May 2013 - Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas

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May 2013 - Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas
MAY 2013
Bringing history to life
Civil War sesquicentennial boosts
living history programs
May is for gardening
Dedicating the future
2
MAY 2013
Contents MAY 2013
32
features
10
in every issue
Bringing history to life
Civil War sesquicentennial boosts
living history programs.
May is for gardening:
12
Companion plantings
Some vegetables, herbs and
flowers protect and feed each
other when grown side by side.
12
photo by GARY BEAN
10
30
34
Vertical gardening
All about
mulch
on the cover
Reenactors stage a battle scene at the Pea
Ridge National Military Park.
4
6 7 18 20 22 32 38 40 42 44 46 49 50 Editor’s Letter
Currents
Trivia
Capitol Buzz
Doug Rye Says
Reflections
Gardening with Janet
Healthy Living
Cooking with Joy
Family Favorites
Crossword Puzzle
Let’s Eat
Scenes from the Past
Around Arkansas
Photo courtesy of Arkansas Department of Parks and
Tourism.
3
editor’s letter
M AY 2013
b y S H E I L A YO U N T
With the
sesquicentennial of the
Civil War continuing,
we decided to feature a
story on the popularity
of living history, or reenactments, in Arkansas
on this month’s
cover. Ben Boulden, a
journalist who wrote
a popular local history
column for years for the Southwest
Times Record, and who now lives
in Little Rock, wrote this story and
we are pleased to have his work in
Arkansas Living.
May is for gardening, too. And
that’s why we are featuring three
features by gardening expert Kris
Weatherbee, along with the latest
from Janet B. Carson, our monthly
gardening columnist from the
Cooperative Extension Service. An
Oregon-based writer, Wetherbee’s
publishing credits include more
than 60 regional, national and
international magazines, and she
is the author of “Oregon Farmers’
Market Cookbook and Guide”
and “Washington Farmers’ Market
Cookbook and Guide.”
Her work is appearing in Arkansas
Living courtesy of Ruralite magazine,
which reaches more than 300,000
co-op members in seven states.
Ruralite, like Arkansas Living, is
produced specifically for electric coop members. That brings up another
subject that I would like to discuss
here. We often get the question,
“Why do I receive this magazine?”
Here is the answer. As a member of
an electric co-op in Arkansas, you
receive Arkansas Living each month
as part of your membership. Since
1946, electric co-op members in
Arkansas have received a publication
designed specifically for them.
Originally it was called the “Arkansas
REA News” and it was produced in a
newspaper format. The reason for the
publication was simple. The co-ops
were fighting many political battles
and they needed grassroots support
from their members, who also own
the co-ops, to succeed. The battles
primarily pitted the fledgling co-ops
against the established investorowned power companies that did not
want competition. The battles were
over such things as service territories
and the right to build and operate
power plants. The goal for the coops then, as it is now, was to provide
reliable, affordable electricity to their
members.
The political battles have changed,
but they continue. And we continue
to need our members, the grassroots,
to remain informed about the issues
affecting the co-ops and the electric
industry. Not only do we need
grassroots support, but we also must
fulfill the seven principles for business
operation that govern co-ops. One
of those includes educating, or
informing, members about the critical
issues.
In addition to the issues, we also
want to help improve our members’
quality of life. In fact, that’s a big
reason why we changed the name
from Rural Arkansas to Arkansas
Living in 2011. Not only have our
service areas moved beyond only rural
areas, but the magazine now places
greater emphasis on many elements
of life in The Natural State. We feature
articles about leisure activities, travel,
health and entertainment. Simply
put, we are proud of Arkansas and
are honored to showcase its history,
culture, food and people.
Volume LXVI, Number 7
(ISSN 0048-878X) (USPS 472960)
Arkansas Living is published monthly.
Periodicals postage paid at Little Rock, AR
and at additional mailing offices.
POSTMASTER:
Send address changes to:
Arkansas Living,
P.O. Box 510, Little Rock, AR 72203
Members: Please send name of your
cooperative with mailing label.
An Official Publication of
Duane Highley President and CEO
Sandy Byrd Vice President, Member & Public Relations
Sheila YountEditor
Marcia Tabor Advertising Coordinator
Rob Roedel Contributing Editor
Geri Miller Production Manager
Dixie Rogers Graphic Designer
Sandy Trantham Editorial Assistant
Gary Bean Contributing Photographer
Bret Curry Contributing Photographer
Arkansas Electric Cooperatives, Inc.
Board of Directors Officers
Martha Pennington
Mel Coleman
Jerry Jacobs
Bill Conine
Chairman, Hamburg
Vice Chairman, Salem
Secretary, Dierks
Treasurer, Clinton
Contact Information
Arkansas Living
1 Cooperative Way
Little Rock, AR
501.570.2311
Email: [email protected]
Mailing Address
P.O. Box 510
Little Rock, AR 72203
Advertising Department
Marcia Tabor
Email: [email protected]
501.570.2312
Subscription Price:
$7.00 per year for non-members
Member of Arkansas Press Association
Acceptance of advertising by Arkansas Living does not imply
endorsement of the product or services advertised by the
publisher or the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas.
Follow us on
4
MAY 2013
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0% A.P.R. interest is available to customers if no dealer documentation preparation fee is charged. Dealer charge for document preparation fee shall be in accordance with state laws. Only Kubota and select Kubota performance-matched Land Pride equipment is eligible. Inclusion of ineligible equipment
may result in a higher blended A.P.R. Not available for Rental, National Accounts or Governmental customers. 0% A.P.R. and low-rate financing may not be available with customer instant rebate (C.I.R.) offers. Financing is available through Kubota Credit Corporation, U.S.A., 3401 Del Amo Blvd.,
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For product and dealer information, call 1-888-4-KUBOTA, ext. 128 or go to www.kubota.com.
5
currents
news, tips & more
Welcome World War II veterans home
The public is invited to help welcome home World War II veterans from Honor Flights
to Washington D.C. on May 4 at the Clinton National Airport in Little Rock and May 18
at the Northwest Arkansas Regional Airport near Rogers. The Northwest Arkansas Honor
Flight is hosting the flights, which are sponsored by the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas,
Tyson Foods and Walmart. The flights will take World War II veterans to Washington, D.C.
for a day to see the World War II Memorial, as well as other memorials. The trip is free to
veterans. A major part of the experience for the veterans will be welcome home receptions
at the airports, starting around 7:30 p.m. For more details on the flights, contact Nancy
Williams at 405-473-8239.
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Bringing Easter cheer to cancer patients
A youth group from the Three River Mennonite Church near Dumas brought
Easter cheer to cancer patients at the 20th Century Club’s Lodge in Little Rock
on March 28. The group learned about the lodge’s mission, which is to provide
lodging for low-income cancer patients who live more than 40 miles from Little
Rock, by reading an article about the lodge in the February 2012 issue of Arkansas
Living. In addition to singing, the church members brought quilts and other gifts
for the patients. It was the second visit to the lodge by the church group, who also
presented a Christmas program there last December. For more information about
the lodge, visit www.hopeawayfromhome.org.
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
subscriptions, address changes and more
Change of address: If you are a member of an Arkansas electric co-op, your co-op maintains the mailing lists for the
magazine. To make changes, please contact your local electric co-op. If you personally subscribe as a non-member, mail your
address change to: Address Change, Arkansas Living, P.O. Box 510, Little Rock, AR 72203, or email [email protected]
Subscriptions: If you are an electric co-op member, contact your local electric co-op re: any changes to your subscription.
If you are NOT a member of an electric co-op and wish to subscribe, please mail a check or money order for $7.00 (12 issues)
or $14 (24 issues) to Subscriptions, Arkansas Living, P. O. Box 510, Little Rock, AR 72203.
Reflections submissions: To submit photos to Reflections, email high-resolution photos, along with names of parents,
children and pets, city of residence and electric co-op, to [email protected] or mail to Reflections, Arkansas Living, P.O.
Box 510, Little Rock, AR 72203. Sorry, we can’t return mailed photographs.
Around Arkansas submissions: To submit an entry to the Around Arkansas calendar of events, email information to
[email protected] or mail to Around Arkansas, Arkansas Living, P. O. Box 510, Little Rock, AR 72203. Include the name
of the event, dates, location and a brief description. Sorry, we can’t include all entries because of space limitations.
To advertise with us: Contact Marcia Tabor at [email protected] or call at 501-570-2312.
For general inquiries or comments: Call 501-570-2311 or email [email protected]
For the digital edition, visit: www.ecark.org. Also visit our Facebook page.
6
MAY 2013
• • • • • • • • •
• •
• •
•
•
•
•
Co-op employees complete advanced
energy audit training
•
trivia
•
• •
• •
• •
•
• • • • • • • •
Twelve co-op employees/energy auditors recently earned FLIR/Infrared
Training Center Level II Thermographer credentials. Infrared thermography
provides noninvasive, real-time detection of problems that cause unmanaged
air infiltration, unwanted heat gain and loss, and moisture intrusion in homes
and buildings.
After nearly four decades, the Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas continue
to remain on the forefront of energy efficiency education and awareness.
Many of the state’s 17 electric distribution cooperatives have credentialed
Building Performance Institute (BPI) building analysts and Forward Looking
Infrared-Infrared Training Center Level I (FLIR/ITC) thermographers on their
staff. These highly skilled energy experts have received the proper training
to complete comprehensive energy audits using the latest in building science
diagnostic technology.
Those completing the FLIR/ITC Level II certification
class are:
• President Woodrow Wilson signed
legislation establishing Mother’s
Day in 1914. In the U.S., it is
always the second Sunday of the
month. Mother’s Day 2013 takes
place Sunday, May 12.
Aaron Mantooth - Arkansas Valley Electric Cooperative
• In America in the 17th century, the
average woman gave birth to 13
children.
Brian Ayers - Carroll Electric Cooperative
Brian Wise - Carroll Electric Cooperative
Joey Magnini - Carroll Electric Cooperative
John Via - First Electric Cooperative
Shawn Dorflinger - Ouachita Electric Cooperative
Keith Kaderly - Ozarks Electric Cooperative
James Reid - Ozarks Electric Cooperative
Dale Smith - Petit Jean Electric Cooperative
David Gaskin - Arkansas Electric Cooperative
Dean Mullins - Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation
Bret Curry - Arkansas Electric Cooperative Corporation
• Over her lifetime, a female oyster
may give birth to more than 100
million young.
• In most of the world’s languages,
the word for “mother” starts with
an “m.”
• In the Peanuts comic strip,
Snoopy’s mother is named Missy.
• About 80 percent of Americans
buy greeting cards for their
mothers on Mother’s Day.
• On Mother’s Day, people
commonly wear a white flower,
typically a carnation, rose or
orchid, to honor their mothers
who are deceased. They wear a
red flower, typically a carnation or
rose, if their mother is still alive.
• Mothers who have children later
in life may live longer.
• Each year, there are four million
new mothers.
• The mother of Fred Rogers
of the popular Mr. Rogers’
Neighborhood television show
for children knitted many of the
sweaters he wore.
