dedication,
our club members enjoyed a
wonderful buffet dinner catered by Business Bistro. Entertainer John Conklin, with his
fine singing voice was met
with great enthusiasm as we
danced the night away.
Remember Katz’s...The
Second Ave. Deli...The Carnegie. Those of you who joined
us last month for the New York
style deli night featuring
singer, DJ, and concert caliber
pianist, EDDIE PIRRERA report a wonderful night. An outstanding entertainer, Eddie’s
list of accomplishments include performances in Las
Vegas and Atlantic City, on
luxury cruise ships and on
national network television.
If you would like to join and
have any questions about The
Barry Geffner After Hours Club,
please call Joel Schartoff 609395-1144 or Eileen Birnbaum
609-409-4366, and if you would
like to be on our email list
please email Regina Haimer at
[email protected]
Alisa Hadassah
By Rhoda Juskow
A new committee is being
formed to send packages to our
grandchildren in college for the
major Jewish Holidays. The cochairs for the committee are
Arlene Lazar (409-2749) and
Rhoda Juskow (409-0983). Call
and let us know if you would like
to work on this special committee. We will provide our young
adult grandchildren with something to eat, something to read,
and a bit of love.
The Southern New Jersey
Region Education Symposium
was a great afternoon, featuring
Linda Scherzer, Former CNN
News Correspondent. Our work-
Pickleball Club
(Continued from page 10)
as well as competitive players
who revel in tournament play.
Our schedule is Monday
thru Friday from 9:45 am until
12 pm, and Saturday from 10
am until 12 pm.
But beware! You’ll soon be
hooked and want to play more
and more often.
shop discussions were led by
Shahar Azani, Jerome Enis,
Andrew Getraer, Howard Joffe
and Deputy Consul General
Elad Strohmehyer of the Philadelphia Israel Consulate. Subjects included Israel and the
media, and the challenges facing U.S. campuses
Don’t forget to pick up a flyer
from the rounder and order your
tickets for our Associates event
on Sunday, September 20 at 1
p.m. Our featured speaker will
be Stephen Flatow, the father of
Alisa (for whom our chapter was
named.) All seats are reserved
and assigned as checks are
received.
Chai Society - For $15 per
month or $180 for the year, you
can be a member of this group
to help support Hadassah. This
year our chapter is planning a
very special “Chai Tea” to honor
our society members.
Call Ella Goldstein 235-9616,
or email her at:. [email protected] to sign up for
Thursday, July 9 and July 16 at
11 a.m. to hear Rabbi Stein discuss the author Philip Roth during this two part session. Cost
Calling for
Minyan
Volunteers
The Minyan Group of
Greenbriar at Whittingham has serviced our
community for over 20
years and now we need
your help in order to continue this most important
function. To cover the
broad spectrum of observance among residents,
we need to ensure the
presence of 10 men at all
Shiva minyans. You do
not have to be fluent in
Hebrew to be part of our
group but we need your
presence. However, if
you are fluent in Hebrew,
we could also ask if you
wish to be a minyan
leader as well. For more
information and to volunteer, please call: Eddie
T h o m p s o n- 8 6 0 - 2 6 6 4 /
Aaron Nitkin-395-7598/
Jim Penzias-860-8344.
for this is $10.
Wednesday, July 29 at 11:30
a.m. join us for Brunch and
Learn with Sally Friedman
“Confessions of a Colunmist: An
Affectionate Look at Ordinary
Life.” Couvert is $26 per person.
Checks made out to Hadassah
and put into Lock Box #19.
GW Friends
By Len Greenberg
GW Friends activities are in
full swing for July. For those of
you who are not familiar with
us, we are an organization
made up of men and women.
Our activities run the gamut
from study groups to speakers
programs and even golf outings. We are always looking
for new people to help us run
our club. If you want to get
involved please call President
Bob Blum at 409-6705. If you
just want to participate as a
spectator or attend a study
group, you are more than welcome. If you are new to the
community we are a great way
to meet new friends. Below is
a list of activities and events
for GW Friends for July.
Wednesday July 1: Pizza
and Pool. If you love the
game of pool or have always
wanted to learn, join us. If you
(Continued on page 12)
JULY 2015 – PAGE 11
JULY 2015 – PAGE 12
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
GW Friends
(Continued from page 11)
have never played, there will
be someone to help you. On
the first Wednesday of the
month we meet at Ciro’s on
Buckelew Ave for Pizza, at
12:30. We reconvene at 2 in
the downstairs pool room of
the Towne Centre for pool. If
you are interested, call Norm
Goodman at 395-8998
Monday July 6: Membership Breakfast. Our monthly
breakfast is for members only.
For just $8 including tax and
tip you can choose from the
Tap Room’s wide selection of
breakfasts. We start at 9 and
finish in about an hour. Lots of
fun for all. Call Howie Katz at
409-8606 for a reservation.
Monday July 6: Movie
Group. Meets monthly to discuss the latest releases. The
group meets at 4 in the Towne
Centre under the leadership of
Bob Modell. 395-8575
Monday July 13: Med-SciTech Group. Each month we
are treated to a presentation
about just about everything in
the fields of Medicine, Science
and Technology. We have
discussed everything from
Autism to the 3-D printer and
dental implants. This month
Elise Lawrence from Life
Choice div of Hospice Compassus will speak of preparations which should be taken
prior to the departure of a
loved one: important details to
be aware of so that survivors
are not left in difficult positions.
This will be an important presentation. The group meets at 4
in the Towne Centre. Call
Mickey Kaplan with any questions. 395-1054
Tuesday July 14: Finance
and Investing Group. Irwin
Kaplan, our resident financial
guru, presents his latest information on investing and finance. You are encouraged to
participate, do your homework,
and make your own decisions.
The group meets at 7:30 in the
Towne Centre. Call Irwin Kaplan with any questions. 8609582
Wednesday July 15: Pool
Club. If you love the game or
have always wanted to learn
join us in the Towne Centre at
2. We meet in the downstairs
pool room. Call Norm Goodman with any questions 3958998
Monday July 20: Music
Group gets together monthly
to hear a presentation from the
wide world of music. We have
heard every genre, composer
and artist imaginable, everything from Bach and Beethoven to Benny Goodman and
the Beatles. If you love music
you’ll want to participate. The
program kicks off at 7:30 in the
Towne Centre. This month Mel
Sahner will be making the
presentation. Call Dave Lasser
with any questions. 409-7667
Tuesday July 21: Walking
Tour of Lower Manhattan
and Wall Street: We will car
pool to the Staten Island Ferry
Terminal on Staten Island and
travel to Manhattan where we
will meet our guide for a walking tour. Group is limited to 20
participants. Call Mike Gerber
for information. Mike’s number
is 409-9380
Tuesday July 21: Lunch
with Friends is a casual get
together in the Tap Room for
lunch, at 1. Just $10 including
tax and tip gets you a special
menu of salads and sandwiches. Seating is limited,
however so you must call
Howie Katz for a reservation.
409-8606
Tuesday July 21: Current
Issues Discussion Group.
Larry Krakower leads the discussion of currents events.
Bring your own ideas and an
open mind. We meet in the
Towne Centre at 7:30. Call
Larry Krakower with any questions. 655-2583
Wednesday
July
22:
Sports Trivia Night. Yankees/Dodgers 1940s and
50s: we loved them or hated
them, but how much do you
remember. Do you remember
the Yankees won five World
Series in a row? Arne Zucker
will lead the discussion of
sports trivia. The group will
meet in the Towne Centre at
7:30. Call Arne with any questions. 409-4344. Place your
name in box 22 to let Arne
know you are coming.
Monday July 27: Book
Group. Under the leadership
of Marv Bachman we meet at
4 to discuss your favorite new
books. This month we will dis-
cuss Road to Character by
David Brooks. The group
meets at 4 in the Towne Centre. Call Marv with any questions.409-5464
Monday July 27: Membership Meeting. Our business
meeting starts at 7 and our
Speaker starts promptly at
7:30. This month our speaker
will be David Aaron who is an
expert on Frank Sinatra and
the Rat Pack. You’ll want to
be there. Our membership
meeting takes place in the
Towne Centre.
Italian American
Sr. Cultural Club
By Rose Corso
On June 5 the Italian American Sr. Cultural club celebrated Father’s Day. Music
from The Sound Affair set us
in the mood for dancing the
night away. Delectable Italian
food rounded out the festive
night. All husbands/ fathers
merit this recognition.
Point of interest: “Sunlight in
a Bottle” Italy’s treasured olive
oil is under threat. The bottles
were presenting a problem.
The stainless steel one was
best at keeping out the light,
but it conducted heat and it
wasn’t cheap. The painted
glass bottle was promising, but
only if it was made with the
right paint. Dark glass was still
an option, though not ideal.
At Fattoria (factory) Altomena, an olive oil farm outside
of Florence, six of the region’s
respected olive oil producers
sat in Mr. Sartori’s tasting
room, three bottles resting on
a tray, waiting for judgement.
Every few months, these gentleman farmers meet on one of
their farms to discuss machinery, bottling, whatever is going
on in their business. “There is
no competition; we all love
olive oil,” said Francesco Biagiotti of Campagnia degle
Oliandoli. “If the whole world
used as much olive oil as we
do, we would be very rich.”
Olive oil, they explained, is
more than something to drizzle
over a dish. It is a lifestyle. It is
a necessary ingredient at
every meal.
Olive oil is as old as time.
