Graduation rate reaches 6-year high Square retail

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Graduation rate reaches 6-year high Square retail
Summer
of drama
Hot sales
at Market
Days
Peter Dossing
reviews a pair
of new productions
Page 2A
Page 1B
GEORGETOWN, TEXAS
Vol. 139 No. 13
n
AUGUST 12, 2015
One Dollar
Graduation
rate reaches
6-year high
Minority student gains
fuel rapid climb
B y JONATHAN ADAMS
Photos by Andy Sharp
A group of regulars meet every Thursday at Handcrafts Unlimited to quilt together and catch up, above. Last week was no different, even as the 32-yearold store celebrated its grand reopening on the Square. A quilt called “Falling Leaves,” below, by artisan Jul Kamen, was one of many on display.
Square retail fixture celebrates revamped interior
least 50 years old.
“My wife Mickie spends a considerable
amount of time and money here — she is a
one-woman economic stimulus,” Mayor Ross
joked.
“This is an amazing organization you have
here. In fact, you are the longest-serving [retail]
business on the Square having been here for
more than 30 years.”
The shop was also revealing a new, re-energized look. They now have an artisan shop department in the back of the store.
Since its inception, Handcrafts Unlimited has
employed an all-volunteer staff. Many of those
volunteers are artists and artisans who have
enjoyed many years of crafting the store’s products. Mr. Pastor said most volunteers work at
Handcrafts Unlimited to enjoy the camaraderie
of the workplace while still making a contribution to the community.
B y MAT T LOE SCHMAN
Creativity was on full display Thursday afternoon on the Square.
Volunteers, dignitaries and guests gathered
for a grand re-opening at Handcrafts Unlimited,
104 West Eighth Street, to celebrate a three-decade history and also look to the future.
“We are pleased to announce we will be in this
location for five more years with an option for
another five after that,” said Board President
Ed Pastor, noting that Handcrafts Unlimited
has occupied the same storefront on the Square
since 1983.
“It’s pretty remarkable to see where we are
today compared to years past.”
As others busily sewed quilts in another area
of the store, Mayor Dale Ross welcomed longtime artisans, volunteers and friends of the
non-profit business featuring handcrafts and
stitchery items all made by artisans who are at
Continued on 7A
As mercury rises, consider canines’ plight
B y MATHE W WALL ACE
With high temperatures stuck
in the torrid triple digits, it’s a constant struggle to keep cool.
As residents deal with the heat,
animal rights groups remind them
to be mindful of their furry companions, who rely on humans for
their well-being.
The arrest last month of Esmeralda Escobar of Georgetown for
allegedly running her 10-year-old
Border Collie, Oliver, to the point of
exhaustion has attracted national
attention. Ms. Escobar was released from jail July 28 and the dog
was returned to her, a spokesman
for the sheriff ’s department said.
Ms. Escobar has been charged
with cruelty to a non-livestock animal, a state jail felony punishable
by 180 days to two years in prison.
Her next court appearance is August 31.
Lauren Rutkowski, media coordinator for People for the Ethical
Treatment of Animals, or PETA,
offered some suggestions to safeguard animals during hot weather:
n Keep dogs inside: Unlike humans, dogs can only sweat through
their footpads and cool themselves
by panting. Soaring temperatures
can cause heat stress, injury or
death.
n Provide water, shade: When
outside, animals need fresh water
and ample shade, and the shifting
sun needs to be taken into account.
Even brief periods of direct exposure to the sun can have life-threatening consequences.
n Walk, don't run: In very hot,
humid weather, never exercise
dogs by biking and making them
run alongside you or by running
them while you jog.
Dogs will collapse before giving
up, at which point it may be too late
to save them.
n Avoid hot cars: Never leave
an animal in a parked car in warm
weather, even for short periods
with the windows partially rolled
down. Dogs trapped inside hot cars
can succumb to heatstroke within
minutes, even if a car isn't parked
in direct sunlight.
Continued on 8A
The rate of students graduating
from the Georgetown school district
has increased by almost 14 percentage
points since 2009.
More than 95 percent of the Class
of 2014 graduated on time, compared
to 81.9 percent of the Class of 2009, the
Texas Education Agency reported last
week.
Georgetown’s black and Hispanic students have shown the biggest
gains, rising 34.7 percentage points
and 25.6 percentage points, respectively, over the six years.
In 2009, 61.5 percent of Georgetown’s black students and 67 percent
of Hispanic students graduated in
four years, lower than the state average in both cases.
In 2014, 96.2 percent of black students and 92.6 percent of Hispanic
students crossed the stage at commencement.
The improvements reflect a collaborative effort between the communiContinued on 3A
Rangers
investigate
jail death
B y MATHE W WALL ACE
Francisco Vasquez, 54, of Cedar
Park, was found dead Saturday inside
the Williamson County Jail.
A preliminary investigation suggests Mr. Vasquez committed suicide,
said Captain Fred Thomas, spokesman for the sheriff ’s department. The
Texas Rangers are investigating.
Jail staff attempted to revive Mr.
Vasquez before paramedics arrived
and took him to Seton Medical Center
Williamson in Round Rock.
Cedar Park police arrested Mr.
Vasquez Saturday afternoon on suspicion of driving while intoxicated. He
arrived at the jail at 4:13 p.m. Jail staff
found Mr. Vasquez unconscious at 5:04
p.m. in a holding cell in the booking
area of the jail.
Precinct 3 Justice of the Peace
Bill Gravell pronounced Mr. Vasquez
dead at 6:06 p.m. at the hospital. Judge
Gravell has ordered an autopsy but results were not available by press time.
The jail has approximately 600 inmates at any time.
Mr. Vasquez’s death is the second in
the jail this year. Ray Steven Rose, 50,
died in June after he was found unresponsive during routine cell checks.
Fallen judge due in court
Friday for sentencing
Tim Wright, 70, the former
judge of Williamson County
Court-at-Law 2, will be sentenced at 9 a.m. Friday in federal court in Austin for firearms violations.
As part of a plea deal, Mr.
Wright pled guilty to two federal violations in May and is
facing up to five years behind
bars.
“I am guilty to those violations and now stand ready to
accept full responsibility for
my actions,” Mr. Wright said
in May. “No one is above the
law, especially not judges.”
Mr. Wright pled guilty to
lying to government agents
and selling firearms without
a license.
According to documents
filed by the U.S. Attorney’s
Office, Mr. Wright acted as a
proxy buyer when purchasing a Zastava M92 assault rifle
from Guns Plus in Georgetown. Mr. Wright also allegedly sold several pistols and an
assault rifle to someone he
knew was a felon.
Mr. Wright is a former
president of the Williamson
County Bar Association and
chaired a district grievance
committee for the State Bar of
Texas. Prior to his indictment,
Mr. Wright had presided over
Court-at-Law No. 2 since 2003
and created the successful
DWI/Drug Court.
— Mathew Wallace
©2015 Williamson County Sun
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512-930-4824 wilcosun.com
Next generation of talent on stage
Andy Sharp
Kid actors and actresses perform Saturday on the Palace Theatre’s Springer Memorial Stage, the conclusion of their two-week
summer workshop at the Palace. More photos on page 1B.
annual Subscriber Discount
August is our annual subscriber appreciation discount.
Subscribe online at wilcosun.com, or turn to page 3B for a coupon.
Sav
$6! e
2A
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Caitlin Faubion, owner of clothing store El Perro Rojo, gets
her booth ready for Market Days Saturday morning, left.
Celeste Castillo, 14, performs for the crowd, above.
Hot sales
at Market Days
Saturday began with cooler temperatures but soon heated up,
not uncommon for August in Central Texas, but that didn’t stop
hundreds of people from descending on the Square for Market
Days to shop and peruse.
Market Days continue through November on the second Saturday of each month.
Photos by Andy Sharp
Cecilie Castillo, 8, left, and her sister CeLorie, 6, found some early-afternoon shade at the county courthouse.
Cindy Hall admires a Donkey Ear Kalanchoe plant at Market Days,
above. Curtis Wren, below, get things ready for his daughter’s
display not long after sunrise Saturday.
While his wife shopped at Market Days, Justin
Evans and his six-month-old son, Camden,
relaxed in the shade of a tree on the courthouse lawn.
Inventory Reduction Sale!
2
FOR
1
THE PRICE OF
HARDCOVER OR PAPERBACK
Equal or lesser value.
Now through September, or while supplies last!
Land of
Good Water
by Clara Stearns Scarbrough
“The Bible for Williamson
County history.”
— Bob Banta, Austin
American-Statesman
Winner! Best Regional
Museum to honor Wag-a-Bag owner
Nancy Rabb, a longtime
Round Rock business and
community leader, will be the
honoree when The Williamson
Museum hosts its annual Cattleman’s Ball October 17.
Mrs. Rabb owns Wag-A-Bag
and serves as vice president
for the chain of Central Texas
convenience stores.
When she and her husband,
Virg, opened their first store in
1964, it was the first commercial building built in Round
Rock in 65 years. Wag-A-Bag
has two Georgetown stores:
at 602 East University Avenue,
across the street from Williams Elementary, and at 3121
Williams Drive about 1.5 miles
west of Interstate 35.
In announcing the honor,
the museum cited Ms. Rabb’s
tireless support and active
involvement in STARRY, Habitat for Humanity, the Round
Rock Community Foundation,
Round Rock Woman’s Club,
Play for All Park, the Williamson County YMCA and the
Round Rock Chamber of Commerce.
Ms. Rabb has earned the
Round Rock Chamber Lifetime Achievement Award and
the Governor of Texas Yellow
Rose designation.
The museum added the Cattleman’s Ball to its Chisholm
Trail Days festivities in 2012
as a fundraising event to help
support its educational pro-
gram, which serves more than
10,000 students throughout the
county.
As an added touch, the museum each year honors an individual or family whose contributions have had a lasting
impact on the county. Previous
honorees include Jim Schwertner, the Avery family and Jack
Garey.
The Cattleman’s Ball will
be held from 7 to 10 p.m. at the
Georgetown Community Center.
Sponsorships, tickets and
tables are now available. Visit
www.upthechisholmtrail.org
or call The Williamson Museum at 512-943-1670.
— Joyce May
The Williamson
County Sun
Phone: 512-930-4824
News: [email protected]
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Historical Association
Advertising: [email protected]
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Postmaster — Send address changes to: The
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Texas.
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
3A
Watson elevated to interim fine arts director role
B y JONATHAN ADAMS
Amid a tumultuous summer
for the fine arts in the Georgetown school district, Carol
Watson is a steady hand at the
helm.
The school board appointed
Ms. Watson as the interim fine
arts director July 20 after the
previous director, JD Janda,
left for personal reasons and
took a position at Tomball ISD
near Houston.
The band directors at both
East View and Georgetown
high schools have also departed this summer.
“We’ve had a lot of turnover
this summer for a variety of
reasons,” Ms. Watson said.
“We’re really getting a fresh
start.”
Ms. Watson said she is interested in the full-time director
position but the school board
is considering its options.
“We feel like with the quick
turnaround time that Carol is
the best person to fill that position,” Superintendent Fred
Brent said of the interim director. “Carol is great and we’re
excited that she stepped up for
this opportunity.”
Mr. Janda’s departure, after
Cliff Croomes left the band
director position at GHS and
Mason Daffinee left East View,
was bad timing but purely co-
incidental, Ms. Watson said.
“It’s one of those perfect
combinations of people retiring, spouses getting changes
in their jobs and young people
having different opportunities,” Ms. Watson said.
“Right now my short-term
goal is to just give everyone a
sense of continuity and stability as we are emerging from the
other side of this big change.
“I feel that it’s very important to comment that I truly
believe that our new superintendent and administration is
putting its full support behind
the fine arts.”
Unlike her predecessor, Ms.
Watson has a background in
visual arts.
“In a lot of ways they have
similarities but they are different animals and we have to
round them all up,” Ms. Watson said of the different fine
arts disciplines.
Ms. Watson started working
for the district in 2000 as an
elementary school art teacher.
In 2008 she became a sculpture and ceramics teacher at
the district’s ninth-grade campus, which later became East
View.
She was named the district’s
fine arts coordinator in 2012
under Mr. Janda.
“Being a coordinator helped
me to develop relationships
with principals on the various
campuses,” she said.
“It helped me strengthen relationships with other people
in the fine arts that I knew or
had taught my child.”
While Ms. Watson’s background is in visual arts, her
son, Carter Calkins, is studying music education at the
University of North Texas in
Denton. During his time at
Georgetown High, he was a
member of the band and later
a drum major.
Ms. Watson wants to better
integrate the fine arts program
at different campuses.
“One of the things that I see
us doing a little differently go-
ing forward is to ensure better
verticality: to make better connections K-through-12 in what
we do,” Ms. Watson said.
“That high school fine arts
teachers will be more connected to their middle school peers
and middle school peers will
be better connected to their elementary school peers.”
Ms. Watson is looking forward to the start of a new
school year.
“I can’t wait for school to
start,” she said. “It’s a very
exciting time to be able to interact with all areas in the fine
arts.”
[email protected]
On-time graduation rate hits 6-year high with Class of 2014
Area graduation rates, 2009-2014
Continued from 1A
ty and the school district, said
District
2009
2010
2011
2012
2013
2014 Superintendent Fred Brent,
who completed his first year
Austin
75.6
78.6
80
82.5
84.1
86.3
as Georgetown’s head adminEanes
97.5
96.4
96.3
96.9
96.9
95.5 istrator in July.