• About 81 percent of women
between ages of 40 and 44 are
mothers.
(Left to right) Jay Bowen, ITC Instructor; John Via; Dean Mullins; Dale Smith; Aaron
Mantooth; Keith Kaderly; David Gaskin; Joey Magnini; James Reid; Shawn Dorflinger;
Brian Ayers; Brian Wise and Bret Curry.
• “When your mother asks,
‘Do you want a piece of advice?’
it’s a mere formality. It doesn’t
matter if you answer ‘yes’ or ‘no.’
You’re going to get it anyway.”
— Erma Bombeck
7
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emember the feeling you had
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hydrotherapy of the jets left you feeling
relaxed and rejuvenated. Aches and
pains seemed to fade away, and the
bubbling sound of the water helped put
you in a carefree and contented mood.
The first time I ever got in a hot tub at
a resort, I said to myself “One of these
days I’m going to have one of these in
my home– so I can experience this
whenever I want.” Now that I’m older,
I’d still like to have the pain relief and
relaxation, but I have to be careful
about slipping and falling in the
bathroom. That’s why I was thrilled
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8
MAY 2013
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9
Bringing History
Civil War sesquicentennial boosts living history programs
B y Ben B o ulden
W
ith the sesquicentennial of the American Civil War in
full swing, history lovers are looking more than ever
to immerse themselves in the past through living history
programs.
A few 150th anniversaries of Civil War battles have come
and gone in the last year or more but several major ones are
approaching. The sesquicentennial of the conflict that pitted
brother against brother has greatly increased interest among
reenactors eager to participate in re-creations of battles and
other commemorations.
“There’s been a tremendous increase in participation,”
said Steve Bailey, president of the Arkansas Reenactors
Educational Association.
The spike in popular interest in the Civil War caused by
the anniversaries of battles such as Pea Ridge in Northwest
Arkansas where a major reenactment took place in March,
has even brought some older reenactors out of retirement.
They had hung up their uniforms and reproduction
weaponry, but they’re dusting it off for the anniversaries,
Bailey said. Many will quit and retire for good once they are
over in 2015 though, they’ve told him. But the good news is
that there are young folks waiting to take their places,
Bailey said.
“One thing that is very heartening is that, not only
with the civilian presence, we’re getting all sorts of family
members coming along with the
reenactors,” Bailey
said. “The young
people are interested
in living history – I’ve
seen a great increase in
them. It’s heartening
to look down the
line and see some
young boys doing it
and know they are
going to be doing it for
decades like we have.”
Pulling away
Old West reenactors, dressed to resemble
characters from the novel and film “True
Grit,” mix with Civil War reenactors along
the Arkansas River in Fort Smith.
Just as the Civil War uprooted families and drew young
men away from their homes and communities in the
1860s, the sesquicentennial is pulling some living history
enthusiasts away from reenactment groups engaged in
depicting the people of other eras.
“(The sesquicentennial) probably will take from us
because of the Civil War events, but I do have people say
they’re going to join up because they’re too old to do Civil
War anymore,” said Ree Walker, vice president of the Early
Arkansas Reenactors Association (EARA).
She and about two dozen other women and men gather
regularly at the site of Cadron near present-day Conway.
Cadron was an antebellum frontier settlement that later
faded away.
Glenn Cook, EARA president, said he got tired
of being a Civil War reenactor when he lived in
Tennessee. The sameness – uniforms, repetition,
Civil War reenactors fire a replica
cannon at the Fort Smith National
Historic Site.
10
MAY 2013
to
Photos courtesy Fort Smith Convention and Visitors Bureau.
life
regimentation – grew old to him. After moving back
to Arkansas many years ago, he decided to move
further back in time as a reenactor.
“I went back to 1740 to 1760, and I’m real happy
there,” he said. “I can be an individual and there’s
enough information out there that you can research
a persona. My family members were some of the
first settlers in Central Arkansas. My great-greatgreat-grandfather was postmaster and justice of the
peace for the El Paso community here. They’re buried here.”
Although the Civil War may be the most visible period
publicly for reenactors and attracts the greatest numbers of
them, others like early Arkansas, the War of 1812 and the
Old West. Those reenactors also spend considerable time and
money studying, buying or making clothes and artifacts from
their periods of interest.
Costs and benefits
Bailey said a Civil War rifle alone can cost anywhere from
$600 to $900. Once you throw in the cost of reproduction
boots, uniforms, tents and equipage, a Civil War reenactor
can easily shell out anywhere from $1,500 to $2,500.
In addition to the cost, there’s the time consumed in
researching the history or biography of a historical person
or group of people, the time at gatherings and even some
hardships endured in being outdoors.
Cook, Walker, Bailey and Ian Beard, education
coordinator at the Old Statehouse Museum in Little Rock, all
agree it is worth it to teach people about the past and keep
history living in popular memory.
“It gives some students a better-rounded idea of the past,
something beyond facts and figures and text,” Beard said.
“It brings history to life. That’s the whole idea. I’ve talked
to college professors who said, ‘I read this. I’ve studied all
about it for 10 years but it wasn’t until I did this that I truly
understood what it was all about.’ Book learning can only
give you so much. That
living history element really
demonstrates how people
did live and interact with the
spaces and objects around
them that you just can’t get
out of a lecture.”
Experience, even
one remade and only
Civil War reenactors lining up.
Old West reenactors camp in a riverfront park in Fort Smith.
approximated, can provide insight into mentalities of the
people in the past, many reenactors said.
Reggie Moore, an African-American reenactor in Fort
Smith, has participated in living history depictions and
scenes at the Fort Smith National Historic Site. He laments
the reluctance of some African-Americans to take part in
reenactments, especially of the Civil War, because of the
painful associations with slavery and the conflict itself.
Nevertheless, he remains passionately committed to it.
Moore said many people don’t know that thousands of
African-Americans fought on the side of the Union.
“Our history has to be explored. It has to be told,” he
said. “If I’m the only one to tell it, then so be it. I will be
there to tell that story.”
Living history offers insight and education to observers,
students and participants. It may also provide an emotional
comfort and connection. Daniel Maher, an associate
professor of anthropology at the University of Arkansas at
Fort Smith, has been studying historical reenactment and
reenactors of the Old West and frontier justice for a future
dissertation on the topic.
“People do these reenactments because of their values,”
he said. “I’m an anthropologist, not a historian. These
performances are today and a manifestation of issues and
concerns they face today. ... They allow people to come in
contact with a nostalgic era and the perceived value system
the era represents.”
Cooke said there’s also the connection and community
among the reenactors themselves that’s positive. While
motivators include education, nostalgia and community,
there’s another that runs along beside them – plain ol’ fun.
“Oh my gosh, that’s why more need to participate,”
Moore said. “I think they would have an absolutely
wonderful time. I do. I think they would have an absolutely
wonderful time.”
Ben Boulden is a freelance writer based in Little Rock.
11
May is for Gardening
(
Companion
planting
H
ave you ever noticed in
your own garden how one
vegetable plant can fail in one
location yet thrive in another?
Given the same soil, water
and light, the two plants don’t
seem to grow the same. The
difference may be a plant that’s
growing next door.
This plant compatibility
is the foundation of a
gardening technique known
as “companion planting”—a
synergistic plant/world
partnership that encourages
plants to thrive and grow. This
type of garden diversity is a
complex codependency that
increases the likelihood of
combining plants that enhance
each other’s performance.
Companion planting can
benefit your garden through
five ways: providing nutrients,
protecting against disease,
repelling pest insects, attracting
beneficial insects and attracting
bug-eating birds.
B y K ris W et h erbee
Plants that protect
Plants that nourish
Certain plant allies improve
the flavor of neighboring vegetables by providing nutrients.
For example, comfrey, buckwheat
and other plants with roots that
grow deep can mine nutrients
and bring them up to the surface, making them more available
to other plants. Various cover crops (alfalfa, clover, and vetch,
for example) also nourish neighboring plants with essential
nutrients and trace minerals including nitrogen, phosphorus,
potassium, calcium, magnesium and iron.
Certain plants can improve
the health of neighbors
through a network of defensive
chemicals that help ward
off plant pests and disease.
Marigolds are a classic example
as both the French and African
varieties contain thiopene in
their roots—a substance that
is toxic to certain types of soildwelling nematodes. As such,
they make great companions
for tomatoes, beans and other
plants that are susceptible to
nematode damage.
Plants that use similar
defensive chemicals to protect
against disease-causing
pathogens include garlic,
onions and chives—commonly
known compatibles that prevent black spot on roses and
scab on apples. Likewise, brassica roots release chemicals
that suppress some soil-borne diseases. Equally important
are silica-rich plants such as comfrey and borage, which
may help neutralize rust, fungal attacks and other water-
Some vegetables, herbs and flowers
protect and feed each other when
grown side by side
12
MAY 2013
Other plants—such as peas,
beans, lupines and clover—
have the ability to transport
nitrogen from the air we
breathe down into their roots
where bacteria can convert it
into a plant-friendly form for
neighboring plants. In this
case, corn, peas and other
nitrogen-hungry plants make
great companions as they will
benefit from the “nitrogenfixing ability” of these legumetype plants.
PhotoS by Rick Wetherbee
borne diseases. And
dandelions in a
tomato patch are a
good thing as their
presence may deter
fusarium wilt, a soilborne fungal disease
that reduces plant
health and overall
yields.
Other ways
companion plants
protect is by keeping
it cool. Summertime
heat can take a toll
on radishes, spinach,
lettuce and turnips.
Larger plants such
as pole beans and
tomatoes provide
needed shade,
conserving moisture
and reducing heat
that would cause
these vegetables to
become woody or
bolt.
Photo by Rick Wetherbee
example is to plant
the garden perimeter
with garlic and
marigolds to repel
aphids and beetles.
Other plants
contain phytotoxins
that lure, then
sicken or kill dining
pests. Mustard oils
found in cabbage
and similar plants
often poison
unsuspecting spider
mites, mosquitoes,
and Mexican bean
beetles. Therefore
cabbage, broccoli,
and kale make good
companion plants
for beans.
Sometimes a
plant can repel bugs
simply by creating
a physical barrier
between the critter
and the plant it
wants to eat. If
Plants that repel
raccoons are raiding
pests
your corn you might
Companion planting can benefit your garden by providing nutrients, protecting against
Most pests locate
surround it with a
disease, repelling pest insects, attracting beneficial insects and attracting bug-eating birds.
their next meal from
scratchy barrier of
their host plant’s chemical odors or
squash vines. One phenomenon
color. A diversified garden boasts a
I’ve noticed in my own garden
complexity of plant odors, colors,
is that flea beetles love to devour
and textures, thereby composing a
cabbage and cauliflower, but they
natural barrier that makes it harder
never seem to bother the sticky,
for these pests to locate their target
hairy leaves of tomatoes. When
meal. How easy it would be for the
I planted the two vegetables
cabbage moth to hone in an area
together, they stopped bothering
growing just broccoli and cabbage.
the cabbage and cauliflower.