(Continued on page 13)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Italian American
(Continued from page 12)
Egy ptians , Pho enicians,
Greeks and Romans all cultivated it. And here, in this sacred conclave of olive oil producers in a small farmhouse
and throughout Tuscany it was
almost a religion: “A good wine
lasts one dinner; a good oil
lasts many meals.” Light, heat
and air are natural enemies.
Puglia produces almost 40%
of the olive oil in Italy. There
are some 60,000,000 olive
trees here, and millions of
them are so old they are protected by the government. “We
love our trees, we take care of
our trees, and our oil is like
wine, each batch is different,”
Ms. Faccilongs commented. “If
it always tastes the same
that’s not how olive oil works.
If it always tastes the same,
you have missed all the magic
of olive oil.”
Starting tips: To ensure you
are getting real extra-virgin
olive oil, make sure the bottle
does not allow much light inside, and look for details like
the name of the farm and an
expiration date (which should
be within 18 months.)
Dates to remember: July 3,
BBQ, singer/D.J. Johnny
Tunes, August 7, come and
have a good time.
Ciao a tutti
Connections
By Dorothy Thompson
Red, White and Blue - A
Happy July 4th to all of you.
An Important Reminder GW CONNECTIONS dues are
now due: $15 of which $5
dues goes directly into our
Charitable Giving Account.
Our fiscal year for dues goes
from June 1 of 2015 through
May 31 of 2016. Save us a
phone call and place your
check of $15, ASAP, into Lock
Box #5 in the Clubhouse
lobby.
If you missed our Installation
of Officers, our Co-Presidents
are Carol Cooper and Marcia
Forrest. If you have any questions concerning Connections,
please give a call to one of
these terrific ladies.
On June 18, our Book and
Author Luncheon was held at
the Knob Hill Golf Club and
Fran Manne and Carol Essner
chaired a terrific day. The
book reviewed is entitled
“Henna House” by Nomi Eve.
The Monroe library has copies
of this enjoyable book.
Our trip to Morristown to
The Seeing Eye Institute with
lunch at The Cozy Cupboard
Tea Room will be on July 16.
There might be some openings and we urge you to call
Charlotte at 409-7969 or Gerry
at 655-2335 today.
Our next General Meeting
will be on August 3. We will
have a live performance by
Sharon Moran who will enthrall
us as she is transformed into
the persona of the incredible
Nellie Bly. Nellie Bly became
the most acclaimed investigative reporter of her day...she
earned international fame by
accomplishing what was considered impossible for a
woman in 1889...traveling
alone around the world in less
than 80 days. Her captivating
story is an inspiration to one
and all. Of course - refreshments will be served.
We have a great deal to
offer everyone. If you are new
or want to join us for the outstanding work we do and the
great events we hold, join us
now. We are planning future
trips so remember to read The
GWVOICE each month.
Connections donates cosmetic samples to The Women
Aware Shelter and clothing to
Home Front. You can bring
them to a meeting or drop
them off with your unwanted,
but in good condition, seasonal clothing to Marilyn
Steiner at 10 Umberland Place
or Doris Becker at 12 Severn
Way. Place items in bags and
drop them at either home, but
not if rain is in the forecast.
We also accept items which
your grandchildren have outgrown.
Our Study Groups continue
to have openings. The Study
Groups are as follows: - Book
Study, The Classics, It’s Debatable, Movie Review, Play
Reading, Poetry and Provocative Thinking. Susan Margulies
- 662-4458 - is in charge of the
Study Groups. Call her and
she will be more than happy to
help you join any of these
groups.
Always check the rounders
in the back hall opposite the
indoor pool for flyers and additional information about GW
Connections.
Remember - Sending a card
through Connections is only a
call away. Call Dorothy at 8602664 and for only $2.50 she
can send a card for you: $1
goes directly into our Charitable Giving Account.
ORT America
By Nancy Feuerstein
By the time you read this in
the Voice, we are well into
enjoying the summer.
The ORT network, spanning
50-60 countries across five
continents, educates more
students than any other nonprofit education organization.
An ORT education focuses on
academic instruction and skills
training for employment, with a
strong grounding in current
science and technology. ORT
students are taught with an
emphasis on giving back to
their communities. An ORT
education is in demand be(Continued on page 14)
JULY 2015 – PAGE 13
JULY 2015 – PAGE 14
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
ORT America
(Continued from page 13)
cause it makes an immediate
and enriching impact on the
lives of children, their teachers, and the local communities.
One special program in Israel, called Kadima Mada
(Science Journey), has raised
math and science scores by
combining advanced educational technology and sophisticated teacher training. By the
end of 2013, ORT had a presence in 88 resource-poor municipalities.
Your ORT dollars are at
work.
Program News
August 26 – HEARING – a
speaker from Total Hearing
Care
October 21 – Women in Art
November 23 – Holiday Party
Fundraising
August 12 – Game Day.
Clubhouse, $26, all welcome,
call Florence 409-8082.
September 9 – Chico’s
Fashion Show, GWclubhouse,
$30, luncheon, Tables of 8,
10, 12. For details, contact
Lollie 235-9680 or Eileen 4094366.
October 28 – Card Party,
$26, call Miriam 409-9160 or
Janice 409-1630.
November 11 – Doylestown,
PA, Guided tour of Font Hill
Castle, plus a visit to the interesting Tile and Glass Company. Details to follow, contact
Lollie 235-9680 or Eileen 4094366.
Refunds for events for medical reasons or if there is a wait
list.
Ongoing: Bowling – Beverly
409-7993; Tribute Cards Rita
395-8993; Cell phones Kay
409-0955; Scrip Stop and
Shop or ShopRite gift cards,
Miriam 409-9160.
Our meetings will be held at
the Senior Center, 7 PM, on
August 26, October 21, November 23, refreshments
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Senior
Sensations
By Elinor Koll
During the cold winter, the
Senior Sensations still had a
“spring-in-our step.” We were
learning new routines and
practicing old dances. Our
show schedule includes the
following: July 26 - Regency
and September 17- Encore.
Our choreographer, Bunny
Feigenbaum has begun tap
classes at Stonebridge. We
welcome the new dancers to
our group.
Yiddish Club
By Donna Steif
On Sunday, June 7, Larry
Strickler, lecturer, educator as
well as veteran “tummler”/
social director for 26 years at
Kutscher’s Country Club in the
Catskills, joined us again for
what proved to be a true “Trip
down Memory Lane.” From
Uncle Miltie to the Beatles, he
explored the Glory Days of
Television. What a fun-filled
morning we all enjoyed!
Please note that unless otherwise specified, the breakfast
programs take place the first
Sunday of every month at
10:15 a.m. Bagels, cream
cheese and coffee are served.
For those who prefer, tea is
also available. Charge is $6
per person unless otherwise
indicated.
IMPORTANT: RESERVATIONS including seating arrangements for your table
must be in NO LATER than 10
days PRIOR to the Sunday
program. AFTER THAT DATE
requests for seating with specific people CANNOT be honored.
Future Programs
On Sunday, July 5 for the
third year in a row, we are delighted to welcome Israel’s
Tzofim Friendship Caravan.
Each year a group consisting
of four girls and four boys, all
17 years old escorted by two
counselors have come to our
Yiddish Club. The young people’s exceptional dancing and
spirited singing in Hebrew,
English and even Yiddish are
something to behold. You will
not be disappointed!
Sunday, August 2, Andrea
Brooks, an award winning
journalist, author and lecturer
will be with us. Her style of
storytelling, humor and insight
are the qualities, which keep
her busy on the speakers’ circuit. Ms. Brooks is an associate fellow at Yale University
and her writing has been included in the Wall Street Journal and Hadassah Magazine.
Her topic will be CUBA IN
TRANSITION: ITS ONCE
AND FUTURE JEWS. On a
recent visit to Cuba, she found
that the relaxation of restrictions both by Americans and
Cubans have resulted in more
travel to Cuba and more people coming forward to reclaim
their Jewish heritage.
Sunday, September 6 Mark Federman will speak on
Russ and Daughters famous
eating place. Most of those
who have lived in New York
City or its environs know of
this NYC Jewish Institution
open for literally 100 years
serving their famed lox and
pickled herring. Mark will truly
take you back in time!
This year’s ANNUAL SHABBAT DINNER will be held on
Friday evening, August 21, in
the Towne Centre Ballroom.
Co-chairpersons Carolyn
Marks and Norman LaPoff
invite all Yiddish Club members to join us for our delicious
traditional Shabbat Dinner
elegantly served and catered
by Lox, Stock and Deli.
We welcome back TUVIA
whose music brings out the
best in one’s dancing and others the joy in just listening. Into
Lockbox #6 place an envelope
marked Shabbat Dinner containing names of those with
whom you wish to be seated
(no more than 10 at a table)
and their checks for $45 per
person. Our Shabbat Dinner is
held IN MEMORY of Roberta
Levey who in the past has cochaired several Shabbat Dinners. She will be sadly missed.
Any questions, call Carolyn at
235-9523 or Norman at 4099935. For dietary restrictions
or handicap requirements, call
(Continued on page 15)
JULY 2015 – PAGE 15
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Can or Can’t You Go Home Again?
By Arnold Bornstein
Novelist Thomas Wolfe wrote
a lengthy novel called “You
Can’t Go Home Again,” which
was highly acclaimed when
published in 1940, after his
death at the age of 38.
It was required reading in
my American Literature course
at New York University, but
frankly I only read excerpts
and relied on a synopsis in the
event of a test. This obviously
was a reflection on me and not
on one of the literary giants of
the 20th Century.
