Meet the Staff Greenbriar This Month

Comments

Transcription

Meet the Staff Greenbriar This Month
Vol. 19
19,, No. 3 – March 2015
P.O. Box 70
70,, Millstone
Millstone,, N.J. 0851
085100
PRSRT STD
ECRWSS
U.S. Postage
PAID
EDDM Retail
Monroe Twp., NJ
08831
A Monthly Periodical Serving Greenbriar at Whittingham
PRESENTED BY THE RESIDENTS CIVIC CLUB OF GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM
WHOA This Month
By Miriam Cohen,
WHOA Vice President
The WHOA Board signed a
two year contract with Con Ed
Solutions to provide electric
power for the clubhouse and
other common areas at a fixed
rate of $0.08956 per kilowatt
hour (KWH) vs. .99643 that is
currently being charged by
JCP&L. Although the difference seems small as we are
talking about a savings of less
than two cents a kilowatt hour,
this is projected to save us
approximately $6,000.00 a
month based on our current
usage. Monroe Township
signed a three year contract
for homeowners with Con Ed
Solutions approximately 18
months ago. If a homeowner
had never changed their electric supplier, they were automatically included in the township contract for a lower rate
than that charged by JCP&L.
Homeowners who had previously switched their electric
supplier, can contact JCP&L
or Con Ed Solutions to verify
the rates and if they wish,
change suppliers.
The Board has also begun
discussions about the use of a
Directed Proxy rather than a
non-directed proxy, also
known as a General Proxy,
when voting in WHOA elections. The change would require that those residents who
choose to vote via proxy designate to which candidate (s)
they want their votes directed,
and not sign a blank proxy.
The WHOA Board has been
working with the management
staff to assure that our clubhouse is well maintained, and
welcoming. We welcome your
comments.
The next WHOA Open
Workshop Meeting is March 16,
at 9:30 am. The meeting is in
the Poker Room. All residents
are welcome to join us. In March
the monthly WHOA sponsored
shows return. The first show of
2015 is on March 21. I hope to
see you at the show.
Green Fair, Community
Garden Planning Continues
By Ruth Banks
In the midst of another snow
storm in the last several
weeks, thoughts of spring and
farm fresh produce come to
the fore, as plans for the next
MT Green Fair and a Community Garden in the new Millstone River Community Park
are being developed. Although
the Park and Garden are still a
year away, we can look forward to planning the annual
Green Fair at a special meeting on Saturday, March 7, at
10 am at the Township Library. Thoughts of changing
the time of the Fair to the
spring are contemplated.
The Green Fair, which is
sponsored in cooperation with
the Library as well as the Environmental Commission, and
is supported by local businesses, needs your ideas,
interests, talents and knowledge to enhance the “quality
of life” in Monroe by helping
us all to learn how to keep our
community green for future
generations. The aim of the
Fair is to preserve and protect
our environment for the future
of our children and grandchildren and all those who come
after us.
The Environmental Commission has been working to
insure this by creating a
Green Team Advisory Committee whose goal is to make
Monroe a sustainable NJ certi-
fied community. Chaired by
Renee Haider, with Leslie
Koppel as Council liaison,
members of the team include
John Riggs, Environmental
chairman, Karen Polidoro,
vice-chair, Henry Sloan, Helaine Evans, Phil Levy, John
Katerba, Joe Slomian, Joseph
Harvie, Ken Chiarella, Lou
Caron.
Sustainable Jersey is a
certification program for New
Jersey Municipalities that
want to go green, save
money and take steps to
sustain their quality of life.
The program provides tools,
training and small grants to
support towns as they pursue sustainability initiatives.
To join Monroe’s Green
Team, contact Renee Haider
at [email protected]
The Environmental Commission meets monthly on the
first Wednesday of the month
at 7 pm in the municipal building in the former senior center
location.
Not as much snow as in Boston, but enough to bring out plows and backhoes here.
Greenbriar This Month
By Howie Abrams,
GWCA Vice President
Well, here we are halfway
through our winter season,
and it is time to think about
upcoming issues which affect
our community.
On December 27, there was
a fire in Village I where a multiple dwelling with five residences was damaged, if not
completely destroyed. It is expected that the fire may have
been due to a problem with a
fireplace in one of the homes.
This would underscore the fact
that residents with fireplaces
should be aware that it is de-
sirable to have a professional
fireplace inspection performed
annually. The chimney flue
from the fireplace requires
maintenance and inspection
for safety. Since a flue vents
the products of combustion,
over time it may become
clogged with creosote, for example, or other by-products.
These can make the flue less
efficient and, therefore, pose a
fire hazard because they can
be ignited by passing sparks.
An inspection may show the
need for remediation.
Concerning snow clearing
after the January storm, our
expectations for the excellent
jobs which had been accomplished in prior years were not
met. The reasons for this are
under review and should be
remediated if we require additional clearing in the month
ahead.
The Greenbriar Board works
hard to keep GW safe and
functioning efficiently. In order
to continue to accomplish our
goals, it is extremely difficult
with the restriction that is
placed upon us by our current
governing documents which
state that we are required to
(Continued on page 2)
Meet the Staff
By Joan Freeman
Kathryn Macaro wasn’t
available on the interview
date, but deserves to be introduced to our community as
were Kathy, Brenda and
Wanda last month. We are
delighted to report that many
residents took the time to tell
them how pleased they were
to get to know a little bit about
them from the article that appeared last month in the
GWVOICE.
I was able to ask Kathryn
about herself one recent Sunday, and she was pleased to
The GW VOICE
Editorial Staff
welcomes anyone interested
in joining us in any capacity.
introduce herself to us and
provide a short biographical
note.
“I worked at Concordia as
an associate Clubhouse director. I had also worked at GW
as an aerobics instructor for
twelve years, so I know quite a
few people in the community
and on the staff here. Monica
mentioned that there was an
opening for a weekend conci-
erge. I agreed to try it out, and
I’ve held this position since
May 2014. My work hours are
8:00 am to 4:00 pm except in
summer when I stay until 6:00
pm.”
She likes everything about
the job, the pleasure of helping
people find the answers to
questions they have, and the
appreciation they show when
(Continued on page 3)
Residents Civic Club Presents
A DISCUSSION OF
HOME SECURITY
With MT Police, 911 Coordinator
March 11 at 7:30 pm
GW Ballroom · Refreshments
All Welcome
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 2
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Greenbriar This Month
(Continued from page 1)
have a 2/3 vote of our homeowners to change major governing issues. Some of these
major issues are:
· Changing our ballot by
eliminating a now required
homeowner signature on the
ballot form.
· Enabling us to use voting
machines exclusively at
election time (with ballot
signatures eliminated) to
save time and money by
eliminating paper ballots and
their mailing costs.
· Eliminating the need for a
run-off election by accepting
the top vote tally of the
number of Board positions
being filled.
There are a number of other
governing issues that need
change also, but again the 2/3
vote issue makes change very
difficult. We need to consider a
voting process where a 50%
+1 vote total will enable
change to occur. At the same
time, the new voting formula
will result in actual cost savings but still provide protection
against radical and/or hasty
change for change sake.
We will be having a Question & Answer session at our
May 18th Open Meeting regarding the proposed governing changes. The WHOA
Board has also stated that
they are contemplating similar
changes to their governing
documents. Both Boards recognize the need to educate
our residents about the way
their government functions
and how to make governance
more effective, especially regarding both Boards’ election
process.
At our meeting on May 18,
the paving of Phillip Court,
Umberland Place, and Wakefield Court should be completed, without any problems,
and we can look forward to
continuing to plan for additional paving projects, as
needed, next year.
As of this writing, I would
expect that the talks with the
DEP regarding Trent Dam
have been concluded and that
we can begin construction
shortly.
Most of you probably know
(from reading your WHOA
Resolutions), the WHOA
Board has concerns about
clothes dryer and fireplace
care because of fire hazard.
Their Resolution has a mandatory dryer vent cleaning/
inspection requirement by cer-
Thank You Notes
I want to thank my friends
and neighbors in GW for their
outpouring of love and sympathy on the loss of my beloved
wife, Raja Binen-Lurie. I really
appreciate your visits, wonderful cards, food and support
during this difficult time in my
life. I will always remember all
of you! Thank you!
Sincerely,
Sol Lurie
***
I wish to thank everyone
who has been most kind to
me and my family for all your
good wishes and your help.
The group that was sent to
me every night who said the
prayers are wonderful and
understanding. I feel in my
G REENBRIAR at W HITTINGHAM VOICE
Staff Members
S. Alexander Banks, Editor-in-Chief
Amy P. Appleman
Ruth Banks
Ben Baum
Ellen Chmiel
Joan Freeman
Eileen Giacalone
Art Gordon
Dick Herlands
Dawn Horowitz
Freddy Howard
Dorothy Kartzman
Arlene Lazar
Harvey Lazar
Gloria Montlack
Olga Naccarella
Dianne Pinkowitz
Martin Rich
Larry Sheppard
Editorial Board
Alex Banks
Ruth Banks
Helen Oxenberg
tified/approved companies
every two years. Upon completion, a certificate must be
provided to the Management
Office. If not, a fine will be imposed. As Greenbriar is a Fee
Simple community, the Greenbriar Board hopes that residents will be aware of both
clothes dryer and fireplace
precautions and will assume
their own responsibility for due
diligence for such inspections
without GWCA Board mandates. This is especially important for those homes with common roofs.
Our next Greenbriar Workshop meeting is Wednesday,
March 11 at 9:30 am in the
new Board Room; and our
next Public Open meeting is
Monday, March 16 at 7:30 pm
in the Ballroom. Please try to
attend our meetings.
Bert Herling
GWCA Rep. Arnold Riback
Ben Baum
Arthur Gordon
Advertising Office
Princeton Editorial Services
P.O. Box 397
Cranbury, NJ 08512
(732) 761-8534
e-mail: [email protected]
Editorial Office
Greenbriar Whittingham VOICE
100 Whittingham Drive
Monroe Twp., NJ 08831
(609) 655-4791
e-mail: [email protected]
Publisher
Princeton Editorial Services
P.O. Box 397, Cranbury, NJ 08512 · (732) 761-8534 or 8535
[email protected]
Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is a monthly periodical presented by the
residents of Greenbriar at Whittingham, Monroe Township, New Jersey.
All editorial material for publication should be submitted on or before the 3rd
of the month prior to publication month to the Editorial Office.
Greenbriar at Whittingham residents may deliver material to The GW VOICE
mail box located at the Concierge Desk in the Towne Centre.
Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is not liable for any typographical or
printing errors that may appear, including in its display or classified advertising,
over the cost of the space of the advertisement.
Note: The advertisements in Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE are, to the
best of The VOICE’s and Princeton Editorial’s knowledge, accurate
representations of the products and services offered. However, no
endorsement by The VOICE or any other party is intended or implied.
Acceptance of all materials is at the discretion of the publisher.
WE RESERVE THE RIGHT TO EDIT ALL MATERIALS
© 2015, PRINCETON EDITORIAL SERVICES
heart that everyone in GW
loved Don. He was a wonderful and kind man and will
be truly missed by me as
well as others.
Sincerely,
Freya Cashmere
Wish Me
By Irwin Dunsky
Epigraph
“Don’t wish me happiness –
I don’t expect to be happy, it’s
gotten far beyond that, somehow. Wish me courage and
strength and a sense of humor
– I will need them all.”
-Anne Morrow Lindberg If you are going to wish me
something
Wish me happiness, joy, love,
and peace
Wish me a worthwhile passage in this life
Wish me a life filled with learning
And then the great joy of passing it on
Even at the worst of times let
me see the light
Remind me how fortunate I am
to have lived
For there will be times I forget
and feel the victim
Wish me the skill of recommitment
Wish me friends that care
about me
Wish me the ability to clear my
roadblocks
To realize and avoid my stumbling blocks
Wish a wide road to acceptance
Wish me love and a chance to
share that love
Wish me all that you wish for
yourself
Wish me victory over my
boogiemen
Wish me the ability to live and
die free
Wish me to be that person that
never,
Never, never gives up
Winter Delivery
by the Tap Room
The Tap Room is now delivering meals or snacks within
the GW community during
March from 12 to 6 pm. There
is a $15 minimum. Call 609235-9269 for service.
Message from The
Manager’s Office
B
y William H. Hinkle,
General Manager
Hopefully the winter weather
will be passing into our rearview mirrors with the turn of
the calendar. Winter has been
challenging, and as a result
you will see the toll it will
have taken on our roadways
and structures. Maintenance
will be summoned for rapid
repairs as sinkholes and potholes may start to appear. If
you notice any hazards developing, notify Management
in helping us to address all
problems in a timely manner.
Black-ice will remain a
concern as long as moisture
is present and freezing conditions develop. When driving in and out of the community, accelerate and decelerate slowly, leaving more distance than normally required
for stopping. It’s more important that you get to your destination safely. There have
been many motor vehicle
accidents in the surrounding
municipalities during the winter due to the icy conditions
that rapidly develop with a
quick change in temperature.
March brings us one step
closer to warmer weather
and spring projects. And with
that warmer weather, we begin to look forward to a number of things: a return of our
friends who headed for
warmer climates in the fall,
Daylight Savings Time
(March 9), spring begins
(March 20), the opening of
our golf course (March 1),
and spring clean-up. Pedestrian walkers will be rapidly
appearing, so do your part in
driving at the suggested safe
speeds when weather permits.
Request for Service: Remember that if you would like
to place a request for work/
service, it is required that
you complete a Request for
Service form which is located
in both the Resident Services
Office and at the Concierge
desk. This is a MUST for
reporting damage from
snow clearing. Additionally,
if you login to your account
on our community’s website
(www.gwmonroe.com) and
then select “eForms”, there is
an electronic version of the
form there that you may opt
to complete.
Spring Clean-Up: Landscape Maintenance Service
(LMS) typically returns on
March 1 to begin our spring
cleanup process which consists of cleaning up any
leaves that fell late last season in addition to removing
branches and twigs that may
have fallen due to the windy,
icy, and snowy conditions
over the winter months, provided that we are not experiencing any snow events.
This process takes many
weeks, so we ask for your
patience as all areas of the
community will be addressed. Grass cutting will
not take place until the
cleanup is complete, which
usually occurs sometime in
April. Make note; if any of
your sprinkler heads are
damaged as a result of routine community maintenance,
our vendors must be notified
to inspect and have the op-
portunity to make the repairs.
Reimbursement is NOT
made if you opt to have your
own company make a repair
which you feel was the negligence of others.
Architectural Changes:
Warm weather reminds us of
all the projects we want to
accomplish. But with that
said, residing in a planned
community requires that
prior approval be obtained
for any exterior project(s).
This means pre-planning on
your part so that you can
acquire and complete the
exterior modification forms,
submit them for review, and
obtain written approval from
your association prior to beginning the work. This is important in coordinating and
scheduling with your vendor.
In many cases, Township
permits are needed and our
approval is a requisite in obtaining that Township permit/
approval. Community approval is needed in order to
obtain Township permits for
modifications such as: air
conditioner replacements,
furnace replacements, and
the like. When in doubt,
check with the Management
Office to see if you need to
complete an architectural
modification form.
Phone Directories: The
2014-2015 Resident Phone
Directories are available at
the Concierge Desk for any
residents who may have left
for their winter retreats prior
to their delivery. Stop by and
pick up your copy any time
the Towne Centre is open.
Remember to also pick up
the monthly update sheet so
your information is up-todate.
Data Updates: During the
latter part of this month and
into the month of April, data
updates will be mailed to
each home so that you can
review the information that is
on file with Security. Pay
special attention to area
codes and phone numbers
for your cell phones, email
addresses,
emergency
contacts, and permanent
visitors. Additionally, please
make note of your home’s
model type, provide email
information for each person
in your house, and the preretirement profession for
each person in your home.
These data sheets should be
mailed in to Management or
dropped off to Security or the
Concierge to ensure your
data is as up-to-date as possible.
Village
I/Whittingham
Residents: Please remember that each home MUST
HAVE a home telephone line
with long-distance service in
order for your alarm system
to communicate with the
monitoring company. You
may utilize either Verizon or
Comcast; however, if you
choose Comcast, you must
notify them at the time of
scheduling that your home is
equipped with an alarm system as they will need to add
a device for proper communication.
Additionally,
during
the
(Continued on page 3)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Monroe Township Cultural Arts Commission Presents
“Tom Paxton and Janis Ian, Together at Last”
On Sunday, March 8, at 3
pm, the Monroe Township
Cultural Arts Commission will
present “Tom Paxton and
Janis Ian, Together at Last.”
The performance will be held
at the Richard P. Marasco
Theatre for the Performing
Arts, 1629 Perrineville Rd.,
Monroe Twp
These two old friends will
put on a show with the assistance of multi-instrumentalist
Robin Bullock, bringing back
favorites like “Ramblin’ Rose”
and “At 17.” They will sing one
another’s songs adding harmony and instrumentals.
Tom Paxton, whose career
spans 50 years, received the
Grammy Lifetime Achievement
Award. His songs have been
recorded by Pete Seeger, Bob
Dylan, Judy Collins, Peter,
Paul and Mary, and other notables. He composed “The
Last Thing on my Mind.”
Janis Ian, a formidable talent, is a singer/songwriter who
received 9 Grammy nominations and two Grammy
awards. She started singing
professionally when she was
just 13 years old at the famed
Village Gate in NYC.
Aren’t we fortunate to have
Tom Paxton and Janis Ian
performing right in our community? Don’t miss this performance. General Admission is $25, Patrons - $22,
Students, FREE.
LWV To Explore New Issues,
Review Dated Ones
By Ruth Banks
The League of Women Voters of Monroe Twp. will be
meeting on Monday March 23
to review studies completed in
the 1980s and 90s and also
explore new public policy issues that have emerged in the
last few years. The meeting
will be held at the Township
Municipal building and will
begin at 1 pm. The meeting is
free and open to the public.
In light of the gap between
1981, when the oldest study
was completed, and today,
and between the 17 other