By surrounding and interplanting
Catnip is another repellent
that same area with carrots and
plant when it comes to flea
onions you confuse the moth by
beetles and green peach aphids.
masking the scent of the broccoli
But you don’t necessarily have
and cabbage.
to plant catnip in your garden
Strongly scented plants also
to benefit from its protection.
benefit their neighbors by masking
Catnip easily self-seeds, however
their scent, especially for those
if you grow it outside the garden
pests that rely on scent to locate
it can then be cut and used as a
good eats. Rosemary, sage, lavender,
protecting
oregano and other strong-smelling
mulch.
plants often foil aphid attacks on
Mustard oils found in cabbage (seen here with lettuce)
Additional repellent plants
susceptible neighbors. Another
and similar plants often poison unsuspecting spider
with beneficial qualities are
mites, mosquitoes and Mexican bean beetles.
13
leeks, onions, and rosemary against the carrot fly; parsley
and tomatoes against the asparagus beetle; geraniums and
petunias against leafhoppers; southernwood against cabbage
moths; and nasturtiums against whiteflies.
Beneficial garden companions
Basil
lettuce, peppers, tomatoes
Beans
cabbage family, corn, eggplant, deters potato beetles, fixes nitrogen
lettuce, marigolds, petunias, potatoes
Calendula
cabbage family, corn, lettuce
Carrots
lettuce, marigolds, onions, parsley, tomatoes
Cabbages
enhances growth, repels flying insects
attracts minute pirate bugs and lacewings
keep away from dill
aromatic herbs, chamomile, marigolds, keep away from strawberries and tomatoes
onions, nasturtiums, potatoes
Catnip
eggplant, lettuce, oriental greens, potatoes
repels flea beetles; use as a mulch
Cucumbers
lettuce, nasturtiums, onions, peas, petunias, radish
keep away from sunflowers and potatoes
Geraniums
cabbage family, grapes
repels cabbage worms, Japanese beetles
Lettuce
beans, cabbage family, calendula, carrots, onions, peas, pansies, radish
compatible with most garden plants
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
however these hard-working adults also need pollen- and
nectar-rich flowers in order to survive. Begin with springflowering plants such as sweet alyssum and sweet woodruff.
Include long-blooming plants like marigolds, coreopsis and
petunias. Then extend the season with later blooming asters,
Plants that attract beneficial insects
chrysanthemums and salvias.
In this case you want to attract bugs—at least when it
Attract parasitic wasps, lacewings and syrphid flies with
comes to attracting beneficial insects that prey on pests.
flowering members of the umbel family, including yarrow,
These insatiable insects seek out and destroy pests such as
parsley, dill, and chamomile. Doing so will greatly reduce
aphids, slugs and snails, cucumber beetles, caterpillars and
pest populations of caterpillars, aphids, leafhoppers and
other nasty bugs that wreak havoc in our gardens.
thrips. Sunflowers, echinacea, cosmos, zinnias and other
Adult beneficials and their larvae feed on insects,
members of the composite/daisy family are prime flowers for
luring in large predatory insects
that dine on cucumber beetles,
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
grasshopper eggs, slugs and
caterpillar pests. And, when you
Grow companion plants as a border around other plants,
get behind on harvesting your
mixed within rows or interspersed throughout a bed
broccoli and lettuce, leave them
be. Their flowers also provide a
PLANT
PLANT WITHCOMMENTS
food source for beneficials.
Marigolds
all garden plants
repels aphids, potato and squash bugs; mass plantings kill nematodes
Nasturtiums
all garden plants
deters many pests; masks plant odors
Onions
most garden plants, except peas
and beans
deters many pests; masks plant odors
Petunias
eggplant, grapes, greens, squash
also plant with any vegetable bothered by leaf hoppers
Peas
carrots, corn, cucumbers, potatoes
fixes nitrogen; keep away from onions
Peppers
basil, carrots, onions, parsley
keep away from fennel
Radish
especially carrots, cucumbers, squash
repels cucumber beetles
Squash
nasturtiums, onions, petunias, radish
keep away from cucumbers and melons
Tomatoes
basil, carrots, chamomile, marigolds
keep away from fennel and potatoes
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
14
MAY 2013
Plants that attract bugeating birds
Another way to keep bad
bugs in check is to attract birds
that feast on insects. Bugs from
soil-dwelling grubs to codling
moths in flight provide a first-
Cabbage moths are confused when
the scent of broccoli and cabbage
are masked by onions and carrots
growing next door.
Marigolds, seen here with parsley, contain
thiopene in their roots—a substance that
is toxic to certain types of soil-dwelling
nematodes.
class feast for chickadees, robins,
wrens, swallows and other bug-eating
birds.
The best way to attract these
beneficial birds is to grow a mix
of nectar, seed and fruit-bearing
plants. For example, cosmos, asters,
zinnias, sunflowers and other seedbearing annual or perennial plants
attract a variety of songbirds that
also feast on insects. And tubular- or
bell-shaped flowers rich in nectar—
such as bee balm, pineapple sage,
nicotiana, verbena and salvia—lure
in hummingbirds, which also dine
on caterpillars and small insects in
addition to nectar.
Companion planting is all about
diversity, which is key to any healthy
garden. So go ahead and experiment
with your own companion plantings.
Grow flowers and herbs among your
vegetables. For that matter, tuck in a
variety of vegetables in your flower
bed. The end result is bound to be
a more beautiful, sustainable and
bountiful garden.
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17
capitol buzz
Dedicating the future
by CARMIE HENRY
T
hey had a ceremony
down in Hope on April
10 to dedicate the new
John W. Turk Jr. Power
Plant that was put into
commercial service
back on Dec. 20, after
seven long years of
construction, delays,
Arkansas Public Service
Commission (APSC)
hearings, reversals, delays, air quality
permit applications, court challenges,
more delays, public demonstrations
and legislative fights. Nothing comes
easy. And, unfortunately, nothing
worthwhile comes cheap.
Your electric cooperatives, while
owning only 12 percent of the plant
(Southwest Electric Power Company,
or SWEPCO for short, is the majority
owner and constructor), provided
by far the largest delegation to the
dedication ceremony. That might have
been proportionate to the political
muscle that was spent during the 2011
Arkansas General Assembly when
the deal was finally cut that enabled
this ultra-supercritical coal-based
technological beauty to be constructed
and fired up.
But the people who made the
difference in the fight were there.
There was former U.S. Rep. Mike
Ross (rumored at this writing to be
considering a new job) talking about
his support from the beginning for
the new plant, even though he had
constituents who were against it. He
made some nice comments taken,
it seemed, direct from the electric
cooperatives “The Mix Matters” media
campaign. There were the mayors of
Hope, McNab and McNeill, and other
Hempstead County officials who carried
18
MAY 2013
a lot of water for the project throughout
the process. There was Lt. Gov. Mark
Darr who supported the plant early
and gave a boost to employees when
he toured the construction site in the
spring of 2011. Chris Thomason, the
young and charismatic chancellor of
the University of Arkansas Community
College at Hope, who has developed
a state-of-the-art degree program for
electric generation technology to serve
a growing demand from students, also
attended. Former state Rep. Bubba
Powers of Hope also was there and
deserves special consideration for
the incredible job he did in leading
the legislative fight. His words at
the dedication were nothing short of
eloquent. And, of course, executives
from SWEPCO and the electric
cooperatives spoke about the plant’s
importance, while friends of the late
John W. Turk Jr., for whom the plant
is named, were on hand to share
memories of Mr. Turk.
What was missing was
representation from the other state and
federal officials who should be shouting
from the rooftops about this $2 billion
investment in southwest Arkansas.
It would not surprise me if the people
of this corner of our state have some
conflicted thoughts on the support, or
lack thereof, they received during this
process. The plant is built, it is running
and Arkansans need to celebrate that
we will have a low-cost source of
clean electricity from this plant for
the next 50 years. Unfortunately,
the combination of opposition from
well-heeled hunting club members,
whose property will never be damaged
by the plant, and the fringe Sierra
Club regulars who make their living
suing and settling lawsuits with deep-
pocketed corporations, continues to
prevent many prominent officials from
even acknowledging the plant exists.
The Arkansas Economic Development
Commission (AEDC) has never said
one word about the plant, but they
are willing to work hard to bring a $1
billion steel mill plant, funded in part
with your tax dollars, that will consume
enormous amounts of electricity, to
eastern Arkansas to compete with two
other steel mills already located in the
same area.
No current member of the Arkansas
congressional delegation so much as
sent a letter in support of the Turk
power plant. If you’re from southwest
Arkansas, you have to be wondering
“what the heck”? Go figure. But I’ll bet
they’ll be at the next pie supper coming
to your local community.
Legislative directory app ready
for Android phones
I mentioned last month that
the electric cooperatives legislative
directory had been converted to a
highly useful smartphone application
that was set for use by iPhone users.
Now the Android version has come
to the market for those who do not
use the Apple phone. To access it you
must go to your app store icon on your
smartphone and type in “2013 AR
Legislative Roster.” The app will begin
downloading from there. And, as a
reminder, for iPhone users all you type
is “AECC.” The app is free.
The response to this public service
has been terrific. As a cooperative
member, we hope you will take
advantage and use the app to bring
your elected representatives closer to
you as you communicate your thoughts
on issues of importance. It makes a
difference.
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3 TON HEAVY DUTY
STEEL FLOOR JACK
SAE
42304
shown
REG.
PRICE
$149.99
REG. PRICE $24.99
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
9 PIECE FULLY POLISHED
COMBINATION WRENCH SETS
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO Item
REG.
PRICE
$59.99
30", 11 DRAWER
ROLLER CABINET
SAVE
$150
ANY SINGLE ITEM!
SAVE
75%
LIMIT 6 - Good at our stores or website or by phone. Cannot be used with other discount or coupon or prior
purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
OFF!
LOT NO. 95275/
60637/69486
Item 69381 shown
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purchases after 30 days from original purchase with original receipt. Offer good while supplies last. Nontransferable. Original coupon must be presented. Valid through 9/1/13. Limit one coupon per customer per day.
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
3 GALLON, 100 PSI
OILLESS PANCAKE
AIR COMPRESSOR
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LOT NO. 66619/
60338/69381
REG. PRICE $179.99
$
7 FUNCTION
DIGITAL
MULTIMETER
OSCILLATING
TRIPLE BALL MULTIFUNCTION
TRAILER HITCH POWER TOOL
R !
PE ON
SU UP
Item
CO
20%
WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE OF $9.99
ITEM 90899/
98025/69096
ON ALL HAND TOOLS!
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
Item
90899
shown
7 FT. 4" x 9 FT. 6"
ALL PURPOSE WEATHER
RESISTANT TARP
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
$
FREE!
R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
LIFETIME WARRANTY
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R !
PE ON
SU UP
CO
SAVE
28%
36 LED SOLAR
SECURITY LIGHT
LOT NO. 98085/
69644/69890/60498
SAVE
$80
Item Includes 3.2V, 600 mAh
69644
Li-ion battery pack.
shown
Item 68048
shown
$
LOT NO.