Actually, I was always intrigued by the meaning of the
title, if not the 720-page novel
(in paperback), for in my youth
I always assumed that you
could always go home again.
The fact that Wolfe had
been an English instructor
briefly at NYU (way before my
time), who came from the
mountains of North Carolina,
who died young, and who had
a lengthy love affair with a
married woman 19 years his
senior, all added to my interest
in him.
I kept reading excerpts of
his book, in pursuit of what he
meant that after literary success and years in New York
and Europe, he couldn’t go
home again, back home to the
mountains of North Carolina
and his roots.
It was disappointing to learn
that the meaning of the title
resulted from the autobiographical content of his novels, and that the people back
home that he wrote about felt
that they had been unflatteringly exposed.
Not only were his books
banned from the local library,
but he even received some
death threats. Truly, he felt
that he couldn’t go home
again.
The book’s title evidently
became a worn out saying and
cliché. I recall that there was a
newspaper story about former
residents of the World Trade
Center area in New York who
had difficulty moving back to
Yiddish Club
(Continued from page 14)
Rickey at 860-8344.
Multimedia Center
The first Sunday of every
month the Multi-Media Center is
open before 10:15 am to allow
Yiddish Club members ONLY to
browse through the selection of
books, DVD’s and video cassettes. Librarian Natasha
Rosenbaum is delighted to inform you that there are NEW
books and DVD’s in the Media
Center. Please be aware that
any material borrowed must be
returned by the following
month’s breakfast. For an annotated bibliography, e-mail Natasha at [email protected]
Yiddish Vinkle
If you enjoy listening to Yiddish being spoken and understand even a little, we suggest
you join the Yiddish Vinkle.
The women and men meet in
the Clubhouse on the third
Wednesday of the month from
10 to 11: 30 am. You will be
warmly welcomed. Just remember you must be a member of the Yiddish Club!
For those of you who have
not had a chance to enjoy our
breakfast programs on the first
Sunday of every month or take
any of our bus trips, we welcome you to join us!
the locale in the aftermath of
September 11, and the newspaper’s headline was: You
Can’t Go Home Again.”
I have another interpretation
of the title. The home of your
childhood and youth is a series of countless incidents and
memories, and when looked
back upon with the passage of
time, things are seen and recalled from a different perspective.
What you lived through at
the age of 9, for example,
does not seem to be the same
when you look back at it at
age 19 or 39 or 59 or whenever. The homes that many
people grew up in and thought
were big, for instance, usually
look much smaller when revisited.
Whether the “home” was a
college dorm or your first
apartment or whatever, those
“homes” don’t appear to be the
same when you revisit them.
Relatively recently, I took
my wife on a short journey to
Shamokin, a small, former
coal-mining town in Pennsylvania, where I was born and
where I lived part of my childhood with my sister and
brother in-law. My sister’s former apartment was unoccupied when we visited Shamokin, and I got permission to go
into the apartment to look
around.
As my wife noted, when
somebody goes back home
again, some memories are
good as well as bad. As a
young boy, I thought the apartment was large and well kept,
but now it looked small and
not well kept.
We also took a short journey
to New Haven in Connecticut,
and my wife showed me the
house where she had lived as
a child and teenager. We also
passed the elementary school
that she had attended, and
she explained how much
smaller it was than what she
had remembered in her mind.
I remember years ago going
to a Yankees-Mets game with
our daughter, who still lives on
Long Island in New York. We
drove past the home where we
had lived for more than 20
years before my wife and I
The Good Old Days
By Joan Freeman
When we read about the
state of the world today, we
seniors are apt to sigh and
tell our younger acquaintances the life was really better
when we were young.
Really? Did we not suffer
through the Great Depression, World War II, the Korean War, the Hippie culture,
the Vietnam War, and much
more? Were we not aware of
despots like Hitler, Mussolini,
Stalin, Idi Amin, and countless other scoundrels?
“Everything we buy is more
expensive these days.” Is
that so? Television sets,
computers, ballpoint pens,
and calculators cost less
than when they were first
introduced on the market.
Telephone calls are much
cheaper. (Remember when
your parents warned you not
to speak for more than three
minutes because the rates
would go up?) Recently, I
bought a dress for $24.99,
the same price I paid for
one I purchased to take on
my honeymoon eons ago
when the value of a dollar
was much higher.
“Life was easier in the old
days.” You must be daydreaming, the ditty about
Monday washing, Tuesday
ironing…etc. was sung because that is the way most
households
operated.
There were no washers,
dryers, no microwaves, no
drip- dry fabrics, no takeout food, no one-stop supermarkets where you can
take care of many errands
in one swoop instead of
making separate stops at
the pharmacy, the butcher,
the bakery, or the bank.
“Families were closer.”
Many adult children stayed
mired in the neighborhoods
(Continued on page 18)
moved to New Jersey.
There were immediate
flashbacks that lingered, almost as if memories were being rewound and then fastforwarded in blurring clashing
sequences that overlapped.
My wife and I have lived
near water most of our lives,
be it in Connecticut or New
York or New Jersey. Basically,
it was and is always the same
water and sand and beach
and sky — and our yesterdays
and tomorrows blend into each
other because our lives are
composed of innumerable
memories.
The thought that things
change as you age and look
back is an elusive matter. You
can always go home again
because all your previous
“homes,” even including some
unpleasant memories, always
dwell in your heart.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 16
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
A Hidden Exotic Garden
By Juliet P. Klein
OK. OK. I confess. I’ve lived
for many years about 50 miles
from Staten Island. But, except
for the fun of riding the famous
Staten Island Ferry from Manhattan and back and, of
course, driving on the
dreaded, often bumper to
bumper, Staten Island Expressway…somehow it was
never on my bucket list of
places to visit. Recently, however, I did have occasion to
visit…I’ll describe in a moment. Curious, and not having
a clue about NYC’s third largest borough, I searched
Wikipedia.
Hopefully, you too, will find
some of the following interesting. At one time, before the
narrows formed, Staten Is-
land’s land mass was connected to that of Long Island.
The first European contact
was by the Florentine explorer
Giovanni da Verrazano. Before the early Dutch and English settlers, Indians claimed
the land. The residents of
Staten Island played a significant role in the Revolutionary
War. Among its many attributes is a huge park system
that it boasts to be an unspoiled paradise. The Wikipedia site includes extensive
information about Staten Island’s demographics, languages spoken, its government, politics, etc.
What I found particularly
fascinating is its lists of notable people, in various categories, who were either born
there or had lived there. Just
to mention a few. Actors/
Actresses in Film/TV...Paul
Newman and Joanne Woodward, Robert Loggia, Rick
Schroeder, and Martin Sheen.
Artists… Alice Austen, famous
female photographer, and Frederick Law Olmstead, famous
American landscape architect
who designed many parks in
the U.S including Central Park.
Business/Inventors… Thomas
Adams, founder of the chewing gum industry, Charles
Goodyear, the inventor of vulcanized rubber, and Antonio
Meucci, with claims on the
invention of the telephone.
Writers… Henry David Thoreau and Frank McCort. Historical figures… Aaron Burr,
Giuseppe Garibaldi, famous
Italian general and politician
who assisted in the formation
of a unified Italy, and Daniel D.
Tompkins, the sixth Vice
President of the U.S. and Governor of NY. He established
the Staten Island Ferry.
Additionally at least 37 movies, partially or totally, have
been filmed there; to name a
few… Beautiful Mind, The
Godfather, Goodfellas, and
Scent of a Woman. And some
TV series, also partially or totally… Blue Bloods, Law &
Order - Criminal Intent and
Law & Order- Special Victims’
Unit.
Located on an 83 acre site
sits the Snug Harbor Cultural
Center and Botanical Gardens
popularly known as “The
Smithsonian of Staten Island.”
Originally built as a retirement
home for sailors, it now contains an art museum, New
York City’s second oldest concert hall, a theatre, and beautiful gardens. It features five
landmarked Greek Revival
buildings which is the largest
collection of that style structure in the U.S.
The most unusual and exceptional garden in the complex is The New York Chinese
Scholar’s Garden. And that
exotic garden was the reason
for my visit to Staten Island.
It’s the only authentic classical
Chinese garden built in the
U.S. The concept of a
scholar’s garden is a far cry
from what we expect when we
think of a garden.
As you enter this garden
you are immediately struck by
its sense of serenity. It contains two pavilions, bridges,
walkways, koi fish ponds,
bamboo paths, waterfalls.
Rather than an abundance of
flowers, the emphasis is on
various trees, shrubs and
some flowers, all selected for
their shape, seasonal character and symbolic meaning.
A visit here is not to be hurried. Rather it’s to appreciate
that all aspects of the design
of this garden, as of all Chinese Scholar’s Gardens, have
a specific reason.
This garden was designed
in Suzhou, China. And all the
architectural components were
prefabricated in Suzhou, including roof and floor tiles,
columns and beams, doors
and windows, bridges and
paving materials. The furniture
inside the pavilions is antique,
made in the 19th century in the
style of the Ming period. Rocks
were carefully chosen from the
Suzhou area. All sent by cargo
ship from China in the spring
of 1998. Shortly thereafter a
team of 40 Chinese artists and
artisans from Suzhou took up
residence on the grounds and
began construction. In six
months they had finished their
work and created the only Chinese Scholar’s Garden in the
U.S. It opened in 1999 to great
acclaim.
So, who were the Chinese
scholars? They sat atop the
social order of ancient China,
not only as figures of intellect
and enlightenment but also as
members of the social elite.