studies done in that time period, we need to take a look at
Message from The Manager
(Continued from page 2)
month of March, residents in
Village I/Whittingham will be
receiving a notification reminding them that they must provide Management with written
documentation showing that a
dryer vent cleaning/inspection
has been conducted within the
past year. This documentation
must be provided to the Man-
For more information:
www.MonroeTownshipCultural
Arts.com.
For tickets call: 1-87777CLICK 9 am to 10 pm EST.
or 732-521-4400.
Tickets will also be available for
purchase at the box office two
hours before the performance.
agement Office not later than
May 31, 2015 or fines may be
imposed. Dryer vent cleaning,
fireplace inspections along
with winterization of homes
and water lines has become a
very important element in
maintaining a safe environment as we look to protect life
and property for Village I/
Whittingham Residents.
what has been accomplished
and what has not. But in addition, we need to recognize that
every day a new public policy
emerges on which we have no
position as a League. For example, a bill has just been
introduced in the state legislature to eliminate county government. How feasible is that?
Is it a good idea or a bad
idea? We might want to ex(Continued on page 4)
Meet the Staff
(Continued from page 1)
the questions are answered.
Like the weekday Concierge
staff, she has a vast knowledge of what is going on in the
community, and even if it
takes a little time, she will do
her best to work with you to
solve your problem.
Kathy also holds down another part-time job. For hobbies she enjoys working-out,
baking, baby-sitting her grandchild, and reading. She keeps
very busy.
We are fortunate to have
Kathryn Macaro at the Concierge desk on the weekends.
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 3
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 4
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
THE COMMUNITY AROUND US
Civic Affairs
By Jerry Tamburro
Monroe Township Council
President
Odds And Ends
The energy aggregation
which the Council established
two years ago will go out to bid
later this year. The results of
the current contract have been
outstanding. They who entered the aggregation program
are saving over 20% of their
electric costs than had they
stayed with JCP&L. Later this
year we will have the same
workshops that we did in the
past and the criteria in the ordinance requires at least a 5%
saving over the rates charged
by JCP&L; more on this later
in the year.
In 2014 the Township made
several important moves to
lower some of our costs. The
MTUD’s acquisition of the wa-
INVEST in the Best for Less… GUARANTEED!
2015 FOR HIGH EFFICIENCY
AIR CONDITIONING & HEATING
stancoclimate.com
2015
Winter Special
Winter Special
Heating
ter rights from SWM in Spotswood will not only lower the
cost of future water but it will
allow less treatment which
also will lower the cost. In addition, we will be able to get
out of a contract for the purchase of surface water at a
rate which is unacceptable to
us. We also took advantage of
the low interest rates and refinanced bonds at an incredible rate of 1.06% (slightly
more than 1%!) This rate was
the result of the bond market’s
rating for the town based on
our strong reserves and our
financial management.
Our labor contracts with our
unions were renewed for a
three year term at a 2% increase. However, all employees are now paying for a per-
centage of their health cost
and the percentage increases
each year so that the net cost
to the town will be less than
the 2% increase.
This year is also important
for us locally as we have our
two at-large Council seats up
for election. Further, the
mayor’s office is up for election. In addition to our local
officials, we have the two
Assembly seats, two Freeholder seats and the County
Clerk seat up for election this
year. Although it is early in
the election cycle the primary
for all these offices is in
June.
Voter turnout in the most
recent elections has been very
disappointing and we are hoping for better results this year.
GW Chapter, Jewish Federation
By Eddie Thompson
Shalom Havarem (greetings
friends,)
We trust that everyone is
managing to survive our usual
Northeast winter and we are
all looking forward to balmier
days. Don’t forget that the first
Passover Seder is Friday,
April 3.
As you have been informed,
the Jewish Federations of Middlesex and Monmouth have
merged as of January 1, 2015,
and the new name of our joint
Federation is “The Jewish
Federation in the heart of New
Jersey.”
Here is a brief recap of the
funds raised in the past 30
years that The Jewish Federation of Greater Middlesex
County has achieved and how
the money that you have graciously and generously donated has been used. The
Federation raised over $100
million for local and overseas
needs during the past 30
years.
Celebrate these highlights:
At home YOU helped to:
· Resettle 1,460 people from
the former Soviet Union.
· Deliver
500,000
meals
locally via “Kosher Meals on
Wheels.”
· Provide
984
Middlesex
teens with grants to visit
Israel and 5,135 Middlesex
young adults to participate in
“Birthright Israel.”
· Grant almost $1 million to
support
Jewish
college
students
via
Israel
advocacy, social activism,
and Jewish learning.
· Support local Jewish day
schools
and
afternoon
Hebrew schools.
· Inspire
1,463
children
through PJ Library books.
· Allocate over $350,000 for
special needs socialization
programs.
· Maintain
abandoned
cemeteries
and
donate
graves to the indigent.
Overseas, YOU helped to:
· Purchase ambulances.
· Build a Jewish National
Fund
handicappedaccessible park.
· Sustain a Youth Center in
Nitzan.
· Support the “Better Together
Youth Center” in Ashkelon.
· Establish the Doug Stahl
Science Lab at Yemin Orde.
· Build an emergency room
and playground in Arad.
a library and
construct a playground at
the Jerusalem Battered
Women’s Shelter.
Please help us to continue
our very vital and necessary
programs by giving generously
and volunteering with Jewish
Federation to make our world
a better place.
If you would like to become
involved with Jewish Federation or if you have any questions or concerns, please call
the Federation office at 732588-1800 or you may call
Dorothy Thompson at 8602664 or Judy Brodman at 3958171.
· Maintain
League of
Women Voters
(Continued from page 3)
plore that concept which has
actually been implemented in
other states.
The League will be undertaking several activities during
the next few months, including
a tour of the Jamesburg
School for Boys as a follow up
from a meeting on Juvenile
Justice held last year . In 1996
the LWVNJ completed a two
year study of Juvenile Justice
in the state, which recommended a number of programs to assist youth at risk.
This included support of rehabilitation programs and adequate funding for community
based facilities.
The review of our many
studies and positions is in
preparation for the state
League’s convention in April,
when members will be tasked
to decide on program studies
and activities during the next
two years. Locally, we will be
holding a series of coffees to
introduce new residents to the
League, and also planning our
Annual Meeting and Luncheon
scheduled for June 8.
For more information about
the League and its programs,
please feel free to contact:
Ruth Banks, GW, 609-6554791; Judy Perkus, Rossmoor,
609-395-1552.
Francine
Glass, Ponds, 609-860-7890;
Evie Kruger, Clearbrook,609655-4303; Mary Ann Colgan,
Renaissance, 609-655-7502;
Roz Brodsky, Concordia,609860-6610.
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
From Our Mayor
B
y Richard Pucci, Twp. of Monroe
Dey Farm Historic Site
Founded by Scottish farmers in the 1680s, Monroe
Township has always celebrated its agricultural roots.
The 40-acre Dey Farm Historic Site on Federal Road,
which serves as the Township
Museum with several historic
buildings including the Dey
Farmhouse and Barn, which
dates back to the 1820s and
the England House, which
dates back to the 1810s, is
due to get a makeover.
Using a $1 million grant
from the Middlesex County
Board of Chosen Freeholders,
the Township will soon make
improvements to the site,
which will be completed by a
contractor licensed to work on
historic buildings.
The grant will be used to
repair the barn on the site,
which dates back to the 1800s
and to construct the Prospect
Plains one-room School
House from the 1850s. This
once was Monroe’s first Town
Hall and later the Township
Recreation Department.
These structures serve as a
living reminder of the Township’s past as a mainly rural
community. Even though we
have grown into a more suburban-rural community, Monroe
Township has 1,290 acres of
preserved farmland, which is
more than any other Middlesex County municipality. The
preserved farms are part of
our 7,246 acres of open
space, which is also more than
any other County municipality.
During the spring and summer, the Township Historic
Preservation Commission
holds guided tours of the Dey
Farmhouse, showing off the
many artifacts found right here
in Monroe, including old
school desks and supplies,
military uniforms, dairy bottles
Nurse’s Notes
Stephanie Fitzsimmons
Sexton, RN, APN, MSN
High Blood Pressure
Most people with high blood
pressure have no signs or
symptoms. Uncontrolled high
blood pressure (HBP) can injure or kill you. It’s sometimes
called “the silent killer” because HBP has no symptoms,
so you may not be aware that
it’s damaging your arteries,
heart and other organs.
Although a few people with
early-stage high blood pressure may have dull headaches, dizzy spells or a few
more nosebleeds than normal,
these signs and symptoms
usually don’t occur until high
blood pressure has reached a
severe or life-threatening
stage.
You can always have your
blood pressure checked in the
nursing office or on your routine visit to your health care
provider. You can also find
machines in some stores that
will measure your blood pressure for free, but these machines may give you inaccurate results.
Primary/Essential
Hypertension
For most adults, there’s no
identifiable cause of high
blood pressure. This type of
high blood pressure, called
essential hypertension or primary hypertension, tends to
develop gradually over many
years. It is frequently detected
when someone is 45 years
and older.
Secondary Hypertension
Some people have high
blood pressure caused by an
underlying condition. This type
of high blood pressure, called
secondary hypertension, tends
to appear suddenly and cause
higher blood pressure than
does primary hypertension.
Various conditions and medications can lead to secondary
hypertension, including: kidney
problems, adrenal gland tumors; thyroid problems; a congenital problem; certain medications; illegal drugs, such as
cocaine and amphetamines;
alcohol abuse and sleep apnea.
High Blood Pressure
Risks
•Age. The risk of high blood
pressure increases as you
age. Through early middle
age, or about age 45, high
blood pressure is more common in men. Women are more
likely to develop high blood
pressure after age 65.
•Race. High blood pressure
is particularly common among
blacks, often developing at an
earlier age than it does in
whites.
•Family history. High blood
pressure tends to run in families.
•Being overweight or obese.
The more you weigh, the more
blood you need to supply oxygen and nutrients to your tissues.
•Not being physically active.
People who are inactive tend
to have higher heart rates. The
higher your heart rate, the
harder your heart must work
with each contraction and the
stronger the force on your arteries.
•Using tobacco, smoking or
chewing, immediately raises
your blood pressure temporarily, but the chemicals in tobacco can damage the lining
of your artery walls. Needless
to say – try and stop smoking.
It’s not too late to stop, no
matter how old you are. Talk
to your health care provider for
assistance.
•Too much salt (sodium) in
your diet. Too much sodium in
your diet can cause your body
to retain fluid, which increases
blood pressure. Sodium is in a
lot of foods. The quickest culprits that come to mind are
cheese, pickles, chips, Chinese food, soup and canned
foods. Read labels!
•Too little potassium in your
diet. Potassium helps balance
(Continued on page 7)
and so much more.
The Dey Farm is unique
because the entire 40-acre
parcel, along with the houses
and barns did not cost the taxpayers any money. The land
was preserved through donation and cluster zoning, where
developers build the same
amount of houses on smaller
parcels and donated the remaining land to the Township.
The England House was also
donated and moved to the site
at no cost.
Upkeep on the farm is done
primarily by the Township Department of Public Works and
volunteers from the Historic
Preservation Commission, but
over the years many local volunteers and scouts have done
work at the farmhouse. Just
this summer, Eagle Scout candidate Thomas Pietrulewicz
organized the painting of the
Dey Farmhouse. Over the past
two years, Eagle Scout Matthew Macyda constructed and
erected a new Martin House
and Matthew Earl constructed
a memorial to the C&A Railroad on the property.
Furthermore, the Historic
Preservation Commission,
chaired by John Katerba,
hosts annual events at the
farm including the vintage
baseball game, with 19th Century rules, between the Flemington Neshanocks and the
Philadelphia Athletics, and the
Civil War Living History Day,
where residents got a glimpse
of what life was like for soldiers and civilians during the
war.
We are excited to get work
started on the Dey Farm to
make sure this landmark is
there for future generations to
explore.
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 5
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 6
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
The Cinema
By Larry Sheppard
Another year has passed and
the Academy Awards will have
happened by the time you read
this column. As usual, this brave
critic will predict the winners and
his own personal favorites. If
you check my selections against
the winners, please be kind!
Best Picture:
WINNER and PERSONAL
FAVORITE….BOYHOOD…12
years in the making and worth
waiting for.
BIRDMAN…Deserving of the
Oscar for originality and vivid
performances.
THE IMITATION GAME…
Great story about the genius
who helped develop the first
computer.
THE THEORY OF EVERYTHING…ED REDMAYNE as
Stephen Hawking made this film
special.
THE GRAND BUDAPEST
HOTEL….How did this unfunny
flick get nominated? Absolutely
ridiculous!
SELMA…Interesting bio
about Dr. King and his mission
but not enough punch!
AMERICAN SNIPER…
Realistic war action but something purposeful missing in the
plot leading to an abrupt
clouded ending.
WHIPLASH…Did
not
see...No opinion
Best Actor
WINNER….EDDIE REDMAYNE for THE THEORY,
ETC. His portrayal of Hawking is
amazing and unbelievable. How
did he do it?
PERSONAL
FAVORITE….MICHAEL KEATON for
BIRDMAN. He is mesmerizing
as an actor trying
to recoup his
reputation
by
putting on a Broadway play.
BENEDICT CUMBERBATCH
for THE IMITATION GAME…
Wonderful acting in an interesting story but not inventive
enough for the Oscar.
STEVE CARELL for FOXCATCHER….Usually, comedy
is his forte and he surprises with
this role of a very disturbed
character. The makeup helped
make it happen.
BRADLEY COOPER for
AMERICAN SNIPER…The film
is long on action but short on
character development which
lessens his chances at the big
prize.
Best Actress
WINNER…JULIANNE
MOORE for STILL ALICE…Did
not see but she has already
won a few important awards for
this role.
ROSAMUND PIKE for GONE
GIRL…Stands a chance with a
solid performance as an avenging wife.
MARION COTILLARD…
TWO DAYS, ONE NIGHT…Did
not see.
REESE WITHERSPOON for
WILD…Did not see.
FELICITY JONES for THE
THEORY OF EVERYTHING…
Competent effort but not
enough for AA award.
Best Supporting Actor
WINNER AND PERSONAL
FAVORITE….ETHAN HAWKE
for BOYHOOD. As a father trying to make up to his children
after being absent for many
years, he touched me profoundly.
EDWARD NORTON for
BIRDMAN…Definitely worthy of
the award for a heated portrayal
of an eccentric actor who knows
his worth.
ROBERT DUVALL for THE
JUDGE…Always a solid performer but no Oscar this time.
MARK RUFFALO…Too
small a part for the AA prize.
J.K.SIMMONS for WHIPLASH…Has already won at the
Golden Globes and the SAG
events so he probably will win
the Oscar…Did not see.
Best Supporting Actress
WINNER and PERSONAL
FAVORITE…PATRICIA ARQUETTE for BOYHOOD.
Helped make the film special as
she ages over the years as a
single mother trying to bring up
her kids.
EMMA STONE for BIRDMAN… Competent acting but
too small a part for the big prize.
KEIRA KNIGHTLY for THE
IMITATION GAME. Again, a
minor role and she will not win.
LAURA DERN for WILD…Did
not see.
MERYL STREEP for INTO
THE WOODS. Did not see.
Best Director
WINNER and PERSONAL
FAVORITE….RICHARD
LINKLATER for BOYHOOD.
Innovative, tender and genuine.
ALEJANDRO INARRITU for
BIRDMAN…If he wins, I would
not be disappointed as it is well
deserved.
AVA DuVERNAY for
SELMA….Good bio but no winner!
MORTEN TYLDUM for THE
IMITATION GAME. Interesting
film but not competitive with the
favorites.
WES ANDERSON for THE
GRAND BUDAPEST HOTEL. If
he wins, I may have to leave the
country.
Finance and Investing
By Irwin Kaplan
Kaplan’s Laws of Investing
1. If you don’t understand
the reason for buying the
stock, don’t buy it.
2. The real value of a stock
investment is the ability of the
company to continue to earn
profits in the future, not its
capitalization (small, medium,
or large), nor who likes it
(Buffet or Tisch).
Qualifying Current Investment Value
I have written in my Finance
Column in the Voice, and
talked about the stock market
and the dynamics of a recovering U.S. economy in our
monthly finance class. I
stressed adopting a very cautious investing strategy for the
present time.
Here’s why. World economies are “stuttering” and it
makes good sense to avoid or
mitigate investment risk by
being very careful in selecting
investment candidates.
While there is good potential
in specific stock investments,
there is also significant risk
because stocks could be quite
volatile in the coming months.
To temper risk, look for companies with forecasted strong
(rising) earnings and pay dividends. Stocks that have rising
earnings and dividends will
tend to limit the downside
price risks of the stock, as well
as adding to the total return for
long-term holders.
Dividend income can also
balance volatility from other
stock sectors or events by
providing dependable income.
The current market phase coexists with very low interest
rates and falling oil prices.
Dividend income streams can
be a hedge from these and
other sources of market volatility.
The volatility of economies
in the United State, Canada,
Europe, Japan, China, and
other industrial economies,
and the continuing social and
financial unrest around the
globe, make investors feel
insecure. The argument for a
U.S. economic recovery to
more “normal” economic conditions is difficult to envision
now. Currently, world-wide
circumstances and unknown
events, impose cautious investing tactics.
So if you believe that we are
in an uncertain stock market
and volatility will continue for
some time , as I do, it makes
sense to focus investing
choices on dividend paying
stocks in a “good” sector that
has reliable future earnings.
Doing so can provide an
opportunity for income and a
chance to grow the value of
your investments. Higher future earnings can turn into
higher dividends paid to stock
holders too.
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Senior Solutions
By Helen Oxenberg,
MSW ,ACSW
(Helen Oxenberg’s column,
Senior Solutions, is syndicated
and appears in several states)
Dear Solutions: I’m a senior and I work in an office
where there are several
young people working. One
young man in particular is
bright and I think he could
advance but he constantly
uses bad grammar which jars
my ears especially since I’m
a former English teacher. He
keeps using this word “aint”
instead of “isn’t” and says
things like “orientated” instead of oriented. I’m not his
supervisor but I would like to
correct him when he uses
wrong grammar and offer to
help him with his grammar.
Should I?
-CharlesDear Charles: Yes. What
jars your ears probably bars
his advancement. Tell him you
think he could have a good
future and you want to help