“What I’ve learned over the
Florence
95.4
92.3
98.5
97.4
90.1
94.8
course of the school year is
Georgetown 81.9
89.9
89.6
94.2
93.8
95.6 that our district has become
more attentive to the needs
Granger
88.6
93.3
96
94.1
94.7 100
of all our students,” Dr. Brent
Hutto
92.2
91.1
91.2
96.8
94.6
97.5
said Monday.
Jarrell
96.4
90.5
89.5
92.5
97.2
90
Dr. Brent highlighted the
work of outside groups in
Leander
83.7
88.5
90.5
94.1
94.8
95
helping the district close the
Liberty Hill
89.1
93.7
96.2
93.2
93.3
96.1 graduation gap.
“We have so many groups
Pflugerville
83.2
85.2
89.6
91.9
93.3
93.7
that volunteer their time,
Round Rock
87.9
89.9
90.3
93.8
94.9
95.8
whether it’s mentoring or The
STATE
80.6
84.3
85.9
87.7
88
88.3 Georgetown Project,” Dr. Brent
said. “What that means to me
Taylor
81.2
81.3
86.6
97
92.2
94
is our students in Georgetown,
if they need help, there will be
someone there to help them.”
The superintendent also
100
highlighted the importance of
a 2013 law passed by the Texas
80
Legislature that changed graduation requirements, allowing
60
students to focus on an area
of interest such as STEM (sci40
ence, technology, engineering
and math) or public service.
20
House Bill 5 went into effect
last year.
0
‘14
‘09
‘14 ‘09
‘14 ‘09
‘14 ‘09
“We’re trying to expand
Black
Hispanic
White
Asian
course offerings that meet
Source: Texas Education Agency students’ learning styles and
From 2009 to 2014, graduation rates for black and Hispanic
interests,” Dr. Brent said.
Georgetown students increased 34.7 percentage points and 25.6
“I truly believe that the students of GISD have a great repercentage points, respectively, bolstering the overall rate.
Georgetown ISD graduation rates
Sun photo
The Georgetown High Class of 2014 celebrates with the school song at the end of graduation.
source in our community and
our district.”
With graduation numbers
up, dropouts plummeted to a
six-year low in Georgetown. Of
the 5,083 students in seventh
through 12th grades in 2014,
21 dropped out (.41 percent).
Of the 4,784 students in those
grades in 2009, 75 dropped out
(1.57 percent).
In addition to the graduation
and dropout rates, state data
released last week showed that
2.4 percent of Georgetown’s
Class of 2014 remained in high
school pursuing a diploma and
0.4 percent received an equivalency degree such as the GED.
Georgetown’s rising graduation rate followed statewide
and regional trends — Texas’
four-year graduation rate increased to 88.3 percent in 2014,
up from 80.6 percent in 2009.
“The graduation numbers
for the Class of 2014 tell us that
school districts and charters
are working every day to assure every student makes it to
Georgetown ISD campuses meet standards across board
Georgetown is among the
94.4 percent of districts statewide to meet accountability
standards.
All 16 campuses made the
grade, the Texas Education
Agency reported Friday in its
annual accountability ratings,
which are mostly based on the
State of Texas Assessments of
Academic Readiness exams
that students take each year
starting in the third grade.
“All the campuses have met
the standard and we’re proud
of that but I’m more proud of
our community for asking us
to focus beyond that,” Superintendent Fred Brent said.
“We want to focus on skills
that kids can take with them
beyond school and beyond the
standardized test.”
The Texas Education Agency considers four measurements when calculating the
yearly accountability ratings:
the percent of students passing STAAR, how students
progress from year to year on
STAAR, performance gaps between high-scoring students
and low-scoring students and
how prepared students are for
life after graduation, such as
college or the military.
Campuses either meet the
standard or are listed as needing improvement.
“The 2015 state accountability system takes into account
a number of factors unique to
the 2014-15 school year,” said
Michael Williams, the state’s
education commissioner.
“As in previous years, most
districts, charters and campuses met the state standards,
which reflects well on our
public education system and
for the economic future of our
state.”
Florence Elementary School
was the only school in the
county that did not meet the
standard.
Gateway College Prep in
Georgetown and Meridian
World School in Round Rock,
both charter schools, met the
standard.
In Austin, three middle
schools and five elementary
schools missed the standard.
the finish line,” said Michael
Williams, the state’s education
commissioner.
“Texas continues to lead the
way in its efforts to close the
achievement gap among all
its student groups and other
states are taking note of our
efforts.”
With the heighted importance placed on standardized
testing these days, Dr. Brent
relishes the focus on other performance measures.
“For a period of time, so
many people got caught up
with accountability that counselors forgot to meet the needs
of students,” he said.
“Our school board and our
community have asked us to
increase counseling services
to provide for our students.”
n
Elsewhere in Williamson
County, Granger had the highest four-year graduation rate at
100 percent, followed by Hutto
at 97.5 percent and Liberty Hill
at 96.1 percent.
In Jarrell, 90 percent of the
Class of 2014 graduated on
time.
— J o n a t h a n A d a m s [email protected]
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4A
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Negotiator
By GARY MILLER
CLARK THURMOND — LINDA SCARBROUGH
Publishers
LINDA SCARBROUGH
Executive Editor
WILL ANDERSON
Managing Editor
Business: Kathryn Manasco, Manager; Rose Elsom
Editorial Staff: Michael Freeman, Life Editor; Will Anderson, Sports Editor; Matt Loeschman,
Joyce May, Jonathan Adams, Mathew Wallace, Reporters; Pat Baldwin, Contributing Editor; Mathew Wallace, Editorial Assistant
Gary Miller, Cartoonist
Advertising: Suzanne Payne
Circulation Manager: Dawn Steele
Composition: Matthew Brake, Production Manager; Elizabeth Hauser
Press: Oscar Moreno, Lead Pressman; Rodney Schwartz
Distribution: Sandy Bonnet
‘What’s It?’ No. 10
Letters
Stop unwise cuts
Demanding the best
to poor disabled kids from our law officers
T
o continue our summer theme of Boomtown Georgetown, here’s something
big and new. So new that it’s not in the
satellite photos yet — do you know it?
If you do, or want to guess, send your
answer to us by next Monday at 5 p.m., and
we’ll enter you in the next weekly drawing for
a one-year subscription to the Sun. Hint: the
swimming pool isn’t new, so if you hunt, you
can find it in the satellite photos.
For email answers, please put “WI10,” with
or without quotes, in the subject line and send
your answer to [email protected]
And of course there’s always the good ol’
telephone: 512-930-4824.
n
This week’s drawing winner is Jeffrey
Clark. It is the new sanctuary for Church on
the Rock on Golden Oaks Drive just south of
the airport.
— Clark Thurmond
Letters
‘Old boy’ justice
for Jana Duty
After challenging and beating the old boy
system of Williamson County politics, District
Attorney Jana Duty is now the recipient of
the old boy backlash. To the casual observer,
one might agree with the verdict, but to those
familiar with the Harmel case, a very different
picture emerges.
The defense team led by Ryan Deck had no defense for their client other than casting doubt on
the integrity, competence, and morals of Wilco
officials, beginning with the Cedar Park police
and going all the way up through the DA. Never
mind that Ms. Duty brought to light the wrongdoings of previous DA administrations, particularly those leading to the wrongful conviction
of Michael Morton.
Deck petulantly protested the prosecution’s
discovery of readily available software — software that Ryan Deck’s team could have obtained just as easily — as just another example
of Williamson County’s withholding evidence.
Evidence that would not clear Mr. Harmel but
would instead be the final blow to a weak defense.
Judge Kennon was wrong to give in to Deck’s
demands for mistrial, and all subsequent delays
for retrial. Jessika Kalaher’s murder was one
of many old, “unwinnable” cases when Duty
came into office. Duty is aggressively prosecuting these cases and will win if Men will replace
the Old Boys.
LYNETTE TRUITT
County Road 253
Save water? Cut
out grass lawns!
Regarding your piece on saving water. Funny,
the greedy City of Georgetown never mentions
stopping growth of housing additions or apartments with landscaped yards to save water. Or
stopping the planting of acres of non-native
grasses in yards across the area.
They could also discourage in-the-ground
pools by the rich.
As far as washing a car is concerned, I am
not going to pay $20 for someone to wash my
car. I can wash it with less than 10 gallons of
water once a month. Harvest rainwater? Wrong
time of year for that. Many of the other ideas
are what people should have been doing their
whole life.
Some are just silly. With California and Las
Vegas, Nevada, as good examples about water,
the people are still asleep at the spigot.
Banning the use of water on grass yards
would save more than enough water to contin-
ue with the greedy growth program by the city
and the county!
BILL HOGLAN
Valleyview Road
More on water in
CO2 and its impact
The letter to the editor by a retired Exxon
researcher arguing that CO2 makes up only a
small fraction of atmospheric greenhouse gases, whereas water is a much more significant
greenhouse gas, may unintentionally mislead
many readers. The relative amount of water in
atmospheric gases is not relevant to the issue
of the effect of increased CO2 or to the issue of
what we should do about global warming (we do
not want to reduce the amount of water). This
is like saying that since one definite cause of
dying is being born, we should not worry about
other less likely causes of death.
The misleading point being argued is that
since there is much more water than CO2 in the
atmosphere, and since it is a greenhouse gas,
the increase of CO2 emission by human activity, including fossil fuel burning, is insignificant.
Besides the spuriousness of this argument
about water, a quick Google search about this issue points out that although CO2 makes up only
a small part of atmospheric gases, increased
levels have serious harmful consequences for
all of us.
For example, https://www.skepticalscience.
com/print.php?r=153 explains that, “[Because]
the amount of water vapor in the atmosphere
exists in direct relation to the temperature,
[if] you increase the temperature, more water
evaporates and becomes vapor, and vice versa.
So when something else causes a temperature
increase (such as extra CO2 from fossil fuels),
more water evaporates. Then, since water vapor is a greenhouse gas, this additional water
vapor causes the temperature to go up even
further ... Studies show that water vapor feedback roughly doubles the amount of warming
caused by CO2. So if there is a 1 degree Centigrade change caused by CO2, the water vapor
will cause the temperature to go up another 1
degree Centigrade. When other feedback loops
are included, the total warming from a potential 1degree Centigrade change caused by CO2
is, in reality, as much as 3 degrees Centigrade
... [Furthermore], CO2 stays in our atmosphere
for years and even centuries. A small additional
amount has a much more long-term effect.”
You can also find similar scientific explanations of this on NASA’s website: http://www.
nasa.gov/topics/earth/features/vapor_warming.html
STEVE DAVIDSON
Innwood Circle
With Comptroller Glenn Hegar projecting a
Texas budget surplus in the Rainy Day Fund of
$11 billion dollars in two years and after just giving businesses a tax cut of nearly $4 billion, it
doesn’t make sense why the Texas Legislature’s
Health and Human Services Committee Chairman Charles Schwertner pushed hard to get a
$350 million cut for therapy to poor kids with
disabilities, including those born prematurely
having difficulty swallowing and speech.
I understand Senator Schwertner is driven by
a philosophical bent to cut government spending but even before these cuts, Texas already
ranked almost or dead last when it comes to delivering most social services. The cuts, which
amount to an 18 percent to 20 percent reduction
in speech, occupational and physical therapy
services, impacts more than 60,000 children.
The Dallas Morning News reports that the
Texas Speech-Language-Hearing Association,
after surveying its 5,500 members, said more
than 30 percent of respondents claimed they
would stop seeing Medicaid patients if the cuts
take effect. Cutting services to small groups of
needy kids who have little political influence is
equivalent to a David against Goliath fight.
There is still a narrow window to prevent
the cuts. If you wish to stop the cuts, please
immediately contact Governor Greg Abbott,
Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick, Senator
Schwertner and the Texas Health and Human
Services Commission, showing support before
the cuts take effect September 1.
Christ expects us to do for the least among us
what we would want done for ourselves. Who
are more vulnerable than poor disabled kids?
Please make the calls or write.
JAY TRAINOR
Tortoise Lane
Insurance likes
ACA, but I don’t
Ruth Anne Hicks’ recent letter to the editor
described the insurance industry’s satisfaction with Obamacare citing the Hospital Corporation of America Healthcare, Inc., Kaiser
Family Foundation, Ascension Health, Tenet
Healthcare and the CEO of the Dallas-Fort
Worth Hospital Council.
Would that we taxpayers were all that satisfied. All the good things the letter spells out:
guess who pays for them? The 50 percent decline
in uninsured and charity admissions occurred
not because the admissions didn’t happen; they
occurred because we taxpayers were forced to
pick up the tab to provide federal subsidies.
How do you think Tenet reduced charity and
uncompensated medical care by $174 million in
the last two years? That’s because you and I paid
for that care with our taxes.
Interestingly, in order to continue being satisfied, insurance providers are now looking at
significant rate increases for 2016. For example,
New Mexico insurer Blue Cross Blue Shield is
proposing a 50 percent hike.
In Oregon, Moda Health Plan is seeking average rate increases of 25 percent. In Maryland
and Tennessee, Blue Cross Blue Shield is seeking an increase of more than 30 percent. Those
increases, if they occur, will be paid for either
by workers’ salaries or by our taxes.