Based on the philosophy of
Confucius, the best and brightest people in society were
chosen to rule. By the 7th century A.D. when Europe was in
the depth of the Dark Ages –
China had instituted a series
of civil service examinations
that guaranteed that only the
most intelligent people would
rise to leadership roles in the
government. The students
receiving the best scores were
appointed to the top posts.
Government service brought
many rewards, but also many
dangers. On one hand, an
official held immense social,
political and financial power.
On the other hand, he was
constantly in danger of retribu(Continued on page 17)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
The Jewish
Heritage
Museum Hosts
“The Shanghai
Ghetto”: Film
and Discussion
Freehold, NJ June 11, 2015.
The Jewish Heritage Museum
of Monmouth County is proud
to present The “Shanghai
Ghetto”, a film and discussion
led by Henry Meisel on Thursday, August 13, 2015 at 2 pm.
Mr. Meisel moved to Shanghai
leaving Europe after Kristallnacht. Following the attack on
Pearl Harbor, Shanghai was
occupied by the Japanese and
Mr. Meisel and his family remained in what became
known as the “Shanghai
Ghetto”. After the movie, Mr.
Meisel will discuss his life experience. The program is free
of charge.
For further information and
reservations, please call the
Museum at 732-252-6990 or
email [email protected] The
Jewish Heritage Museum of
Monmouth County is located
at 310 Mounts Corner Drive in
Freehold Township. It is a 501
(c)(3) organization and handicapped acc
Exotic Garden
(Continued from page 16)
tion if his performance was
poor. Such retribution included
public flogging, imprisonment,
banishment, even execution.
It is not surprising that when
these scholars retired, they
sought refuge from the unceasing and unnerving tensions of governing. Many of
them sought serenity in their
own isolated and beautiful
environments. The trend became increasingly popular
among the governing elite in
the 14th century and again in
the late 19th century to have
these beautiful gardens as
part of their homes.
Much of the extraordinary
garden construction of the 14th
century took place in cities
south of the Yangtze River
and in particular in the city of
Suzhou. Marco Polo, one of
the first westerners to visit
Suzhou called it the “Venice of
the Orient” because it’s laced
with rivers, canals and hundreds of bridges. It accumulated vast wealth during the
Ming Dynasty derived from
banking, commerce and agriculture.
Dear Reader, my visit to the
garden was much too short
and I did not know much of the
above descriptive information.
It’s from an interpretive guide
booklet ($1) available at the
admissions office which I
bought at the end of my visit.
Perhaps someday soon I’ll be
able to return and truly enjoy
the experience as well as exploring other parts of the interesting Snug Harbor complex.
If you’re interested in visiting
the garden…be aware that the
garden is not flat…there are a
number of levels…and the
footpaths are extremely uneven…so if you are not surefooted it will be difficult to maneuver. Also be sure to ask,
when paying admission, for
the use of the interpretive
placard which explains and
gives much meaning to what
you’ll see.
Rio De Janeiro
By Dawn Horowitz
Rio De Janeiro is the most
famous city in Brazil and a
heavily visited tourist destination. The city has been the
focus of songs, films and stories. “Carnivale” the parade
before Lent, as celebrated in
Rio, is described as the largest
and most rowdy of all celebrations worldwide. As an example of this kind of behavior, our
guide explained that at Carnivale time the sidewalk plantings are protected by a steel
fence to stop celebrants from
destroying them.
For the rest of the year and
always, Rio is a vibrant, dynamic city, ready to welcome
tourists to explore its special
varied attractions. Thus, my
husband Paul and I were expecting a fun time when we
visited last winter. We were
not disappointed.
Our first stop as we followed
our scheduled guided tour of
Rio was the Arte Deco cathedral. Cone shaped, with the
appearance of a factory, having a reddish-brown brick-like
exterior, the Metropolitan Cathedral of San Sebastian was
designed by Edgar Fonseca.
He styled the cathedral to resemble the pyramids designed
by the Mayas on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula.
Once we entered the structure, it was gorgeous inside.
Sunlight filled the four floor-totowering-ceiling stained-glass
rectangular windows sending
streams of color throughout
the enormous auditorium. The
windows, 210 feet high, reach
the dome and form a sparkling
glass cross at the top, most
impressive and awesome. The
area can seat 5,000 people,
with room for 20,000 standees. In the basement there is
a museum with historic objects
from the cathedral’s past.
Then, we went on to visit
two of the natural wonders of
Rio. The first was to Sugar
Loaf, a mountain in the midst
of the city and noted for the
best viewing of the metropolitan scene and its lively harbor.
We enjoyed a cable car ride,
divided into sections. The cable ride was arranged to jump
from peak to peak until the car
reached the spectacular tip of
Sugar Loaf. As suggested in
the tourist brochure, when we
moved from place to place, we
kept trying to find certain landmarks, but were totally unsuccessful. However, we did get
to see wonderful views of the
entire city.
Next we traveled to Corcovado Mountain where the statue
of Christ-The- Redeemer is located. The huge statue, made
of concrete and soapstone, portrays Jesus with his arms outstretched. This photo has become the main symbol shown
on most of the souvenirs sold in
the city.
We took the cog railway up to
the base viewing platform and
then the elevator to the higher
elevation. Again we enjoyed
seeing a different aspect of the
city from above. At the top, instead of the serene majesty we
expected to be there, we found
large noisy groups of sightseers
with souvenir stands and food
stations and debris floating on
all the level surfaces. It was not
a happy sight.
On the ride down we passed
multiple breadfruit trees in the
midst of the jungle. Paul continued to try to photograph one
large breadfruit hanging from
tree but the rail car swayed as
we rode rapidly lower; it be(Continued on page 19)
JULY 2015 – PAGE 17
JULY 2015 – PAGE 18
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Autism Awareness
By Len Greenberg
April was Autism Awareness
Month. Autism, known as ASD
(Autism Spectrum Disorder) is
a major problem, however,
and we need to do a better job
of making the public aware of
it whenever we can. Our 16
year old grandson, Brandon
has autism. It is a heartbreaker. He can communicate,
however on a very limited basis and rarely speaks in full
sentences. He can read almost
anything, however his reading
comprehension scores are very
low. He spends a lot of time on
the computer, much of which is
taken up with videos meant to
be watched and enjoyed by
children half his age. He can
play complicated piano pieces
by Mozart and Beethoven, but
still recites or types out complete scenes from Sesame
Street. Brandon’s two younger
brothers (ages 11 and 14) often
engage him in games such as
“tag” just to get him to interact
with them.
As often portrayed, autism is
a puzzle that the experts have
not been able to solve. There
is much success in therapy
which will help these children
in dealing with their autism on
a day to day basis. After age
21 those with autism will “age
out” of the public assistance
phase of therapy. It is estimated that over half a million
people with autism will “age
out” in the next 10 years nationwide.
Autism today is diagnosed
in 1 of every 68 children in the
USA. In New Jersey autism is
diagnosed in 1 of every 45
children! It is a disease that
affects the patient’s ability to
communicate in such a way
that normally would allow
some level of competence in
their lives. These children/
people often appear to be in
their own world. They will look
past you when addressed and
rarely respond to the average
person’s attempts to communicate. Many autistic children/
adults never achieve any language. They simply cannot
speak.
Autism can be diagnosed
between the ages of 18 to 24
months. Pediatricians look for
symptoms of autism that can
be present at this age. A child
with autism will rarely display
the ability to communicate.
They often do not play with
other children. Indeed their
play with typical toys is unlike
the usual manner in which
children will play. Toy trucks
will be lined up rather than
“driven.” Often unusual attention is paid to lights and items
that spin. An autistic child often will stare at these items
rather than want to “play” with
them and will not respond to
his or her name being called.
Many times the ability to point
(a communications tool) is
lacking in an autistic child.
The good news is that many
school systems have incorporated Autism Lifestyle programs into their special needs
high school curriculum. Brandon does attend public high
school and is in such a program. In his third and fourth
year he will be placed in a job
training situation with the cooperation of public minded
companies. His abilities will be
determined by the experts in
the school, along with input
from his parents. New Jersey
is known to have one of the
better autism programs in the
country. All this, of course
costs the taxpayers money.
Please be aware of this need
when you look into how your
tax dollars are being spent.
As I mentioned above we
need to be aware of the autism problem. It affects us all.
The statistics are foreboding.
Be sure when communicating
with your legislators and congressmen that they are doing
their part. This problem will
become more and more evident as we see these children
with autism become adults
with autism.
If you have more than a casual interest, there is lots of
information about autism on
the internet. Take the time to
make yourself aware of what
is going on. Such agencies as
Autism N.J. and Autism
Speaks have interesting web
sites that will help you to begin
your journey.
Poetry Corner
My Glorious Chariot
By Irwin Dunsky
My knee draws so much
It should be hung in the
Metropolitan Museum of
Art
A painless position has
become
An unfulfilled prayer I
spend my
Lost sleeping hours
looking for
Swollen and demanding
My knee keeps reminding
me
How simple things can
become complicated
Getting up from a seated
position
Has become a planned
endeavor
Stairs and curbs now
challenges
My knee will eventually
restore
But will I remember to
appreciate
My painless functioning body
For the miracle that it is
Or will I forget and return
To treating my body like a slave
Rather than the glorious
chariot it is
The Good Old Days
(Continued from page 15)
where they grew up, never
experiencing the pleasures
of the wider world, and opportunities for a better life. A
large family sharing one
bathroom was the norm, not
the exception. A bang on
the door, and a frantic “It’s
my turn!” was part of the
daily routine. Dad was busy
all day trying to earn a living. Mom was either at
home orchestrating everything else the family required, or she too was working outside the house. By
the end of the day she was
so bushed she had little energy left for the kids, so
many of them had to fend
for themselves.