68048/
69227
WEIGHS 74 LBS.
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Fayetteville
Ft. Smith
Jonesboro
Little Rock
19
Doug Rye says cut your energy bills
A different kind
of envelope
by DOUG RYE
Oftentimes I refer to the
term “building envelope”
or “thermal envelope.”
Both are interchangeable
and synonymous. So,
just what is a building
envelope? Well, in
simple terms, it is the
building components
that separate the building
interior from the exterior
environment. And since this column is
about energy efficiency, let’s call it the
“thermal envelope.” On the simplest
of buildings, the thermal envelope
consists of the floor, the four walls and
the ceiling or roof.
There are two things that can affect
the energy efficiency of the envelope.
One is the insulation value of the
components and the other relates to
the amount of air that can transfer to
and from the envelope.
For the sake of teaching, picture
a normal ice chest. It’s a miniature
ultra-efficient structure where the floor,
walls and the roof are super-insulated,
and there is only one doorway leading
in and out. Some have a capped
plumbing penetration – the drain
plug. This structure requires very little
energy to fulfill its job of keeping its
contents chilled. However, lifting the
lid introduces air infiltration and will
affect the energy consumption (melting
ice), energy cost (buying more ice) and
comfort (warm soft drinks). Keep the
lid closed, and the content stays cold,
and the ice lasts much longer. You may
not be aware that many of today’s new
homes are insulated with similar foam
used in ice chests. Plus, existing homes
can be retrofitted as well.
So how does an ice chest relate to
a dwelling? After all, nobody wants
20
MAY 2013
to live in a big insulated box. Most
people prefer to live in a building
that contains amenities, comfort
and improves our quality of life. Of
course, we also want affordable utility
bills. Well, the good news is building
an efficient new home or retrofitting an
existing home is doable. However, the
bad news is many desired amenities can
adversely affect the energy efficiency of
the thermal envelope.
For example, the installation of
windows into a well-insulated wall
will almost always decrease the energy
efficiency of the thermal envelope.
This is because the windows may have
some air leakage, and the insulation
value of the window is less than the
well insulated wall. Also, the glass will
allow more heat rays from the sun to
enter the house. We all want windows
in our house, so what can we do to
enjoy the benefits of windows without
dramatically affecting the envelope?
The answer is that we must analyze the
efficiency of each component and it’s
direct impact on the envelope.
In this particular case, we could
install the fewest number of windows
necessary to make us happy, and choose
the most feasible energy-efficient
windows. Keep this in mind as a general
rule of thumb; if the energy efficiency
of the thermal envelope goes down,
then the energy bill usually increases.
We will continue this subject in next
month’s column.
Until then, let me remind you
it’s that time again! It’s time for the
Electric Cooperatives of Arkansas’
Energy Efficiency Home Makeover
Contest. This is perhaps one of the best
teaching projects in the nation. One
fortunate and deserving family will be
chosen to receive a complete energy
makeover worth up to $50,000. The
co-ops use the project as a medium for
teaching Arkansans and folks across
America about energy efficiency.
All of the energy measures and
components I share are incorporated
into the makeover project. The electric
cooperatives have dramatically changed
the lives of five previous winners by
transforming their homes through the
makeovers. The winners now have
extremely comfortable homes with
manageable electric bills. Most are
averaging a 50 percent reduction in
their bills following the makeovers.
Will you be the next winner? Be sure to
visit www.ecahomemakeover.com and
fill out an application. Learn about the
thermal envelope while visiting www.
smartenergytips.org.
Please call my office at 501-653-7931
if you have questions, and I will be
happy to help you. Or you may attend
one of our seminars sponsored by your
local electric co-op.
DOUG RYE SEMINAR SCHEDULE FOR:
FIRST ELECTRIC CO-OP
May 14, 6:30 p.m., at the U of A
Community College in Morrilton.
CLAY COUNTY ELECTRIC CO-OP
May 16, 6 p.m., at the Clay County
Electric Co-op office in Corning.
SOUTHWEST ARKANSAS
ELECTRIC CO-OP
June 20, 6:30 p.m., at the Southwest
Arkansas Electric Co-op office in
Texarkana.
Rogers, AR
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21
Snapshots from our readers
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Reflections
Mat, Jeff, Emilee and Sassy, a two-year-old Palomino,
taking a rest. Shelli Cox, Delight.
Lynlee and Stallings in
Poppy and Nini’s bean
field. Gail Stewart,
Blytheville.
Kitty and
her donkey.
Kitty
Kendal,
Beardan.
Petunias have a home in
a sweet gum tree.
Ernest Smith, Ashdown.
Mikey sitting in his grandfather’s kayak.
Judy Deffenbaugh, Van Buren.
Elijah holding his baby
goat. Abigail Eldridge,
Leslie.
A ‘Trumpeter‘ rose.
Levi Snell.
Landon riding his John Deere tractor. Cherry Mantooth, Kirby.
24
22
MAY 2013
Cooper likes to play in the mud with his
trucks. Steve and Judy Jernigan, Trumann.
Travis
looking
at the mud
before the
bull riding.
Sandy
DePriest,
De Queen.
Baby chicks galore.
Linda Bennett, Holy Grove.
Mason
enjoying a
spring day.
Daniel
and Jamie
Rogers,
Mountain
Home.
Hailey and Jacob
shrunk! Sandra
Baker, Mountain
Home.
Sunrise looks like fire in
the sky. Julia Lephiew, Rye.
Rabbit
framed
by a
wooden
fence.
Dan McClellan, Hogeye.
Share your photos with your fellow Arkansas Living
readers! Please send high-resolution photos with detailed
information about the pictures (who took it, where, who is
in it, etc.) to: [email protected]
Zoey’s big news.
Devenna Tollett, Nashville.
Or mail to:
Reflections, Arkansas Living
P.O. Box 510
Little Rock, AR 72203
Sorry, we can’t return photographs.
Moon Mullins
A Thumb Pickin’
Mu riel Anderso
n
Ozark Tradition
Auto HArp
Workshop
Ju ne 6- 8
Ozark Folk Center hosts its annual Thumb Picking Weekend, May 17-18. Musicians
will honor Merle Travis, master of the thumb-picking style, and other artists who have
embraced this unique guitar technique. Performers include Muriel Anderson, Moon
Mullins, Eddy Adcock and more.
On-site lodging is available at The Cabins at Dry Creek.
Call 870-269-3871 for reservations.
M O U N T A I N V I E W, A R K A N S A S
Infor mation: 870-269-3851 • Cabin Reser vations: 800-264-3655 • OzarkFolkCenter.com
Surprisingly affordable.
ll
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ree
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es Othe
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800.756.2506
unitedbilthomes.net
* With approved credit for qualified land owners.
24
MAY 2013
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Funding an emergency
Help your financial future survive the unexpected
B y D oreen F riel
“Life is what happens to you while
you’re busy making other plans,” the late
John Lennon noted in his 1980 song “Beautiful Boy (Darling
Boy).” Unfortunately, when certain types of life events strike,
your finances can take a big hit – unless you’re prepared.
Following are some guidelines for weathering financial
hardships without running up large credit card balances or
dipping into your retirement savings.
Make sure you’re insured
Having insurance may seem like an obvious first step, but
many of us either don’t carry enough coverage or the right
type. Here are three kinds to consider:
• Long-term disability insurance. Could you live for
months or years without a paycheck? The average worker
has a 30 percent chance of being disabled for three months
or more during his or her career, and the average disability
claim lasts 31 months. Most disabilities, in fact, are caused by
medical problems like back pain, cancer or heart disease – not
accidents.
Find out what “LTD” coverage you have available
through your employer, if any. If you need more, look into
a supplemental policy, but be sure you understand all of
the terms before buying. For help in making an educated
decision, read the Guide to Disability Income Insurance
available at publications.usa.gov.
• Life insurance. If you have family members who rely
on you, life insurance remains a must. And don’t just limit it
to breadwinners – if a non-working spouse dies, the surviving
parent might need to pay for child care and other assistance.
The question then becomes how much insurance do you
need (and for how long)? Standard formulas may not give
you the best answer, so try a calculator like that offered by
bankrate.com to factor in your unique circumstances.
• Homeowners/renters insurance. If you experienced
theft, fire or storm damage, could you afford to buy new
belongings and fix up your residence? When taking
out coverage, make sure it’s regularly adjusted to keep
pace with replacement costs. If you live in a region at
high risk for earthquakes or flooding, you may need a
special policy, as these disasters aren’t covered by most
homeowners’ insurance.
Maintain an emergency savings fund
It’s easy to imagine scenarios where you might require
emergency savings: a job loss, unexpected medical bills or
unplanned home repairs. Unfortunately, many folks view
retirement accounts as “back-up funds,” which is a mistake –
after being tapped, you greatly shrink retirement savings.
To keep from reaching into retirement plans, many
financial advisors recommend socking away six months’
worth of living expenses into a separate savings account
– and some suggest putting in a full year’s income to
compensate for a weaker job market.
So should you save first for retirement or emergencies?
It depends on your situation. If you have some rainy-day
money already designated and your employer offers a match
on 401(k) contributions, meet the full match and shift
anything you were investing above that into your emergency
reserve until it’s built up to a safe level. In addition, if you
have high-interest debt to pay off, do that before setting
money aside.
The bottom line: Managing financial risks ahead of time
can help protect your financial health – including your nest
egg.
Doreen Friel is a marketing communications consultant who
produces employee benefits-related materials for the Employee
Benefits Communications Department of the National Rural
Electric Cooperative Association, the Arlington, Va.-based service
arm of the nation’s 900-plus consumer-owned, not-for-profit
electric cooperatives.
25
Help us
battle copper crime
Metal theft—the crime that endangers lives and can
result in thousands of dollars in damages ultimately paid
for by you—continues to plague electric utilities all over
America.
Copper wire is appealing to thieves who look to sell it
for scrap. Burglars often climb power poles, scale fences and
break into buildings to steal the precious metal—almost
always endangering themselves and others in the process.
Between 2001 and 2008, the price of copper skyrocketed
500 percent. After a brief decline in 2009, it has hovered at a
strong $3.40 per pound for the past several years.
Some electric cooperatives stamp copper and aluminum
wire with an ID number to deter theft. Stolen wire is
commonly brought to recycling centers and traded for
cash. Although
many state laws
require recycling
centers to keep records
of transactions, enforcement can be difficult. Without
identifying marks, stolen wire is hard to track and rarely
recovered. Legislation introduced on the federal level aims
to improve tracking and impose stiffer penalties; most
states have toughened metal theft laws over the past few
years as well.
Thieves may not understand that they are risking their
lives by taking copper from utility poles or substations, where
high transmission voltage is stepped down to a lower current
for distribution lines. Arkansas’ electric cooperatives urge
you to follow these guidelines to guard against electrical
dangers and prevent copper theft.
• Never enter or touch equipment inside a substation;
stay away from power lines and anything touching a
power line.
• If you notice anything unusual with electric facilities,
such as an open substation gate, open equipment,
or hanging wire, contact your local electric co-op
immediately.