him. Ask if he would agree to
have you correct his grammar
so that he can learn correct
English. If he agrees then later
on you can offer lessons.
You’re generous to offer this
and if he’s really as bright as
you think he’ll appreciate it. If
he doesn’t then he ain’t that
bright and you can’t orientate
him to learn!
Dear Solutions: My daughter
has asked me for some help
so I’m asking you. Her husband works in his mother’s
business. She keeps telling
my daughter how to spend
their money and what she
really needs and why does
she spend so much on this,
etc. She’s really upset but her
husband says that one day
this business will be his and
he treats her like a queen.
What do you think my daughter should do?
- RachelDear Rachel: Her husband,
the crown prince, is waiting
for his mother, the queen, to
abdicate and hand over the
business to him. Right now
though she’s giving your
daughter the business and
she doesn’t have to wait for
that. If he won’t either stand
up to mom or leave and
strike out on his own, then
she must stand up for herself. If her husband will not
join her in spelling out her
independence then she
should not discuss any purchases she makes with her
mother-in-law. If asked she
should just say she buys
what she decides she wants.
She should tell her mother –
in – law she respects her
opinion but she must make
her own decisions. Her husband’s business affairs and
her household affairs need to
be kept separate. Hopefully
he can tell this to his mother
since she probably needs
him in the business as much
as he wants to be there.
Dear Solutions: Whenever I
go out to lunch with some
women acquaintances it turns
into a gossip session. There is
one woman in particular who
starts it all. Even when I see
her alone she immediately
starts talking about someone
else. If I don’t want to join in
then I’m left saying nothing
and ignoring her. Why do people gossip anyway?
-ADear A: The latest gossip
is that that woman wants to
bring some drama into her
life because she’s bored or
she has nothing much to talk
about so it’s easier to talk
about people than to learn
interesting things about the
world, or that she wants to
feel important so knowing
something others don’t know
about someone makes her
feel powerful or —— etc.
etc,. If you want to stop a
gossip hear her out, nod your
head and then start a discussion about another topic altogether. If you do this enough
times she may stop talking
about other people to you. Of
course she may stop talking
Nurses Notes
(Continued from page 5)
the amount of sodium in your
cells. A few choices of potassium rich foods include: oranges, cantaloupe, bananas,
grapefruit, spinach, prunes,
and sweet potatoes.
•Too little vitamin D in your
diet. It’s uncertain if having too
little vitamin D in your diet can
lead to high blood pressure.
Vitamin D may affect an enzyme produced by your kidneys that affects your blood
pressure.
•Drinking too much alcohol.
Over time, heavy drinking can
damage your heart. Having
more than two drinks a day for
men and more than one drink
a day for women may affect
your blood pressure. If you
drink alcohol, do so in moderation. For healthy adults, that
means up to one drink a day
for women of all ages and men
older than age 65, and up to
two drinks a day for men age
65 and younger.
So what do you do if you
have high blood pressure?
Discuss the problem with
your health care provider.
Medication may be ordered
and it is a good idea to take it
consistently. I have met many
residents in the community
who are proud of their no prescription history but blood
pressure medicine is not to be
played with. You may be able
to lower your blood pressure
with lifestyle changes but you
should talk to your physician
before discontinuing high
blood pressure medicine.
Look at the risk factor list
above: what can you change?
You cannot change family history, race or age. You can begin
to slowly incorporate exercise,
lose weight, eat a healthy diet,
cut down on your salt intake and
alcohol consumption; and stop
smoking. If this was easy none
of us would be overweight. Slow
and steady changes in concert
with your physician can help
control your high blood pressure. Take care…
Lecture, Monday, March 2,
1pm, “Balance and Tips to
Improve Your Balance” by
Jerri Blitzer and Beth AndoBrenman, physical therapists
who will lecture and take questions. Please register with the
Concierge
to you altogether. Take your
choice.
Problems? Become part of
the Solution. Write to Helen
Oxenberg, Senior Solutions,
P.O. Box 346, Jamesburg, NJ
or
email:[email protected]
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 7
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 8
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
The Green Thumb
By Laura Resnick
FAREWELL, WINTER! In
the spring, everything comes
alive, and the gardener in
each of us cannot wait to get
outdoors and start something.
For your garden, choose your
personal favorites, preferably
a combination of annuals and
perennials. Right now, think
“perennials”. They each bloom
at a specific time, and only for
several weeks, so consider
getting plants with bold flowers
that bloom in succession. For
example: daffodils, hosta, iris,
peony, daylily, phlox and chrysanthemum. Keep in mind that
perennials take time to mature, and may get better from
year to year. So be patient,
and enjoy them as they return
each season.
Annuals reward us with continuous bloom all summer. We
can help them achieve their
destiny if we “deadhead” or
“pinch” the blossoms when
they fade, thus prolonging
their colorful display. Of
course, they give up the ghost
when cold weather sets in.
Perennials can be planted in
early spring, but wait until May
or June to plant the more tender annuals.
FORCING
SPRING
BLOOMS. Forsythia, redbud,
pussy willows, azaleas and
other shrubs will provide indoor color if you cut some
heavily budded branches and
force them into premature
bloom. (Hint: the flower buds
are larger than the leaf buds.)
Set the stems in water, in a
cool spot away from direct
light, and wait until the flower
buds move down and into
blooming position at a 90 degree angle to the stems. Then
move them to a brighter location and watch the flowers unfold into a glorious mass of
color.
MAPLE SYRUP TIME. The
sap is flowing in maple trees in
the northeast, a reliable sign of
winter’s end. Day temperatures in the 40’s and night
temperatures in the 20’s are
ideal for tapping the sap that is
boiled down, for days, into maple syrup. It takes 40 to 50
gallons of sap to produce one
gallon of maple syrup. At the
store, look for the product labeled “Pure” maple syrup.
COMMON WOOD SORREL: Known as oxalis, this
plant is found in warmt e m p er at ure wo o d l and s .
Widely grown as a houseplant,
it has very thin stems, with
leaflets that are made up of
three heart-shaped leaves.
During the night the leaves
fold inward. In the spring the
oxalis produces small pink
flowers. The foliage can be
dark green, burgundy or plumcolored. The green-leaved variety has been dubbed “lucky
shamrock”, due to its threeleaf clover-like motif. You’ll
see lots of these in the nurseries now, as they are a popular
gift for St. Patrick’s Day.
The month of March is unpredictable. Sometimes cruel,
it teases us by having a warm
sunny day followed by a blustery cold day, followed by a
driving rainstorm, and so on.
However, spring will soon
awaken outside our windows.
The weather will moderate, the
grass will green and the earth
will soften. So, simply take it
on faith. That much is predictable.
Note: The Green Thumbs
will meet at 11am on Tuesday,
March 10 at the Monroe Twp.
Senior Center.
Reflections
By Ben Baum
Driving to South Carolina at
the end of January, I once
again observed the common
thread that courses through all
of us. In several restaurants
on our way to Surfside Beach
and in South Carolina we
watched as children of all
races, cultures and religions
exhibited similar behaviors,
namely, not listening to their
parents, running around, crying and yelling and laughing in
an infectious manner. And in
most instances it was obvious
that the children were loved by
the parents.
Living within the GW gates,
it is frequently easy to forget
that so many diverse people
have so much in common.
Martin Luther King’s dream of
all the children playing together isn’t so farfetched. Our
generation has been known to
grouse about how younger
folks are attached to their electronic devices. Well on our trip
I was glad that I was connected to my children, friends
and Mom’s assisted living facility.
Before we left on our trip we
had interactions with security,
the nurse, the concierges and
the Tap Room staff. I couldn’t
help but think that we are
lucky to have all these dedicated people to work with us
and for us. Next time you complain about GW rules or the
Boards’ role in our everyday
activities remember that the
Board members contribute
many hours for your benefit. If
you have a gripe, suggestion
or inquiry, show up at the next
WHOA and /or Greenbriar
meeting.
When you read this Daylight
Saving time will be just a week
away and thoughts of spring
and milder weather won’t be
far behind.
A large number of seniors
from northern climes-Canada,
upstate New York, New Jersey
and New England- are in
South Carolina from January
to April. We checked out the
very active and popular Myrtle
Beach Senior Center and
found out that their facility
pales compared to our Monroe
Township facility. I didn’t have
the heart to tell their staff that
our Center has 14,000 members in a state of the art new
building.
One of the popular activities
in S.C. is eating , at extremely
reasonable rates, at buffets. I
decided if I continued to patronize buffets in NJ, I’d become Ben plus.
Advantages of living with
winter weather: Viewing the
transformative beauty of a
snowfall; Drinking your favorite hot drink; Snuggling under
your favorite blanket; Building a snowman; Possessing
a separate cold weather
wardrobe (guess who suggested this one?); Really
looking forward to the onset
of spring.
Mark your March calendar
for the following dates: Daylight Savings Time begins-8,
St. Patrick’s Day-17, First
Day of Spring-20 and Palm
Sunday-29. Also mark the
following days: Peace Corps
Day-3, World Wildlife Day-3,
World Day of Prayer-6 and
International Women’s Day8. The birthstone for March is
the aquamarine or bloodstone or jade; the flower is
the daffodil. I’ll be a bit hyperactive the week of 15-21,
‘cause I’ll be observing
Chocolate Week! You won’t
be able to reach me from 2729; I’ll be squirreled away
participating in Crossword
Puzzle Days.
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
News from the Golf Course
By The Golf Club Board
While snow has covered the
Golf Course most of the winter. March 1 signals the opening of the Pro Shop, and the
beginning of our new season.
Spring is on its way and golfers will be out on our links.
This year we are expanding
our membership program.
Any relative or friend of a GW
resident is welcome to become a member of the Golf
Course.
We continue to look for
groups that would like to have
outings at our course in order
to raise money for their organizations. Last year we had two
groups playing during our offhours. They were very impressed with the condition of
Greenbriar
Bridge Club
By Arthur Van Blerkom
The GW DUPLICATE
BRIDGE CLUB is currently in
winter mode. The Monday
game, which started November 3, 2014 switched to Encore for six months THE
REGULAR THURSDAY
NIGHT GAME has been suspended for the winter. There is
no daily cost for the Monday
game at Encore.
I am sad to announce the
death of two members of the
bridge club, Doris Kohlberg
and Elihu Nemiroff.
In the December issue of
the GW VOICE Bridge article I
reviewed preemptive bids and
I would like to go a little further. If you are in first or second position with six or seven
in a suit you should have two
of the top three honors or
three of the honors. In third
position most people will open
2D 2H 2S 3C 3D 3H 3S with
six or seven points, after the
bidding is Pass Pass. The
other important thing is you
should show more caution
when you are vulnerable. You
should have 9 or 10 pts when
vulnerable.
I would also like to discuss
the 2C opening bid. The basic
requirement is either 22 or
more points or 9 tricks. The 9
trick bid is the one that a lot of
players do not use but should.
In other words if you have
AKQXXXX DIAMONDS and
AK SPADES that is considered as 9 tricks and you
should open 2 CLUBS. Responding to 2C by your Partner should be 2D which is a
waiting game. There are bids
that are available but for the
inexperienced player, should
not be used. The 2C bidder on
his second bid describes his
hand closer. If he has 22 -24
pts he bids either 2H 2S 2NT
while if he has 25-27 pts he
can bid 3NT or 4H if he has six
strong hearts or spades.
By the way, if you would like
to play a little duplicate bridge
to learn more about duplicate,
the Monday game is usually
best for less experienced play-
our Golf Course, and the professional way that their Outing
was handled.
In order to remain financially
competitive with surrounding
courses we have kept our fees
as low as possible.
Yearly Membership for
residents has been kept at
$800 plus tax. For residents
who work, a Limited Membership is available at $450 plus
tax. It entitles the golfer to play
on weekends and holidays. A
Twilight Membership at $450
plus tax entitles residents to
play every day after 3 pm. A
Beginner Program includes
ten group lessons with the
Golf Professional for $100 plus
tax. Balls and clubs are provided, rules and golf etiquette
ers. The less experienced
players would be competing
against similar players and if
you want to learn there is assistance, if you want it.
Intermediate Bridge Lessons are being planned for
early in March. Contact the
writer of this article for further
details. We would like to start
a beginners’ class but only if a
sufficient number of players
sign up. Contact the concierge
desk and sign up and when
we have sufficient numbers,
we will schedule a series of
introductory lessons.
If any player, a Bridge Club
member or not, has any bridge
questions, please contact the
writer of this report at
[email protected] or 609-8606346.
Since there are no more
duplicate games at GW there
are no scores to report.
Scores will be reported when
the games resume at GW.
If you want to play in the
Monday afternoon games at
Encore which is also a GW
game you must inform Encore
Security in advance before
5pm on Sunday. So email me
that you are playing and I will
forward the notice to Encore.
GW Connections
By Dorothy Thompson
We hope March will treat us
with a little less in the snow
department. At least, living at
Greenbriar/Whittingham, we
don’t have to shovel and are
able to leave our home in a
day or two. If you are at home,
update your calendars with
dates for our Connections organization.
With our upcoming events,
please make sure that your
dues of $15 are paid so you
will be able to participate in
everything we have to offer.
Remember that $5 of your
annual dues goes directly into
our Charitable Giving Fund
Account. Some upcoming
events are as follows:
On Monday, May 4, we will
have our installation of officers
followed by a musical treat,
“The Watering Can Band” with
our own Eddie Thompson performing. This musical group
explained, and a round of golf
played with an experienced
golfer who acts as a mentor to
each Beginner foursome. This
is an excellent way to learn
golf. If the Beginner signs up
as a Member, the $100 Beginner fee is deducted from the
Membership fee.
August Membership entitles a resident to play from
August 1 to December 31 for
$480 plus tax. If the August
golfer has played his five allotted times, these fees will NOT
be deducted from the August
fee. For golfers who walk the
course, Pull-Carts can now
be stored, along with golf
clubs for $120 plus tax, bags
alone $70 plus tax.
sings songs from the 40’s,
50’s and 60’s. We will hold this
entertaining evening at 7 pm
in our Ballroom, and of course
refreshments will be served.
On May 13, we will be going
to Staten Island where we will
visit the New York Chinese
Scholar’s Gardens, located in
the Snug Harbor Cultural Center and then go to the Alice
Austen House. Alice Austen, a
19th century photographer,
was ahead of her time. Lunch
will be at the Do Noi Restaurant, an Italian restaurant
listed in Zagat. This trip is limited to 49 people. Checks will
be accepted on April 15 and
the cost is $49 for this wonderful day. Place checks in our
lockbox #5 in the clubhouse
lobby.
On June 18, we will go to
the beautiful Knob Hill Country
Club for our Book and Author
Luncheon. The book is entitled
“Henna House” by Nomi Eve.
In this book, the author paints
a picture of Yemenite Jewry
during the 20th century.
Evocative and enthralling...a
tale (and traits) of a young
woman...her family, her community and the rituals (henna)
that bind them. Nomi Eve also
wrote “The Family Orchard”, a
Book of the Month selection
which was nominated for a
National Jewish Book Award.
Seating is limited and we urge
you to place your check for
$42 in Lock Box #5 on April 1.
Looking ahead to July 16,
we will go to the Seeing Eye
Institute in Morristown where
we will learn the history of
guide dog training and have
an opportunity to meet a guide
dog, trainer and someone who
has been paired with a dog.
We will then have a repeat
visit to the Cozy Cupboard
Tea Room, a venue we visited
last year. A check for $62, into
lockbox #5, will be accepted
after June 4 for this terrific
day.
If you have been away or
are still away, please remember Connections donates cosmetic samples to the Women
Aware Shelter. You can bring
them to our May meeting or
(Continued on page 10)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 9
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 10
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
GW Connections
(Continued from page 9)
drop them off with your unwanted, but in good condition,
seasonal clothing to Marilyn
Steiner - 860-6494 - at 10 Umberland Place or Doris Becker
- 395-8018 - at 12 Severn
Way. Let them know you are
stopping by with your bags so
the bags don’t remain at their
door in case they are away on
vacation or just not at home
that day.
Check the rounders in the
back hall opposite the indoor
pool for flyers and additional
information about GW Connections. Join us at our upcoming fantastic events.
Our Study Groups continue
to have some openings,
please call one of the following
names: Book Study - Barbara
Fineman, The Classics Phyllis Dayboch, It’s Debatable - Harriet Bachman, Movie
Group - Arlene Lazar, Play
Reading - Marcia Lambek,
Provocative Thinking - Rita
Modell (Group - 1) and Provocative Thinking - Enid
Kadish (Group - 2), Poetry Arlene Lazar.
Remember - We can send a
greeting card through GW
Connections for only $2.50.
Just call Dorothy - 860-2664
and she can send a card for
you. $1 of every card sent
goes directly into our Charitable Giving Fund Account.
GW Friends
By Len Greenberg
I recently read a brief article
in a local newspaper here in
Florida. It talked about how the
British have announced locating a “Mars landing craft” that
had been lost in space since
2003. They found it ON
MARS! Go figure. All these
years and it was where it was
supposed to have been. Well,
one thing is sure, the GW
Friends are always here for
you. You don’t have to look
very hard for us. We are a
social and educational organization. We are open to all GW
residents and have interesting
study groups, monthly speakers and outings all year. Here
is a list of events for the month
of March 2015:
Monday, March 2 Monthly
Membership Breakfast. We
get together at 9 in the Tap
Room. Just $8 including tax
and tip, allows you to choose
from the Tap Room’s complete
breakfast menu. Contact Jim
Penzias and let him know you
are coming. 860-8344.
Monday, March 2 Florida
Membership Breakfast: Once
again at the Bagel Tree in the
Kings Point Shopping center in
Delray Beach. We start at 9
and have a good time. Just $9
brings you a special menu to
choose from. A good time is
guaranteed. Contact Len
Greenberg for a reservation.
Seating is limited, so don’t wait
to let us know. 954-979-0162.
Monday, March 2 Movie
Group. We meet monthly to
discuss the latest releases
from the world of movies. Bob
Modell leads the discussion