“Women were put on a
pedestal, and treated with
deference.” Oh yeah? Poor
women had to work for almost slave wages as there
was no minimum wage. Intelligent women were de-
nied entry into Law Schools
and Medical Schools. Ivy
League colleges and Universities did not admit women.
Middle class women were
encouraged to pursue careers in nursing, teaching, or
secretarial work, or urged to
do work for good causes as
reluctant volunteers. Until
1920 women could not vote,
and many could not do business unless they used their
husband’s name. The pedestal was really upside down.
Certainly, life expectancy
has increased enormously in
recent years, thanks to medical technology. MRIs, antibiotics, heart surgeries, and
stem cell treatments that
were unimaginable in the
past have allowed us to live
healthier lives.
So, next time you wax nostalgic about the good old
days, be grateful that you
don’t still live in them.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 19
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Membership Information
Being a registered member
of the Office/Center is free and
available to Monroe Township
residents, 55 years of age or
older. Advance registration is
recommended to ensure
easy admission into a program. Registration is also
available on the same day of
an event from 9 to 11:30
a.m. For more information,
visit the Senior Center to pick
up a calendar of events or
visit www.monroetwp.com,
and look for the “Office of Senior Services” link under
“Departments.”
Get Your Game On!
On select days and times,
bring friends and play your
game of choice on Monday
and Wednesday afternoons
from 1 to 4 p.m. and on Tuesday and Friday mornings from
9 to noon. Cribbage (for new
and seasoned) players meet
on the 2nd and 4th Wednesday. (Some days are shared
with classes.)
Impulse Quartet
On Monday, July 6, at 1:30
p.m., enjoy this performance
by Impulse! - a women’s a
Capella quartet, singing patriotic tunes and ballads in barbershop harmony. Please register in advance.
Acrylics for All Levels
Starting on Tuesday, July 7,
at 10 a.m., join Andrea for a
fun and creative 3-day class
(7/7, 7/21, 7/28) for beginners
and intermediates. Course fee:
$45 p.p. (includes supplies
and instruction).
Pre-registration is required,
in-person, with payment.
Space limited.
Better Bidding
Starting on Tuesday, July 7,
at 1 p.m., join Janet Wood for
this 10 session class as she
teaches you how to be a better
bidder by using some of the
new conventions that facilitate
partner communication. This
course IS NOT SUITABLE for
beginners. Space limited.
Course fee: $20 p.p., due
upon registering in advance, in
-person. Please register in
advance.
Movie Musical Love Affair
On Tuesday, July 7, at 1:30
p.m., explore and listen to the
most memorable songs from
Hollywood with Francine and
Joel. You will be singing along
to such favorites: “Caberet”,
“Fame”, “The Wizard of Oz”,
and much more! Please register in advance.
Being Abreast About
Breast Health
On Wednesday, July 8, at
noon, Princeton Radiology and
the Breast Cancer Resource
Center host an interactive
lunchtime presentation that
focuses on information and
tools regarding breast health.
A pizza lunch is provided.
Space is limited. Please register in advance.
Summer Evening Series
On select Wednesdays, our
annual Summer Evening Series continues! Please be sure
to consult the Summer Series
Pamphlet about Frosty Palace
Revisited (on July 8, at 7 p.m.)
and Johnny D & The Decades
(on July 22, at 7 p.m.) with
catered fare from City Streets.
(Both events require a ticket
purchase in advance.)
Moving Forward: Widows,
Wives & Friends
On Thursday, July 9, from
10:30 a.m. to 12:00 p.m., join
nationally recognized speaker
and author, Kathleen Rehl,
Ph.D., CFP, and author and
lecturer, Norman J. Politziner,
CFP, for a special workshop
Rio De Janeiro
(Continued from page 17)
came a challenge. Nevertheless, he finally did get one
good picture.
During our touring we passed
the 100,000 seat Maracana
Football Stadium. We were not
allowed to enter but, from the
outside, it looked very green
and very open. Our guide told
us it will be the venue for the
opening of the 2016 Olympic
Games.
Two world-famous beaches
are located within Rio De Janeiro city limits, the Copacabana and Ipanema. (The
Ipanema is the subject of the
bossa nova song The Girl from
Ipanema, which was a hit during
the mid-1960s.) Situated at the
edge of the central downtown
business district and on the Atlantic Ocean, this city’s seacoast
has the same fine brown-pink
sand beaches that we know
from our Jersey shore. It was
summer when we visited and
many residents were enjoying
the benefit of living at the
ocean’s side.
We immediately compared
the similarities and differences
of the scenes on our beaches
with those of Rio. We saw the
colorful umbrellas and tiny cabins being used by the numerous
family members sitting together
and we watched the active
groups of young people playing
soccer and volleyball on the
sand. However, no boardwalk
adjoined the beach; a one-lane
concrete pedestrian walkway
bordered the sandy area.
On the opposite side of the
street, we noticed that elegant
hotels and restaurants were
available and invited people to
enter. It seemed to contrast a
fancy lifestyle with an ordinary
one. Also there was a wide divided roadway for cars and
buses directly connected to the
promenade. The appearance of
this coastal scene, to me, was
more European than American.
Flags and banners flew from
poles planted in the sand. Individual carts, kiosks and stalls
were stationed along the beachfront road selling souvenirs and
food. We had planned to wander onto the beach but the temperature was 97 degrees in the
sun and the heat got to us. We
quickly left the region, hunted for
shade, and then ran for cold
liquid refreshment.
Rio was all it promised to
be. It was a modern, urban
metropolitan area with the
usual amenities plus the
greenery of its jungle environment. I loved seeing the influence of the mountains, nature’s wonders, as part of the
regular sightseeing attraction
touted by the city’s guides.
focusing on the fragile time of
becoming a widow, coping
with grief and stress, and dealing with family and financial
issues. A donation of $5 is
required at registration to help
support the charitable efforts
of the Friends of the Senior
Center, Inc. Please register in
advance.
Silver Poets Club
On Friday, July 10, 10 a.m.,
poetry readers/writers are welcome to join Vijay Joshi’s new
poetry club. This second session brings an appearance
and reading from our first featured, award winning poet,
Audrey Henderson, whose
manuscript, Airstream, was
published in November.
Please register in advance.
The Vertigo Buzz
On Friday, July 10, at 2
p.m., Dr. Anita Bhandarkar,
Au.D., CCC-A, discusses the
signs, causes, and risk factors
of vertigo and how to go about
treating this condition. Please
register in advance.
Collage: Painting
with Paper
Starting on Monday, July 13,
from 10 a.m to noon, join the
ranks of Matisse, Bearden,
and Schwitters as Karen Starrett, of Creative Aging Arts,
LLC, helps you experiment
with different kinds of papers,
pastes, and acrylic mediums
to create images that convey a
visual story during this 2-day
workshop (ends 7/20). Course
fee: $7 p.p., due upon registering in-person, in advance.
Marc Chagall
On Monday, July 13, 10
a.m., Maurice Mahler, Art Historian, brings the art of Marc
Chagall to life during this DVD
presentation. Visit the Master
in his studio and hear, in his
(Continued on page 20)
Caregiver
Support Group
Meetings are 90 minutes
Registration is not necessary.
Focus: Spouse/Partner
2ND Thursday at 1:30 p.m.
Location: Saint Peter’s
Adult Day Care Center
Monroe Township
Questions may be directed to Stephanie Fitzsimmons, RN, NP
at 1-800-269-7508, press 1, press 8662
Sponsored by Saint Peter’s University Hospital
JULY 2015 – PAGE 20
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
(Continued from page 19)
own words, his unique methods. Please register in advance.
Jimmy Givens Trio
On Monday, July 13, at 1:30
p.m., enjoy a musical afternoon with the Jimmy Givens
Trio, consisting of Mark Cohn
on keyboards, Dorian Parreott
on sax and vocals (who is the
President of the American
Federation of Musicians Local
#399) and Jimmy Givens on
drums (the “Last of the Lakewood Hotel Musicians”). Support of this grant/performance
comes from the Special Film
Trust Fund and the Musicians
Performance Trust Fund.
Please register in advance.
Cher: Farewell Tour
On Thursday, July 16, at 1
p.m., join Mike Ferreira as he
shares the exciting farewell
tour (on DVD) of American’s
Favorite Diva: Cher. This is an
extraordinary concert, featuring her hit songs, not to be
missed. Please register in advance.
Post July 4th
Celebration
On Friday, July 17, from 12
to 2 p.m., join the Office Staff
and the Friends of the Senior
Center, Inc., as they combine
forces to celebrate the season!
On the Menu: Assorted sandwiches and sides catered by
Lox, Stock & Deli with musical
entertainment by Jerry Castaldo. A special summer treat
will be provided by Gil & Bert’s
Ice Cream. Tickets: $15 p.p.,
due upon registering inperson, in advance. Sorry, no
refunds for this venue. Reserved tables are granted for
parties of 6 to 8.
NEW: Boot Camp
Starting on Friday, July 17,
at 10 a.m., join Georgeann for
10 sessions of boot camp —
complete with different stations to strengthen, tone, build
endurance and improve balance. Course fee: $35 p.p.,
due upon registering inperson, in-advance.