Photos courtesy Georgia Transmission Corporation
• Install motion-sensor lights on the outside of your
house and business to deter possible thieves.
• Store tools and wire cutters in a secure location, and
never leave them out while you are away.
• If you work in construction, do not leave
any wires or plumbing unattended or
leave loose wire at the job site, especially
overnight.
• Help spread the word about the deadly consequences that can result from trying to
steal copper or aluminum wire.
All three of these voltage regulators at a
substation in Georgia were destroyed when
a suspected metal thief cut a ground wire.
Estimated cost for the lost equipment was
$75,000.
A remote terminal unit—a computer
that monitors activities of substation
equipment—was destroyed in a metal theft
incident in Georgia. Estimated cost for the
lost equipment was $5,000.
28
MAY 2013
Source: Cooperative Research Network
Insuring Arkansans for
over 60 years
Call me today to see how you can take advantage
of this winning combination from Shelter.
Find the Shelter Agent in your town at ShelterInsurance.com.
ALMA
Randy Coleman
Randy Milam
ArkAdeLphiA
Chad Kesterson
John & Deborah
Tackett
Ashdown
Joey Bailey
BArLing
Brandon Zimmerman
BAtesviLLe
Jeral Hastings
Carroll Shawver
BeeBe
John Hayes
BeLLA vistA
Scott Comiskey
Benton
Tom Morrow
Brett Polk
BentonviLLe
Chris Taylor
CLinton
Jim Gilliam
hAMpton
Mark Hodnett
ConwAy
Fred & John Tate
Ryan Webb
hArrisBurg
John Dillinger
Crossett
Dan Pevy
Deb Zeigler
deQueen
Woods Agency
dierks
Todd Moore
eL dorAdo
Amber Myers
FAyetteviLLe
Whit Hensman
Steve Smith
Drew Trucks
Gary Cooper
Randy Hutchinson
FordyCe
Tom Tidwell
BerryviLLe
Richard & Mary Lou
Harp
Ft. sMith
Jeff Clark
Jerry & Wade Gilkey
Brent Lovell
Kevin Minks
BLytheviLLe
Scott Wallis
gLenwood
Doyle Shields
BryAnt
Laryssa Calley
Cory Pratt
grAvette
Bob Kelley
CAMden
Matt Gibbs
Robert Murry
ChArLeston
Jim Milam
greenBrier
Brock Rowell
greenwood
Phil Hicks
hArrison
Roger Earnest
hAtFieLd
Kenny Miller
heBer springs
Tim Brewer
Rick York
hope
Trey Branch
hot springs
Bart Bledsoe
Matt Sullivan
LittLe roCk
Steve Ferguson
Dale Lockard
Jeff Moore
Ron Paulson
Eddy Peters
Richard Yager
Chad Millard
Stefan Elmore
Bob Rhodes
Jim Tindall
Chris Haas
MAgnoLiA
Chad Turner
Paul Whitley
MALvern
Justin Stewart
MArshALL
Jeff Jennings
huntsviLLe
Rick Witt
MAuMeLLe
Christy Bryan
iMBoden
Denny & Kelly
Durham
MeLBourne
Mike Cone
JACksonviLLe
Gene & Mary Ellen
Bowman (Agents)
Sheryl Boyd
(Affiliate Agent)
MenA
Telissa Montgomery
Monette
Bob Blankenship
Scott Everett
Todd Martin
MontiCeLLo
Paul Griffin
JonesBoro
Paula Graddy
Bob & Bobby Haun
Blake Rogers
Mark Webb
MountAin view
Shawn Downs
LAke City
Gary Owens
north
LittLe roCk
Dan Cook
Brian Cress
Monica Reiners
Curtis Short
Ron & Vicki
Clevidence
nAshviLLe
Greg Tate
newport
Mark Manning
ozArk
Toby Hogan
pArAgouLd
Travis Ryan
pAris
Bill Elsken
perryviLLe
Baylor House
piggott
Tonya Coomer
presCott
Pete DeWoody
rogers
Bill Cooley
Keri Earwood
Walter Yockey
Sean Garrison
russeLLviLLe
Peggy Stratton
sALeM
Nick Coleman
seArCy
Richard Cargile (Agent)
Dei Bryant
(Affiliate Agent)
Debbie Likert
sheridAn
Grant Westmoreland
sherwood
Candice Alford
Becky Bradley
Scott Richards
Brian Thompson
Bob Tobey
siLoAM springs
Jerrell Suttles
springdALe
Steve Harp
Shane Rhoades
Duane & Wayne
Scoggins
stAr City
James West
texArkAnA
Missy Dickens
Kim Wren
truMAnn
Charles & Martis
Stephan
vAn Buren
Stuart Davis
Ted McEvoy
wALnut ridge
Danny & Sue Gibson
wArren
Greg Harton
whitehALL
Darren Clark
wynne
Brett McFadden
Debbie Meyer
we’re your shield.
we’re your shelter.
29
May is for Gardening
Vertical
gardening
Take advantage of garden space by using
the third dimension to grow vegetables and
other edibles
B y K ris W et h erbee
W
Plants grown vertically cast a shadow. Running your trellis in an eastto-west direction on the north side of your garden creates optimal
light exposure for trellised plants while casting the least amount of
shadow in the garden.
hen garden space is limited, you can still grow spacehungry vegetables such as squash, melons and prolific
tomatoes. Growing vegetables and vining fruits on an arbor
or vertical trellis is the most efficient way to add space in
a less than spacious garden. Not only will you be able to
grow more produce in less space, but the added sun and air
on plant surfaces will help bring a superior quality to the
produce.
Growing vertically improves air circulation, which helps
minimize mildew and other plant diseases. Trellising also
eliminates soil contact so vegetables and fruits stay cleaner
and are less likely to rot. Fruits are quicker to ripen and often
more flavorful due to the additional sunlight exposure. And
since the veggies and fruits are more visible and not hidden
beneath lush growth, they can be harvested at their peak of
perfection.
Trellising also saves strain on your back as there is
minimal stooping, bending or hunching over needed to
harvest crops. And just imagine the extra watering, weeding,
and feeding it would take to grow enough bush beans or
peas to equal the yield that pole varieties produce when
grown on vertical supports.
Getting started
Growing vegetables and vining fruits on an arbor or vertical trellis is
the most efficient way to add space in a less-than-spacious garden.
30
MAY 2013
Before setting up any type of trellis system, amend the
soil with lots of rich compost or well-rotted manure prior
to planting. This is key to producing optimum yields in a
smaller space. By enriching the soil, you will improve the
soil tilth and fertility, and help get plants off to a good start.
Where and how you situate your trellis system is equally
important. Keep in mind that plants grown vertically
will cast a shadow. Running your trellis in an east-to-west
direction on the north side of your garden will create
optimal light exposure for trellised plants while casting the
least amount of shadow in the garden. Shadows cast over
neighboring sun-loving crops can be minimized by running
your trellis in a north-to-south direction, though vertical
plants on the northern end of the trellis will receive less light
than plants on the southern end.
A few shadows are inevitable but can become an asset if
you use them to your advantage by planting shade-tolerant
crops such as lettuce, spinach and other heat-sensitive
vegetables, flowers, and herbs near a plant-laden trellis.
Standing tall
A variety of trellis systems can be used to grow vegetables
vertically, from cages and hog panels, to poles, stakes and
strings, and store-bought trellises and arbors. Plants are
typically grown up plastic or string mesh, chicken wire,
hog panels or hand-strung twine, or wire, attached to trellis
supports made of metal, wood, bamboo, plastic, or PVC
pipe.
My favorite material for trellising plants is
a hog panel or cattle panel. These are basically
sections of fencing made of galvanized heavy
wire. Cattle panels are usually about 5 feet tall
with square openings about 6x6 inches across.
Hog panels are about 3 feet tall, with top
square openings about 6x6 inches across that
get progressively smaller lower to the ground.
Available at farm supply stores, they provide an
inexpensive way of creating a long-lasting and
rust-resistant trellis.
You can position panels to form an A-frame
secured at the top or run panels upright and
secure them to metal posts spaced about
5 feet apart in a row, attaching the panel
to each post with heavy-duty wire or zip
ties. To raise the trellis height to 6 feet
tall, simply attach the panel 2 feet off the
ground.
Whether you place your trellis
horizontally or vertically, growing certain
crops off the ground will expand your
gardening options for space hungry
vegetables and fruits. Either way, your
garden—and the bounty it provides—will
soar to new heights of satisfaction.
Photos by Rick
Wetherbee
Eight- to 10-foot poles made of willow branches
made this teepee-style trellis. The frame is wrapped
in string, chicken wire or netting to provide a
surface for vines to climb.
A variety of trellis systems can be used to grow
vegetables vertically, from cages and hog panels, to
poles, stakes and strings, and store-bought trellises
and arbors. This trellis holds dried sunflowers
— great food for birds who may also eat insects
plaguing crops.
Use the CLEAN Sea Mineral Product
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31
gardening with Janet
Summer annuals add color to season
B y J anet B . C ars o n
Seasonal color can
make a landscape
inviting and exciting,
and summer annuals
are arriving daily at
local nurseries. Our
cooler-than-normal
spring has the pansies,
violas and other winter
annuals lasting longer
than normal, so many gardeners have
been a bit slow to plant summer color,
but now is the time.
Annuals are plants that complete
their life cycle in one season. Winter
annuals are planted in the fall to give
you color all winter until it heats up
in the late spring. Summer annuals
are planted after all chances of frost
are over and should give you color all
summer, potentially up until a killing
frost. Some annuals are more vigorous
than others and some take summer
weather in stride, while others wither
without regular care.
When choosing annuals, just as
with any plant, fitting the plant to the
location can determine your success.
Do you have full sun, partial sun, light
shade or deep shade? Will you be able
to water?
Then
consider
your
color choices.
Planting seasonal
color in a
block of color makes a stronger
statement than diluting the color
by planting it in long thin lines.
A group planting of one or two
harmonizing colors makes a bold
display while using every color
in the rainbow can sometimes
be a bit intimidating. Consider
where the color can make the
biggest impact and plant there.
Usually entrance-ways or public
areas get the best views and most
Periwinkles thrive in full sun.
enjoyment. Seasonal color
should be one component in the
annual foliage plants that pack a lot
landscape, because it would be
of punch with bright, showy leaves.
too much work to change your entire
Coleus plants come in a huge range
landscape every season.
of colors, and there are choices for
Annuals that thrive in full sun
full sun to total shade. “Wasabi” is a
and can take heat and drought in
great bold chartreuse foliaged plant
stride include angelonia (summer
that thrives in the sun, while “Sedona”
snapdragon) in shades of pink, purple
is a lovely orange for the shade, but
or white; lantana with solid colors of
there are many choices. Caladiums
yellow, orange, red, and white or biare summer bulbs that thrive in the
colors with combinations of all of the
shade, and there are numerous varieties
aforementioned colors; penta with
with white, pink and red color mixes.
red, pink, purple or white flowers, and
Alternanthera (which includes Joseph’s
periwinkles and zinnias in a wide range
Coat) is a large family of colored leaves.
of colors. While they can take drier
“Party Time,” “Crème de Menthe,” “Little
conditions, all would benefit from
Ruby” and more can give you color all
some water in a dry season. season long with relatively little care.