In June of last year, Forbes mentioned a
study conducted by the Manhattan Institute
that showed that Obamacare will increase insurance rates on younger women by an average
of 44 percent and on younger men rates will increase an average of 91 percent.
Increases for 63 year olds were less, only 37.5
percent on average for women and 22.7 percent
for men. That study didn’t include the federal
premium subsidies available. Federal subsidies, paid by you and me, the taxpayer, make
Obamacare appear to be affordable while distorting its true cost.
Our Founding Fathers, increasingly forgotten and ignored, did not envision a socialist
country, but that is what we have. All the lessons
most of us learned when young like hard work,
make your own way, take care of your own and
earn your keep are not what our country now
values. We have traded our birthrights for a
mess of porridge, individual enterprise and
self-responsibility for big government.
JOHN OPPIE
Lariat Drive
Many of us have been deeply shaken by the
revelations of police who use their powers to
abuse and kill fellow citizens. Moreover when
we express these concerns we are often accused
of “cop hating” and wishing for a society that is
unsafe and out of control. Police defend themselves by stating they have a dangerous and
stressful job.
That last is true but no excuse for what we
are seeing. Many of us see it as an attack from
the inside on our law and justice system. In a
democracy it is vital that we can trust the legal
system. Each time a rogue, racist cop steps over
the line more of us lose trust in the system.
Our police serve a vital function and deserve
respect and support when they follow the rules
that protect us all. Happily most officers do just
that but good, caring police are also the only
way we now have to purge the destroyers in
their midst. They should be behind efforts to
lift that burden from their shoulders. A civilian
review board makes more sense than an Internal Affairs Department, many of which have
proven ineffective as well as hated.
We demand qualification and clear codes
of behavior in other professions like teachers
and doctors, who face severe consequences for
breaching professional standards. We should
expect no less from the professional standards
of police officers.
GLENDA TURCK
Killeen
Can taxpayers afford
city’s new budget?
Moving to Georgetown four years ago, I have
been astounded at the city’s budget growth. Its
budget has increased 60 percent while its population has increased 23 percent. The budget is
increasing almost three times faster than the
city is growing. This is unsustainable!
In the last four years, 2012 through 2016, the
budget increased from $178.3 million to $284.7
million, or $106.4 million (60 percent). This
equates to a 12.4 percent increase per year. If
Georgetown’s budget continues to grow at this
rate, it will double in six years!
The U.S. Census Bureau recently released
the latest population estimates for Georgetown.
The population in 2010 was 47,995 and in 2014,
their latest estimate is 59,102. This equates to
a 5.3 percent annual growth rate. The Bureau
of Labor Statistics data shows that annual inflation over this same time period has been 1.7
percent.
The city apparently does not have a policy or
ordinance that limits the budget growth. The
State of Texas adopted a policy this year that
the biennial budget growth is limited to population growth plus inflation. Applying that metric
to Georgetown would limit the annual increase
in the budget to 5.3 percent + 1.7 percent = 7.0
percent. Georgetown’s budget growth is far
above 7.0 percent and continued growth at levels above that is a recipe for financial disaster.
Just look at cities like Detroit, Michigan; Chicago, Illinois; and Stockton, California.
Georgetown’s trend of budget increases being much greater than population plus inflation
growth has been going on more than 10 years.
This needs to be reined in to be in line with the
State of Texas metric. Georgetown needs to limit budget growth now.
TERRY PUTNAM
Dawson Trail
About Letters
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Letters may be edited for length (200 words is
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with similar names, we run street names but not
complete addresses.
Email to: [email protected]
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Rachel Venice Champlin
Rachel Venice
Champlin went to
her heavenly home
on August 8. Rachel
was born February
1, 1928, in Briggs.
In 1943 she married
Lawrence Champlin. They lived in
Florence where they
raised eight children together before losing Lawrence to
cancer in 1989. Honoring Mrs.
Champlin as pallbearers will
be her grandsons.
Rachel was a member of
the First Baptist Church in
Florence and also worked in
the Florence Library for many
years. While Rachel enjoyed
reading and playing dominoes
with friends, her favorite thing
to do was spend time with her
family. A visit from any of her
children, grandchildren or
great-grandchildren was always a welcomed treat. Rachel
had a big heart and kind nature
that will never be forgotten.
Rachel is preceded in death
by her parents; husband, Lawrence Champlin; and daughter, Sharon Kirkham. She
is survived by her four sons
and daughters-in-law, Eugene
Champlin and Carolynn, Allen
Champlin and Martha, Leeroy
Champlin and Darlene, and
Joe Champlin and Donna. She
is also survived by
three of her daughters and sons-in-law,
Kathy Massey and
Stan, Brenda McCarver and Don, and
Joy Bizzell. Rachel
also leaves behind
her brother, Bennie
Wiley and wife Billie. The family that Rachel
and Lawrence started now
spans to 18 grandchildren, 39
great-grandchildren, one greatgreat-grandchild, as well as
numerous nieces, nephews and
friends. Rachel will be missed
by everyone who knew her.
Visitation will be held Monday, August 10, from 6 to 8 p.m.
at Gabriels Funeral Chapel in
Georgetown. Funeral services
will be officiated by Brother
Roy Smith at the First Baptist
Church in Florence on Tuesday,
August 11, at 11 a.m.
Personal memories and
words of comfort may be sent
to the family through the online
guestbook at www.gabrielsfuneral.com.
Ashley Nichole
Foley, 20, tragically
died from injuries
sustained in a single
vehicle accident at
about 9 a.m. Thursday, August 6, in
Georgetown.
Ashley was born
August 28, 1994, in
Austin to Amanda Faye and
Bryan Ray Foley. She will be
missed by many friends and
family for her stunning smile
and contageous laughter. She
joins her father, Bryan Foley
(1974-2014), and leaves behind
her son, David Manuel Charles
(Febuary 8, 2012).
She was known to her friends
and family for her fun-loving
and adventurous attitude, giving heart, and overall canny
ability to be the first to make
you laugh and keep you smiling. She was always a helping
hand and a shoulder to cry on
when in need. She was truly
loved by many and will be deeply missed by all.
She is survived by her mother, Amanda Foley; step-father,
Billy Shelton; brothers, Dylan
Shelton, Jacob Foley and Bry-
an Foley, Jr.; sister
Jordan Foley; grandparents, Deborah and
Kyo Mckirdy, Raymond and Francis
Foley, Crawford And
Geneva Lane, and Jon
and Diana Appelt;
great-grandmothers,
Paula Harris and
Edith Harris; and numerous
aunts, uncles, nieces, nephews
and cousins.
Memorial sevices will be
held 3 p.m. Saturday, August 15,
at Ramsey Funeral Home, 5600
Williams Drive, Georgetown.
Flowers may be sent directly
to the funeral home and contributions to the family can be
made at www.gofundme.com/
AshleyFoley.
You are invited to share a
message or memory in our memorial guestbook at www.RamseyFuneral.com.
cio and Simon Flores.
He leaves behind to
cherish his memory
his sister, Dominga
Flores; numerous
nieces and nephews;
and other loving family and friends.
Personal words of
comfort may be sent
to the family online at www.gabrielsfuneral.com.
Steven Ragsdale,
32, of Jarrell, passed
away on August 7.
He was born July 6,
1983, in Georgetown
to Shane Ragsdale
and Kathy (MaLean)
Ragsdale. He married
the love of his life,
Emmy LeVan on February 8, 2013, in Georgetown.
Steven loved spending time
with his family and fishing. He
was often described as bigger
than life.
Survivors include his wife,
Emmy Ragsdale; daughters,
Atleigh Cooper, Alyssa Nehring, Brooklyn Nehring, Carsen Chandler-Ragsdale; sons,
Easton Ragsdale, Lane Chandler-Ragsdale; mother, Kathy
Ragsdale; father, Shane Ragsdale; brother, Cody Ragsdale
(Tiffany); nieces, Maci and Haley Ragsdale; honorary sister,
Storm-struck homes
could see tax relief
Residents whose property was damaged by spring
storms could get a break on
their property taxes following
action last week by county
commissioners.
Property owners can now
request a reappraisal of their
property’s value if it was damaged by a natural disaster between May 4 and June 29.
August 31 is the deadline to
submit the request to County
Judge Dan Gattis’ office.
The property would be reappraised at its market value
immediately after the disaster.
The reappraisal would be
pro-rated and impact only the
amount of county property
tax paid for 2015.
In addition to basic contact
information, property owners must include the address
of the property and the date,
cause, description and esti-
mated dollar amount of the
damage in their requests.
Property owners must also
state whether the property is
insured and whether they received an insurance payment
for the damages.
The form, which must be
signed and notarized, can be
downloaded from the county
website at www.wilco.org.
Requests can be mailed to
the attention of Rebecca Clemons, executive assistant to Williamson County Judge Dan
Gattis, or delivered in person
to the judge’s office on the first
floor of the courthouse on the
Georgetown Square.
The full address is: 710
South Main Street, Suite 101,
Georgetown, Texas 78626
Contact Ms. Clemons with
any questions at 512-943-1550.
— Joyce May
BRIEFS
Steven Ragsdale
Jose Flores, Jr.
Jose Flores, Jr.,
65, of Taylor, passed
away on Sunday, August 9. A Rosary will
be recited at 10 a.m.
on Thursday, August
13, at The Gabriels
Funeral Chapel, 393
North Interstate 35,
Georgetown, with a
graveside service following at
Georgetown Memorial Cemetery in Georgetown.
Jose was born on October 20,
1950, in Grandview to Jose and
Martina Saldana Flores.
Jose is preceded in death by
his parents; his sister, Rafaela
Flores; and his brothers, Igna-
Ashley Nichole Foley
5A
Shallon May.
A memorial service will be held on
Friday, August 14,
at 3 p.m. at Heritage
Baptist Church in
Georgetown.
Memorials may be
made to Go Fund Me.
You are invited to
share a message or memory
in our memorial guestbook at
www.RamseyFuneral.com.
Arrangements made under the care and guidance of
Ramsey Funeral Home 5600
Williams Drive, Georgetown,
Texas 78633, 512-869-7775.
Roadwork to slow Williams Drive traffic
Repaving began Monday on Williams Drive from Lakeway Drive to Serenada Drive.
Two-way traffic will be maintained during the repaving, which is expected to last through Friday and possibly
into next week. The so-called “recycle-in-place” repaving
removes asphalt from the road, mixes it with emulsion
and reapplies it to the roadway.
Work will begin at 7 a.m. each day and finish by 6 p.m.
Traffic delays are expected.
Drivers trying to reach Interstate 35 or downtown from
west Georgetown can try alternate routes such as D.B.
Wood Road to Highway 29, Shell Road to Texas 195, Northwest Boulevard or Airport Road.
Tax offices close for training
Williamson County Tax Assessor/Collector’s offices
will be closed on a rotating basis this week for training.
While one office is closed, other offices will be open regular business hours.
Closed this week:
n Wednesday, August 12th — Georgetown, 904 South
Main Street;
n Thursday, August 13th — Cedar Park, 350 Discovery
Boulevard; and Taylor, 412 Vance Street.
Visit the County Tax Assessor/Collector’s website at
www.wilco.org/tax or call 512-943-1601.
Melba Rae Smith
Melba Rae (McKenzie) Smith died on
August 6 in Georgetown in the company
of her family. Melba
was born on May 28,
1925, in Sheridan,
Arkansas, to Arthur
Ray (A.R.) McKenzie
and Hallie (Arbaugh)
McKenzie. She graduated from
Sheridan High School in 1943
and the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville in 1946 with
a bachelor’s of science in home
economics. After graduation,
Melba followed in the footsteps
of both of her parents and entered the teaching profession.
Her career began in Brinkley,
Arkansas, in 1946. In 1952 she accepted a job offer from Braniff
Airlines and moved to Dallas.
She later resumed her teaching
career as a home economics
teacher at schools in Milford,
Italy and Grandview. In 1985,
after 35 years as a teacher, Melba retired. She enjoyed her later years by spending time with
her family, cooking, sewing and
following the Arkansas Razorback sports teams.
She married Robert (R.C.)
Smith on July 24, 1954, in Sheridan, Arkansas. The marriage
lasted for over 50 years until
R.C.’s death on October 22,
2004. She is survived by one son,
Robert Ray (Bob) Smith and
daughter-in-law, Cindy Aldy
Smith and one grandson, Robert Shea Smith, all of Georgetown; two granddaughters,
Jennifer Cantrell and husband,
Stephen, of Mooreville, Mississippi, and Lacy Cunningham
and husband, Buck, of Oxford,
Mississippi; one great-grandson, James Cunningham; one
great-granddaughter, Finley
Jane Cantrell; three cousins,
Margaret (McKenzie) Herzfeld
and husband, James,
of Benton, Arkansas,
Kathy McKenzie, of
Hot Springs, Arkansas, and Carole Parsley and husband,
Robert, of Crofton,
Maryland; as well as
a very close friend,
Mildred Talton, of
Arlington. She was preceded
in death by her husband; and
parents; one uncle, Bob McKenzie and wife, Mary, of Hughes,
Arkansas; and one cousin, Bob
Kelly McKenzie.
Her family express their
deep gratitude to the staff of
The Legacy in Georgetown
and to Florentino Gonzales and
family also of Georgetown for
their special care, support and
many kindnesses.