and will let you know what to
see next month for the meeting. The group meets at 4 in
the Towne Centre. Please call
Bob to reserve a seat at the
table. 395-8575.
Wednesday, March 4 Pool
and Pizza. Group meets at
12:30 at La Villa on Applegarth
Rd. for Pizza, then reconvenes
at 2 in the downstairs Pool
room in the Towne Centre. If
you love the game or have
always wanted to learn call
Norm Goodman and tell him
you are interested. 395-8998
Monday, March 9 Med-SciTech Group. Monthly get together brings you interesting
presentations on the world of
medicine, sciences and technology. If you have an interest
or some expertise you’d like to
present, this group would love
to have you. If you want to
come and just listen to an interesting presentation, we’d
love to have you. Call Mickey
Kaplan. 395-1054. The group
gathers at 4 in the Towne
Centre.
Tuesday, March 10 Finance & Investing Group.
Irwin Kaplan leads the monthly
discussion of the world of finance and investing. Great
new ideas and review of old
ideas. The group meets at
7:30 in the Towne Centre Call
Irwin and let him know you are
coming.860-9582
Monday, March 16 Music
Group. If you love music you’ll
want to join this group at their
monthly gathering. Everything
from Bach to the Beatles has
been discussed. Come to one
of our gatherings and see why
this group is so popular. Call
Dave Lasser and let him know
you are interested. The group
meets at 7:30 in the Towne
Centre. This month’s presentation will be made by Larry
Shulman, who will present
George Gershwin. Dave
Lasser can be reached at 4097667
Tuesday, March 17 Lunch
with Friends Just a casual get
together at 1:00 in the Tap
Room. Only $10 including tax
and tip brings you a special
selection of sandwiches and
salads. A great way to break
up the Winter doldrums. Seating is limited so reservations
are a must. Call Reese Kase
and let him know you are coming. 395-8311
Wednesday, March 18
Pool Group. We get together
on the third Wednesday of
each month, at 2 for Pool in
the Towne Centre downstairs
Pool room. If you love the
game or have always wanted
to learn, call Norm Goodman
and let him know you are interested. 395-8998
Monday, March 23 Book
Club. Marv Bachman leads
the group. Each month a
member of the group presents
a report on a leading new
book. This month Jack
Sandler will present My Promised Land, by Avi Shavit.
The group meets at 4 in the
Towne Centre. Call Marv and
let him know you are interested. 409-5464.
Monday, March 23 Members Meeting and Speakers
Program. After our business
meeting, which starts at 7, we
will bring you, once again, Professor Michael O’Donnel who
will discuss the two battles that
saved the American revolution: the battles of Trenton and
Princeton.
This presentation starts
promptly at 7:30. Be there for
this special presentation. Professor O’Donnel is a Professor
at Rutgers University, Osher
Lifelong Learning Institute. If
you have any questions, call
Bob Leiner and let him know
you are coming.860-9196
Golfers stay tuned: We are
planning another golf outing
for the month of May. Watch
our e-mails for more information.
Italian American
Sr. Cultural Club
By Rose Corso
CARNAVALE, a beautiful
way to start the New Year, and
with a Club absence of two
months, celebrating this joyous holiday with Masks, lively
entertainment and always delicious food, was quite a beginning.
Point of interest: Vince Camuto, CEO/Chief Creative
Officer of the Nine West fashion company, died January 15,
2015. He was a titan of retail
and founder of Nine West footwear. He was responsible for
more items in the closets of
many Americans. His strength
lay in his sensitivity to the ever
changing tastes of his customers. He had the ability to select
from 100 pairs of sample
shoes, the ones that would
resonate immediately.
He was born on the Lower
East Sid of Manhattan in June
1936. His mother was a seam(Continued on page 11)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Italian American
Sr. Cultural Club
(Continued from page 10)
stress, his father a Sicilian
artisan. Vince Camuto began
working at age 18 at the I.
Miller shoe company, as a
shoe repair clerk and then on
the sales floor. In the 1960s he
worked in Miami for the Sudbury Shoe Company where he
was mentored by the founder
Ted Poland, and where he
successfully turned around
one of Mr. Poland’s factories.
In 1969 he was contracted
by the Japanese-owned Bank
of Sumitomo in New York to
design and import private-label
shoes using factories in Brazil
that had been idle. He started
Nine West in 1978 with a fellow contractor, Jerome Fisher,
naming the company after a
number on a building they saw
out of a window of their office
on the 57th floor.
Tommy Hilfiger, the designer and longtime friend and
neighbor in Greenwich, called
Mr. Camuto a master of making attractive, affordable
shoes. He did it in a different
way from Manolo or Jimmy
Choo. It was his intent to
please a lot of women because not many women could
afford a $700 pump for evening wear but they could afford
$150.
The company went public in
1993 and was bought by the
Jones Apparel Group six years
later for almost $900 million.
Robert Camuto, his son, recalled tagging along in his
youth to a trade show at the
Plaza Hotel, when the business was very different. “In the
‘70s shoes were basically
black and brown,” he said. “I
remember my father telling
buyers not only to buy pink
shoes, but five different kinds
of pink shoes.”
Dates to remember: March
6, April 3. Ciao a Tutti!
ORT America
By Nancy Feuerstein
This is a good time to thank
our friends at G/W for your
participation and support. By
being a member of ORT
America, you are part of a
global organization that has
been in the forefront of education in the Jewish and world
community for 134 years.
Thank you!
On January 20, at the Monroe Township Library, we cohosted with Hadassah and the
League of Women Voters to
present a film about human
trafficking. The discussion and
the film were very informative
and raised awareness of a
serious problem.
We’re always happy to welcome our Snowbirds back in
March, so join us for our everpopular luncheon and card
party on March 25, catered by
Lox, Stock & Deli in the ballroom, 11:30 am. The cost is
$26 per person. So gather
your friends together for a funfilled day of canasta, mahjongg, pan, etc.; call Miriam, at
409-9160, or Janice, at 4091630, with any questions.
On April 13, we’re looking
forward to the Book and Author Luncheon at Battleground
Country Club, $48 per person.
The author, Boris Fishman will
speak to us about his very
successful book, “A Replacement Life”, which was published by Harper Collins in
June, 2014 to RAVE reviews.
His novel is a “provocative,
soulful and sometimes hilarious story of a failed journalist
asked to do the unthinkable:
forge Holocaust restitution
claims for old Russian Jews in
Brooklyn.” Be sure to get your
copy of the book so Mr.
Fishman can autograph it for
you. Everyone is invited to join
us! Contact Roz at 409-9097
or Alyce at 409-9545.
Our trips to Media Pa. are
very popular and our next one
will be May 13, with one bus
only. We’ll be seeing a live
performance of “Hello, Dolly”
and the cost is $58 per person. The shows are always
enjoyable and we love strolling
through the charming town of
Media. Lunch is on your own.
Contact Lollie at 235-9680 or
Eileen at 409-4366.
Mark your calendars for future upcoming events and
watch for further details.
June 1 – Mercer Symphonic
Band, Senior Center
June 11 – Green Wood
Cemetery, Brooklyn – 2 hr.
trolley tour
July
22
–
Member
Appreciation
Aug. 12 – Game Day
Sept. 9 – Luncheon and
fashion show by Chico’s of
Hamilton
Oct. 28 – Card Party
Nov. 11 – Doylestown, Pa. –
Mercer Museum, Moravian
Tile and Pottery, tour of
Fonthill Castle, Mercer Mile
and lunch at the Doylestown
Inn. Cost is $46 per person.
Our meetings will be held at
the Senior Center, 7 pm on the
following dates: May 27, Aug.
26,
Oct. 21, Nov. 23. Refreshments are served and everyone is welcome.
Ongoing: Bowling – Beverly
409-7993; Tribute Cards –
Rita 395 – 8993; unwanted
cell phones – Kay 409-0955;
Gift cards for Shoprite and
Stop & Shop – Miriam 4099160.
Another reminder: Dues for
2015 were due on January 1
— $36. Thank you so much
and thank you for your support
The Martin
Salmanowitz
Senior Social
Club
By Paul Bresalier
On January 8, the Martin Salmanowitz Senior Social Club
began the New Year with a
great luncheon show featuring
comedian Dale Grand, Esq. We
had the largest turnout in some
time, with 270 people in attendance. Reservations for the
shows listed below are streaming in so we are definitely off to
a good start.
If you are not on the club’s email contact list and would like
to be notified of upcoming
events, please send an e-mail to
[email protected]
and provide your name and email address.
Bingo
Our club sponsors and conducts an evening of Bingo on
the second Friday of each
month with doors opening at 7
pm. The next Bingo is scheduled for March 13 in the ballroom.
Events Calendar
March 19 – Thursday – The
Mastros Luncheon Show with
singing, comedy, and celebrity
impressions. 1 P.M. Ballroom.
Family style lunch catered by
the Tap Room Café includes
corned beef, roast beef, and
turkey sandwiches with potato
salad, cole slaw, cake, and coffee. $16 pp members, $18 pp
non-resident guests.
April 16 – The Mary Mancini
and Mario Tacca Luncheon
Show. Mary’s singing and
Mario’s world champion accordion playing will provide a world
class show. 1 P.M. Ballroom.
Family style salad platters, cake,
and coffee catered by the Tap
Room Café. $17 pp members,
$19 pp non-resident guests.
April 21 – Tuesday – “Abie’s
Irish Rose” luncheon show at
the Hunterdon Hills Playhouse.
Bus leaves 10 A.M. See flyer for
luncheon choices. $69 pp members, $72 pp non-resident
guests. Waiting list.
May 14 – The Wendy & Rik
Luncheon Show featuring singers Wendy Becker and Rik Howard. The high energy show is
reminiscent of great male and
female duos such as Louis
Prima and Keely Smith and
Steve Lawrence and Edye
Gorme. 12:30 P.M. Ballroom.
Lunch includes salad, lemon
chicken, lasagna, roast potatoes, vegetables, cake, coffee,
and soda. The price is only $17
pp members and $19 pp nonresident guests.
Speakers Program
- Programs start at 2:30 P.M.
All members are invited.
March 12 – Theresa Grossa,
Dietician, will speak about Nutrition.
April 2 –A speaker from Consumer Affairs will discuss
Frauds.
April 23 – Stephanie
Fitzsimmons, St. Peter’s Hospital, will discuss Male Caregivers.
Yiddish Club
By Donna Steif
On Sunday, February 1,
2015, “THE WORD MAVENS”,
Joyce Eisenberg and Ellen
Scolnic joined us. They are the
co-authors of the “Dictionary of
Jewish Words”, a user-friendly
guide of more than 1200 Hebrew, Yiddish and English
words which are often, unbeknownst to us, part of our everyday conversation. It was a
wonderful morning as some of
those attending the program
shared with the rest of us their
own personal stories.
RENEWAL OF MEMBERSHIP: Dues of $10 per person
must be placed in Lockbox #6
in a separate envelope
marked “DUES”.
Please note that unless otherwise specified, programs
take place the first Sunday of
every month at 10:15 am. Bagels, cream cheese and coffee
are served. For those who
prefer, tea is also available.
Charge is $6 per person
unless otherwise indicated.
2015 Future Programs:
On Sunday morning, March
1st, we again welcome acclaimed author, Gloria Goldreich. The Yiddish Club is
proud to announce that her
newest book, “The Bridal
Chair”, a story of Marc Chagall’s daughter, will be DEBUTED at our breakfast where
it will be available for purchase
as well as book-signing.
PLEASE NOTE DATE
CHANGE: The clubhouse will
be CLOSED on Sunday,
APRIL 5 because of EASTER,
hence our April breakfast program will be held on Sunday,
April 12. Lisa Sherman and
accompanist, Bob Egan, at the
piano will present, “DECADES
OF JEWISH DIVAS”, a tribute
to the singers, songwriters and
entertainers including Bette
Midler, Edie Gorme, Carole
King and Helen Reddy. Prior
(Continued on page 12)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 11
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 12
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Yiddish Club
(Continued from page 11)
to our monthly program on this
day, we are honored to have
one of the winners of the
Henry Ricklis Memorial Committee’s Annual Student Essay
Contest for 2015 share his or
her essay with us. Ricklis Eye
Witness Survivors, members
of the committee, tell all who
will listen about what happened during the Holocaust
and why it must never happen
again”.
On Sunday, May 3, Maggie
Anton, author of “Rashi’s
Daughters” will discuss Rev
Hisda’s daughter in BOOK 1
“APPRENTICE” and BOOK 2
“ENCHANTRESS” and details
about Jewish life in Babylon
and Israel in the third century
CE. The interest lies in its portrayal of Sorcery and customs
in this exotic faraway period of
time and place, sometimes
against the backdrop of war.
She will share with us fantastic
tales of demons, the Evil Eye,
and magical incantations.
Maggie will host a book sale
and signing after her presentation.
2015 Future Trips
Only Yiddish Club members
may attend!
WAIT LIST ONLY: On Tuesday, March 31, 2015 the Super Gala Kick-Off of the Centennial Year of the Folksbiene
National Yiddish Theatre will
be held in Carnegie Hall. The
program starring Itzhak
Perlman in the Fiddler’s House
with Klezmer musicians from
around the globe will begin at
7:30 pm. Tickets are $80 per
person including door to door
bus service. Departure is at
4:30 pm from GW Parking Lot.
Plan a late lunch at home and
bring a snack.
On Tuesday, April 21, there
will be a trip to Philadelphia to
the Penn Museum at the University of Pennsylvania. This is
a freestanding building not on
the university premises. We
will visit the Archaeology and
Anthropology Museum as well
as enjoy a guided tour of the
Israeli Artifacts Gallery. Afterwards there will be time to
further explore the area. Lunch
is ON YOUR OWN at the Museum Cafe. Cost is $35. A few
seats remain. Call Zeena at
409-0472 for any questions.
On Thursday, May 21 we
are headed for the New York
Botanical Gardens to see
Frida Kahlo’s solo exhibition of
her works in NYC in more than
25 years. Lunch is on YOUR
OWN in the cafe. Weather
permitting, enjoy a free tram
ride on your own around the
beautiful gardens.
On Tuesday, June 2, during a trip to Ellis Island - the
Island of Hope, Island of
Tears - we’ll visit the gateway for millions of immigrants to the United States
from 1892 until it closed in
1954. Your ancestors may
have been among those who
started new lives at that time.
MUST HAVE PHOTO ID
WITH YOU! Cost of $45 includes transportation, cruise to
Ellis Island and self-guided
audio tour. Our group will NOT
stop at the Statue of Liberty.
Lunch is on YOUR OWN at
the cafeteria. Place checks
payable to the Yiddish Club in
Lockbox 6 by May 1, no later.
Mark envelopes “Ellis Island.”
MULTI-MEDIA CENTER:
The first Sunday of every
month the Multi-Media Center
is open before 10:15 a.m. to
allow Yiddish Club members
ONLY to browse through the
selection of books, DVD’s and
Video Cassettes. Anything
borrowed must be returned by
the following month’s breakfast. For an annotated bibliography, e-mail Librarian Natasha Rosenbaum at [email protected]
YIDDISH VINKLE: Come
join us even though you speak
or understand very little Yiddish, you will be warmly welcomed. Become a member of
the Yiddish Club and join the
women and men at the Yiddish Vinkle the third Wednesday of every month from 10
a.m. to 11:30 a.m. in the Clubhouse.
For those who have never
attended our breakfastprograms or trips, please join
us. It would be our pleasure to
welcome you. Remember you
must be a member of the Yiddish Club to participate.
Anticipation
By Juliet P. Klein
As I write this, it’s midJanuary and outside it’s frigid,
below zero with bone chilling
winds ... but inside I’m cozy
and warm as I type away on
my lap top that’s placed on my
dining room table among my
many papers. Lo…for various
reasons, it’s been many a year
since the table, which has a
thick glass top that’s placed on
top of two huge ceramic Chinese ornamental fish bowls,
has been used to dine upon.
And so, as soon as the lap top
took up residence here, with
no other convenient place to
call its own, it soon became
apparent that obviously the
dining room table would be its
logical home since the table
could also serve as a much
needed desk.
I reach for a cup of hot apple cider made using our
Keurig brewer…what could be
easier! I’m drinking the hot
apple cider to curb my afternoon munchies. You see it’s a
treat because I’m on a diet
and desperate to lose a few
pounds before our cruise, only
a few weeks away, to the Caribbean. We’re booked on
Royal Caribbean’s (RC) latest
cruise ship, the brand new
“Quantum of the Seas” which
is billed as the line’s first
SMART ship. Its maiden voyage was in November 2014.
Although not as large as RC’s
massive ships the “Allure” and
“Oasis of the Sea’…still it’s not
too shabby at 167,800 tons
and accommodates 4,180
passengers plus a huge crew
and staff. It prides itself with
the latest state-of –the- art
technology and many innovations so that passengers will
truly enjoy “smooth sailing.”
A perusal of RC’s Quantum
website describing its offerings
will boggle the mind. If your
idea is to simply lie about and
relax for ten days…perish the
thought. The overall theme of
the cruise is to keep you moving and moving and moving, to
be constantly entertained and
dining from morning till well
past midnight. We’re long time
RC cruisers and the line’s emphasis has always been to
offer more and more innovations and amenities geared to
all ages.
An example of its latest
technology is a passenger’s
ability to check in, submit a
photograph and reserve all
dining and entertainment options…all on-line from the
comfort of their home before
sailing time. Its goal is to have
guests onboard from “sidewalk
to ship” in ten minutes…no
lines, no forms and no checkin counters. Additionally, passengers will have the option of
wearing radio frequency identification (RFID} equipped wrist(Continued on page 13)
Poetry Corner
Trying Counts
By Irwin Dunsky
Even though I put effort into something
It doesn’t always work out
That doesn’t discount the value of trying
Cause trying counts
Effort investors usually achieve more than
Those waiting for their ships to come in
Trying builds a work ethic consciousness
And gives you a reason to wake up
Somehow we connected success
As an end result of trying
And in that bonding trying loses its glory
Trying’s value stands on its own
Lessons can be learned from trying
Consistent endeavor brings greater returns
Without trying life gets stale
And hopelessness can rent a room in your head
Trying counts
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Your Dreams While Awake
By Arnold Bornstein
You remember “dreams”
from your youth (“goals” is
the more common word),
perhaps playing for the New
York Yankees, or a Hollywood career, or becoming a
millionaire. As you grow, so
does reality.
Nevertheless, your dreams
while you are awake (not the
sleeping ones) are truly
goals, and as the years go
by, it becomes clearer as to
what you may or may not be
able to achieve. Some goals,
like the pursuit of happiness,
seem to remain in your inner
being throughout life. While
other dreams may imply
something that you doubt
you could achieve, but you
surely would like it to happen.
In any event, in your later
years it may be a good idea
to revisit some of your
dreams, and with the gift of
time that you may have
lacked in the past, you may
want to try to pursue some of
those dreams again.
Instead of primarily seeking things to do, why not try
to rekindle some of your old
dreams? You still may not
reach your destination, but
the journey may be enjoyable.
Look what happened to
Leonardo da Vinci. You remember him. He used to put
paint on canvases. I read
Anticipation
(Continued from page 12)
bands to open their stateroom
door and make onboard purchases instead of the usual
keycards. And for those who
get a bit crazed by waiting for
their luggage arrival, they will
be able to track it with their
smartphone. How about that!
The newest activities include a presentation of the
Broadway show “Mama Mia”
and RIPCORD by iFLY (a sky
diving simulator), the North
Star Observation Capsule
which ascends 300 degrees