Art of the Masters
On Friday, July 17, at 2
p.m., join our friend Christina,
from Creative Notions, as she
discusses the career and life
of Peter Max. After the lecture,
you will create a personal
masterpiece on plastic using
the artist’s style. Lecture only?
Sign up over the phone. Project? Please register in-person
to get a coupon while they
last. Please register in advance.
Newsies: History of the
Newspaper
On Monday, July 20, at 1:30
p.m., take a trip back in time
as Maryanne ChristianoMistretta provides an interactive discussion about the history of the newspaper industry—from the first newspaper
published in 59 B.C. to today’s
technological advances affecting its very existence. (Our
speaker worked in the newspaper industry herself as a
journalist at The Montclair
Times, The Herald News, and
The Aquarian Arts.) Please
register in advance.
Michael & Ted Present
On Tuesday, July 21, at 2
p.m., join Michael and Ted,
from WWFM’s “The Classical
Network”, as they explore the
development of Jerome Kern,
from his first published song to
the last song he wrote for
Broadway. Please register in
advance.
Intro to Yoga
Around the World
On Thursday, July 23, at 9
a.m., learn about Eileen’s approach to chair yoga during
this introductory session.
Then, if you like, you may sign
up for the new class that starts
on Thursday, August 6, at 9
a.m., for 8 sessions.
(Registration information about
the class will appear in our
next issue.)
Quick & Healthy
Snacks Demo
On Thursday, July 23, at
1:30 p.m., join Anthony Dissen, MA, RD, CentraState, for
an interactive cooking demonstration focusing on quick and
healthy snack foods. Space is
(Continued on page 21)
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra
Announces Composers of the
2015 NJSO Edward T. Cone
Composition Institute
The New Jersey Symphony
Orchestra announces the four
composers of the 2015 NJSO
Edward T. Cone Composition
Institute, a multi-faceted program that promotes new music
and emerging composers. The
Institute—which runs July 12–
16 on the Princeton University
campus—is presented in collaboration with the Princeton
University Department of Music
and generously funded in part
by the Edward T. Cone Foundation, Princeton University and
the National Endowment for the
Arts.
Selected from an international
applicant pool of 38 university
composition students and composers in the early stages of
their professional careers, the
four composers of the Institute
will participate in five days of
intense compositional evaluations and consultations. The
program will culminate in a
world-premiere performance of
the participants’ works by the
NJSO on Thursday, July 16, at
7:30 pm at the Richardson Auditorium; the concert also includes
Urban Ocean by Institute Director and Princeton University
Department of Music Chair Steven Mackey.
Luke Carlson
The Philadelphia Inquirer has
called the music of composer
and conductor Luke Carlson
“magical” and “otherworldly.”
The New York Times has called
Carlson’s work “personal and
strong.” His compositions have
garnered multiple honors, including first prize in the 2014
MACRO competition and multiple prizes from Network for New
Music; he was a composition
fellow at the 2013 Aspen Music
Festival. He received his PhD
from the University of Pennsylvania and currently lives in
Philadelphia.
Carlson’s Institute composition, The Burnished Tide, is the
recipient of the 2013 Druckman
Prize, a commission from the
Aspen Music Festival that premiered in the summer of 2014
under the direction of Robert
Spano. Carlson says: “Wanting
to compose a work of continuous energy and vibrancy, I took
my inspiration from the idea of a
visual artist’s excited urgency in
attempting to capture an image
during the fleeting period of time
known as the ‘golden hour,’ the
time of day when the setting sun
imparts long shadows and rich
colors. The work flows in a single arc, consisting of distinct but
connected sections of intensity,
introspection, playfulness and
aggressiveness. Utilizing a variety of orchestral colors and instrumentations, my intent is to
project a sense of relentless
energy and unbridled excitement.”
Brendan Faegre
Portland, Oregon, native
Brendan Faegre is a composer,
educator, bandleader and percussionist. His music draws
inspiration from jazz and rock
drumming, Hindustani classical
music and contemporary concert music. Faegre’s works have
been performed internationally
at festivals including Huddersfield, Gaudeamus, Beijing Modern and Cabrillo. He has received commissions from
groups such as the New York
Youth Symphony, Debut Orchestra, Slagwerk Den Haag,
Ensemble Klang and the David
Kweksilber Big Band.
www.brendanfaegre.com
Of his Institute composition,
Faegre says: “Inspired by the
ideas and music of Beck Hansen, Dirt to Gold takes
‘worthless’ sounds and transforms them into powerful, meaningful music. This transformation
happens many times throughout
the piece, and on many different
levels. Abrasive thumps and
squeaks crystallize into cool
grooves, ever-shifting rhythms
gradually settle into clear patterns, and aluminum foil makes
several high-profile appearances in the orchestra.”
Shuying Li
The Seattle Times has hailed
award-winning composer Shuying Li as “a real talent here waiting to emerge” with her “skillful
orchestral writing, very colorful
language and huge waves of
sound.” Her compositions have
been performed by Seattle
Symphony Orchestra, Orkest de
ereprijs (Netherlands), Avanti!
Chamber Orchestra (Finland),
ICon Arts Ensemble (Romania),
Cecilia Quartet (Canada) and
Opera From Scratch (Canada),
among others. She holds a
Master’s Degree from the University of Michigan, where she
(Continued on page 21)
Eat-Your-Heart-Out
Sisters in Pain © Jan. 2015
By Myra Danon
Jemma Nigh Productions
This is a satirical look at one
woman’s reaction to her husband’s unexpected announcement of his retirement from his
career, and his eagerness to
spend more “together” time.
The thought of her sharing
more hours than she has had
to for many years, fills her with
dismay (more like dread) at
first, but she recovers. Determined to find ways to return to
her former lifestyle, she sets
him up with a scheme that
accomplishes that goal—
temporarily. She shares her
angst and her plans with her
friends, who have experiences
of their own to tell.
Any resemblance to persons
who seem familiar to any of
the characters is purely and
utterly coincidental.
Performances
All Adults Welcome
July 23, Thursday: 7 p.m.
Twin Rivers Branch of the
Mercer County Library
276 Abbington Drive, E. Windsor, N.J.
August 13, Thursday: 7 p.m.
Monmouth County Library,
Headquarters
125 Symmes Drive, Manalapan
*August 14, Friday: 1:30
p.m.
Monroe Senior Center
*Must be a Monroe resident
and a registered member of
the Monroe Senior Center to
attend this performance. Registration is free.
JULY 2015 – PAGE 21
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra
(Continued from page 20)
will start pursuing a doctorate
degree in September.
www.shuyingli.com
Li says: “Do Not Go Gentle
Into That Good Night” was inspired by Dylan Thomas’ poem.
However, the music itself was
more independently developed.
There are two themes—one is
introduced in a vague and
hidden way and suppressed
until the climax arrives; while
the other is varied and presented many more times
through the work. These two
themes finally mingle together. The whole process is
also a realization from the
dark to the bright.”
Reinaldo Moya
Venezuelan-American composer Reinaldo Moya is the
recipient of the 2015
McKnight Composers Fellowship, Van Lier Fellowship from
Meet the Composer and
Aaron Copland Award from
the Copland House. A member of the faculty at St. Olaf
College in Minnesota, he
graduated from The Juilliard
School with both master’s and
doctoral degrees, under the
tutelage of Samuel Adler and
Robert Beaser. In conjunction
with librettist Mark Campbell,
Moya has been commissioned by the Minnesota Opera to write a new work for
their Project Opera, to be premiered
in
2016.
www.reinaldomoya.com
Of his work Siempre Lunes,
Siempre Marzo, Moya says:
“The title of this work refers to
Melquíades, the Gypsy’s
room in Gabriel García
Márquez’s One Hundred
Years of Solitude. In this
room, time passes in a very
peculiar way: it is always
Monday, and always March.
This piece is then based
around the figure of
Melquíades, who is one of the
most intriguing characters in
the novel. This orchestral
work is not programmatic or
narrative. Instead, each
movement can be seen as a
vignette inspired by the various aspects or episodes related to Melquíades.”
The Institute experience
At the Institute, participating
composers will have their
work rehearsed and performed by the NJSO and will
participate in master classes
with Institute Director Steven
Mackey, as well as receive
feedback from guest conductor JoAnn Falletta and NJSO
musicians. The Institute will
also provide career-enriching
sessions with music-industry
leaders, including Boosey &
Hawkes, Inc., New Music
USA, Subito Music Corporation and WQXR’s online newmusic station Q2 Music, as
well as executive speech
coach, author and Inc.com
columnist Sims Wyeth. By the
conclusion of this laboratory
experience, participants will
have gained invaluable musical and practical feedback
about writing for orchestra.
Mackey says: “What is truly
unique about this Institute is
the multifaceted experience
the composers receive even
beyond the major opportunity
to workshop with a professional orchestra. The business
of composing goes beyond the
creative musical process, and
at the Institute, industry leaders will illuminate key elements of publishing, promotion
and other important practical
issues these composers will
encounter as they launch and
sustain successful careers.”
Falletta conducts a concert
featuring each Institute composer’s work, as well as
Mackey’s Urban Ocean, on
July 16 at 7:30 pm at Richardson Auditorium. Generaladmission tickets for “Four:
New Orchestral Works” are
$15 and are available for purchase
online
at
www.njsymphony.org/events/
detail/four-new-orchestralworks or by phone at
1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476).
The Orchestra may program
Institute composers’ works on
future regular-season concerts. After giving the world
premiere of 2014 Institute
composer Chris Rogerson’s
Night and the City at last
year’s Institute concert, the
NJSO will perform the work on
its 2015–16 classical finale
program.