Services were held at the
Pat Boze Memorial Chapel of
Wayne Boze Funeral Home
at 2 p.m. Sunday, August 9.
Interment followed at Ozro
Cemetery near Maypearl. Pallbearers for the service were
Rodney Mathers, Andy Penn,
John Abney, Mike Kendall, Ken
Blank and John Wayne Pruitt.
Honorary pallbearers were
Pat Penn, Donald Ray Campbell, James Herzfeld, Horace
Bratcher, John Jackson, Calvin
Jackson, Laura Faye Marion,
Vivian Mustaq, Mildred Talton
and Alice Kendall.
Visitation with the family
was held Saturday, August 8, at
the Wayne Boze Funeral Home
in Waxahachie from 6 to 8 p.m.
Memorials may be made to
the Grant County Museum, 521
West Shackleford Street, Sheridan, Arkansas, grantcountymuseumar.com or the American Heart Association.
Arrangements are under the
direction of Wayne Boze Funeral Home in Waxahachie.
Photos by Andy Sharp
Waiting game
From left, Garrett Hanley, 11, Taryn Brune, 10, Avery Lopez, 11, and Gabby Rodriguez, 12, anxiously wait Saturday to go on stage at the
Palace Theatre for a produciton of Disney Revue. They were among the 133 children who got the chance to perform for parents,
friends and family members at the end of their two-week summer Palace workshops. Zach Moser, 11, below. More photos on page 1B.
KEN CRAIN
ATTORNEY AT LAW
Criminal Law
Deadline for obituary receival:
Tuesday at 10 a.m. for the Wednesday paper,
Friday at 10 a.m. for the Sunday paper.
Obituaries may be
e-mailed to
The Williamson County Sun through the address
[email protected]
Obituary questions should be addressed to
Mathew Wallace, 512-930-4824.
• All Felonies
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• Contested Divorces
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Wills & Probate
Occupational DL’s
Free Telephone Consultation • Payment Plans Available
Former Williamson County Prosecutor
Licensed by Supreme Court of Texas since 1984
Serving Williamson, Travis, Bell and other Counties
512-869-0131
www.KenCrainAttorney.com
1915 South Austin Avenue, Suite 105, Georgetown
6A
BUSINESS
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Find sophisticated treasures at downtown store
B y MAT T LOE SCHMAN
Two Rivers Market
under new ownership
Two Rivers Market, 103
North Austin Avenue in the
San Gabriel Court shopping
center south of Williams
Drive, is under new ownership.
Days before Bob Weimer
was planning to close the market, Karl Hohen and Beverly
Clendennen stepped in to buy
the business and keep it going.
The new owners took over
August 5.
Mr. Weimer had to sell the
business for personal reasons,
according to a post on the market’s Facebook page.
“This was a very difficult
decision for our family but
ultimately family and the
health of our family takes priority,” the post said. “We truly
appreciate the love and support that our little adventure
has received in the past few
months.”
Craft brewery prepares
for grand opening
Rentsch Brewery, 2500
Northeast Inner Loop north
of Weir Road, will host its
grand opening August 29.
Chief Operating Officer/
Brewmaster Andrew Rentschler said the event from
noon to 8 p.m. will be children
and pet friendly. There are
plans to have food trucks on
site.
For more information, call
the brewery office at 512-6885046.
Sport Clips branches into
women’s market
Sport Clips, a leading salon brand headquartered in
Georgetown, has opened its
first Vent “blotique” for wom-
THE LIST
CIVIL LAWSUITS
Filed 8/3-8/7
County of Williamson, Texas vs.
C&B Futures LLC DBA Liberty
Center ET AL, 8/5/15, 26th Judicial
Court, 15-0308-T26
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. Christopher D. Collins AKA
Christopher Collins ET AL, 8/5/15,
26th Judicial Court, 15-0311-T26
David W. Boren and Beth H. Boren
vs. Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., GE
Capital Consumer Card Co., Green
Tree Servicing, LLC, 8/3/15, 26th
Judicial Court, 15-0747-C26
Courage Cheer and Dance United,
LLC vs. Jason Hodges, 8/5/15, 26th
Judicial Court, 15-0751-C26
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. Leander Shopping Center, LTD.
ET AL, 8/5/15, 277th Judicial Court,
15-0309-T277
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. Dana Sue Vaughn AKA Dana
Vaughn, 8/5/15, 277th Judicial
Court, 15-0312-T277
Oak
Ridge
Association, INC.
Homeowners
vs. Marlena
8th St
Main St
BRIEFS
Austin Ave
Love of family brought Ruth
Norrell from California to Texas.
Love of meeting new people
and selling quality gifts led her
to open Divine Treasures just
off the Square at 809 South
Main Street.
“I had this same store with
the same name in Mission Viejo [in Southern California] for
about 10 years,” Ms. Norrell
said.
“I moved here two years ago
because two of my children
moved here. It ended up being
a great decision.”
The fine gift and home décor shop opened June 1 in the
storefront formerly occupied
by Southern Hippie.
“I said I would never open
another gift store again,”
said Ms. Norrell, who previously owned two bagel shops,
worked as a respiratory therapist and also was on staff at
another local gift shop.
“But this was something I
could not pass up. I want to offer something for everybody at
an affordable price.”
Ms. Norrell described her
store as “eclectic.” Divine
Treasures offers gifts for all
ages including jewelry, artwork, clothing and home décor.
One section of Divine Trea-
n
Divine
Treasures
St
Matthew9th
Brake
sures is devoted solely to items
for babies.
“I wanted a place where people can pick up a quick gift,”
Ms. Norrell said.
“A one-stop shop.”
The storeowner said she is
working to establish a mostly
local supplier base.
“Many of the items we sell
are from nearby artisans, not
from overseas,” Ms. Norrell
said.
The first thing customers
notice about the store is the
unique awning outside the
front door. The white, rounded
wooden entryway is adorned
with colorful hanging flowers.
“It was a little plain up front
before,” Ms. Norrell said.
“We wanted something inviting. This stops people and
they look inside our store.”
Location is also important
— Divine Treasures is in the
heart of downtown with free
public parking on the street
and in a lot about 20 yards
away.
Lynn Ricks works at Divine
Treasures and loves coming to
her job every day.
“I don’t have a retail background — I was a math teacher
at Austin Community College
for many years,” Ms. Ricks
said.
“But I enjoy talking to the
customers. Everyone loves to
stop and tell you their story
and it is fun to hear them.”
Both Georgetonians and
customers from afar are checking out the new store, Ms.
Ricks said.
“It’s been a very good response and we get people coming in from everywhere — lots
of tourists this summer from
as far away as Scotland, England, Bosnia and Germany,”
she said.
Ms. Norrell loves to see Divine Treasures attracting clientele from across the globe.
“We’ve been really happy so
far,” the owner said.
Ms. Norrell also said Ms.
Ricks has been crucial to her
early success in Georgetown.
“I couldn’t do this without
her,” Ms. Norrell said.
Matt Loeschman
Divine Treasures owner Ruth Norrell, left, and employee Lynn Ricks invite everyone to check out the
new gift shop at 809 South Main Street, just off the Square.
“Lynn is just awesome. She
is a people person and customers are just drawn to her. We
want people to feel comfortable
here.”
Sun City resident Nancy
Guynn stopped by Monday
morning to buy a gift. Ms.
Ricks welcomed her and quickly recognized Ms. Guynn as a
repeat customer.
“I love the artwork in here.
You really can’t find this quality at these reasonable prices
anywhere else,” Ms. Guynn
said.
“This is the best shop of its
type in Georgetown.”
Divine Treasures is open
from 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. seven
days a week. Contact the shop
by calling 512-688-5184.
[email protected]
en and girls.
The salon is in Cedar Park
at 1335 East Whitestone Boulevard, in the 1890 Ranch Shopping Center. A grand opening
ceremony was held Thursday.
One of the many features of
Vent is its TryBar. Customers
will have a chance to not only
buy the latest products and
tools but also try them in the
salon. There will be monthly
features on new products with
demonstrations, discounts
and samples to take home.
Local pecan growers
take top honors
At the annual state pecan
show July 14 in Frisco, several
local growers nabbed awards.
Nuts shown at the Texas Pecan Growers Association Conference were grown in the 2014
season and the show featured
24 entries from 11 Williamson
County growers.
In the Classic and New Division, Darwin Karkoska of
Granger earned first place
with his Blake sample and
Ann Singleton of Jarrell took
first with her Success sample.
Bruce Johns of Taylor was
second with his Apache sample.
David Philips of Georgetown had the only Imperial
sample in the contest.
Other WilCo growers included David Conrad of
Round Rock, David Patton of
Georgetown, Ray Ponton of
Taylor and Raymond Danek
of Georgetown.
In the commercial division,
Mr. Karkoska earned first
place honors with his Choctaw sample and John Doerfler
of Weir took first with his Desirable sample.
Mr. Doerfler also showed a
third place Sioux sample.
Compiled
by
Matt
Loeschman. Send business
news to [email protected]
Sign of growth
The new corner sign for 600 Degrees Pizzeria and Drafthouse, 124 East Eighth Street a block west of the Square, was installed
over the weekend. Owners of the restaurant say their new expanded wing should be open within the next month.
Editor’s note: The List is a weekly collection of information
gathered from the Williamson County Courthouse, city offices and various websites. We provide these public records to
help you find new businesses, new customers and identify the
area’s hottest residential and commercial locations. Listings
may vary each week due to information and space constraints.
Hopkins, 8/5/15, 277th
Court, 15-0752-C277
Judicial
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. WC Round Rock Land Partners,
LP, 8/3/15, 368th Judicial Court, 150307-T368
Landscaping and Masonry, decks
patio or atwork permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-26629
133 Highview Road, Richard
Ciampa, electrical trade permit,
8/4/2015, 2015-26734
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. Tapimata, LLC, 8/5/15, 368th
Judicial Court, 15-0310-T368
1405 East 16th Street, Richard
Ciampa, electrical trade permit,
8/4/2015, 2015-26735
The County of Williamson, Texas
vs. Norman Manning, 8/7/15, 368th
Judicial Court, 15-313-T368
110 Star Thistle Trail, Drees Custom
Homes, irrigation permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-23925
PERMITS
200 Brantley Lake Lane, David
Weekley Homes, irrigation permit,
8/5/2015, 2015-24049
Filed 8/3-8/5
750 Rolling Hills Drive, Charles
Bruce, capacity check, 8/4/2015,
2015-26604
Matt Loeschman
405 Penna Lane, Chesmar Homes,
irrigation permit, 8/5/2015, 201524627
3500 D.B. Wood Road, K.A.
Hickman, certificate of occupancy,
8/4/2015, 2013-15251
1009 Jonathan Cove, Vale Building
Group, irrigation permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-22327
807 Salado Creek Lane, C&C
116 Bastian Lane, D.R. Horton Inc.,
2015-26719
permit, 8/3/2015, 2015-26569
368 River Chase Boulevard, CJR
Homes, mechanical trade permit,
8/4/2015, 2015-23846
622 Pinnacle Drive, D.R. Horton
Inc., new residential single family
permit, 8/3/2015, 2015-26567
5301 Scenic Lake Drive, D.R.
Horton Inc., irrigation permit,
8/5/2015, 2015-23562
198 Whispering Wind Drive, Stan's
Heating and Air Conditioning,
mechanical trade permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-26730
500 Pinon Cove, Gehan Homes,
new residential single family permit,
8/3/2015, 2015-26570
5305 Scenic Lake Drive, D.R.
Horton Inc., irrigation permit,
8/5/2015, 2015-23546
100 Harvey Point Lane, Pulte
Group, new residential single family
permit, 8/5/2015, 2015-26598
200 Cross Mountain Trail, Chesmar
Homes, irrigation permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-24104
301 Mangrum Hill Road, Pulte
Group, new residential single family
permit, 8/5/2015, 2015-26599
105 Martino Trail, Chesmar Homes,
irrigation permit, 8/4/2015, 201524631
403 Davis Mountain Circle, Pulte
Group, new residential single family
permit, 8/5/2015, 2015-26597
109 Charmstone Lane, Grand
Haven Homes, irrigation permit,
8/5/2015, 2015-23663
404 Davis Mountain Circle, Pulte
Group, new residential single family
permit, 8/5/2015, 2015-26600
3986 Cole Valley Lane, Highland
Homes, irrigation permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-24470
603 Kite Ridge Road, Pulte Group,
new residential single family permit,
8/5/2015, 2015-26601
111 Whispering Wind Drive, TCB
Quality Landscaping, irrigation
permit, 8/4/2015, 2015-26725
620 Pinnacle Drive, D.R. Horton
Inc., new residential single family
permit, 8/3/2015, 2015-26566
204 Moulins Lane, D.R. Horton Inc.,
mechanical trade permit, 8/4/2015,
2015-23917
109 Moulins Lane, D.R. Horton Inc.,
new residential single family permit,
8/3/2015, 2015-26571
2200 Caribou Drive, Airpro Inc.,
mechanical trade permit, 8/4/2015,
615 Pinnacle Drive, D.R. Horton
Inc., new residential single family
irrigation permit, 8/5/2015, 201523279
112 Bastian Lane, D.R. Horton Inc.,
irrigation permit, 8/5/2015, 201523232
212 Cibolo Ridge Drive, Chesmar
Homes, new residential single
family permit, 8/3/2015, 2015-26577
PLANNING & ZONING
Filed 7/31-8/5
Tamiro Plaza, 501 South Austin
Avenue, no applicant listed,
7/31/2015, CDC-2015-025
Main Street Baptist Church, 1001
Main Street, Jim Wilson, 8/3/2015,
CDC-2015-026
Lakeside Phase 1, Joseph Fish
Survey, Nick Sandlin, 7/31/2015,
FP-2015-032
The Park on San Gabriel, Steve
Crauford, 7/31/2015, REZ-2015012
Foster Square, 610 North Austin
Avenue, Mani Mashhoon, 8/4/2015,
SP-2015-012
Oak Park Estates, 206 Stardust
Lane,
Stonewood
Enterprises
Limited, 7/31/2015, UTE-2015-015
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
7A
Square retail fixture celebrates revamped interior
Continued from 1A
Photos by Andy Sharp
Paula Cooney admires the large selection of handmade quilts Thursday afternoon at the grand re-opening of Handcrafts Unlimited.