above sea level and allows
breath-taking 360 degree
views of the ocean, bumper
cars, roller skating, basketball
court, circus school, etc. etc.
All this is in addition to the
usual activities and amenities
expected on an RC cruise.
Perhaps its newest innovation is its change in dining options. Passengers’ dinner options are no longer restricted
to only two dining times in
main dining rooms. Now they
may choose the time they wish
to dine and in which one of 18
available restaurants.
Of course, each restaurant
offers a different cuisine but
only five are complimentary all
the others come with price
tags. Among the restaurants
are five “specialty restaurants”
each offering a very exceptional food and ambiance experience….and all are somewhat pricey.
Since we always enjoy celebrating special occasions by
dining at fine restaurants
which offer exceptional food
and ambiance…and since the
cruise is at the beginning of
the year…and still to be considered a special occasion for
celebration because after all…
we made it through another
year and… hopefully will be
that in the year 1505, Mr.
Gheradini refused to pay for
the portrait that da Vinci had
done of his wife. It was to be
a gift for his wife, Mona Lisa
Gheradini, but Mr. Gheradini
thought the smile looked
fake. I guess Lenny da Vinci
may have felt he was stuck
with that unwanted painting.
But that obviously didn’t stop
him from continuing the pursuit of his dreams.
Of course, we shouldn’t
confuse our goals with those
of geniuses like Leonardo,
but there is a message there
for all of us. If a dream or
goal has remained with us
over the years, why not consider giving it another shot?
It doesn’t have to involve
greatness, but perhaps just a
common thing that you have
wanted to try to do and it has
lingered in your thoughts.
Successful aging, which is
important at any age, certainly is a goal. Obviously,
there are factors in aging that
you have no control over, but
what about the things that
you could control? There are
deadly diseases and fatal
accidents. However, why
shouldn’t we, at any age,
always attempt to do the best
we can in trying to ensure
our future good health?
As you know, as you get
older, you may more frequently reflect upon the
“what if’s” — the decisions
blessed with more years to
come…darling Erv immediately booked us for dinner at
each of the five specialty restaurants. And we will, of
course, also eat at the five
complimentary restaurants.
And so, dear reader, you
can understand my great anticipation to witness the ship’s
innovations but most of all to
experience all of the hoped for
yummy offerings of the specialty restaurants…for which
the need to lose a few pounds.
And surely you can also suspect that I plan to indulge…
and without restraint. After all,
a celebration is a celebration,
right!
Stay tuned, next chapter,
voyage review.
large and small that were
made in your life, and what if
you had decided the other
way?
Of course, with 20-20 hindsight it’s much easier to look
back and determine afterwards whether you made the
right or wrong decision.
Nevertheless, in any pending decision in your current
life, whether it be financially
or career or pleasure oriented, or whatever, you may
not want to leave out your
dream or goal.
In any case, a burden that
we all seem to face is the
balancing of satisfaction and
sacrifice in our lives. One
side is riddled with clichés:
(Continued on page 14)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 13
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 14
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Not Chilly in Chile
By Dawn Horowitz
Chile in South America is a
long skinny country bordering
the Pacific Ocean in the West
and sharing the Andes Mountain range with Argentina in
the East. It lies below the
Equator and Chile’s summer is
our winter and our winter,
Chile’s summer. Therefore,
when planning a getaway from
this season’s snow and freezing temperatures at GW, my
husband Paul and I decided it
was time to visit some countries in South America to enjoy
the warm summer’s sun. Chile
was our first stop.
Today, Chile’s population is
listed as 17 million, mainly the
descendants of Europeans
who immigrated because of
problems within their native
lands. The original tribes na-
tive to Chile were decimated
by the Spanish explorers and
the land was subject to Spanish rule until the early nineteenth century. At present,
Chile retains its Latin culture
and language.
Chile’s largest city is Santiago, located in the central valley of the country. It is a bustling modern metropolitan
area. The downtown features
the traditional square with the
cathedral on one corner. We
walked through the many
chapels of that church and
were surprised at how the
many layers of gold and silver
ornaments, covering the saint
statues, brought bright shining
light into the interior of the cathedral. The church had the
same layout and design as
those we had seen previously
in Italy. But the facade was of
a Spanish colonial building so
Chile’s heritage was preserved
in this way.
Surrounding the square
were various municipal buildings with Latin American motifs. The center of the square
was paved in tiles, very southwestern with grass around the
path. The carts and shops set
around the walkways were
selling fast food for the local
residents, a busy, pedestrian
site.
Also on that day, we took
the bus up to the park of San
Cristobal Hill, on the tip of an
extremely tall spiky mountain
in the middle of the city. We
viewed the attractive town below with its unusually shaped
glass skyscrapers. While
standing on the top of the
mountain I loved seeing the
reflection of the buildings and
traffic projected on the glass
facades of the skyscrapers on
the opposite sides of the
street. The sun colored these
reflections and presented a
unique skyline.
The following morning, we
traveled to Valparaiso, a World
Heritage site 75 miles northwest of Santiago. This charming village, with its novel architecture, was a delight to visit.
Since most of the homes and
shops there cling to the steep
hills of the Andes, we took the
funicular to the midlevel to see
where the area’s citizens live
and work. We wandered
around the winding narrow
cobblestone streets. The area
is noted for its artisans and
artists and we were fortunate
in being invited to visit one
studio.
As we toured, we admired
the colorful flowers in bloom in
the front gardens of the
houses. The houses were built
of wood, stucco or brick
painted in the early colonial
style. There were personal
slogans and art works written
on fences and doorways that
individualized each residence.
The village looks as if it is from
another era until one sees the
advertisements for cellphones
and WiFi. Also the town has
no “curb your dog” ordinance,
which was a hazard as we
walked.
The city center is located on
a tiny flat plain in front of the
ocean. At this spot, there was
a market selling seafood and
souvenirs. Of course, I
shopped for the local handicrafts. I loved the special designs of silver, copper and
lapis for sale and bought earrings as gifts for my granddaughters.
Later, we visited the tiny
fishing village of Vina del Mar
with its enormous gambling
casino. The casino looks as if
it is a governmental municipal
monument with landscaped
grounds and large concrete
lion statues at the entry. The
town has become a semiresort because the casino is
situated there. For us however, lunch at a nearby cafe
was wonderful since our
choice of a delicious carrot
cake and espresso coffee was
perfect for the time. We never
went into the casino.
Learning how to order a
meal in South America was a
challenge since their idea of
the size of an individual portion differed so completely
from ours. On our first day
Paul and I each chose a different dinner. We were shocked
at the size of the steaks that
arrived. They were enormous:
at least seven inches long and
one and a half inches thick,
enough for three people. And
the French fries came in a
huge bowl. Afterwards, we
shared every meal.
Because of its geographic
location, Chile hosts seven
major different climates. It is a
destination for winter sports,
i.e. ice skating, sledding, skiing as well as the summer
pleasures of swimming, boating, etc. The land includes so
many examples of nature’s
beauty that wherever travelers
look, a gorgeous scene enfolds. The copper colored Andes Mountains shadowing the
valleys enriches the entire
country. Chile remains a great
choice for all vacations!
Your Dreams
(Continued from page 13)
No pain, no gain. When the
going gets tough, the tough
get going. Survival of the
fittest. The law of the jungle.
You can’t win if you’re not
in...
Another side can also be
riddled with clichés: Take
time to smell the roses. Enjoy yourself; it’s later than
you think. All work and no
play....
The bottom line for many of
us in the pursuit of satisfaction
is the degree to which we
choose to make or not make
particular sacrifices, real or
imagined, in the pursuit of that
satisfaction.
There are also questions
about what we mean by satisfaction and by sacrifice. We
evidently have to provide the
answer for ourselves, if we
can.
At any rate, here is one
more cliché: To make a long
story short — I may have
made a short story long — so
I’ll leave it to what Ralph
Waldo Emerson said: “Write it
on your heart that every day is
the best day in the year.”
And here’s wishing that at
least some of your dreams
while awake do come true!
Monroe Twp. Fire
District #3
Meeting
Schedule for
2015
Business meetings are held
at the Fire House located at 16
Centre Point Drive, Monroe
Twp., NJ 08831 at 7 pm on the
following dates.
· March 3
· April 14
· May 12
· June 9
· July 14
· August 11
· September 8
· October 13
· November 10
· December 8
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 15
March 2015 Calendar of Events for
the Monroe Township Public Library
Book Café
11 a.m., Wednesday, March
4. Talk about books that you
read and enjoyed. Light refreshments served. Register at
the Welcome Desk.
Open Mic Night
6-8:30 p.m., Wednesday,
March 4. Talent program open
to beginners, seasoned performers and spectators. Registration is first come, first
served.
Sit -N- Stitch
10:30 a.m., Fridays, March
6, 20. Stitch projects; assist
others, share tips, projects and
patterns. Bring your own supplies. Light refreshments
served. Registration not required.
Great Decisions Discussion
Forum: The Middle East
10:30 a.m., Saturday, March
7. Crisis in Iraq and Syria,
tension between Iran and
Saudi Arabia and the fall of
Yemen, the struggle between
Sunni and Shi’a groups for
dominance is tearing apart
the region. We will discuss
how this fits into the larger
narrative of the Middle East
and U.S. policy in the region.
Register and reserve background information at the
Welcome Desk.
PSO Chamber Music Series:
Romantic Violin
1 p.m., Monday, March 9.
Enjoy an afternoon of sophisti-
cated classical music in an
intimate setting. Program features Dvorak’s “Romantic
Pieces for Violin and Piano,
Op. 75”; Edward T. Cone’s
“Elegy for Violin and Piano
(1946)”; Brahms’ “Sonata for
Violin and Piano in G Major,
Op. 78.” Program features
violinist Ruotao Mao and pianist Michiko Otaki. This program offered in collaboration
with the Monroe Township
Cultural Arts Commission.
Registration is not required.
Spring International Film
Festival presented by The
Friends
2 and 6:30 p.m., Thursday,
March 12. The 2012 French
film “Le Chef” will be shown.
Veteran chef competes for his
position after new CEO has
plans to change the restaurant’s menu. Movie shown with
English subtitles. Tickets are
$1 and available at Circulation.
Friday Afternoon Movie
2 p.m., Friday, March 13.
Recent dramatic romance
about wealthy man taking psychiatric patient to a family
event. Movie is free, registration is not required.
Gallery Artist Reception
1-3 p.m., Saturday, March
14. Meet photographers from
the Cranbury Digital Camera
Club and discuss their work.
Light refreshments served.
Registration is not required.
Saint Peter’s Auxiliary Will Host
Fashion Show to Aid the Fight
against Breast Cancer
The Saint Peter’s University
Hospital Auxiliary will host its
spring fashion show to benefit
breast health programs at
Saint Peter’s from 11 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. on Saturday, March
21, at the Pines Manor in Edison. This year’s theme is
“Hats Off to Women.” Tickets
are $65 for the show, featuring
fashions and entertainment by
Journey Productions and a sitdown lunch. Attendees can
take part in gift basket and
special prize basket drawings
along with a 50/50 cash raffle.
For more information or to
register for the event, contact
the Saint Peter’s Auxiliary at
732-745-6641 or by email at
[email protected]
Auxiliary members make a
difference in the lives of those
in need.
“If you are not already a
member of the Saint Peter’s
University Hospital Auxiliary,
you might want to join the
group in 2015,” said Kathleen
Killion, president of the Saint
Peter’s University Hospital
Auxiliary. “The Auxiliary is a
great way to promote and support Saint Peter’s University
Hospital through increased
community awareness, healthrelated education and fundraising initiatives. It’s also a
way to make and build new
friendships. Auxiliary members
seem to enjoy a very special
camaraderie.”
Members are needed to
organize and help run the Auxiliary’s many fund-raising
events.
Call Mary Ann Snediker at
732-846-9434 to become a
member of the Auxiliary.
Saint Peter’s University
Hospital is a 478-bed acutecare teaching hospital spon-
sored by the Roman Catholic
Diocese of Metuchen. Saint
Peter’s is a state-designated
children’s hospital and a regional perinatal center, and is
a regional specialist in geriatrics, oncology, orthopedics,
women’s services, and ambulatory care. The Children’s
Hospital at Saint Peter’s University Hospital provides families with access to a full range
of pediatric specialties, including pediatric cardiology
through its affiliation with The
Children’s Hospital of Philadel(Continued on page 16)
Library Board Meeting
6:30 p.m., Monday, March
16
International Book Club
10:30 a.m., Tuesday, March
17. Discuss “Madonna on the
Moon” by German author Rolf
Bauerdick. Register and reserve your copy at the Welcome Desk.
Genealogy Club
1:30 p.m., Wednesday,
March 18. Beginning and experienced genealogists welcome to discuss research,
share findings and resources.
Registration is not required.
Makerfest
11 a.m.-4 p.m., Saturday,
March 21. Creativity celebrated
with hands-on demonstrations
and exhibitors for all ages.
“Makerfest” is looking for creators of all ages. For more information, contact Steve Hrubes at
(732) 521-5000 ext.140 or
[email protected]
Friends Meeting
7 p.m., Tuesday, March 24
Friday Afternoon Movie:
Classics Edition
2 p.m., Friday, March 27.
“To Kill a Mockingbird” will be
shown. Movie is free, registration is not required.
George Ivers Display Case
Artwork by students from
Monroe Township High School
Rotunda Art Gallery
Photographs by members of
the Cranbury Digital Camera
Club
All events are open to the
public.
www.monroetwplibrary.org
EMAIL BULLETIN DELIVERY
SOME OF THE EMERGENCY AND OTHER
EMAIL BULLETINS FROM MANAGEMENT
SENT TO RESIDENTS ARE BEING
RETURNED AS UNDELIVERABLE. TO
FACILITATE DELIVERY, PLEASE ADD
THE EMAIL ADDRESS
[email protected]
TO YOUR CONTACT LIST.
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 16
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Membership Information
Being a registered member
of the Office/Center is free and
available to Monroe Township
residents, 55 or older. Members can register/sign-up for
the activities around the 15th
of the previous month.
Advance registration is recommended to ensure easy
admission into a program.
Registration is also available
on the same day of an event
from 9 to 11:30 a.m. Members
are encouraged to see if there
are openings for a particular
activity up to 2 days in advance and on the program
day. For members unable to
attend a registered program, a
cancellation phone call is appreciated.
For more information, visit
the Senior Center to pick up a
calendar of events or visit
www.monroetwp.com, and
look for the “Office of Senior
Services”
link
under
“Departments.
The Senior Center is located
at 12 Halsey Reed Road,
Monroe Township; phone,
609-448-7140
Get Your Game On!
On select days and times,
bring friends and play your
game of choice on Monday
and Wednesday afternoons
from 1 to 4 p.m. and on Tuesday and Friday mornings from
9 to noon. CRIBBAGE (for
new and seasoned) players
meet on the 2nd and 4th
Fashion Show
(Continued from page 15)
phia. Saint Peter’s is a sponsor of residency programs in
obstetrics and gynecology,
pediatrics and internal medicine, and is a major clinical
affiliate with Rutgers University
Biomedical and Health Sciences. Saint Peter’s also
sponsors residency programs
in radiology and orthopedic
s u r g e r y .
V i s i t
www.saintpetershcs.com for
more information.
Wednesday. (Some days are
shared with classes.)
Income Tax Assistance
Now through April 15, by
appointment, AARP-trained
Tax Counselors will be available on Mondays and
Wednesdays to help individuals with their low-to-moderate
income tax returns. Transportation is available on select
days and times. To make an
appointment, please ask for
Rosanna or due to the high
volume of calls, please leave a
message.
Drivers Safety
On Monday, March 2 at 8:45
a.m., the AARP-sponsored
Drivers Safety program is
available to help you enhance
your skills. For registration
information, please call the
Senior Center. Space limited.
Pablo Picasso
On Monday, March 2 at 1:30
p.m., join Maurice Mahler, Art
Historian, as he explores the
life and work of one of the
most important artists who
influenced the art of the 20th
Century. Please be sure to
register in advance.
Continuity of Care
On Tuesday, March 3 at
1:30 p.m., join Saswati Chakraborty and a representative
from VNA, for an informative
discussion on the options
available for individuals posthospital stay. Learn about the
different programs offered depending on insurance and
other skill factors. Please be
sure to register in advance.
Acrylics for All Levels
Starting on Tuesday, March
3 at 10 a.m., join Andrea for a
fun and creative 3-day acrylics
class (March 3, 17, 24) for
beginners and intermediates.
$45 fee, due upon registering
in-person, in advance, includes all supplies. Space limited.
Frank Sinatra and The Rat
Pack
On Thursday, March 5 at
1:30 p.m., enjoy a musical and
informative discussion, with
David Aaron, as he explores
how the Rat Pack came to be
during this audio and visual
experience. Please be sure to
register in advance.
Bagels Plus Long Term Care
Secrets
On Friday, March 6 at 10
a.m., as you enjoy your bagel
and shmear, courtesy of The
Gardens at Monroe, Kate G.
Jenkins, who implements
benefits and aids her clients at
SeniorBridge with their long
term care policies, will share
hidden long term care secrets
to get the most out of your
policy. Please be sure to register in advance.
March Movie Times
On select days this month,
enjoy a special presentation
with an Irish feel: On Monday,
March 9 at 1:30 p.m.: THE
GUARD (Rated R, with Brendan Gleeson and Don
Cheadle); on Tuesday, March
17 at 1:30 p.m.: THE IRISH
TENORS (classic folk songs
performed by Anthony Kearns,
Ronan Tynan, and Finbar
Wright at The Rosemont
Theatre); and, on Tuesday,
March 31 at 1:30 p.m.: IRISH
ESCAPE (a documentary centered on the 1876 liberation of
six Irish political prisoners on
board the American whaler,
Catalpa.). When registering in
advance, please note the program title and date.
Bridge Defense with Janet
Starting on Tuesday, March
10, from 1 to 3:30 p.m., join
Janet Wood for this 12session instructional program
for Intermediate Bridge Players. Designed for players who
have taken previous classes,
defense is vital to good play
and continuous communication with your partner. Course
fee: $24, due upon registering
in person and in advance.
Space limited.
Lighten Up for Weight Loss
On Wednesday, March 11
at 1:30 p.m., Caryn Alter, MS,
RS, RD, CentraState Medical
(Continued on page 17)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
(Continued from page 16)
Center, provides this introductory discussion about the upcoming 4-session program
commencing on March 18 at
9:15 a.m. Learn how to lose
weight and keep it off with