The No. 1 shade annual is
Because annuals are around for just
impatiens, but they are not drought
one season, we want to get our money’s
tolerant, doing best in moist
worth, so we fertilize this group of
conditions. Common impatiens will
plants more frequently than any other.
do well in light to heavy shade, while
Broadcast a slow release fertilizer as you
some of the newer introductions of
plant and then follow it up with a more
Fusion and New Guinea impatiens
fast acting fertilizer every two to three
need a little sun to bloom their best.
weeks throughout the season. Mulch
Full morning sun or filtered light is
your plants to conserve moisture and
my preference. Other shade lovers
moderate the soil temperature and then
include wax leaf begonia in red, pink
water as needed. Some plants will set
or white, torenia (wishbone flower) and
seeds so they will have to be “deadplectranthus Mona Lavender.
headed,” which simply means cutting
Color is not just achieved
off the spent flowers so they don’t set
with flowers. There are plenty of
seeds. If you allow them to set seeds,
Zinnias need sun and can take heat and drought.
32
MAY 2013
Energy efficient? Absolutely!
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they put too much energy into seed
production and not enough into
flowering, and we want all the flowers
we can get. If your plant gets a little
leggy, give it a haircut and fertilize,
and it should bounce back and begin
to bloom again.
The choices for seasonal color
improve annually. New varieties,
new plants and new colors come
out every year, so try some triedand-true, as well as some new
plants or new varieties of your old
favorites. If the plant doesn’t grow
to your expectations or gets plagued
by diseases and insects, then pull
it and plant something new. They
are annuals – they are usually fairly
inexpensive compared to other plants,
and can be easily replaced. We are
fortunate that in today’s market we
can find replacement plants yearround. It wasn’t that long ago that if
you hadn’t bought your seasonal color
by Mother’s Day, you wouldn’t find
any.
Summer annuals do well planted
in the ground or in containers. So
whether you need to spruce up a large
yard, or add some color to a balcony
or patio, there is a flower for your
need. Now you just need to get out
there and find plants you enjoy and
start planting.
Janet B. Carson is a horticulture
specialist for the University of Arkansas
Cooperative Extension Service.
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33
May is for Gardening
All about mulch
Photos by Rick
Wetherbee
Protect and improve your garden in minutes with
a layer of organic nutrients
B y K ris W et h erbee
A
re you looking for a simple one-step process to
keep weeds out of the garden, improve soil texture,
increase beneficial critters, fertilize your plants, conserve
soil moisture, moderate soil temperature and prevent soil
compaction and erosion? Mulch is the answer! Covering
the ground with a blanket of mulch is one of the easiest and
quickest ways to protect and enrich the beauty and health of
your garden plants and overall landscape. In fact, it can make
the difference between a plant that thrives or one that dies.
Most any type of organic or inorganic material that
you spread or lay on top of the soil is referred to as mulch.
Examples of organic materials include compost, aged
Mulch enriches the beauty and health of your garden plants and
overall landscape, as seen with this path of bark mulch through an
herb garden.
34
MAY 2013
manure, straw, shredded leaves, grass clippings, bark chips,
nut hulls and pine needles. As these materials break down
and decompose, they improve the condition and fertility
of the soil. Inorganic materials—such as plastic, landscape
fabric and small rocks—perform similar functions but do
not add organic material to the soil and can be difficult to
remove. As such, they are best reserved for more permanent
plantings in good soil.
The makings of a good mulch
Though there is no perfect mulch for every situation, the
attributes of ideal mulch are as follows: It allows water and air
into the soil, resists compaction, is odor-free and attractive,
and stays where you put it. Ultimately, the best mulch is one
that you can easily find and apply to your garden.
Your decision about which mulch to use depends
mostly on its availability, ease of application and aesthetic
appearance. Rocks and 100-pound straw bales are heavy
to move; black plastic tears and shreds and straw may not
beautify your perennial bed. Yet, in the right setting, each of
these make excellent mulch.
Depending on where you live, you may find gardening
shops, farming centers, or manufacturers that sell straw (be
sure to use straw that was cut before going to seed), wood
chips and aged sawdust. They might even have crushed hulls
from nuts such as filberts, peanuts, and walnuts, or cocoa
bean hulls that faintly fill the air after a rain with the aroma of
chocolate. Mulches that are typically fee-free include shredded
leaves, pine needles, compost, tree trimmings or unsprayed
grass clippings. (Allow clippings to dry out before using.)
Right mulch, right time, right place
The effectiveness of any mulch depends on when you use it and where you put
it. In general, applying mulch in late winter or early spring will prevent most weed
seeds from germinating before they even have a chance to start. Mulch applied in
late spring to early summer will help keep the soil cool and conserve moisture during
the hot days of summer. Late fall applications keep soil temperatures warmer through
winter, protecting roses, evergreens, trees, shrubs and any bare ground. Keep in mind
organic mulch applied in any season ultimately adds nutrients to soil, thereby feeding
plants.
In the vegetable garden, plastic mulch helps prevent weeds and retain soil
moisture. A black or colored plastic mulch also raises soil temperature for heat-seeking
fruits and vegetables such as tomatoes, peppers, watermelons and eggplants. However,
this type of mulch is typically not permeable to water or air, and it can crack or tear
easily.
Landscape fabric lets water and air flow through while still preventing weeds.
This makes it an ideal mulch around trees, shrubs and other permanent plantings
as well as in aisles between beds or on paths. The durable fabric is often used as an
underlayment or a base mulch, then topped with a thin layer of a more attractive
mulch, such as wood chips. The two together will provide more protection against
weeds than either one alone.
How to apply mulch
Whether you rake it, dump it, or spread it with your hands, the
right way to apply mulch will depend on the area and the plants
you’re mulching. You can spread it with a rake on paths as well as
the bare ground and around trees or shrubs. But in smaller beds
with established plantings, you’ll be less likely to damage existing
plants if you spread the mulch with your hands.
Keep a “mulch-free zone” around plants, trees, and shrubs:
about a 1- to 2-inch space for plants, 4- to 8-inch circle around
shrubs, and a 12- to 36-inch circle around the base of trees. The
finer and denser the mulch, the less you need to apply. Maintain a
2- to 3-inch thick layer for fine-textured materials such as sawdust,
shredded leaves, and compost. Keep a 4- to 5-inch layer for coarsetextured materials like wood chips and straw. Organic mulch will
eventually break down and settle, ­­and some types decompose faster
Mulch allows water
than others. So you’ll need
and air into the soil,
to apply additional mulch to
resists compaction,
keep it at the right depth.
is odor-free and
attractive, and
No matter how, why,
stays where you
when, or where you mulch,
the benefits go beyond the soil put it. The best
mulch is one that
and plants. Organic mulch
you can easily find
also provides food, shelter and and apply to your
garden.
hibernating sites for many
birds, butterflies and their
caterpillars. A mulched landscape is also more
attractive and provides a unifying effect to the
overall scenery. It’s amazing how a one-step
process can be so simple to do yet so significant
to a beneficial, beautiful and thriving landscape.
Courtesy Ruralite
These strawberries are surrounded by
wood chips.
Place mulch by hand to protect new
plantings, and keep a “mulch-free zone”
around plants, trees, and shrubs: about a
1- to 2-inch space for plants, 4- to 8-inch
circle around shrubs, and a 12- to 36-inch
circle around the base of trees.
Most any type of organic or inorganic
material spread on top of the soil is referred
to as mulch; this garden uses wool.
35
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a wide variety of professional and plantrelated organizations.
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MAY 2013
healthy living
Keeping fit
and having
fun as we age
Regular physical activity at any
age can help you live longer, feel
better and reduce health problems.
But far too many people, including
baby boomers, don’t get the exercise
they need. According to the 2012
Participation Report from the
Physical Activity Council (PAC), 35
percent of Americans over the age
of 55 are physically inactive. Since
regular exercise helps control blood
pressure, body weight, cholesterol
and so much more, boomers need to
find ways to get their bodies moving
so they can live longer, healthier
lives.
“Though any amount of exercise
is beneficial, ultimately adults should
work up to getting at least 30 minutes
most days of the week, as long as
they feel comfortable and pain-free,”
said world-renowned nutritionist Joy
Bauer. “From taking a Zumba class
to walking and stretching, getting
regular physical activity helps the
joints stay loose, maintains muscle
mass, and gets the blood flowing – all
of which make everyday tasks easier.”
The American Council on Exercise
recommends older Americans choose
exercise programs that include
cardiovascular, muscle conditioning
and flexibility exercises. Low-impact,
non-jarring exercises such as walking
and swimming are good options. A key
to sticking with a fitness program is
making sure it’s enjoyable.
A fun new program for older adults
is Zumba Gold, a low-impact dancebased workout designed specifically for
boomers and seniors. Workout routines
combine salsa, merengue, flamenco
and cumbia moves with fun music.
The program was created by 71-yearold Joy Prouty, a veteran in the fitness
industry and a former Rockette.
“From cardio to toning, this
collection brings together some of
Zumba’s most popular offerings in
a format enabling older adults to
rediscover the energy of their youth,”
said Prouty. To learn more about
Zumba Gold, visit www.zumbagold.
com.
Workout safety tips
Whenever beginning a new fitness
activity or program, make sure you do
it safely.
• Wear comfortable shoes that fit well.
• Stay hydrated with plenty of fluids.
• Listen to your body. If it hurts or it feels like too much, stop.
You also need to be aware of
danger signs while exercising. Stop
the activity and call your doctor or
911 if you experience pain or pressure
in your chest, arms, neck or jaw;
feel lightheaded, nauseated or weak;
become short of breath; develop pain
in your legs, calves or back; or feel
like your heart is beating too fast or
skipping beats.
“It’s important to see your
doctor before beginning any
workout routine to receive
a thorough cardiovascular
evaluation,” said Bauer. “Once
you’ve been cleared by your
doctor, I recommend starting
out slowly.”
Source: Family Features
39
cooking with Joy
Joy Rice
Keepsake Recipes
by
I don’t think my collection would set any records, but I love reading and collecting cookbooks.
One of my oldest is my mom’s 1965 edition Better Homes and Gardens. What I’ve discovered
is that there is a prize inside these older cookbooks – the handwritten notes. Sometimes it’s an
addition or substitution, but then you find the big treasure – those handwritten recipes in the
back, or down one side of a page. They’re the best ones, special recipes from friends or family, handed down from
generation to generation. Here are a few of my family’s favorites – all sweets, but a piece of our history.
Ethel’s Apple Dapple Cake
3 eggs
1 ¼cup vegetable oil
2 cups sugar
3 cups all-purpose flour
1
⁄3 cup milk
1 tsp. salt
1 tsp. baking soda
2 tsp. vanilla
3 cups chopped apples
1 ½ cup chopped pecans
Glaze:
1 stick butter or margarine
1 cup brown sugar
¼ cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla
Mix the eggs and oil together in a large
bowl; add sugar, flour, milk, salt, soda
and vanilla, and mix well. Fold in the
apples and pecans. Batter will be stiff.