8th St
Main St
Austin Ave
Artisans submit products
to the shop for sale including
quilts, knitted and crocheted
items, wood pieces, pottery,
ceramics, jewelry and more.
Contributors must be 50 years
or older, live in Williamson
County or a surrounding county and sign a contract that indicates that all craft items are
made by the artisan. About 250
artisans contribute to Handcrafts Unlimited.
The store accepts donations
of artisan supplies, fabric,
tools, kits, quilts and quilt tops
and as a non-profit organization, all donations are tax deductible.
Mayor Ross and Mr. Pastor
recognized retiring volunteers
Marilyn Poluszny, Tom and
Marie Brown and Rose Taylor
for their many hours spent
working at the shop over the
last three decades.
“You contribute to the fine
quality of life in Georgetown,”
the mayor said.
Others also spoke about
their memories of working at
Handcrafts Unlimited.
“I am just amazed to see
this store transform since we
started. It’s been a wonderful
experience,” said past board
member Norine Collier.
Shelly Trathen said she remembered when the “floor
was dirt.”
“When I first got here, the
floor wasn’t here yet,” she
joked.
“But the greatest thing has
been the friendships over the
years. This has been such a
great way to meet so many nice
people.”
The store was adorned last
week with about 25 handmade
quilts hanging on the wall.
Jul Kamen won the people’s
choice award for her quilt and
received two tickets to an upcoming quilting show.
The mayor, who called
Handcrafts “more of an art
museum instead of a store,”
was all smiles as he mingled
with guests at the event.
“This is one of the reasons
Georgetown is totally unique,”
he said.
“Handcrafts Unlimited is a
huge asset to the Square and
to our city.”
For more information about
Handcrafts Unlimited, call 512869-1812, email [email protected]
gmail.com or visit www.handcraftsunlimited.com.
Handcrafts n
Unlimited
St
Matthew9th
Brake
Ed Pastor, president of the
board of directors for Handcrafts Unlimited, speaks at the
grand re-opening of the store,
above. With him is Diana Hiltz,
the store’s executive director.
Above right, Marie Brown and
her husband, Tom, were honored for their years volunteering at the store. Ms. Brown has
been volunteering since the
store opened in 1983.
Judy Belle Horick, above, a past board member for the store, exclaimed Thursday, “Now I’m just a
shopper!” Annika Price, 6, below, looks over a pouch made to leave lost teeth for the Tooth Fairy.
8A
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Consider canines’
summertime plight
Continued from 1A
n Don’t haul animals in
truck beds: This practice is
dangerous because animals
can be catapulted out of a
truck bed on a sudden stop
or strangled if they jump out
while they’re tethered.
n Stay alert: Keep an eye
on all outdoor animals. Make
sure they have adequate water
and shelter. If you see an animal in distress, provide him or
her with water for immediate
relief and contact humane authorities right away.
n Avoid hot pavement:
When outdoor temperatures
reach the 80s, asphalt temperatures can reach 140 degrees,
Clark Thurmond
Handy Rotarians build ramp
Starting at 7:30 a.m. Saturday, seven members of the Georgetown Rotary Club worked until noon building a new ramp for
Ashley Martinez, who lives with her mom and dad, Andrea and Enerio Martinez, on the south side of Georgetown.
After the ramp was finished, the builders watched as Ashley zipped down and back up in a test drive.
From left are Rotarians Larry Bingham, Chris Cash, Wiley Rudasill, George Lourigan, Bill Connor and Club President David
Kellerman. Not pictured, Steve Shaw. In front, Ashley with her dad, Enerio.
A ramp-build starts with a referral from a social service agency to the Texas Ramp Builders, which coordinates ramp building
throughout the state. The ramp is planned, construction drawings prepared and the projects are assigned to local teams,
service clubs and church groups, who do the actual building.
Deadline approaches for 2015 Art Hop entries
The 2015 Art Hop, organized by Georgetown Art
Center, is accepting entries in different mediums
through August 31.
In addition to a best-ofshow award worth $1,000
cash and $1,200 in gift certificates, prizes will be awarded to first place ($500 in cash,
$250 in other prizes), second
place ($300 cash) and third
place ($200 cash) in five cat-
egories: three-dimensional,
two-dimensional representational, two-dimensional
abstract, photography and
print making.
Selected pieces will be on
display October 2-30 at the
Georgetown Art Center, 816
South Main Street, and the
Georgetown Public Library,
402 West Eighth Street.
Now in its eighth year, the
Art Hop draws interest from
all over the state: the 2014
contest attracted entries
from 212 artists in 57 Texas
cities.
This is the first year for
two-dimensional entries to
be split into two categories.
“It is really hard to judge
an abstract painting against
a portrait or landscape,”
said Nick Ramos, who owns
his own graphics design
firm and is coordinator for
the Art Hop.
“This gives the artists
more opportunity.”
Artists can get more information by calling Mr. Ramos
at 512-705-7557, going online
to www.georgetownartcentertx.org or visiting the art
center, the library, TechShop
in Round Rock or Jerry’s Artarama in Austin.
— Will Anderson
H E A LT H C A R E D I R EC TO RY
Douglas J. Grimm, DPM
Scott T. Pattison, DPM
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Round Rock
Georgetown
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FAMILY MEDICINE
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Welcoming
Anita F. Herrera, FNP-C
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Richard E. Otto, M.D.
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Anita F. Herrera, FNP-C
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(512) 868-0901 • (512) 931-9911
Office Hours: Mon-Fri: 8 a.m. - 7 p.m. • Saturday: 9 a.m. - Noon
The years-long debate over
the Georgetown Salamander
and how best to protect it appears to finally have been settled.
The federal government
will allow the city to oversee
the protection of the amphibious species, which lives in
springs and caves across the
city.
The U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service last week approved a
final rule for the Georgetown
Salamander under section 4(d)
of the Endangered Species
Act, enabling development
that may affect the salamander to continue as long as it
follows the city’s development
rules.
Since publication of the
proposed 4(d) rule, Georgetown incorporated and expanded upon the ordinance in
its Unified Development Code,
the city’s primary tool to regulate development.
Among other regulations,
the city’s rules create development buffer zones around all
springs, prohibit construction
within 160 meters of known
salamander habitats and limit development upstream of
salamander habitats.
“This serves as an excellent
example of collaborative conservation of an endangered
species following several years
of the Service and Georgetown working together closely
to conserve the Georgetown
Salamander,” said Fish and
Wildlife Regional Director
Benjamin Tuggle.
The Georgetown Salamander is unique to Texas and
entirely aquatic, found only
in springs and caves fed by
the northern segment of the
Edwards Aquifer. The entire
known range of the species is
within Georgetown’s boundaries.
NOTEBOOK
town school district’s assistant
director of transportation, has
been named the 2014-15 Transportation Supervisor of the
Year by the Texas Association
of Pupil Transportation.
Ms. Mahagan was recognized June 27 at the annual
TAPT convention and trade
show in Dallas.
Ms. Mahagan has been a
member of the school district’s
transportation department for
18 years.
Savage inducted
into honors group
Dr. Jon F. Dietlein, M.D. • Dr. Pamela Evans, O.D.
Dr. Thad A. Labbe, M.D.
Cataract Surgery • Glaucoma
Optical Boutique • Contact Lenses
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Homecare by Angels
Samantha Savage was recently inducted into the Sigma
Alpha Lambda national leadership and honors organization at Texas A&M in College
Station.
The organization honors and rewards academic
achievement and provides
members with opportunities
for community service, personal development, and lifelong professional fulfillment.
GRADUATIONS
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Feds approve of city’s
salamander protection
ACHIEVEMENTS
Foot Associates of
Central Texas, LLC
causing pain, burns, permanent damage and scarring
on dogs’ paws after just a few
minutes of contact. Walk on
grass when possible and avoid
walking in the middle of the
day.
“The safest time to take
your dog for a walk during the
hottest times of the year are
in the morning and evening,”
said Dr. Stephanie Webb, DVM,
owner of Good Water Animal
Hospital in Georgetown.
“One of the number one
things to ask is whether or not
your pet is acclimated to the
climate.”
Two Georgetown alumni
graduated from LeTourneau
University in Longview at
spring commencement:
n Victoria Day, Bachelor of
Science, accounting;
n Logan Turner, Bachelor of
Science, engineering.
PRE-SCHOOL
Head Start
opens enrollment
Applications are being accepted for Head Start pre-kindergarten for the 2015-16
school year.
Head Start provides comprehensive early childhood education for kids up to 5 years old.
“While financial need is a
consideration, participation
and eligibility are based on
many factors and we encourage all residents to apply,”
Program Director Charlene
Burgess said.
“We know parents are their
children’s primary teachers
and advocates. We look forward to being a partner to that
relationship.”
The program is funded
through grants to serve pregnant women, infants and toddlers.
To register, parents must
live in Williamson or Burnet
counties. Visit www.wbco.net/
services or call 512-948-7609 for
more information.
GEORGETOWN ISD
Transportation admin
tapped for state honor
Holly Mahagan, the George-
— Matt Loeschman
District preps for
Community Showcase
Businesses and nonprofit
organizations will have the
opportunity to display their
goods and services to more
than 1,500 school district employees at next week’s annual
Community Showcase.
The school district will open
up Georgetown High School’s
cafeteria Monday to 120 local
vendors so that teachers and
other staffers can get a feel for
what the city’s businesses have
to offer. Georgetown High is
at 2211 North Austin Avenue,
south of Inner Loop.
Displays can be set up from
2 to 5 p.m. Sunday or from 7:30
to 8:30 a.m. Monday.
FLORENCE ISD
Lunch discounts
available for students
The Florence school district
asks that parents who need
free or reduced-price lunch for
their children request a copy
of the school’s policy at the
central office, 306 College Avenue west of Highway 195.
Free or reduced-price
lunches will be offered to families whose household income
meets or is below the income
eligibility levels; families that
receive help from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance
Program (SNAP, also called
food stamps), Temporary Assistance for Needy Families
or Food Distribution Program
on Indian Reservations; or if
the child is considered a foster
child, homeless, a runaway, a
migrant or displaced by a declared disaster.
Children enrolled in Head
Start or Even Start are also eligible for free or reduced-price
lunch.
Compiled by Jonathan Adams. Send education news to
[email protected]
W I LLI A MSON COUNTY
Wednesday, August 12, 2015
Section
B
Photos by Peter Dossing
Ms. Brown, left — played by Phyllis Gilbert — and
Ms. Apple, played by Meg Miller, enjoy a visit in
the park and feeding the pigeons in An Evening
of Short Plays.
Janese Watts, 11, left, and Addy Ruiz, 10, get their costumes ready before going on stage for their Disney Revue performances on the Palace Theatre’s Springer Memorial Stage Saturday. See more photos on 3B.
Magic
on the Stage
Photos by Andy Sharp
S
ome 133 children got the chance to perform for
parents, friends and family members this past
weekend at the end of two-week summer Palace
Theatre workshops.
Three groups of kids ages 10-12 performed their
versions of the Disney Revue. A younger group, ages 7-9, did
three performances of The Unity Tree at the Palace Playhouse, across the street from the main theater.
On August 21 and 22, teen workshop students will perform
Into the Wood on the main theater stage. A total of 485 youngsters participated in the Palace summer workshops.
The Palace Theatre’s lobby was completely packed with parents, family members and friends of kids performing.
—Andy Sharp
Above, Emma Stroup received red roses presented after the show
from her parents, Steve, in background, and Jeannine. Annie Violette,
the show’s costume coordinator, watches the performance, below.
Plays too good
to pass up
I
t’s late summer and
Sun City
Theatre is
hosting its
first Summer
Festival of
Short Plays.
Entitled An
Evening of
Short Plays,
the Sun City
Actor and
Theatre
Arts Guild
(AcTAG) is
presenting a
Peter Dossing
night of seven delightful
comedies.
Individually
directed by
four directors and
supported by
a total cast
Red Poppy Rating: 4 out of 5
of 16 actors,
these short
plays were selected by AcTAG’s play reading
committee from a large collection of candidate plays. Their intent was to choose plays
where the audience could identify with the
characters portrayed.
“We were looking for an evening of fun for
our audience,” director Patrick McElhinney
said. “We tried to pick plays where some of
them are uproariously funny and some of
them are just gently funny. But they’re all
funny.”