easy, practical tips. Attendees
at this session will have the
opportunity to register and pay
for the class. Course fee: $46
p.p., due upon registering in
person, in advance. Please be
sure you can commit to the 4
sessions before signing up for
this program.
Michael and Ted Present 2
Programs
On Thursday, March 12 at 2
pm, join Michael and Ted,
from WWFM’s “The Classical
Network”, as they explore (1)
the musical scores of three
musical dynamos: DeSylva,
Brown, and Henderson:
“Button Up Your Overcoat”
and “Life is Just a Bowl of
Cherries” — just to name a
few. Then, on Thursday,
March 19 at 2 p.m., they discuss (2) the life and career of
Stephen Sondheim (which
was previously scheduled in
December.) When registering
in advance, please note the
program date and title.
Guided Imagery
On Friday, March 13 at
10:30 a.m., learn how guided
imagery and creative visualization techniques can help
you better cope with stress.
Join Nadine Roberts, Integrative Mind/Body Stress Mgt.
Practitioner, RWJUH, for this
helpful demo and discussion.
Please be sure to register in
advance.
Get Organized
On Friday, March 13 at 1:30
p.m., find out how to manage
information, get organized,
and remember what you need
to do by utilizing ten top tips.
Toby Ehrlich, LCSW and
David Rosenberg, MSW, Executive Director of Wilf At
Home, are trained Memory
Workout Facilitators. Please
be sure to register in advance.
All about the Base (of Support)
On Monday, March 16 at
1:30 p.m., join Mary Tremmel
and Vaishali Patel, Mercy College Occupational Therapy
students, for an informative
and demonstrative discussion
on ways to promote better
balance through exercise and
prevent falls. Handouts,
stretches, and chair exercises
are included. Please register
in advance.
Zumba Gold
Starting on Friday, March 20
at 9 a.m., join Fran for a Latininfused, low impact workout
for 8 sessions. (No class on
April 3.) Get ready to move
your hips and bring bottled
water! Course fee: $28, due
upon registering in person, in
advance. Space limited for
safety.
Art of the Masters
On Friday, March 20 at 2
p.m., join our friend Christina,
from Creative Notions, as she
discusses the career and life
of Frank Stella. After the lecture, you will create a personal
masterpiece in the artist’s style
using mixed media Lecture
only? Sign up over the phone.
Project? Please register inperson to get a coupon while
they last.
Music of the 30’s and 40’s
On Monday, March 23 at
1:30 p.m., enjoy listening to
Marvin Fischer, as he performs and discusses the classic Big Band music and
“Standards” of the 1930’s and
1940’s. Please be sure to register in advance.
Body Works:
Spring Session
Starting on Tuesday, March
24, join Julie twice a week for
this low impact and weight
resistance class for 20 sessions. Class meets on Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m. (resistance
bands needed) and on Thursdays at 11 a.m. (hand weights
used). Call-in day for registration: Tues., March 3 at 9 a.m.
(In case of a snow closing, call
on March 10th.) Course Fee:
$40, due upon receiving class
confirmation. Previous participation does not guarantee a
spot in this class. Space limited.
Women in Art
On Tuesday, March 24 at
1:30 p.m., the Newark Museum brings this PowerPoint
presentation to the Senior
Center with a focus on how
women were portrayed from
Egyptian times to the Gilded
Age (when art was mostly created by men). Then, the rise of
women artists, photographers,
and sculptors are explored
from the 19th Century through
today. Please be sure to register in advance.
Mixed Watercolor Media
Starting on Thursday, March
26 at 12:30 p.m., join Jeremy
Taylor for this 5-session watercolor class that incorporates
acrylics and guache. Course
fee: $50, due upon registering
in-person, in advance. Space
limited. Supply list available
upon request. (Feel free to
bring a brown bag lunch, bottled water, and/or a coffee
travel mug to class.)
Jewbadors
On Thursday, March 26 at
1:30 p.m., we look forward to a
performance by the Jewbadors. At press time, however,
no other information is available. Please call the Senior
Center for a program update.
Thank you!
Recall Rev-Up: What’s Your
Name?
On Friday, March 27 at 1:30
p.m., learn how to improve
your recall of names with the
help of Toby Ehrlich, LCSW
and David Rosenberg, MSW,
Executive Director of Wilf At
Home, trained Memory Workout Facilitators, from The
Oscar and Ella Wilf Campus
for Senior Living. Please be
sure to register in advance.
Music Bingo
On Monday, March 30 at 2
p.m., enjoy a twist on this old
favorite with Tara Feeley, from
TF Entertainment. Music
Bingo combines popular tunes
with your favorite pastime.
Prizes, of course, and light
refreshments, too! Thanks to
The Gardens at Monroe,
grand prizes will be awarded
as well. Tickets: $1 p.p., due
upon registering in person, in
advance. Due to event specifics, this program is limited to
50 players.
OUR ON–GOING ACTIVITIES:
Computer Support: Select
Days, by appointment.
Drop-In Bridge: Mondays,
from 9:30 a.m. to noon
Got Game? It’s “play” time
on Mon. /Wed. afternoons and
Tues. /Fri. mornings. (Please
bring in your game and your
friends.)
Monroe Twp. Center Chorus: Tuesdays at 9:30 a.m.
Chess-Mates: Tuesdays at
noon.
SHIP/PAAD & Senior Gold
assistance: By Appt.
Blood Pressure Screening:
2nd Tues. of every month from
1 to 3 p.m.
Green Thumbs: 2nd Tues.
of every month, 11 a.m.
Cancer Support: 3rd Tues.
of every month, 1:30 p.m.
Science Today: 4th Tues. of
every month, 1:30 p.m. Topics
(Continued on page 18)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 17
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 18
(Continued from page 17)
Change Monthly.
Co mputer Clinic: 1st
Wednesday, from 10 a.m. to
noon
Healthy Bones: Seasonal
program for osteoporosis prevention.
Art Studio: Wednesdays at
10 a.m.
Jewelry Gems: Wednesdays
at 1 p.m. (jewelry making
group; no instruction.)
Cribbage: 2nd & 4th
Wednesdays, 2 to 4 p.m. For
Novices & Players!
Parkinson’s Support: (via
JFK): 1st Wed., 1 p.m.
Diabetes Support: (via
PHCS): 3rd Wed., 2:30 p.m.
Caregivers Support for Alzheimer’s Patients: 4th Wed. at
2 p.m.
Ceramics Studio: Thursdays, 10:30 to 12:30 p.m., $5
fee due at first class each
month; additional fees for
bisque pieces & extra studio
time.
Duplicate Bridge: Thursdays, 12:30 p.m. Please register in advance; sanctioned
games, Pay $5 on day of
game.)
Lo-Vision Support: 3rd
Thurs., 10:30 a.m.
Folk Dancing: Currently, on
hiatus...indefinitely.
Canasta Clique: Fridays at
10 a.m. (Players only)
Harmonikids: Fridays at
10:30 a.m. Harmonica Players
Welcome!
The Busy Bees: Fridays at 1
p.m. (Knitting /Crocheting)
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra presents program of works
by Rachmaninoff, Tchaikovsky and Kubian
NJSO gives world premiere
of Darryl Kubian
commission,
O for a Muse of Fire
Serhiy Salov performs
Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody
on a Theme of Paganini
The New Jersey Symphony
Orchestra and Music Director
Jacques Lacombe give the
world premiere of Darryl
Kubian’s O for a Muse of Fire
on a program that also includes masterworks by Rachmaninoff and Tchaikovsky.
The NJSO commissioned the
work from Kubian—an accomplished composer and NJSO
first violinist—as part of the
New Jersey Roots Project.
Inspired by Shakespeare’s
Henry V—and echoing the
NJSO’s Winter Festival celebration of the Bard through
music—O for a Muse of Fire
will feature vocalist Mary Fahl.
Pianist Serhiy Salov returns to
NJSO stages for Rachmaninoff’s Rhapsody on a Theme
of Paganini; the program
closes with Tchaikovsky’s
Sixth Symphony, “Pathétique.”
Performances take place on
Friday, March 20, at 8 pm at
the Richardson Auditorium in
Princeton; Saturday, March
21, at 8 pm at the Count Basie
Theatre in Red Bank and Sunday, March 22, at 3 pm at the
State Theatre in New Brunswick.
The premiere of Kubian’s O
for a Muse of Fire culminates
the Orchestra’s critically
lauded five-year New Jersey
Roots Project, which has
showcased works by composers whose time in the Garden
State has significantly influenced their artistic identity.
More than 80 patrons supported the commission
through the NJSO’s Sound
Investment program, a special
fundraising initiative. Patrons
who contributed to support the
commission have enjoyed
unique access to the composer, receiving insight into
Kubian’s compositional process, from inspiration to orchestration.
“The New Jersey Roots Pro(Continued on page 19)
Essential Emergency Information
(Please cut out and save)
Gather the items listed below and place them in a bag, suitcase, box,
backpack or container (your kit) in the event you have to leave your
home.
1. Anyone on life support systems: get a back-up battery-pack.
2. Keep information and phone numbers (doctors, family, friends,
hospital, list of medicines, pet shelters, insurance, vital records)
conveniently located in a fire-proof, water-proof box. Put in an easily
accessible place. Remember to update your kit and check on its
location often.
3. Buy a battery operated radio, cell phone chargers for car, flashlights,
extra batteries.
4. Have cash on hand (at least $100).
5. Clothing for family members.
6. Extra set of car and house keys.
7. Whistle (to call for help).
8. Buy a GPS for your car
Also, remember to complete these emergency tasks!
9. Keep car with at least 1/2 tank of gas filled. (If there is notice of a
storm, a full tank.)
10. For heat, boil pots of water, on stove. DO NOT just turn stove on.
NEVER leave unattended.
11. Avoid using candles, but if you must, NEVER leave unattended. Use
flameless candles.
12. Make contact with your neighbors, family.
13. Stock-up on water (1 gal/person/day), non-perishable foods, mechanical can opener, up-to-date meds, AND don’t forget for your pets, too.
14. Fill tub with water for sanitary reasons.
15. People with special needs, register with the Township.
16. ** Keep the Towne Centre Emergency Plan for generator use in accordance with the sheet (sent in the mail) along with the bands that were
issued, with this Emergency Reminder.
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
NJSO
(Continued from page 18)
ject truly comes full circle with
this commission from Darryl
Kubian,” Music Director
Jacques Lacombe says. “For
patrons to play a part in bringing this new work to life makes
this world premiere an even
greater celebration of the vibrant artistic culture of our
state.”
O for a Muse of Fire takes
its inspiration from Shakespeare, relating to the NJSO’s
multi-year Winter Festival,
“Sounds of Shakespeare.”
Kubian says the work is a response to Henry V: “Musically,
I felt I could represent the conscience of the king, as expressed through the play: that
one person could have the
power of life and death on a
large scale. King Henry knows
that going to war will result in
loss of life, but he ultimately
decides that the unity he
seeks is worth the sacrifice.”
TICKETS
Tickets start at $20 and are
available for purchase online
at www.njsymphony.org or by
phone at 1.800.ALLEGRO
(255.3476).
THE PROGRAM
Rachmaninoff &
Tchaikovsky
Jacques Lacombe, conductor; Mary Fahl, vocalist; Serhiy
Salov, piano; New Jersey
Symphony Orchestra
KUBIAN: O for a Muse of
Fire (World Premiere) (New
Jersey Roots Project)
RACHMANINOFF: Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini
TCHAIKOVSKY: Symphony
No. 6, “Pathétique”
Full concert information is
a v a i l a b l e
a t
www.njsymphony.org/events/
detail/rachmaninofftchaikovsky.
THE ARTISTS
Jacques Lacombe,
conductor
A remarkable conductor
whose artistic integrity and
rapport with orchestras have
propelled him to international
stature, Jacques Lacombe has
been Music Director of the
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra since 2010 and Orchestre Symphonique de Trois
-Rivières since 2006. He was
previously Principal Guest
Conductor of the Orchestre
Symphonique de Montréal and
Music Director of orchestra
and opera with the Philharmonie de Lorraine.
Lacombe has garnered critical praise for his creative programming and bold leadership
of the NJSO. Time Out New
York has named Orchestra’s
acclaimed Winter Festivals “an
eagerly anticipated annual
event” for the innovative concert experiences that have
included a realization of Scriabin’s “color organ,” collaborations with theater and dance
troupes and presentations of
Tan Dun concertos in which
clay pots and water become
solo instruments. The New
York Times wrote that “It was
an honor to be in the hall” for
Lacombe and the NJSO’s performance of Busoni’s Piano
Concerto at the 2012 Spring
for Music Festival at Carnegie
Hall.
Recently, Lacombe helmed
a pair of unique initiatives
through the New Jersey Roots
Project: the NJSO launched
the inaugural NJSO Edward T.
Cone Composition Institute for
young composers—a week of
intense compositional evaluations and consultations that
culminated in a live performance of the participants’
works—and gave the world
premiere of Cone’s Symphony
in a special lecture-concert.
Other 2014–15 NJSO highlights include the “Sounds of
Shakespeare” Winter Festival,
featuring collaborations with
violinist Sarah Chang and the
Shakespeare Theatre of New
Jersey.
In July, Lacombe made his
Tanglewood Music Festival
debut with the Boston Symphony Orchestra; this season,
he returns to the Deutsche
Oper Berlin for productions of
Carmen, The Damnation of
Faust and Samson and Delilah; L’Opera de Monte Carlo
for Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of Mtsensk and Vancouver Opera for Carmen.
He has appeared with the
Cincinnati, Columbus, Qué-
bec, Toronto, Vancouver and
New Zealand Symphony Orchestras and National Arts
Centre Orchestra of Ottawa.
He frequently conducts in
France, Spain and Australia
and has led tours and recordings with the National
Youth Orchestra of Canada.
Opera highlights include allstar productions of La Bohème
and Tosca at the Royal Opera
House Covent Garden and
numerous productions with the
Deutsche Oper Berlin and
Metropolitan Opera, as well as
engagements at opera houses
in Marseille, Strasbourg, Turin
and Munich. He has recorded
for the CPO and Analekta labels; with the NJSO, he has
recorded Orff’s Carmina Burana and Janáček’s Suite from
The Cunning Little Vixen and
released a new recording of
Verdi’s Requiem. His performances have been broadcast on
PBS, the CBC, Mezzo TV and
(Continued on page 20)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 19
Sunday, March 8
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 20
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
Lost Lives, Lost Art
The Monroe Township
Henry Ricklis Holocaust Memorial Committee will hold its
annual Yom HaShoah Observance on Sunday April 19 at 1
p.m. in the Monroe Township
Middle School Marasco auditorium. Doors will open at
12:30 for Yahrzeit (Memorial)
Candle Lighting and admission
is free to all. Please note that
seating is on a first come basis.
Our theme Lost Lives, Lost
Art will focus on art that was
stolen or destroyed by the Nazis during the Holocaust Period. It notes the courageous
efforts of the Monuments Men,
a US Army unit, in recovering
and returning the looted art to
their rightful owners and often
venturing behind enemy lines
to locate the hidden art works.
A movie depicting these courageous works called The Monuments Men (George Clooney,
Matt Damon, Bill Murray, Cate
Blanchett, etc.) is based on a
novel by Robert M. Edsel; a
story of non-military types,
(over the hill) people; art historians, art dealers and museum
curators, tasked by President
Roosevelt with rescuing the
plundered art. There is a frantic time schedule dictating their
strategies since Hitler has ordered that upon his death all
stolen art is to be destroyed
and the war was ending with
Hitler’s imminent death. To
paraphrase George Clooney:
“Returning refugees will come
TOWNE CENTRE NEWS
By Monica Caterson, Clubhouse / Recreation Manager
WHOA Entertainment
WHOA Trips
Johnny Petillo with Steven Scott
Saturday, March 21, 2015
8 p.m.
$25 – At the Monroe Twp. High School
Amish Country
July 22, 2015
Saturday, April 18, 2015
Saturday, May 16, 2015
Saturday, June 20, 2015
Saturday, July 18, 2015
Saturday, August 15, 2015
Saturday, September 19, 2015
Saturday, October 17, 2015
Saturday, November 21, 2015
*Flyers will be in the Towne Centre*
WHOA Movies
In The Ballroom @ 1:00PM
*Flyers in Towne Centre*
WHOA
Atlantic City
Wednesday, March 4, 2015
Bus Leaves Community @ 9AM
“Golden Nugget”
Wednesday, April 1, 2015
Bus Leaves Community @ 9AM
“Bally’s”
Sunday, March 8, 2015 @ 1p.m.
Movie: “20 Feet From Stardom”
WHOA
Duffy Square
Sunday, March 22, 2015 @ 1p.m.
Movie: “Jersey Boys”
Duffy Square trips will
resume in May of 2015…
21, 2015
home to their burned and
bombed homes and somehow
start over again. But to destroy
their art is to destroy their heritages and their history as if
they had never existed. This
would be the end of a culture;
a way of life, a thousand years
of civilization and ironically six
million pieces of art.” The
Monuments Men were not
about to let this happen.
The keynote speaker, Mr.
Harry Ettlinger, a member of
the Monuments Men Unit,
(Sam Epstein in the movie) will
talk about his experiences in
locating and finding the looted
art sometimes steps and minutes before disaster hit. He
has traveled throughout the
United States and Europe imploring museums and private
collectors to return the stolen
art work to their legitimate
owners. He salutes today’s
new Monuments Men and
Women in working for the
same cause.
Our Shoah remembrance
program will include an original new film by Amy Antelis
about the Bloch-Bauer family
and the theft of their special
artwork. We will present our
touching two menorah lighting
ceremony; Judith Sherman, a
published author and survivor,
will recite a new work and
Naomi Miller will sing a tribute
to Carl Lustbader with original
lyrics by Joanne Howard.
Please join us on April 19, 1
p.m. for a memorable afternoon. Questions or further
information: Contact Chairperson Nina Wolff at 732 6057811, or [email protected]
NJSO
Meredith Monk, Bruno Weil,
Zdenek Macal and Phillip
Glass.
Kubian is an accomplished
composer; during the 2007–08
season, the NJSO gave the
premiere of Kubian’s 3-2-1
Concerto for Electric and
Acoustic Violin and Orchestra—an NJSO commission
dedicated to then-Music Director Neeme Järvi and NJSO
Concertmaster (and soloist)
Eric Wyrick. Following its critically acclaimed premiere, Scientific American featured 3-2-1
in its “60-Second Science”
blog, describing the work as a
“beautiful example of what
happens when artists are inspired by scientific discoveries.”
Kubian’s “The Maestro
Waltz,” a special 70th-birthday
piece for Järvi, was the featured encore during a number
of 2006 NJSO concerts; it was
mentioned in Järvi’s biography, The Maestro’s Touch.
The New Sussex Symphony
commissioned Kubian’s overture Occam’s Razor, premiering the work in May 2009; the
Omaha Symphony performed
the piece in March 2012.
Kubian’s music-production
company, Xtreme Medium, is
involved with many diverse
projects, including the score
for “Living with Predators” for
the Wildlife Conservation Society at The Bronx Zoo. Other
past projects include music for
Pangolin Pictures, NHK, CBS,
The Learning Channel, Discovery Health and The Travel
Channel.
Mary Fahl, vocalist
Mary Fahl first achieved
fame as lead singer and cofounder of the mid-1990s New
York City-based chamber-pop
group October Project. The
hallmark of their sound was
Fahl’s power vocals over gorgeous melodies played with
passion and sophistication.
After the band disbanded,
Fahl came to the attention of
Peter Gelb, the current head
of the Metropolitan Opera.
After one audition, he signed
her to a deal with Sony Classical where she released her
orchestral album “The Other
Side of Time.” Other recordings include a re-working
of Pink Floyd’s “Dark Side of
the Moon” for V2 Records,
“Love and Gravity” on Rimar
Records and “Live at the
Mauch Chunk Opera House,”
which was recorded at one of
America’s oldest vaudeville
(Continued from page 19)
Arte TV, among others.
Born
in
Cap-de-laMadeleine, Québec, Lacombe
attended the Conservatoire de
Musique de Montréal and
Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. He was named a
Chevalier de l’Ordre national
du Québec in 2012 and a
Member of the Order of Canada in 2013—among the highest civilian honors in the country.
Darryl Kubian, composer