Additional information about
the Institute is available at
www.njsymphony.org/institute.
THE NEW JERSEY
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Named “a vital, artistically
significant musical organization”
by The Wall Street Journal, the
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra
embodies that vitality through its
statewide presence and critically
acclaimed performances, education partnerships and unparalleled
access to music and the Orchestra’s superb musicians.
Under the bold leadership of
Music Director Jacques Lacombe, the NJSO presents
classical, pops and family programs, as well as outdoor summer concerts and special
events. Embracing its legacy as
a statewide orchestra, the
NJSO is the resident orchestra
of the New Jersey Performing
Arts Center in Newark and regularly performs at the State Theatre in New Brunswick, Count
Basie Theatre in Red Bank,
Richardson Auditorium in
Princeton, Mayo Performing
Arts Center in Morristown and
bergenPAC in Englewood. Partnerships with New Jersey arts
organizations, universities and
civic organizations remain a key
element of the Orchestra’s
statewide identity.
In addition to its lauded artistic programming, the NJSO presents a suite of education and
community engagement programs that promote meaningful,
lifelong engagement with live
music. Programs include the
three-ensemble NJSO Youth
Orchestras, school-time Concerts for Young People performances and multiple offerings—
including the El Sistemainspired NJSO CHAMPS
(Character, Achievement and
Music Project)—that provide
and promote in-school instrumental instruction as part of the
NJSO Academy. The NJSO’s
REACH (Resources for Education and Community Harmony)
chamber music program annually brings original programs—
designed and performed by
NJSO musicians—to a variety
of settings, reaching as many as
17,000 people in nearly all of
New Jersey’s 21 counties.
For more information about
the
NJSO,
visit
www.njsymphony.org or email
[email protected]
Tickets are available for purchase
by
phone
1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476) or
on the Orchestra’s website.
The New Jersey Symphony
Orchestra’s programs are made
possible in part by The New
Jersey State Council on the
Arts, along with many other
foundations, corporations and
individual donors. United is the
official airline of the NJSO.
TOWNE CENTRE NEWS
By Monica Caterson, Clubhouse / Recreation Manager
(Continued from page 20)
limited. Tickets: $5 p.p., due
upon registering in-person by
7/15. Please make your check
payable to: “CSMC-HAC”.
Stress Management
On Friday, July 24, at 1:30
p.m., join Toby Ehrlich, LCSW,
Director of Corporate Marketing
for The Oscar and Ella Wilf
Campus for Senior Living, as
she identifies and examines the
stressors in everyday life. Learn
techniques to help relieve and
reduce stress. Please register in
advance.
Emily Dickinson
On Wednesday, July 29, at
10:30 a.m., join Irene Curran,
retired LAL teacher from Monroe Twp., as she explores the
life and works of the reclusive
“Belle of Amherst”. Wearing
white, Ms. Curran recites Emily
Dickinson’s poetry and shares
details of her life and “the scandal.” Please register in advance.
Jerry’s Travels
On Wednesday, July 29, at
1:30 p.m., take an armchair
adventure, with Jerry Mirelli, as
he journeys through the sights
of India and shares his personal
insights during this slide presentation. Please register in advance.
All Things French
On Thursday, July 30, at 1:30
p.m., Paul White, from Huntington Reading Group, presents a
unique look at the beauty that is
France and the “City of Lights”
that is Paris. Travel the streets,
view iconic landmarks, and enjoy the art of the Louvre, during
this PowerPoint presentation.
Please register in advance.
Pizza Plus Mark Twain
On Friday, July 31, before
enjoying a slice or two of pizza,
a drink, and a treat, we start this
program at 10 a.m. (coffee provided) in order to begin the first
episode of this 2-part PBS, DVD
presentation, directed by Ken
Burns. In this “all-day” event,
explore the extraordinary story
of Mark Twain — told primarily
in his own words so that you
may personally experience his
compelling yet contradictory
genius. Once lunch is served,
the second episode will commence. Each episode runs for
two hours. (Please expect to
spend the day with us at the
Center.) Tickets: $6 p.p., due
upon registering in-person, in
advance.
Remember Our
On-Going Offerings
Love to Sing? Join the Monroe Township Chorus on Tuesday mornings at the Senior
Center at 9:30 am. Directed by
Sheila W.
Have a computer question?
Make an appointment with
George R. for a one-on-one
consultation, by appointment, on
Tuesdays, Wednesdays, and
Thursdays, for an hour.
Intrigued by the world around
us? Science Fans will enjoy
SCIENCE TODAY at 1:30 p.m.,
on the 4th Tuesday of every
month. Hosted by Vivian S.
(Please be sure to register!)
WHOA Entertainment
WHOA Trips
101 Years of Broadway
Saturday, July 18, 2015 – 8PM
Amish Country
July 22, 2015
$25 – At the Monroe Township High School
On Sale to Residents &
Non-Residents Now!!!
Summer 2015 Cruise
Aug. 27 – Sept. 5, 2015
Robert Klein & Susi Cruz
Saturday, August, 15, 2015 – 8PM
$25 – At the Monroe Township High School
On Sale to Residents: Thursday, July 2nd
On Sale to Non-Residents: Monday, July 6th
Saturday, September 19, 2015
Saturday, October 17, 2015
Saturday, November 21, 2015
*Flyers are in the Towne Centre*
WHOA’s Sunday Movies
In The Ballroom @ 1:00PM
*There will be no
movies in July
due to Ballroom Renovations*
*See flyer for future movies.
Baltimore Trip
September 2015
*Check Flyers*
Winter 2016 Cruise
January 17-29, 2016
*Flyers in Towne Centre*
WHOA Atlantic City
Wednesday, July 1, 2015
“Golden Nugget”
On Sale Now
Wednesday, August 5, 2015
“Bally’s”
On Sale Now
WHOA Duffy Square
Wednesday, July 15, 2015
Wednesday, August 19, 2015
Wednesday, September 16, 2015
*All Duffy Trips are on Sale Now*
JULY 2015 – PAGE 22
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
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(732) 887-5437.
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TRANSPORTATION DOCTOR – Airports, trains, piers,
doctors, local service, NYC.
Reliable and references. Call
Lon J. (732) 423-1847.
NAT TRANSPORTATION –
Monroe resident. All airports,
shipyards, NYC and local.
Doctor and hospital visits.
(917) 657-5611.
APPELSON CAR SERVICE –
Owner operated, fully licensed
and inspected vehicles providing airport, doctor, shopping
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transportation, 24/7. We offer
the fairest and most competitive prices in town. Call or text
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RICK’S CAR SERVICE – Professional driver. Greenbriar
resident, reasonable rates.
(609) 902-9979.
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Call John (732) 610-0703.
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jobs welcome. Power washing
also available. Call (609) 4683412.
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H V A C R
L i c e n s e
#19HC00038100. (732) 616-9939.
WINDSOR MOVING COMPANY – Helping families pack
and move for over 20 years.
Fully insured. Lic. PC00512.
Call (609) 448-8840.
Miscellaneous/
Services
LARRY CAMPANELLA sings
songs from the Rat Pack and
other greats from the 50’s70’s!
www.palmbeachrecords.net
(732) 501-4226.
DJ ENTERTAINMENT – Specializing in music from the
1940’s to 1990’s. (732) 2384306.
PC PROBLEM SOLVERS –
Low priced service. Slow computer? Viruses or spyware?
Pop-ups? Computer and internet set-ups. We make house
calls. Call Herman (609) 4090824.
COMPUTER REPAIRS - RJF
Sales Company LLC (formerly
Monroe Computer Service). Is
your computer running slow? It
may need a tune-up. Desktop
and laptop repair in your
home. Virus removal and protection. Monroe resident with
over 20 years of computer experience. www.monroecomputer.com (732) 723-9537
or (732) 967-3400.
COMPUTER ASSISTANCE in
seniors home. Help with all
aspects. Selection, setup and
training. (609) 409-7631.
Wanted to Buy
BUYING & SELLING GUNS –
Call for pricing. (609) 5589509. Ask for David. Licensed
Firearms Dealer.
For Sale
USED PRIDE RALLY 3WHEEL electric scooter. $300
or best offer. Bob (609) 3957043.
DOUBLE PLOT for sale Beth
Israel — Woodbridge $3,500.
Call 609-395-0777.
Help & Health
Services
CARING HANDS HOME
CARE PROVIDER – Certified
Home Health Aide Services.
Companion care. Hourly or
live-in. Skilled Nursing visits.
Licensed, accredited, insured,
bonded. 92 Main Street, Matawan, NJ 07747. (732) 4412273.
CARING ELDER CARE – A
local service you can trust. We
will help you live independently; two hours a day or a few
hours a week. Experienced.
Flexible schedule. (646) 4130813.
www.CaringElderCare.com
AT ANGEL TOUCH HOME
CARE we provide excellent
care for elderly and we make
sure that we have the best
qualified workers for the job.
We are a company that cares
for our patients and makes
sure they are treated by the
best. 24-hour care (living with
resident). Elderly companionship. Call (609) 907-6059.
ANNA’S HOME CARE – Certified professional caregiver is
looking for live-in/live-out job in
Monroe Township. Experienced, references. Driver’s
license. Accepts long-term
care insurance. Low prices.
Private care option. Call
Anna at (609) 409-1600 or
(908) 337-7462.
OUR CARING HOME COMPANIONS help seniors live at
home. Personal care, meals,
housework, transportation, up
to 24 hour care. Top references and screenings, we do
things your way. Affordable
rates. VISITING ANGELS.