Bake in greased tube pan at 350 degrees
for 1 hour. Melt the butter in a pan, then
add other glaze ingredients and cook 2 ½
minutes. While cake is still hot, pour the
glaze over it before removing from pan.
For a spicy cake, add ¼ tsp. of cloves or
nutmeg and ¼ tsp. cinnamon to the cake
batter. Serves 10.
Melba’s Cake with
Chocolate Icing
A family favorite!
2 cups sifted cake flour
1 1⁄3cups sugar
½ cup Crisco
1 tsp. salt
3 tsp. baking powder
1 cup of milk
5 eggs
1
⁄3 cup milk
1 tsp. vanilla
Sift cake flour, salt and baking
powder together in bowl. In separate
bowl, cream sugar and Crisco well, and
then add eggs one at a time. Alternate
adding some of the flour mixture, then
some of the milk to batter. When well
incorporated, add vanilla. Pour into
greased and floured 9”x13” pan, or 2 9”
cake pans. Bake at 350 degrees for 25
minutes. Serves 12.
Chocolate Icing
2
½
½
½
1
cups sugar
cup cocoa powder
cup milk
cup butter
tsp. vanilla
Pinch of salt
Bring all ingredients to a rolling boil
and boil 1 minute. Remove from heat,
put the pan in cold water and beat until
thickens. Punch holes in cake with the
end of a wooden spoon; pour icing over
cake. Icing will harden as it sets.
Pineapple Cake with
7-Minute Frosting
Make Melba’s Cake (listed here). When
cool, poke holes in the cake and pour a can
of crushed pineapple and some shredded
coconut over the cake; ice with the following
7-minute frosting.
2 egg whites
1 ½ cup sugar
1 tbsp. light corn syrup
½ cup water
Pinch of salt
1 ½ tsp. vanilla
In a double boiler, mix egg whites,
sugar, corn syrup, water and salt; beat
rapidly over boiling water, for 7 minutes
or until stiff, glossy peaks form. Add
vanilla, mixing to blend well.
Melba’s Cake with
Chocolate Icing
40
MAY 2013
Photo by Gary Bean
Ethel’s Apple
Dapple Cake
Sue’s Pound Cake
1
1
6
3
3
½
stick butter
stick margarine
eggs
cups sugar
cups flour
pint whipping cream (not
whipped)
1 tbsp. vanilla
1 tsp. almond flavoring
Beat the butter, margarine, eggs and
sugar together well; add flour, beating
well; add remaining ingredients. Pour
into greased and floured tube pan and
place into a cold oven. Set temperature
at 350 degrees and bake for 1 ½ hours.
Serves 12.
Four-Layer Delight
1 ½ cup flour
1 ½ stick butter
1 cup chopped pecans (divided use)
8 oz. cream cheese
1 cup powdered sugar
16 oz. cool whip (divided use)
2 small packages instant chocolate
pudding
3 cups cold milk
Melt butter, add flour and ½ cup of
pecans. Press into a 9”x13” pan and
bake for 15 minutes at 375 degrees.
Cool the crust. Cream together cream
cheese, powdered sugar and 1 cup of
cool whip; spread over crust. Add the
milk to the instant pudding mix; beat
for 2 minutes. Spread this over the
second layer and let set for 10 minutes.
Top with remaining cool whip and
sprinkle with remaining pecans.
Serves 12.
Questions? Comments? Contact Joy at
[email protected] or 501.570.2277.
Committed. Strong. reliable.
truSted. member-owned.
We are more than 10,000 customer-owners across Arkansas who trust
Farm Credit with our large and small financing needs. With $2.8 billion
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refunds totaling more than $122 million since 1997. we’re Farm Credit.
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41
family favorites
A lot of people brag about
Linda Earl’s cooking. Among
them are the C & L Electric Board
of Directors who enjoy Linda’s
delicious dishes following the
board meeting each month.
Linda retired from Century Tube,
Inc., in Madison, Ind., where she
worked as an inventory expeditor
and quality control supervisor in
October 2007.
In 2008, Linda built a new home
across from Cane Creek Lake in
Star City in order to be closer to
her mother, Helen Faught, and
granddaughter, Jillian Rauls. She
also has two children, Karen
Rauls of Star City and Troy Deon
Earls of Clarksburg, W.Va. Linda
enjoys traveling, baking cakes
and watching her granddaughter
compete in rodeo events.
42
MAY 2013
Crockpot Pepper Steak
2 lbs. beef sirloin steak, sliced into
2” strips
1 tsp. garlic powder
3 tbsp. vegetable oil
1 beef bouillon cube
¼ cup hot water
2 tbsp. cornstarch
2
⁄3 cup chopped white onion
2 green bell peppers, sliced
1 red bell pepper, sliced
14-oz. can stewed tomatoes, undrained
4 tbsp. soy sauce
2 tsp. white sugar
1 tsp. salt
Preheat a large skillet over medium heat
on top of stove. Combine beef sirloin
steak, garlic powder and vegetable oil
in hot skillet. Cook, stirring frequently
until beef is thoroughly browned. Place
in crockpot. Combine beef bouillon, ¼
cup hot water and cornstarch in a small
bowl. Whisk until smooth. Pour over
steak in crock-pot. Add chopped onion,
bell pepper slices, stewed tomatoes, soy
sauce, sugar and salt to crock-pot. Stir until
all ingredients are combined thoroughly.
Cover and cook on high for 4-5 hours or on
low for 7-8 hours. Serve over cooked rice.
Salmon Cakes
1 pouch salmon
¼ cup chopped green onion
¼ cup chopped red bell pepper
¼ cup mayonnaise
1 tbsp. lemon juice
½ tsp. garlic powder
¼ tsp. seasoned salt
dash of cayenne pepper
1 egg
1 cup seasoned bread crumbs
¼ cup olive oil
Combine onion, bell pepper,
mayonnaise, lemon juice and seasonings
in a bowl. Sir in salmon, egg and ¼ cup of
breadcrumbs. Form into patties and roll in
the remaining breadcrumbs. Cook in olive
oil for 3-4 minutes until brown. (Patty size
can vary depending on the individual.)
Ranch Chicken Tenders
10-12 chicken tenders
1 cup original ranch dressing
¼ cup dry buttermilk ranch dressing
1 ½ cups flour
½ tbsp. Mediterranean spiced sea salt
¼ tsp. poultry seasoning
salt and pepper to taste
vegetable oil
Mix the original ranch dressing and dry
buttermilk ranch dressing together. Add
chicken tenders. Cover and refrigerate 1
hour. In a large bowl mix flour, sea salt,
poultry seasoning, salt and pepper. Roll
chicken tenders in flour mixture. Fry until
golden brown.
Oven Roasted Red Potatoes
with Rosemary & Garlic
1 ½ lbs. small new red potatoes (about 15), scrubbed and dried
¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil
4 to 6 cloves garlic, crushed
1 tbsp. fresh or 1 tsp. dried rosemary
Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Cut potatoes
in half. In a large bowl, mix the olive oil,
garlic and rosemary; add the potatoes
and toss well. Transfer the potatoes to
a shallow baking pan and roast until
potatoes are tender when tested with the tip
of a knife. Serve hot; can also be chilled
and served with fried chicken or ham.
Broccoli, Cauliflower Salad
1 head of broccoli
1 head of cauliflower
1 package cheddar cheese cubes
1 small onion, finely chopped
1 cup mayonnaise
¼ cup sugar
In an airtight container mix chopped
onion with 3 tbsp. sugar and refrigerate
overnight. Also mix mayonnaise and
remaining sugar; cover and refrigerate
overnight. The following day, chop
broccoli and cauliflower into bite size
pieces. Place in large bowl. Add in
cheese cubes. Mix onion and mayonnaise
together and pour over broccoli,
cauliflower and cheese. Toss until well
covered. You can substitute sour cream or
yogurt for mayonnaise if desired.
Karen’s Cast Iron Skillet
Apple Pie
1 stick butter
1 cup brown sugar
4 to 5 Granny Smith apples (peeled,
cored and thinly sliced)
1 cup white sugar
1 tbsp. cinnamon
1 box Pillsbury All-Ready pie crust
(room temperature)
(Vanilla ice cream is always good
with apple pie!)
In a cast iron skillet, melt butter. Add
brown sugar and stir to dissolve in butter.
Place one piecrust on top of butter and
brown sugar mixture. Add sliced apples.
Sprinkle apples with white sugar then top
with cinnamon. Make X’s in the second
piecrust and place on top of apples. Tuck
excess crust around edges leaving a ruffled
edge around the top. Bake in a preheated
350 degree oven for exactly 40 minutes.
Enjoy!
marketplace
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43
crosswordpuzzle
AR176
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
ACROSS
1 Lump of earth
14
15
5 Warning
17
18
10 Front
20
21
14 ___ View
(near Wabash)
24
25
15 Dewy
27
28
16 Footnote
32
33
34
35
abbreviation
17 Wine cups
37
38
18 Rock group
40
41
"___ Base"
43
44
19 Transmit
46
20 Siesta
21 Shank
51
52
53
54
22 Crossett's
56
57
58
county
60
61
24 Author John
___
63
64
26 ___ fixe
(obsession)
62 Ladd or Alda
27 Old lang.
63 Serves perfectly
28 Razorback great
64 Called
Jamaal
65 Thomas Hardy
32 Hurt
heroine
35 Kinder
36 US agcy.
DOWN
37 Burden
1 Metallic sound
38 Hindu gateway
2 Town near Clarksville
39 Baseball's Dizzy ___
3 Giraffe's cousin
40 Organ of hearing
4 Bayou ___ Arc
41 Foot wear
5 Site of Noah's Ark?
42 Town near Batesville 6 ___ tenens
43 Bill and Hillary
(temporary substitute)
45 Heir
7 War god
Do You Have: Standing Water,
46 Formerly, formerly
8 ___ Grande
Soggy
Soil, Septic
47 NBA's
PippenSmell In Yard,
9 Razorback great
Or Gurgling
In Pipes??
51 Town
near Black
Darren
SpringsIs: Non-Destructive,
Our Process
10 Former treasurer
54 ___ City Friendly, Takes
Jimmie Lou
Environmentally
11 Cain's brother
Less(near
Than Glendale)
A Day, And Requires
55 ___ Spring County
12 Motion picture
NO DIGGING!!
56 Above
(comb. form)
57 Drying
need AERATION
13 Whirlpool
OZARK
SEPTIC
59 Explorer
Hernando
21 African country
1-800-723-1020
de ___
23 Fortune-teller
60 Bowl
25 Winter vehicle
61 Garnish fruit
26 Ancient Peruvian
8
9
10
11
12
13
29
30
31
16
19
22
23
26
36
WATER
PROBLEMS ??
stilwell-burrowsALad.indd 1
39
42
45
NO MORE SAND !