Darryl Thomas Kubian is a
member of the New Jersey
Symphony Orchestra’s first
violin section and former principal second violin of the
Brooklyn Philharmonic Orchestra. Kubian has been a
featured soloist with the NJSO
on the theremin, performing
the “Cantelina” from VillaLobos’ Bachianas Brasileiras
No. 5. He has performed jazz
violin with trumpeter Randy
Brecker in a Charlie Parker
program entitled “Bird Lives!”
and has arranged and performed Ellington’s “Sacred
Songs” in collaboration with
the Jazz Studies Program at
Rutgers University. Kubian’s
improvisational skills have
been highlighted with artists
such as Nigel Kennedy, Al
Jarreau, Bobby Short and
Renée Fleming. In addition to
his solo and chamber ensemble performances using modern, electric and period instruments, Kubian has performed
in Broadway musicals including The King and I, Show
Boat, Crazy for You and
Tommy. He has recorded with
such noted artists as Trevor
Pinnock, Malcolm Bilson,
Greenbriar @ Whittingham’s Shopping & Community Bus
(Continued on page 21)
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 21
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
NJSO
(Continued from page 20)
theaters and filmed for PBS
where it is currently airing
around the country.
Fahl has appeared OffBroadway in the 59E59 Theater’s production of Murder
Mystery Blues, a musical
based on the short stories of
Woody Allen. She also has
written and performed songs
for several major motion pictures, including the lead song
(“Going Home”) for the Civil
War epic Gods and Generals.
L e a r n
m o r e
a t
www.maryfahl.com.
Serhiy Salov, piano
Born into the exceptional
pianistic tradition of the
Ukraine, Serhiy Salov also
draws on substantial periods
of study in both composition
and musicology. His recital
programs extend from Johann
Sebastian Bach through the
Classical, Romantic and early
Modernist composers to
György Ligeti. He also dedicates himself to contemporary
pieces.
His concerto repertoire
ranges from the great works of
the 19th and 20th centuries to
lesser-known Soviet composers. Salov also has transcribed
large-scale works for solo piano, including Stravinsky’s
Rite of Spring and Petrushka,
“Fêtes” from Debussy’s Nocturnes and a version of
Poulenc’s D Minor Concerto
for two pianos and orchestra.
His competition achievements include the Montreal
International Musical Competition (2004) and second prizes
at the Gina Bachauer Competition (2010) as well as the
Cincinnati World Piano Com-
petition (2012). In May 2014,
Salov won the Richard Lupien
Improvisation Prize.
In the current season, Salov
will make his debut with Krakow Philharmonic Orchestra,
Artur Rubinstein Philharmonie
Lódz and Philharmonia Orchestra.
THE NEW JERSEY
SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA
Named “a vital, artistically
significant musical organization” by The Wall Street Journal, the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra embodies
that vitality through its statewide presence and critically
acclaimed performances, education partnerships and unparalleled access to music and
the Orchestra’s superb musicians.
Under the bold leadership of
Music Director Jacques Lacombe, the NJSO presents
classical, pops and family programs, as well as outdoor
summer concerts and special
events. Embracing its legacy
as a statewide orchestra, the
NJSO is the resident orchestra
of the New Jersey Performing
Arts Center in Newark and
regularly performs at the State
Theatre in New Brunswick,
Count Basie Theatre in Red
Bank, Richardson Auditorium
in Princeton, Mayo Performing
Arts Center in Morristown and
BergenPAC in Englewood.
Partnerships with New Jersey
arts organizations, universities
and civic organizations remain
a key element of the Orchestra’s statewide identity.
In addition to its lauded artistic programming, the NJSO
presents a suite of education
and community engagement
programs that promote meaningful, lifelong engagement
with live music. Programs in-
clude the three-ensemble
NJSO Youth Orchestras,
school-time Concerts for
Young People performances
and multiple offerings—
including the El Sistemainspired NJSO CHAMPS
(Character, Achievement and
Music Project)—that provide
and promote in-school instrumental instruction as part of
the NJSO Academy. The
NJSO’s REACH (Resources
for Education and Community
Harmony) chamber music program annually brings original
programs—designed and performed by NJSO musicians—
to a variety of settings, reaching as many as 17,000 people
in nearly all of New Jersey’s
21 counties.
For more information about
the
NJSO,
visit
www.njsymphony.org or email
[email protected]
Tickets are available for purchase
by
phone
1.800.ALLEGRO (255.3476)
or on the Orchestra’s website.
The New Jersey Symphony
Orchestra’s programs are
made possible in part by The
New Jersey State Council on
the Arts, along with many
other foundations, corporations and individual donors.
United is the official airline of
the NJSO.
The Jewish Heritage Museum
Presents “From Felix Mendelssohn
to Paul Ben-Haim: The Odyssey
of the German Jewish
Composer,” Concert
From the beginning of Jewish emancipation in the 19th
century, Jewish composers
played a major role in German
musical life. During the 19th
century, Romantic composers
Salomon Jadassohn and Friedrich Gernsheim, among others, followed in Felix Mendelssohn’s footsteps as prominent
composers, teachers, and
conductors. As the 20th century unfolded and Hitler came
to power, the path for German
Jewish composers became
more difficult. In the end, many
composers fled into exile.
Korngold, Schoenberg, Zemlinsky, Kurt Weill, and others
came to the United States,
while Paul Ben-Haim (born
Paul Frankenburger) left for
Palestine in 1933 where he
became the father of Israeli
classical music. Others, like
Viktor Ullman and Erwin
Schulhoff, were less fortunate
and were murdered in the
death camps.
Pianist Alan Mallach will
provide a narrative and play
the music of these composers,
beginning with Mendelssohn
and ending with Ben-Haim,
while illuminating their lives
and the rich, bittersweet story
of Jewish composers in Germany. “From Felix Mendelssohn To Paul-Haim: The Odyssey of the German Jewish
Composer” will take place on
Sunday, March 29, 2015; at 2
pm. Tickets are $15 members
and $18 non-members.
Alan Mallach, a resident of
Roosevelt NJ, is a pianist
and composer who has performed widely in New Jersey
(Continued on page 22)
March 20
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 22
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
Transportation
TRANSPORTATION – Airports, events, doctor’s appointments and more. Call George
(732) 887-5437.
RICK’S CAR SERVICE – Professional driver. Greenbriar
resident. Reasonable. (609)
902-9979 or (609) 655-8051.
CAR SERVICE – For a comfortable ride I hope you decide
to call John (609) 655-2015.
Airports, doctors, shopping.
TRANSPORTATION DOCTOR – Airports, trains, piers,
doctors, local service, NYC.
Reliable and references. Call
Lon J. (732) 423-1847.
MARVIN’S CAR SERVICE –
Greenbriar resident. Low
rates. Airports, piers, NYC,
Philadelphia, anywhere 24/7.
Ride in style for less. (908)
812-6299.
EXPERIENCED
LIMO
DRIVER – NYC, airports, anywhere. Clearbrook resident.
Call John (609) 642-6136 or
(732) 610-0703.
A. HARRINGTON LIMOUSINE – Owners are Greenbriar
Whittingham residents. Call
(800) 458-5466.
NAT TRANSPORTATION –
Monroe resident. All airports,
shipyards, NYC and local.
Doctor and hospital visits.
(917) 657-5611.
Home
Improvement &
Services
TKS HOME IMPROVEMENTA full-service contractor and
handyman services. Kitchens,
baths, basements, painting,
tile and more. No job too big or
too small. Credit cards acc e p t e d .
L i c e n s e
#13VH05970500. (609) 2592574.
LEN’S REMODELING &
HANDYMAN SERVICE –
Specializing in home improvements. We do it all. We paint
one room or the whole house.
Sheetrock and wall repair.
Crown moulding. Renew or
repair that bathroom or
kitchen. Doors, medicine cabinets, closet doors and closet
remodeling. Bath tile and
grout, caulking, shelving. All
flooring including ceramic tile,
hardwood and carpet. Anything in your home. All major
credit cards accepted. Licensed and insured. NJ License # 13VH03701800.
www.lensrmc.com Call (732)
851-7555.
JOHN PEARL HOME IMPROVEMENT AND LANDSCAPING, LLC – General
repairs, painting, tile, masonry
repairs, flooring, landscaping.
Basement/garage cleanouts
and more. NJ License #
13VH06515700. All calls returned. (908) 208-1150.
RELIABLE
HANDYMAN
SERVICES – Local resident.
No job too small. All labor
guaranteed. Call me to discuss-no obligation. Reasonable rates. Call (609) 4097096 or (908) 385-5869.
EXPERT HOME REPAIRS Kitchen, bath, closet remodeling, tiling, painting. Call Bob
Katz – (609) 490-9522 for details.
MIKE THE HANDYMAN –
See my display ad in this edition. (732) 780-0468.
WINDSOR MOVING COMPANY – Helping families pack
and move for over 20 years.
Fully insured. Lic. PC00512.
Call (609) 448-8840.
Miscellaneous/
Services
CUSTOM DRAPERIES &
BLINDS – Call for specials
( 9 0 8 )
6 7 2 - 2 2 5 2 .
www.customdraperiesmonroet
ownship.com
TAROT READINGS in your
home. Concordia resident
Donnalee makes local house
calls. Group specials. (609)
664-2446.
PET CARE – Loving, responsible, experienced. Reasonable rates. Please call (609)
664-2237.
PROFESSIONAL PET CARE
– Bonded and insured. Local.
Call (609) 860-9696.
PC PROBLEM SOLVERS –
Low priced service. Slow computer? Viruses or spyware?
Pop-ups? Computer and internet set-ups. We make house
calls. Call Herman (609) 4090824.
COMPUTER ASSISTANCE in
senior's home. Help with all
aspects. Selection, set-up, and
training. (609) 409-7631.
COMPUTER REPAIRS - RJF
Sales Company LLC (formerly
Monroe Computer Service). Is
your computer running slow? It
may need a tune-up. Desktop
and laptop repair in your
home. Virus removal and protection. Monroe resident with
over 20 years of computer experience. www.monroecomputer.com (732) 723-9537
or (732) 967-3400.
Tax Services
INCOME TAX PREPARATION – Michael Stiller – MBA.
35 years of experience. Inhome appointments, prompt
service. (732) 718-9050.
GREGORY TAX SERVICE –
Personal and small business.
Low fees, in-home appointments. IRS, AFSP qualified.
Jim Gregory (609) 409-7039.
Wanted
to Buy
BUYING & SELLING GUNS –
Call for pricing. (609) 5589509. Ask for David. Licensed
Firearms Dealer.
Help & Health
Services
CARING ELDER CARE – We
will help you live independently; two hours a day or a few
hours a week. Experienced,
reliable, affordable.
Local,
references. (646) 4130813.www.CaringElderCare.c
om
OUR CARING HOME COMPANIONS help seniors live at
home. Personal care, meals,
housework, transportation, up
to 24 hour care. Top references and screenings, we do
things your way. Affordable
rates. VISITING ANGELS.
(732) 656-7720.
STELLACARE HOME CARE
SERVICES – Our services
assist with bathing, cooking,
running errands, cleaning,
medication reminders and
doctor’s appointments. (732)
988-2185. Ask for Debra…a
kind gentle soul.
ANNA’S HOME CARE – Certified professional caregiver is
looking for live-in/live-out job in
Monroe Township. Experienced, references. Driver’s
license. Accepts long-term
care insurance. Low prices.
Private care option. Call Anna
at (609) 409-1600 or (908) 337
-7462.
HOME HEALTH AIDE AVAILABLE – She is excellent, sensitive, honest, responsible and
exceptional at everything she
does. Call for reference at
(609) 860-1243.
LEASE A NIECE – Companionship, assistance with cooking, shopping, household activities, paperwork, appointments. Local transportation.
CHHAs, CNAs, LPNs, RNs.
Tracie (732) 904-3885.
Housecleaning
Services
QUALITY HOUSE CLEANING – Experienced and reliable. Trustworthy and respectful. References. Call (609) 712
-3880.
IZABELA’S CLEANING SERVICE
- Professional house
cleaning. Quality work. References available. Reasonable.
2 bedroom/2 bath, $65 and up.
Experienced. Free estimates.
(609) 954-0181 or (609) 6569281.
Notice to All GW VOICE
Contributors
As the scope of the GW
VOICE has grown, the
process of publishing each
month is of necessity almost entirely handled by
computer, hence is very
sensitive to the method of
transmission and the condition of copy submitted for
publication.
Since we have observed
that much of the copy received is actually generated on a computer, we
believe it can be transmitted to the GW VOICE editor by computer as well. Email
to
gwvoice
@comcast.net. It is a relatively simple process to
attach copy to an e-mail or
paste it into the body of an
e-mail directly. If you wish,
we will be happy to provide
instruction at the GW
VOICE office at a mutually
convenient time.
If you do not have e-mail
capability, copy must be
typed using a conventional
typewriter, word processor
or computer and delivered
UNFOLDED, UNCLIPPED,
and UNSTAPLED to facili-
tate scanning. Copy must
be on letter-sized paper
and brought to the GW
VOICE office in the annex
section of the Towne Centre. A mailbox for copy is
situated in the wall next to
the entrance to the office.
Please use 10-12 point
black Times Roman type
on 20# white printing or
copy paper. Do not use
exotic typefaces or bold
type throughout your document.
If you wish, you may put
copy in a 9” X 12” envelope. DO NOT FOLD INTO
A BUSINESS SIZE envelope. Henceforth, if you
supply folded and/or stapled or clipped copy you
will be notified directly of
the proper method of submission.
Thank you for your cooperation. We encourage you
to submit copy for publication and will do everything
we can to help you meet
our requirements. If you
have any questions, please
call Alex Banks at 609-6554791.
Caregiver
Support Group
Focus: Spouse/Partner
2ND Thursday at 1:30 p.m.
Location: Saint Peter’s
Adult Day Care Center
Monroe Township
Meetings are 90 minutes
Registration is not necessary.
Questions may be directed to Stephanie Fitzsimmons, RN, NP
at 1-800-269-7508, press 1, press 8662
Sponsored by Saint Peter’s University Hospital
NICE
JEWISH
GIRL’S
HOUSE
CLEANING
and
Health Aide Service. 20 years
experience. Low rates. Insured
and bonded. Call Eileen at
(609) 860-9050.
Jewish Heritage
Museum
(Continued from page 21)
and elsewhere. In addition to
performing, Mallach is an
expert on late 19th and 20th
century Italian opera, author
of Pietro Mascagni and his
Operas, and The Autumn of
Italian Opera. He is also
known for his work in housing and urban revitalization,
and has authored many
books and articles on those
subjects.
For more information or to
make a reservation, call the
Museum at 732-252-6990 or
visit www.jhmomc.org to make
reservations online. The Jewish Heritage Museum is located at 310 Mounts Corner
Drive in Freehold. It is a 501(c)
(3) tax-exempt organization
and is handicapped accessible.
Please print your ad and mail it to Princeton Editorial
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 23
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE
SUNDAY
1
10:15 am Yiddish Club
8
1 pm Movie: “20 Feet from
Stardom”
15
22
1 pm Movie: “Jersey Boys”
29
1 pm Movie: “And So It
Goes”
MONDAY
TUESDAY
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
5
FRIDAY
6
SATURDAY
2
3
4
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
10 am GW Debatables
10 am ORT
10 am Body Sculpting
10 am Line Dancing
11 am Aquacise
12 pm Men’s Fitness
1 pm Woodworking
1 pm Painting
1 pm Storm Water Mgt.
Comm. Mtg.
1 pm Health Lecture
4 pm Tap Dancing
4 pm GW Friends Movie Club
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6 pm Water Volleyball
6 pm Zumba
9 am Sculpting & Arts/Crafts
Class
9 am Healthy Bodies
10 am GWCA Site Review
Comm.
10:30 am Golf Comm. Mtg.
10:30 am Line Dancing
1 pm Cards
2 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4 pm Tap Dancing
7 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
9 am Ping Pong
9:30 am Ceramics
10 am Aerobic Fitness
10 am Aquacise
1 pm Quilting
7 pm Resident Civic Board
Mtg.
7 pm Yoga
7:30 pm New Kids On The
Block
9 am Healthy Bodies
9:30 am Decoupage
10 am Entertainment Mtg.
10 am Chorus
1 pm Cards
1 pm Knitwits & Art/Sewing
Class
2 pm Senior Social Club
6 pm Water Volleyball
7 pm Cards
7 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
9
10
11
12
13
9 am Ping Pong
9:30 am GWCA Open
Workshop Mtg.
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Computer Club
10 am Aerobic Fitness
10 am Aquacise Class
1 pm Quilting
7 pm Yoga
7:30 pm Residents Civic
Club Open Mtg.
9 am Healthy Bodies
9:30 am Decoupage
9:30 a.m. WHOA Building
and Grounds Comm.
10 am Chorus
11 am WHOA Towne Centre
Mtg.
1 pm Cards
1 pm Knitwits & Art/Sewing
Class
2 pm Senior Social Club
6 pm Water Volleyball
7 pm Cards
7 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
9:30 am Yiddish
Entertainment Group
10:30 am Aquacise
1 pm 3D Dimensional Art
7 pm Bingo
14
9 am Sculpting & Arts/Crafts
Class
9 am AARP Driving Course
9 am Healthy Bodies
10:30 am Line Dancing
12:30 pm Orientation Mtg.
1 pm Cards
2 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4 pm Tap Dancing
7 pm Cards
7 pm WHOA Covenants
Comm. Mtg.
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Finance Study
Group
17
18
19
20
21
9 am Healthy Bodies
9:30 am Decoupage
10 am Chorus
10 am WHOA Landscape
Comm. Mtg.
1 pm Cards
1 pm Knitwits & Art/Sewing
Class
1 pm Senior Social Club
6 pm Water Volleyball
7 pm Cards
7 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
10:30 am Aquacise
1 pm 3D Dimensional Art
7 pm Canasta Tournament
Johnny Petillo with Steven
Scott at the Monroe
Twp. High School
26
27
28
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am Hadassah Board
Mtg.
10 am Body Sculpting
10 am Line Dancing
11 am Aquacise
12 pm Men’s Fitness
1 pm Painting
1 pm Woodworking
4 pm Tap Dancing
4 pm GW Friends Med-Sci
Group
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6 pm Water Volleyball
6 pm Zumba
7:30 pm History Club
16
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am WHOA Open
Workshop Mtg.
10 am Provocative Thinking
10 am Body Sculpting
10 am Line Dancing
11 am Aquacise
11:30 am WHOA Closed Mtg.
12 pm Men’s Fitness
1 pm Woodworking
4 pm Tap Dancing
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6 pm Water Volleyball
6 pm Zumba
7:30 pm GW Friends Music
7:30 pm GWCA Open Mtg.
9 am Sculpting & Arts/Crafts
Class
9 am Healthy Bodies
10:30 am Line Dancing
1 pm Cards
2 pm Patio Discussion Group
4 pm Tap Dancing
7 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm GW Friends
Discussion Group
7
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Ping Pong
Happy St. Patrick’s Day
23
24
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
10 am Golf Finance Comm.
Mtg.
10 am GW Connections
10 am Body Sculpting
10 am Line Dancing
11 am Aquacise
12 pm Men’s Fitness
1 pm Woodworking
1 pm Painting
1:30 pm GGCA Board Mtg.
4 pm Tap Dancing
4 pm GW Friends Book Club
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6 pm Water Volleyball
6 pm Zumba
7 pm GW Friends
9 am Sculpting & Arts/Crafts
Class
9 am Healthy Bodies
10:30 am Line Dancing
1 pm Cards
2 pm Patio Discussion Group
4 pm Tap Dancing
7 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
30
31
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
10 am Body Sculpting
10 am Line Dancing
11 am Aquacise
12 pm Men’s Fitness
1 pm Woodworking
1 pm Painting
4 pm Tap Dancing
5:30 pm Weight Watchers
6 pm Water Volleyball
6 pm Zumba
9 am Ping Pong
9:30 am Ceramics
10 am GWCA Covenants
Comm. Mtg.
10 am The Yiddish Vinkle
10 am Aerobic Fitness
10 am Aquacise
1 pm Quilting
7 pm Billiards Group
7 pm Yoga
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
10:30 am Aquacise
1 pm 3D Dimensional Art
6:15 pm Italian American
Club
9 am Sculpting & Arts/Crafts
Class
9 am Healthy Bodies
9:30 am Yiddish Club
10:30 am Line Dancing
1 pm Cards
2 pm Patio Discussion
Group
4 pm Tap Dancing
7 pm Cards
7:30 pm Billiards
25
9 am Ping Pong
9:30 am WHOA Budget &
Finance Comm. Mtg.
9:30 am Ceramics
9:30 am Computer Club
10 am Aerobic Fitness
10 am Aquacise
11:30 am ORT Card Party
1 pm Quilting
7 pm Yoga
9 am Healthy Bodies
9:30 am Decoupage
10 am Chorus
1 pm Cards
1 pm Knitwits & Art/Sewing
Class
2 pm Senior Social Club
5 pm IASCC Board Mtg.
6 pm Water Volleyball
7 pm Cards
7 pm Stained Glass Group
7:30 pm Billiards
7:30 pm Line Dancing
9 am Ping Pong
9 am Yoga
9:30 am Painting Group
10:30 am Aquacise
1 pm 3D Dimensional Art
7:30 pm After Hours Club
9:30 am Computer Club
General Mtg.
MARCH 2015 – PAGE 24
GREENBRIAR AT WHITTINGHAM VOICE