PETE’S
PICKS
Evening of Short Plays
Continued on 5B
Morgan Reeb, 12, performs.
Ma, played by Rose Sommo, responds to another phone call from her daughter, Dee.
Agape Actors Co-op goes on a Picnic in latest onstage production
I
t’s a simple story, really.
This handsome young
muscled drifter named
Hal comes to a small 1950s
Kansas town to visit an old
college buddy on a hot Labor
Day weekend. Hal’s virility
and sexual magnetism seem
to attract the attention of every woman in town, including
Madge Owens, the girlfriend
of Hal’s fraternity brother,
Alan. Therein lies the conflict.
Written by the American
playwright, William Inge, and
originally produced in 1953,
Picnic won the Pulitzer Prize
for Drama and the New York
Drama Critic’s Circle Award
for Best Play. A 1955 film
adaptation starring William
Holden and Kim Novak was
nominated for six Academy Awards, including Best
Picture.
Mr. Inge, a Kansas na-
Picnic
Red Poppy Rating: 4 out of 5
PETE’S
PICKS
Peter Dossing
tive, was one of the first
American dramatists to deal
with the quality of life in the
small towns of the Midwest,
and he achieved notable
success throughout the 1950s.
One side note is that Paul
Newman made his Broadway
debut in the original Broadway production, first as Alan
and later as Hal.
Presented by the Agape
Actor’s Co-op and co-directed
by Lori Mann and Jeff Davis,
their production of Picnic resonates with the provocative
and thoughtful dialogue that
made this play an award-winner 62 years ago.
Co-director Jeff Davis
told me that “It’s a joy to
bring life to such a beloved
piece of theater and these
Photo courtesy of Jeff Davis
Millie, played by Alyssa Castro; Mrs. Potts, played by Mary Margaret Mainer; Madge, played by Erin
Priddy, and their mother, Flo, played by Christina Little-Manley, try to talk Madge out of leaving
Continued on 5B home in a scene from Picnic.
2B
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Roundabout
Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter: @wilcosun for
news and @wilcosunsports for sports scores.
S
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AUGUST
M T W T F S
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24 25 26 27 28 29
31
DEADLINES
Items are due by noon
Friday for the Wednesday
paper and noon Wednesday
for the Sunday paper. E-mail to
[email protected]
events
BE A FORCE FOR FRIENDSHIP
by joining the Friendship Force
of Georgetown for food and fun.
Learn about the possibilities of
spreading friendship domestically
and internationally through
sponsored trips. For more
information visit friendshipforce.
org or ffgeorgetowntx.org or call
Bettie Clapper at 254-495-3100.
Uptown Social, 501 South Austin
Avenue, Georgetown, Thu., Aug. 13,
5:30 to 7 p.m.
CEDAR PARK AFTER DARK is a
mini-con celebrating all things
geek. Join with others interested
in science fiction, gaming, comics
and cosplay while visiting booths
from Steve Jackson Games, Titan
Moon Comics, Wonko’s Toys and
Games and more. Dress as your
favorite character for the cosplay
contest that starts at 8 p.m. Cedar
Park Public Library, 550 Discovery
Boulevard, Fri., Aug. 14, 7 to 9 p.m.
SOAR AWAY with the Georgetown
Aero Modelers Association
for National Model Aviation
Day. Enjoy static displays and
flying demonstrations of the
radio-controlled model aircraft.
Visitors will also get the chance
to experience flying one of
these craft with the help of an
instructor and trainer aircraft. For
more information about this free
event, visit www.gamarc.org or
email Mike Hunter at [email protected]
suddenlink.net. 655 County Road 141,
Georgetown, Sat., Aug. 15, 10 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
kids
FALL 2015 YOUTH CO-ED SOCCER
hosted by Georgetown Parks
and Recreation is now accepting
registrations. Leagues are available
for kids ages 4 to 14. The 10-week
season begins on Sat., Sept. 5.
Registration costs $45 for residents
and $55 for non-residents. For more
information, call Blake Reynolds at
512-819-3102. Georgetown Recreation
Center, 1003 North Austin Avenue,
register through Sat., Aug. 15.
theater
HANK WILLIAMS: LOST HIGHWAY
presented by the Palace Theatre
follows Mr. Williams’ rise from
his beginnings on the Louisiana
Hayride, to his triumphs on the
Grand Ole Opry, to his eventual
self-destruction at 29. We are
treated to indelible songs like “I’m
So Lonesome I Could Cry,” “Move It
on Over” and “Hey, Good Lookin’,”
which are given fresh and profound
resonance set in the context of
Mr. Williams’ life. Tickets cost $27,
$25 for seniors 55 and up, $15 for
students and active duty military,
$11 for children 9 and under. 810
South Austin Avenue, Georgetown,
through Sun., Aug. 16; Fri., and Sat.,
at 7:30 p.m., Sun., 2 p.m.
PICNIC, William Inge’s Pulitzer Prize
winning drama about young love,
family and the need to belong is
proudly presented by the Agape
Actors Co-Op. Witness the story of
the handsome young drifter named
Hal who shakes up a small Kansas
Sun photo
Groove your way
HOWLIN’ WATERS covers BB King, Stevie Ray Vaughan and others in this week’s Music on the Square performance. Put on your dancing shoes and bring your picnic
to this free concert. The Square, Georgetown, Fri., Aug. 14, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. Above, Gianna Paolini, who turns five in September, enjoys the brisk Friday breezes on the
courthouse lawn as she takes in the smooth jazz stylings of Cactus Groove during an earlier session of this year’s Summer Concert Series.
town through his virility and sexual
magnetism. To reserve tickets
please visit www.ticketor.com/
agapeactors or call 512-88-STAGE.
The Black Box Theatre, 4490 East
University Avenue, Georgetown,
through Sun., Aug 16; Thu., Fri., and
Sat., at 7:30 p.m.; Sun., 2:30 p.m.
SUN CITY’S GOT TALENT brings
the popular performance show
format to Georgetown. Tickets are
available for $15 at the community
association office in Sun City
and include cabaret seating, two
beverages, snacks, door prizes and
audience participation throughout
the show. For any questions call
Cathy at 512-417-1747. Two Texas
Drive, Georgetown, Sat., Aug. 15, 6
to 9 p.m.
biz
SMALL BUSINESS NETWORKING
gathers owners and entrepreneurs
to meet in a casual environment
sponsored by the Board of Directors
Networking Group. Free, coffee
and breakfast available. For an
agenda and more information visit
BODNetworking.com. Mel’s Lone Star
Lanes, 1010 North Austin Avenue,
Georgetown, Wed., Aug. 12, 8:30 to
9:30 a.m.
health
A MATTER OF BALANCE is a fun,
dynamic course that helps prepare
individuals on how to manage
falls while maintaining an active,
healthy lifestyle. Classes are free
but register by calling Rita Handley
at 512-868-9544 or email [email protected]
faithinactiongt.org. 2423 Williams
Drive, Georgetown, classes are Tue.,
and Thu., Aug. 11 through Sept. 3,
1 to 3 p.m.
PARKINSON’S CAREGIVERS
SUPPORT GROUP offers free
exercise, yoga and dance classes
specifically designed for individuals
with movement disorders. The
meetings are open to patients,
care partners, family and friends.
For more information contact Mary
Jane Berry at 512-240-4167. 2423
Williams Drive, Georgetown, Thu.,
Aug. 13, 2 p.m.
WALK WITH A DOC allows
participants to engage in a healthy
two mile walk with healthcare
providers from Scott & White Round
Rock. The free event features
free pedometers, blood pressure
screenings, T-shirts and healthy
refreshments. San Gabriel Park,
Georgetown, Sat., Aug. 15, 9 to 10:30
a.m.
art
WATERCOLOR WORKS by artist Kim
Hoerster and nine students from
Artsea Lessons and Studio are on
display at Franklin & Company, Fine
Jewelers. For more information,
visit www.kimhoerster.com. 109
West Seventh Street, Georgetown,
exhibit through Mon., Aug. 31.
THE TEXAS SOCIETY OF
SCULPTORS’ eighth annual Summer
Show will feature 60 works of art
displayed throughout the first and
second floors of the Georgetown
Public Library. The exhibit is free
and open to the public during
library operating hours. 402 West
Eighth Street, through Fri., Sept. 25.
THE HEALING ARTS GALLERY
of St. David’s Georgetown
Hospital presents a new exhibit
featuring the work of the Sun
City Photography Club. Enjoy
25 photographs of lovely flora,
majestic animals, landscapes of
beautiful areas around the world
and unique portraits of individuals.
2000 Scenic Drive, Georgetown,
exhibit runs through Tue., Sept. 29.
sports
Ballroom, 2 Texas Drive, Georgetown,
Tue., Aug. 18, 10 a.m.
SWINGING FOR THE SPARKLERS
invites participants to fun afternoon
golf scramble. Singles cost $100
and a team of four costs $400.
Register day of or pre-register by
visiting www.planmygolfevent.
com/27856-SparklerGolfScramble or
call Chris Osborne at 512-773-9336.
Teravista Golf Course, 4333 Teravista
Club, Round Rock, Fri., Aug. 14,
registration at noon; shotgun start
1:30 p.m.
philanthropy
music
WALBURG SONGWRITER
WEDNESDAYS is a concert at the
Walburg German Restaurant with
guest performers on stage weekly.
Songwriters should sign in by 6:30
p.m. 3777 FM 972, Walburg, Wed.,
Aug. 12, 7 p.m.
learn
THE SALON AT WILDFIRE presents
Nick Roland speak on the Bandera
hanging tree. Seating is limited so
please arrive early. 812 South Austin
Avenue, Georgetown, Wed., Aug. 12,
6:30 p.m.
DEVELOP THE SKILLS needed to
record your memoir with Beverly
Scott, an instructor teaching
classes for almost 20 years. The
class costs $85 for Williamson
Museum members and $95 for nonmembers. Call 512-943-1670. Pioneer
Conference Room, Williamson County
Courthouse, 710 South Main Street,
Georgetown, class meets every
Wed., starting Aug. 12 through
Wed., Sept. 16, 10 a.m. to noon.
film
MOVIES IN THE PARK presents a
free showing of Big Hero 6 (PG).
Enjoy this family friendly animated
film about the friendship of a plussized inflatable robot and a young
prodigy. San Gabriel Park, 445 East
Morrow Street, Georgetown, Thu.,
Aug. 13, approximately 8:45 p.m.
Legislative update
Sun photo
CONGRESSMAN JOHN CARTER will provide the Georgetown Area Republican Women with an update from D.C. Tickets cost $15 and
include lunch. Please reserve your seat by Fri., Aug. 14 by emailing [email protected] Berry Creek Country Club, 30500 Berry Creek
Drive, Georgetown, Wed., Aug 19, 11 a.m. Above, Representative Carter speaks at the Memorial Day commemoration in Sun City earlier
this year.
THE HEART OF TEXAS CHAPTER
OF DELTA WATERFOWL hosts its
annual banquet filled with food,
drinks and exciting raffle and
auction opportunities. Tickets
cost $50 for one person or $60
for a couples ticket and kids 18
and under are free (accompanied
by an adult). Tickets include the
meal and open bar. Sponsorship
opportunities are available for
$500. For more information
contact Larry Neal at 512-6536267. Georgetown Community
Center, 445 East Morrow Street,
Fri., Aug. 14, 5 p.m.
GEORGETOWN BRANCH OF
THE AMERICAN ASSOCIATION
OF UNIVERSITY WOMEN invite
interested parties to join them
for a coffee and learn about the
organization. Women who have an
Associate or higher in nursing or a
Bachelor’s or higher in any other
specialty is eligible to join. Please
RSVP by calling Barbara McGrail at
512-868-0162. Cowan Creek Amenity
Center, 1433 Cool Spring Way,
Georgetown, Sat., Aug. 15, 10 a.m.
to noon.
back to school
GEORGETOWN ISD. First day Mon.,
Aug. 24.
LEANDER ISD. First day Mon., Aug.
24.
FLORENCE ISD. First day Mon.,
Aug. 24.
JARRELL ISD. First day Mon., Aug.
24.
GRANGER ISD. First day Mon., Aug.
24.
TAYLOR ISD. First day Mon., Aug
24.
politics
THRALL ISD. First day Mon., Aug
24.
SUN CITY KIWANIS CLUB hosts a
talk with John Sullivan, Georgetown
fire chief. The meeting is free
and open to the public. For more
information about the Kiwanis visit
www.suncitygtkiwanis.org. Sun City
LIBERTY HILL ISD. First day Tue.,
Aug 25.
SOUTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY. First
year classes begin Mon., Aug. 17;
classes begin Mon., Aug. 24.
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
3B
Lucian Nastase, 10, left, and Jordan Patterson, 11, above. Annie
Violette adjusts the costume of Leighton Landreth, 12, below.
Photos by Andy Sharp
Palace Education Coordinator Gwen Dicapo gives a pep talk to some of the 10-to-12-year-old actors before the crowd enters the theater for a Disney Revue performance on the Palace Theatre’s Springer Memorial Stage on Saturday.
Young actors
and actresses
demonstrate
the skills they
learned at their
Disney Revue
performance.
The family of, Addy Ruiz, 10, watch her perform Saturday: father Mark, mother Hope, brother Peter,
5, and sister Teresa, 8.