47
48
49
50
55
59
Do You Have: Standing Water,
Soggy Soil, Septic Smell In Yard,
Or Gurgling In Pipes??
Our Process Is: Non-Destructive,
Environmentally Friendly, Takes
Less Than A Day, And Requires
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OZARK SEPTIC AERATION
1-800-723-1020
44
MAY 2013
NO MORE
NO MORE
IRON!
S
SULFUR!
S
NO MORE
62
HARDNESS!
65
Indians
28 Buenos ___
(Argentina's capital)
29 Views
30 Moonfish
31 Zola novel
32 Actor Baldwin
33 ___ Hill (near Altus)
34 Mata ___
35 Not a soul (2 wds.)
38 Actor Billy Bob
39 Impression
41 Greek colonnade
42 Postern
44 Mythical maidens
45 Climbed
47 Comedian Martin
48 Gunwhale pin
49 Theta followers
50 College jackets
51 Nothing, in Mexico
52 Of the ear
53 Love flower
54 Stroke water
58 Town near Plainview
59 Fri. follower
Crossword answers on page 36.
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45
let’s eat
dining in arkansas
Josie’s at the
Lockhouse
B y R OB R O E D E L
N
estled on the White River with
two levels of wrap-around decks
overlooking the lock and dam at
Batesville, Josie’s at the Lockhouse offers
diners a beautiful view to compliment
some pretty darn good food.
The restaurant has an impressive
décor featuring antique signs, fishing
trophies and local relics. The view of
the river from inside is stunning with
floor to ceiling windows facing the
river.
As I was waiting to be seated,
Craighead Electric Cooperative Board
Member J.D. Salmons walked into
the restaurant. He was in Batesville to
transport Ed DuBare, a local pilot, back
to Jonesboro. Salmons was quick to let
me know that Josie’s was his favorite
lunch spot in Batesville and that Steve
The chicken Caesar salad tastes as
good as it looks.
the eating essentials
Josie’s at the Lockhouse
50 Riverbank Road, Batesville
870.793.7000
www.josiessteakhouse.com
Hours of Operation
Monday - Thursday 11 a.m. - 9 p.m.
Friday - Saturday 11 a.m. - 11 p.m.
Closed on Sunday
46
MAY 2013
Carpenter, the owner, was a good
The fabulous “Southwest Burger” topped
friend.
with fresh onion rings with a side of sweet
Salmons asked the manager to give
potato fries.
Steve a call and see if he could join us.
Salmons and DuBare ordered the
The sandwich featured three slices
lunch special, Hawaiian Grilled Tilapia.
of Texas toast, ham, bacon, turkey,
The fish was complimented with a
American cheese, Swiss cheese, lettuce,
choice of fries or rice, and mixed
tomatoes and mayonnaise. The result
vegetables. The gentlemen said that the
is a filling sandwich that appeals to
food was cooked perfectly.
diverse tastes.
The food parade began with the
The final entrée was Josie’s signature
potato skins appetizer.
rib-eye steak, which
These were stuffed
was cooked to
with bacon pieces,
perfection with grill
green onions and
marks that let me
melted cheese. They
know the cook staff
tasted great. And,
pays special attention
after a little coaxing,
to the steaks. All
my lunch partners
steaks at Josie’s are
tried one too.
hand-carved daily.
The chicken
A side of grilled
Caesar salad was
asparagus added great
Josie’s is known for its fresh cut,
delivered next.
color to the plate. The
perfectly cooked steaks.
This healthy entrée
steak was very moist,
featured grilled chicken breast strips
fork tender and loaded with flavor. The
with parmesan cheese and croutons
asparagus was crisp and well-seasoned
on a bed of fresh romaine lettuce with
with just enough spice.
a creamy Caesar dressing. The chicken
As I sampled the offerings, Salmons
had a good peppery flavor.
and DuBare nibbled a little here and
The “Southwest Burger” was
there, but when the “Bourbon Street
anything but typical in appearance. The
Bread Pudding” was presented at our
burger was a freshly ground certified
table, Salmons’ eyes perked up. It was
Angus beef patty that was cooked just
a very light bread pudding packed
right, topped with homemade onion
with flavor provided by a rum sauce
rings, Josie’s homemade barbeque
and garnished with a spiral cut fresh
sauce, pepper jack cheese, lettuce,
strawberry. The dish was so pretty and
tomatoes and pickles served on a
appetizing that we hesitated a little
Kaiser bun. A side of sweet potato
before digging in. Salmons consumed
fries accompanied the burger. The
his half of the dessert and said he
burger’s freshness and flavors were
“loved it” and “it was going to be my
fabulous.
fault later that day when he needed a
The most popular lunch sandwich is
nap.” I was amazed how the pudding
the club sandwich. The team at Josie’s
was so fluffy, yet very moist with a
doesn’t skimp on meats and toppings.
creamy center.
“Building Solutions”
...with integrity!
Carpenter and his family originally
opened Josie’s in Waldenburg and
experienced great success for many
years. A group of business people
from Batesville, who frequented the
Waldenburg location, urged Carpenter
and his wife, Beth, to open a second
location in Batesville. After careful
consideration, the family opened
Josie’s in Batesville in 2005. The family
operated both locations for a while,
but eventually sold the Waldenburg
location.
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The club sandwich is loaded with great
tasting meats and toppings.
“We enjoy dealing with the
people,” Carpenter said. “We are a
family-owned restaurant and work
to give our customers a high level of
personal service.”
He said the menu at Josie’s is
constantly evolving.
“We find something that we like
and then we experiment with it and
work to improve it,” Carpenter said.
“We are always adding to the menu
and adding specials.”
The family is also making constant
improvements to the building. Steve
added a private wine cellar meeting
room a few years back. The room is
adorned with historic photographs of
the area and offers a great view of the
river in a more intimate setting.
Maybe I will see you at Josie’s and
we can try the items together, but I
won’t share the “Bourbon Street Bread
Pudding” next time.
Dining recommendations? Contact Rob
Roedel at [email protected]
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47
48
MAY 2013
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
scenes from the past
• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •
Photographs from the Archives
“Stairstep falls and lengthy rapids provide excitement for kayakers on the Cossatot River,
especially on the upper half. The river flows south from near Mena in Rich Mountain Electric’s
area to the Little River south of De Queen in Southwest Arkansas Electric’s area.”
Rural Arkansas, April 1990
39
49
around arkansas a sampling of events
Calendar
May 10-11
Delta Rockabilly Music Festival
Helena
Featuring bands from around the world
celebrating the roots of rock.
www.deltarockabillyfest.com
Toads, on your mark! The toad race is a
highlight of the annual Toad Suck Daze
festival in Conway.
May 3-4
Art on the Creek
Bella Vista
Fifty booths of hand-created arts and crafts along
the creek in Bella Vista. 479-855-2064.
Hamburg Armadillo Festival
Hamburg
Carnival rides, craft vendors, pageants, talent
show and live music. 870-853-8345.
May 3-5
32nd Annual Toad Suck Daze
Downtown Conway
Something for everyone, including the World
Famous Toad Races. 501-327-7788.
May 4
Polk County Garden & Plant Sale
Polk County Fairgrounds, Mena
Sponsored by the Polk County Master Gardeners.
Garden-related vendors, art and more. 479-3943911 or email: [email protected]
Pioneer Village Spring Fest
White County Historic Museum, Searcy
Demonstrations of pioneer life in White County,
including leatherworking, woodworking,
blacksmithing, quilting, Dutch oven cooking and
more. 501-850-6633.
May Day Heritage Fest 2013
Grant County Museum, Sheridan
A day filled with Arkansas’ living history
presentations, arts and crafts, music, food and
more. 870-942-4496.
Woodcarving Show and Sale
Baxter County Fairgrounds, Mountain Home
Saturday hours are 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Sunday
hours are 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. 870-431-8591.
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May 10-12
Old Timer’s Days Arts & Crafts Fair
Historic Main Street, Van Buren
Six blocks of Van Buren’s Main Street will be
closed off to provide space for more than 200
exhibitors from more than seven states. A children’s festival and Friday evening concert.
www.vanburen.org
May 11
Dogwood Days Festival
Horseshoe Bend
Danielle Colby of the American Pickers television
show is expected to visit the festival and sign
autographs.
110 Anniversary of Main Street
Calico Rock Museum, Calico Rock
From 11 a.m. to 3 p.m., the town will celebrate
the building of historic Main Street with a
reunion and more. 870-297-4129;
www.calicorockmuseum.com
Spring Cruise-In
Mountain Home
Sponsored by the Classic Chevy Club of North
Arkansas. 870-425-6575.
May 12
Mother’s Day Bell Choir Concert
Garvan Woodland Gardens, Hot Springs
The Ringers of Hope bell choir will present a
special Mother’s Day concert in the Anthony
Chapel at 3 p.m. 870-342-6210; www.garvan
gardens.org/eventcalendar/default.aspx
May 17-18
Arkansas Master Gardeners
Conference Garden Sale
John Q. Hammond Convention Center, Rogers
Vendors selling garden-related items will be open
to public from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Friday and 9
a.m. to noon to Saturday. Conference not open
to public. 479-855-7766.
Atkins Picklefest
Atkins
Enjoy the famous “fried dill pickles,” pickle juice
drinking and pickle eating contests, live music,
food vendors, arts and crafts, quilt show, canning
contest, bingo games, kids games, 5K run,
tractor pull, rodeo and more. 479-747-0122.
Dermott Crawfish Festival
Dermott
870-538-5656; www.dermottcrawfishfestival.
com/events
May 18
Wolf House Dutch Oven Cook-Off
Norfork
Celebration of pioneer living at the oldest
two-story log structure in Arkansas. Dutch
oven cooking demonstrations. Civil War
re-enactments, vendors, exhibits and more.
870-499-5722.
Heartbeat of the Ozarks
Charity Car Show
Historical Downtown Rogers
Heartbeat of the Ozarks Classic Car Club car/
truck/motorcycle show. Supports Circle of Life
Hospice of Northwest Arkansas. 479-372-6215.
May 24-25
Fulton County Homecoming
Festival
Salem
Open Street Market, Apple Pie 5K Run, terrapin
race, music, parade. 870-895-5565.
May 26
Mustangs on the Mountain Show
and Shine
Museum of Automobiles, Petit Jean Mt.
The iconic Ford Mustang will be the star for the
day. $20 entry fee. Program benefits museum.
501-727-5427.
Trace Adkins Concert
Black Oak Amphitheater
Concert includes Trace Adkins, Aaron Lewis and
Blackberry Smoke. www.BlackOakAmp.com
May 27
Veterans Celebration
Tri-County Fairgrounds Pavilion, Marvell
Col. John C. Edwards will speak and Harold
“Coach” Steelman will display his private collection of military memorabilia from World War
I to the present. All veterans will be honored.
870-338-1469
May 30-June 1
Spring Gospel Bluegrass Festival
Heavensent Gospel Bluegrass Park, Scotland
Music from several gospel groups. Jammers are
welcome. Camping available. 501-0592-3767.
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