(732) 656-7720.
Housecleaning
IZABELA’S CLEANING SERVICE - Professional house
cleaning. Quality work. References available. Reasonable.
2 bedroom/2 bath, $65 and up.
Experienced. Free estimates.
(609) 954-0181 or (609) 6569281.
NICE
JEWISH
GIRL’S
HOUSE CLEANING and
Health Aide Service. 20 years
experience. Low rates. Insured
and bonded. Call Eileen at
(609) 860-9050.
Notice to All GW VOICE
Contributors
As the scope of the GW
VOICE has grown, the
process of publishing each
month is of necessity almost entirely handled by
computer, hence is very
sensitive to the method of
transmission and the condition of copy submitted for
publication.
Since we have observed
that much of the copy received is actually generated on a computer, we
believe it can be transmitted to the GW VOICE editor by computer as well. Email
to
gwvoice
@comcast.net. It is a relatively simple process to
attach copy to an e-mail or
paste it into the body of an
e-mail directly. If you wish,
we will be happy to provide
instruction at the GW
VOICE office at a mutually
convenient time.
If you do not have e-mail
capability, copy must be
typed using a conventional
typewriter, word processor
or computer and delivered
UNFOLDED, UNCLIPPED,
and UNSTAPLED to facili-
tate scanning. Copy must
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and brought to the GW
VOICE office in the annex
section of the Towne Centre. A mailbox for copy is
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the entrance to the office.
Please use 10-12 point
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exotic typefaces or bold
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If you wish, you may put
copy in a 9” X 12” envelope. DO NOT FOLD INTO
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Thank you for your cooperation. We encourage you
to submit copy for publication and will do everything
we can to help you meet
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have any questions, please
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EMAIL BULLETIN DELIVERY
SOME OF THE EMERGENCY AND OTHER
EMAIL BULLETINS FROM MANAGEMENT
SENT TO RESIDENTS ARE BEING
RETURNED AS UNDELIVERABLE. TO
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THE EMAIL ADDRESS
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TO YOUR CONTACT LIST.
HENRYKA’S
HOUSE
CLEANING – Quality work.
References available. Call
(609) 586-0806.
The GW
VOICE
Editorial
Staff
welcomes any
resident
interested in
joining us in
any capacity.
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Please print your ad and mail it to Princeton Editorial
JULY 2015 – PAGE 23
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
1
5
6
10:15 am Yiddish Club
6:00 pm Golf Party
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Yoga
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am GW Debatables
10:00 am Body Sculpting
10:00 am Line Dancing
11:00 am Aquacise
12:00 pm Men’s Fitness
12:45 pm Duplicate Bridge
1:00 pm Woodworking
1:00 pm Painting
1:00 pm Storm Water Mgt
Comm. Mtg.
1:00 pm Woodworking Club
1:00 pm Health Lecture
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
4:00 pm GW Friends Movie
Club
5:30 pm Pickleball
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6:00 pm Water Volleyball
6:00 pm Zumba
12
13
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
19
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
26
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Hadassah Board
Mtg.
9:00 am Yoga
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Body Sculpting
10:00 am Line Dancing
11:00 am Aquacise
12:00 pm Men’s Fitness
12:45 pm Duplicate Bridge
1:00 pm Woodworking
1:00 pm Painting
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
4:00 pm GW Friends Med-Sci
Group
5:30 pm Pickleball
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6:00 pm Water Volleyball
6:00 pm Zumba
7:30 pm History Club
2
FRIDAY
3
4
9:30 am Decoupage
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Entertainment Mtg.
1:00 pm Cards
1:00 pm Knitwits & Art &
Sewing Class
2:00 pm Senior Social Club
5:30 pm Pickleball
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm Duplicate Bridge
7:00 pm Stained Glass
Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
7
8
9
10
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Computer Club
9:30 am Shuffleboard
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Aerobic Fitness
10:00 am Aquacise
1:00 pm Quilting
1:30 pm Bridge Lessons
7:00 pm Yoga
7:30 pm Residents Civic
Club Open Mtg.
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:30 am Decoupage
9:30 am WHOA Building and
Grounds Comm. Mtg.
9:45 am Pickleball
11:00 am WHOA Towne
Centre Mtg.
1:00 pm Cards
1:00 pm Knitwits & Art &
Sewing Class
1:00 pm GWCA Finance
Comm. Mtg.
2:00 pm Senior Social Club
5:30 pm Pickleball
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm Duplicate Bridge
7:00 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
9:30 am Yiddish Entert.
Group
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Aquacise
1:00 pm 3D Dimensional Art
6:30 pm Canasta
7:00 pm Bingo
11
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Sculpting & Arts/
Crafts Class
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am GWCA Site
Review Comm.
10:30 am Golf Mtg.
10:30 am Line Dancing
1:00 pm Cards
2:00 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
7:00 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
14
15
16
17
18
9:30 am Decoupage
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Chorus
10:00 am WHOA Landscape
Comm. Mtg.
1:00 pm Senior Social Club
(*Ballroom Open*)
1:00 pm Cards
1:00 pm Knitwits & Art &
Sewing Class
5:30 pm Pickleball
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm Duplicate Bridge
7:00 pm Stained Glass
Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
10:00 am Tennis Club
9:00 am Yoga
10:00 am Pickleball
9:30 am Painting Group
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Aquacise
1:00 pm 3D Dimensional Art
6:30 pm Canasta
Tournament
22
23
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Computer Club
9:30 am Shuffleboard
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am GWCA Covenants
Comm. Mtg.
10:00 am Aerobic Fitness
10:00 am Aquacise
1:00 pm Quilting
1:30 pm Bridge Lessons
5:30 pm Pickleball
6:30 pm ORT Mtg.
7:00 pm Provocative Thinking
7:00 pm Yoga
7:30 pm GW Friends Sports
9:30 am Decoupage
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Chorus
1:00 pm Cards
1:00 pm Knitwits & Art &
Sewing Class
2:00 pm Senior Social Club
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm Duplicate Bridge
7:00 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
24
25
29
30
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Sculpting & Arts/
Crafts Class
9:00 am AARP Course
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Line Dancing
12:30 pm Orientation Mtg.
1:00 pm Cards
2:00 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm WHOA Covenants
Comm. Mtg.
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Finance Study
Group
21
27
28
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Sculpting & Arts/
Crafts Class
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Line Dancing
1:00 pm Cards
2:00 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
7:00 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm GW Friends Current
Issues Group
9:00 am Sculpting & Arts &
Crafts Class
9:30 am Yiddish Club Mtg.
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Line Dancing
1:00 pm Cards
2:00 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
7:00 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:30 am GWCA Open
Workshop Mtg.
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Shuffleboard
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am The Yiddish Vinkle
10:00 am Aerobic Fitness
10:00 am Aquacise
1:00 pm Quilting
1:30 pm Bridge Lessons
7:00 pm Billiards
7:00 pm Yoga
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Shuffleboard
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Aerobic Fitness
10:00 am Aquacise
11:30 am Hadassah Brunch
1:00 pm Quilting
1:30 pm Bridge Lessons
6:00 pm GWCA Welcome
Comm. Reception
7:00 pm Yoga
9:30 am Decoupage
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Chorus
1:00 pm Cards
1:00 pm Knitwits & Art &
Sewing Class
2:00 pm Senior Social Club
5:00 pm IASCC Board Mtg.
5:30 pm Pickleball
7:00 pm Cards
7:00 pm Duplicate Bridge
7:00 pm Stained Glass
Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:00 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Aquacise
1:00 pm 3D Dimensional Art
6:15 pm Italian American
Club
SATURDAY
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Shuffleboard
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Aerobic Fitness
10:00 am Aquacise
1:00 pm Quilting
1:30 pm Bridge Lessons
7:00 pm Residents Civic
Club Board Mtg.
7:00 pm Yoga
7:30 pm New Kids on the
Block
20 *BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:00 am Yoga
9:30 am WHOA Open
Workshop Mtg.
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Provocative
Thinking
10:00 am Body Sculpting
10:00 am Line Dancing
11:00 am Aquacise
12:00 pm Men’s Fitness
12:45 pm Duplicate Bridge
1:00 pm Woodworking
1:00 pm Painting
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
5:30 pm Pickleball
6:00 pm Water Volleyball
6:00 pm Zumba
7:30 pm GW Friends Music
7:30 pm GWCA Open Mtg.
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:00 am Yoga
9:45 am Pickleball
10:00 am Golf Finance
Comm. Mtg.
10:00 am GW Connections
10:00 am Body Sculpting
10:00 am Line Dancing
11:00 am Aquacise
12:00 pm Men’s Fitness
12:45 pm Duplicate Bridge
1:00 pm Woodworking
1:30 pm GGCA Board Mtg.
4:00 pm Tap Dancing
4:00 pm GW Friends Book
Club
5:30 pm Pickleball
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6:00 pm Water Volleyball
6:00 pm Zumba
7:00 pm GW Friends
THURSDAY
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:00 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Aquacise
1:00 pm 3D Dimensional Art
31
9:00 am Ping Pong
9:00 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
9:45 am Pickleball
10:30 am Aquacise
1:00 pm 3D Dimensional Art
7:30 pm After Hours Club
Happy 4th of July
*BALLROOM CLOSED*
9:00 am Ping Pong
10:00 am Pickleball
12:00 pm Computer Club
Luncheon
10:00 am Pickleball
JULY 2015 – PAGE 24
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE

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