Similar documents

GW Voice

GW Voice mail box located at the Concierge Desk in the Towne Centre. Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is not liable for any typographical or printing errors that may appear, including in its display or class...

More information

July 2014 Voice

July 2014 Voice Princeton Editorial Services P.O. Box 397, Cranbury, NJ 08512 · (732) 761-8534 or 8535 [email protected] The Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is a monthly periodical presented by the residents of Green...

More information

December 2014 GW Voice

December 2014 GW Voice paving contractors, narrowed them down to three, and selected one as our contractor to start a first-time street repaving program for the Greenbriar Community. The actual paving will take place in ...

More information

November 2013 GW Voice

November 2013 GW Voice Boards will be making their selection for 2014 committee service. If you are a member of a 2013 committee, you must still submit an application to be considered for 2014 committee service. Applicat...

More information

GW Voice

GW Voice of the month prior to publication month to the Editorial Office. Greenbriar at Whittingham residents may deliver material to The GW VOICE mail box located at the Concierge Desk in the Towne Centre....

More information

04-2016 GW Voice (April 2016)

04-2016 GW Voice (April 2016) Greenbriar at Whittingham VOICE is a monthly periodical presented by the residents of Greenbriar at Whittingham, Monroe Township, New Jersey. All editorial material for publication should be submit...

More information