Berkley Landreth,
11, demonstrates
her acting skills
during Saturday’s
Disney Revue
performances on
Springer Memorial
Stage.
Zach Moser, left, and Garrett Hanley, both 11, above.
868-2224
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4B
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Church to honor
Baptist minister
Since he arrived at
Crestview Baptist Church
20 years ago, Pastor Dan
Wooldridge has been a
steadfast leader to a growing congregation and an
active member of Georgetown’s larger faith community.
Dubbing it a “Danniversary” celebration, the
church will honor its longtime senior pastor August
16 during a special 6:30
p.m. service in the sanctuary followed by a 7:30 p.m.
reception in the gym.
All are invited to the
church at 2300 Williams
Drive, about a mile west of
I-35.
“There are people probably all over the county he
has touch and influenced,”
Associate Pastor Jack
Phelps said.
The congregation size
has tripled during Pastor
Wooldridge’s tenure.
DANNIVERSARY
Sunday, August 16
6:30 p.m. – A special
celebration service and
reception in honor of
Pastor Dan Wooldridge of
Crestview Baptist Church,
2300 Williams Drive in
Georgetown.
“He has been a constant
and someone we all know
we can count on at any
time,” Pastor Phelps said.
“He is one of those rare
individuals where what
you see from the pulpit is
exactly what you are going
to see in everyday life from
him.”
Pastor Wooldridge and
his wife Shannon Wooldridge have three grown
children.
— Joyce May
Sun photo
Father Trey Garland is the priest at Grace Episcopal Church, which has more than 500 members.
Grace Episcopal reaches east and west
W
Paper applauds
local oil endeavors
OUR PURPOSE: T o g l o r i f y G o d
ith campuses on both sides of Interstate 35 and
b y b e in g a fa ith fu l s te w a r d o f
parishioners of all ages and stages of life, the nearly
a ll th a t is e n tr u s te d to u s .
150-year-old Grace Episcopal Church offers something for everyone.
“We are a very diverse, inclusive worshiping
Darren & Stephanie
community that strives to make Jesus Christ known to all,”
Featherstone
Father Trey Garland said. “It is probably the friendliest and
AUGUST 12, 1915
warmest congregation I have served.”
Some six or eight
The main campus of Grace Episcopal Church sits in the
at Wolf Ranch
weeks ago, Mr. Chas. F.
heart of Old Town at 1314 East University Avenue, a location
(512) 930-4884
Craver and his son, Mr.
it has called home since 1955.
BA RBA R A Y ELV ER TO N
A. H. Craver, successful
Organized in 1869, the church originally met on Main
oil men from Tulsa, OklaStreet. Its former building was relocated to the corner of
24 Heroes of Jericho,
homa, stopped over here
Main and Ninth streets. Now known as Grace Heritage CenTexas Jurisdiction FAM,
for a few days at the Comter, it is home to the Georgetown Heritage Society.
with Moriah Court Dismercial Hotel.
Grace Episcopal Church was the first parish in the Epistrict 58, held a luncheon.
In a quiet way, they
copal Diocese of Texas to have a satellite campus, which it
Madilla Hillard, District
secured
a
large
number
calls Grace West. Since it was started five years ago, the west
of leases on property 24, was honored as Queen
campus has met at 4701 Williamson Drive, in building 4 of the
south of here. Mr. Craver for ‘71 and was presented
shopping center that is also home to BB’s Restaurant.
has moved his family to a gift.
The church has signed a lease on a new building in the
n
Georgetown and they are
shopping center across D.B. Wood Road from the Williams
Citizens’
State Bank
now living at the old McDrive H-E-B and plans to be moved in by October.
has
provided
the Little
Daniel
home.
Last
week,
On Sunday mornings, both campuses offer an 8 o’clock Rite
oil machinery began to League with a score1 Eucharist. The west campus has a Rite 2 Eucharist with muarrive and to be hauled board.
sic at 9:30 while the main campus has a 10:30 sung Eucharist,
out to the Dimmitt place,
n
which is a more formal service.
four miles south of town.
Jaycees urge all to save
“The west campus does a very relaxed style of worship
Here, they are ready to papers to recycle.
with more of a praise feel to it. The liturgy and the main
put up a derrick and start
campus has the more traditional focused Eucharist,” Father
n
a cable outfit to work
Garland said.
Band rehearsals start
drilling for oil.
While Grace has 525 members on its rolls, average Sunday
August 14. Mr. Klett reCraver & Co. are well minds the freshmen they
attendance is right around 275, Father Garland said.
known and reliable men. must provide their own
(512) 863-2567
“The west campus is predominantly retired people. The
They believe there is oil
HisWayCleaning.com
main
campus
is
a
very
healthy
mix.
We
grow
monthly
in
900 S. Austin Ave
white shoes.
in our vicinity and, at
young families. We have little kids running around,” he said.
their own expense, they
A healing service, also known as sacrament of the sick, is
AUGUST 8 & 11, 1999
are going to make a try
held each Tuesday at noon at the west campus.
Webworms plaguing
for it. We welcome them
“It is a simple said service with a brief reading of the saint
mighty
oaks.
to our town, even tempoof the day. We offer the laying on of hands and the anointing
n
rarily. We rejoice in their
of oil for those who are sick or those who want to come and
$30,000
worth
of comenterprise
and
hope
them
proxy for those who are sick. It takes about 35 or 40 minutes.”
puters and TVs stolen
great success.
Anyone is welcome to attend, Father Garland said. In the
from Georgetown High
n
Episcopal Church, one does not have to be Episcopalian to
School. They are to be
State
tax
rate
highest
receive
Holy
Communion,
he
noted.
Annette & Wally Wilson
on record. The state tax replaced before school
Father Garland arrived at Grace in October 2012 after
(512) 784-8690 • (512) 659-8690
4097 Williams Dr. • 512-686-1694
for 1915-1916 is 55 cents, starts, and insurance covserving as a rector in Greenville, South Carolina for about
breaking all records. ered most of the loss.
five years. He’s a native Houstonian but was no stranger to
* DISCOUNTS PROVIDED EVERY DAY; That
MARKED
PRICES
OFFERED BY O
rate
was REFLECT
fixed to-COMPARABLE PRICES
n
Central Texas.
day. The rate is divided as
“My parents had a lake house on Lake LBJ. I have been
Adryan Cooper and
* DISCOUNTS
PROVIDED EVERY DAY; MARKED PRICES REFLECT
COMPARABLE
PRICES 30
OFFERED
BYJessie,
OTHERcut
SELLERS
FOR SIMI
follows:
Ad valorem,
coming to the Hill Country since I was about
four,” Father
father,
the ribcents; schools, 20 cents; bon at the opening cereGarland said.
Coupon
Confederate pensions, mony for Patricia Webb
He attended The University of the South, known commonCOUPON FOR IN STORES OR ONLINE
five cents.
ly as Sewanee, in Tennessee, from 1999 to 2002.
Cooper Elementary, the
Coupon
n
The Reverend Dr. David Peters, a veteran Army chaplain,
school named for a be-Coupon
serves as curate – an associate to the rector – at Grace.
U.S. for freedom of seas loved teacher killed in aCode:
“It is an interesting kind of time dichotomy for us, but
at any cost. Immediate highway
Expert In-House Jeweler
Coupon
accident.
e Item at RegulaLimit
Code:
r Pon
with two priests it is not a problem. It emphasizes the breadth
action on Lusitania reOn
n
O
Custom Design Work
of Episcopal worship. The fact that we can do so much in
quested in terms not to be
Excludes Heid
A full-time Offer
uniformed
good for one item at regularSilhouette
price onlyC
Georgetown is a great thing,” Father Garland said.
disregarded. Courteous
one coupon per customer per day. Must present custom
couponoa
policeLimit
officer
work
“by the
yard
Offer is not validwill
with any other
coupon, discount
or previ
During the academic year, Grace offers Christian education
but unmistakable. Note
Excludes Heidi Swapp Minc. Foil Applicator, CRICUT products, Tim H
between
Georgetown
Machine,
candy
&
snack
products,
gum
&
mints,
Silhouette
CAMEO
classes for all ages each Sunday beginning at 9:30 a.m.
to Germany declares Bercustom orders, special orders, labor, rentals and class fees. A singl
yard” equals one item.and
Online fabricthe
& trim discount is limite
Grace Episcopal School serves as an educational arm of
lin communications un- High“by theSchool
Cash Value 1/10¢.
Ninth
Grade
Center.
the parish, offering Christian learning opportunities for
satisfactory. Submarine
n
children ages 2 to 6.
warfare upon neutrals is
Get your “Aged Beef ”
—Joyce May
Handmade gifts & items
greatly indefensible.
calendar for $9. It feacrafted by local seniors.
tures Sun City men doing
AUGUST 10, 1972
The Escape: We are a gift and home furnishings store located in
on the Georgetown Square
their favorite activities.
Mr.
and
Mrs.
Martin
Large Enough To Serve
104 W 8th St • 512.869.1812
historic downtown Georgetown since 1996. We specialize in handBergstrom of 415 Ranch Profits are to be split beSmall Enough To Care
HandcraftsUnlimited.org
made items from throughout the USA.
Road were chosen as tween the Georgetown
512-930-4283
winners of the George- Fire Department and the
town Garden Club– World War II Memorial in
Georgetown Chamber of Washington, D.C.
he Georgetown Symphony
Commerce joint effort
Society brings high quality,
to choose a Yard of the
AUGUST 8 & 12, 2007
professional classical concerts to
Month. Mr. Bergstrom, a
the Georgetown area, and strives
Gabriel’s Overlook now
retired farmer, grows a part of Georgetown’s exto enrich the music education
Georgetown
vegetable garden in his traterritorial jurisdicof our young people by exposing
1010 Austin Ave.
back yard and flowers in
4th and 5th grade students to
tion.
5 1 2 -8 6 3 -5 4 5 1
the front.
classical music via our Musical
n
n
Enrichment Programs.
2500 Williams Dr.
Georgetown Tourism
Wilson Fox, long-time
5 1 2 -8 6 3 -7 2 3 0
has given businesses 20
chairman of the Williamson County Democratic passes to give to customExecutive Committee, ers so they can park freehas resigned that posi- ly over two hours around
tion. He stated that he the Square.
n
cannot support McGovTax Preparation
Williamson County
ern for the Party’s presFine Antiques &
IRS Representation
idential nominee. W. K. checks bridges every six
Vintage Jewelry
Audit, Review & Compilation
A Community Owned,
McClain, longtime Dem- months.
Since 1877
Independent Funeral
110 West 8th Street
ocratic liberal, could be
3613 Williams Dr., Ste 501
Establishment
asked to fill the position, Yesteryears is a compila(512)
869-2088
512-863-5720
(512) 869-8888
but he is out of town at tion of headlines, photo
GeorgetownAntiqueMall.com
www.JohnLewisCPA.com
GabrielsFuneral.com
captions and stories from
this time.
Sun issues spanning the
n
For information about how to sponsor the church page, call 512-930-4824 or email [email protected]
The forum of District past century.
yesteryears
512.868.8000
512-639-3906
$
$
$
Handcrafts
Unlimited
Longhorn Title
Company, inc
T
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$
™
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®
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Group puts on several plays
Picnic cast really hits
their characters
Continued from 1B
Actress Cindy Wright told me
that “these short plays give us
newer actors an opportunity to try
our hand at acting without having
to memorize pages and pages of
script.”
After attending their dress
rehearsal, I here offer you a short
summary of each play — but I’m
not going to give away their endings. Sorry.
Kicking the evening off is “Hello,
Ma.” — Written by Trude Stone and
directed by Judy Dargis.
Ma (played by Rose Sommo) and
Dee, her daughter (Sandra Hense),
are in their respective apartments
and all the dialogue is a series of
telephone conversations. Dee is continually calling her mother about
her own boyfriend problems, but
Ma turns the tables on her daughter.
Second up is “One Question” —
Written by Trude Stone and directed by Patrick McElhinney.
Dan (Ev Canfield) and Mary
(Cindy Wright) are having dinner
at Mary’s apartment. After three
years, Mary wants a commitment
from Dan, so she “pops the question” which leads to more questions. Will she get her man?
The third play is “Whatever You
Say” — Written by Trude Stone and
directed by Steve Huth.
Ben (Pat Brian) and Annie (Terry
Chambers) have been married 50
years and have just returned from
a belated honeymoon. But, it didn’t
go well, and now Annie wants a
divorce. A amusing verbal spat
ensues. Will they make 51 years?
Fourth play is “A Bench in the
Park” — Written by Albert M.
Brown and directed by Patrick
Henry.
Ms. Apple (Meg Miller) and
Ms. Brown (Phyllis Gilbert), both
retired, meet in the park. Ms. Apple
feeds the pigeons and Ms. Brown
feels that it’s a waste of time. Ms.
Apple surprises Ms. Brown when
she asks Ms. Brown to take over
feeding the pigeons. What’s up?
“We decided on an evening of
short plays because we’ve never
done this before,” veteran director
Steve Huth commented. “This is a
case to see if the audience appreciates it, and it’s a great way of getting people to perform who haven’t
been on the stage before. We have
16 people in the cast and that’s a lot
of people to schedule their time and
ANGLICAN
Light of Christ Anglican Church 420
Wolf Ranch Pkwy; Pastors: The Rev’ds Dr.
Steven Pope & WM. J. Disch; 512-591-7183
ASSEMBLY OF GOD
River of Life Church 6040 Airport Rd;
Pastor Paul Vincent; 512-863-0854
Georgetown Legacy Church 100 Stadium Dr; at Chamber offices; Robert Jones,
Pastor; gtlegacy.com
BAPTIST
Pastor, Dan
Wooldridge
Southern Baptist
Continued from 1B
Peter Dossing
CATHOLIC
Holy Trinity of Corn Hill FM 1105
between Walburg and Schwertner; 512863-3020.
St. Helen
Catholic Church
512-863-3041
www.sainthelens.org
2700 E. University Ave.
Georgetown, TX 78626
Father Brian McMaster
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
CHRISTIAN SCIENCE
Sunday Worship:
11:00a.m. & 6:00p.m.
Wednesday Prayer Time:
6:00-8:00p.m.
Pastor Michael S. Delaney
512-863-8899
315 FM 1105
Weir, TX 78674
Andice Baptist Church (Southern
Baptist) 6570 FM 970; Daniel Crowther,
Pastor; 254-793-2557.
Calvary’s Hill Baptist Church 1802
Bridge St; Robert W. Lynch, Jr., Pastor;
512-863-5767.
First Baptist Church (Southern Baptist)
1333 W. University Ave.; 512-869-2586.
First Baptist Church (Granger) 301 E.
Mesquite, Granger; Pastor Danny “Pat”
Cole; 512-859-1389
Friendly Will Missionary Baptist
Church - 706 West 14th St; Rudy Williams, Pastor; 512-863-2006.
Grace Baptist Church (Cooperative
Baptist) Pastor Kyle Tubbs, 1101 North
Mays St., Round Rock; 512-402-8388
Main Street Baptist Church (Southern
Baptist) 1001 Main St; Ernest Jones,
Pastor; 512-869-7854.
Macedonia Baptist Church 206 MLK
Street; Jimmy Johnson, Sr., Pastor; 512863-6044.
New Creation Baptist Church (Southern Baptist) 702 E. 15th St; David Balderas,
Pastor; 512-762-9962
and Wayne Ogden (Richard Hahn),
who are old timers in the neighborhood. Irene and Wayne are overly
obnoxious to their new neighbors
and what happens at dinner between the two couples is hysterical.
Pass the mustard please.
Sun City’s ‘ole salt director Patrick Henry, shared with me that “90
percent of the play is in the casting
and I wanted a perfect cast and I
think I got it. I would have to say
they’ll never be better than they are
today. That’s for sure.”
Director Judy Dargis has worked
behind the scenes for several
AcTAG productions as stage manager.
She says that “I thought for a long
time that I would like to direct, so
when they came up with this venue
of short plays and the four directors, it just seemed like something
too good to pass up. It has been
delightful and I want to do more.
It’s a real team building effort and
so great to see all the pieces come
together. You think that it’s never
going to happen, but it finally does
and that’s very rewarding. The folks
who are going to see our Evening of
Short Plays are in for a real treat.”
An Evening of Short Plays is now
showing August 12-15 and 19-22 in
the Sun City Atrium, 7 p.m., One
Texas Drive. Tickets are $10. Run
time is just under two hours including intermission. Rated General
Audiences with some profanity.
Peter Dossing is a recovering standup comedian who was captivated by
the theater at a very early age and
especially enjoys community theater
productions. He can be reached at
[email protected]
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Continued
Continued
Sunday School 9:45am
Worship 8:30am, 11:00am, 6:30pm
2300 Williams Drive, Georgetown
512-863-6576 • peoplesharingjesus.com
of Weir
multifaceted characters. Staging
Picnic in the Black Box Theatre
allows us to turn up the heat,
intimacy and romance in this
piece. The audience will really
feel like they’re in a front yard
in Kansas. It’s going to be something special and memorable.”
Let’s return to Labor Day, where
our hunky, good-for-nothing Hal
Carter (Zach Bond) drifts into
the backyard and the lives of Flo
Owens (Christina Little-Manley)
and her two daughters. Millie
(Alyssa Castro) is a brainy high
school tomboy who plans to live
in New York after college. Her
sister Madge (Erin Priddy) is the
town beauty, but barely made it
out of high school and works in a
five-and-dime store. Her well-to-do
boyfriend, Alan (Alex Poole), has
big plans for the two of them in
the near future.
There are other female characters in the story, such as the
delightful Mrs. Potts (Mary Margaret Mainer), the liberated biddy
next door, but she’s ever-so-slightly
at odds with Flo, Madge’s controlling mother. Flo can’t bear to
watch her daughter repeat her
mistakes. And then there’s Rosemary Sydney (Georgia Medler), an
“old-maid schoolteacher” who is
Flo’s boarder. She badly wants to
marry her current darling, Howard Bevans (Dave Lovelace), but
he really isn’t a willing prospect.
Mary Margaret commented,
“I loved playing the part of Mrs.
Potts. She is the nicest person I
have ever got to play. I usually end
up playing people who are awful,
but everybody likes this lady
tonight. That’s good.”
College freshman Alyssa Castro
added, “This is one of my favorite
plays. I read this script in my
sophomore year in high school,
and I wanted one day to play the
tomboy Millie — and three years
later, to actually do it is really
cool.”
Alyssa is planning a degree
in aerospace engineering at the
University of Texas. Future rocket
scientist?
Zach Bond and Alex Poole, who
played the opposing males, laughingly told me that they “have been
best friends for four years.” Both
In a “Dinner with Friendly Neighbors,” Donna Palmer (Mary Kay Hattamer)
and Nick Palmer (Steve Huth), are having dinner with old-timers Irene Ogden
(Linda Ivey) and Wayne Ogden (Richard Hahn). The waiter is Bryn Rigby.
work to learn all their lines — this
is a great opportunity for them.
We’re very excited about the whole
thing. It’s a very good concept, so
we’ll see how that goes.”
No. 5 on the marquee is “May I
Recommend the Crow” — Written
by Sam Bobrick and directed by
Steve Huth.
After a divorce that was a
financial disaster for him, we find
Charles (Bryn Rigby) working as
a waiter in an elegant restaurant.
Who should come in but his ex-wife,
Joyce (Linda Ivey). Charles is trying
to be a good waiter while seething
over the way Joyce has treated him.
Joyce enjoys his predicament — in
a sadistic sort of way. Absolutely no
fury like a woman scorned.
Short play No. 6 is entitled “She
Needs Me” — Written by Trude
Stone and directed by Patrick
McElhinney.
Two good friends (both in their
70s and widowed) meet in a Northern city in the winter. Sylvia (Nancy
Dossing) is trying to convince Ruth
(Terry Michela) that she should join
her for an extended stay in Florida.
Ruth says she can’t go because her
divorced daughter “needs” her.
Sylvia knows, but Ruth doesn’t, that
the daughter is planning to move
away to take a job in Texas. Then
the news comes out. What to do
now?
Closing the performance is No. 7,
“Dinner with Friendly Neighbors”
— Written by Sam Bobrick and
directed by Patrick Henry.
Donna (Mary Kay Hattamer)
and Nick Palmer (Steve Huth) have
recently moved into the neighborhood and they are having dinner in
a restaurant with Irene (Linda Ivey)
Welcome
Bienvenidos
CHRISTIAN
SCIENCE
SOCIETY
of
Georgetown, TX
1433 Cool Spring Way
Cowan Amenity Center
Sun City
512-943-4784
Sunday Service 10:00 AM
CHURCH OF THE NAZARENE
Georgetown Church of the Nazarene
4051 E. Hwy. 29; Kevin Bell, Pastor; 512869-0303
CHURCH OF CHRIST
Sunday Bible Class
9:30am
Sunday Morning Worship 10:30am
Sunday Evening Worship 6:00pm
Wednesday Bible Class 7:00pm
408 W. Morrow Street,
Georgetown
512-863-9749
www.gabrieloakschurchofchrist.org
6613 L a k ew ood s D r . S ou th
( F irst right p a st Su n C it y )
w w w . c of c nor th s id e. or g
5 12- 8 63- 08 8 6
S u n d a y
W e d n e sd a y
9 :3
1 0 :3
2 :0
7 :0
0 a
0 a
0 p
0 p
m
m
m
m
B ib le
W o rs
W o rs
B ib le
C la s s
h ip
h ip
C la s s
Br a d He l g e r s o n , Pr e a c h e r
EPISCOPAL
Grace Episcopal Church 1314 E.
University; Rev. Fr. Trey Garland, Rector;
512-863-2068
INTERDENOMINATIONAL
The Worship Place 811 Sun City Blvd;
512-869-1310
T’Shuva Israel Steve Hoelscher & Gabe
Carrasco; 512-818-0233
JEHOVAH’S WITNESSES
Kingdom Hall of Jehovah’s Witnesses
1701 N. Austin Ave. 512-863-5435.
JEWISH
Congregation Havurah Shalom (CHS)
Sun City Cowan Creek Amenities Center;
Linda Schaffer, President, [email protected]
chstx.org
LATTER DAY SAINTS
The Church of Jesus Christ of
Latter-Day Saints 218 Serenada Dr;
512-863-7173
LUTHERAN
ST. PETER
LUTHERAN CHURCH (LCMC)
125 years in Walburg
“The friendly little church in the valley”
Sunday School 9:30 - Worship 10:15
www.stpeterwalburg.org • 512-863-5600
I-35N to FM 972 three miles east
Faith Lutheran
Church (lcms)
A Stephen Ministry Congregation
Services: 8:30 and 11:00am
Sunday School & Bible Classes: 9:50am
Faith Lutheran Preschool
Rev. Walter Pohland, Sr. Pastor
Rev. John F. Selle, Associate Pastor
Cassie Schermbeck, DCE
Jonathan Loesch, DCE
010
CATHOLIC
LUTHERAN
8 3- 332
L
C
M
S
Join us for Sunday services at
8:00am | 10:45am | 6:00pm
Bible & Sunday School
classes begin at 9:30 a.m.
www.zionwalburg.org
512.863.3065
6001 FM 1105
North IH-35 to Walburg, Exit 268, 3 miles
east on FM 972, North on FM 1105.
Cross and Crown Lutheran Church
3800 Shell Rd; Rev. Eric Hartzell, Pastor;
512-869-PRAY.
METHODIST
First United Methodist Church
Traditional Worship Services
8:30 & 11:00 am – Sanctuary
Contemporary Worship Service
11:00 am – McKinney Ministry Center
Sunday School – 9:45 am
410 E. University Ave., Georgetown
863-2370 · www.fumcgt.org
Wellspring United Methodist Church
8:30 AM
9:30 AM
Traditional Worship
Traditional Worship
Sunday School for All Ages
11:00 AM Contemporary Worship
6:00 PM Youth Fellowship
5:30 PM Youth Snack Supper
Nursery care is provided for morning worship services.
All Are Welcome, All Are Accepted
Dr. Jeff Smith – Senior Pastor
6200 Williams Drive, Georgetown
512-930-5959 • www.wellumc.org
Florence United Methodist Church 300
Curry Street; Jonathan Mellette, Pastor;
254-793-2535.
Jarrell United Methodist Church 404
1st St, Jarrell; The Reverend Jonathan
Mellette; 512-746-2550
St. John’s United Methodist Church
311 E. University; Rev. Travis Franklin;
512-863-5886
St. Paul United Methodist Church 610
Martin Luther King; Rev. Arcynthia Louie.
Wesley Chapel A.M.E. Church 504 4th
St; Silas Swint, Pastor; 512-931-2305.
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
SUNDAY
SERVICE AT
10 AM
3400 Shell Rd., Georgetown
512-868-8892 • www.CalvaryGT.org
Santa Rosa
Catholic Church
Mass: Saturday 5pm
Sunday 8am & 10:30am
Rev. Father Larry Stehling
Deacon Ken Ryan
254.793.0273
FM 970, Andice
www.srdl-cc.org
Sunday
Service
B i b l e C l a Morning
s s
9 : 3 10AM
0 a m
W Sunday
o r s h i p S Evening
e r v i c e Service
1 0 : 3 60 a PM
m
E v e n i n g W o r Evening
s h ip
6 : 0 0 p 7PM
m
Wednesday
Study
W e d n e s d a y E v e n in g
7 :0 0 p m
101 E. Tomlinson St.
M (254)
i n i s t e r S 300-8649
te v e H a m m a n
101 East Tumlinson St., Florence
We can’t wait to meet you!
Hutto Church of Christ 100 Mager Ln,
Hutto Elementary, Hutto; Cort Laurence,
Minister; 512-497-0143
are seniors at East View this year
and met their first year when they
had theater class together.
They continued, “The first
project we worked on was actually
this play. We did the same scene
that we did today where he hops
on my back.”
The only thing I haven’t talked
about is the actual picnic!
Toss all of these folks together
on a hot Labor Day, bring in some
whiskey, add some heightened
emotions, and presto: instant
disaster for the families. Fortunately, all the audience ever saw
was them heading off to the picnic
and returning at dark in the next
scene.
Everybody in the cast really
hit their character. A lot of it just
came natural and it was super
fun to watch this production. You
can probably guess the ending in
Picnic, but I’m not going to tell you
here. We all want a happy ending
for the flustered maiden, Madge,
but did she choose wisely?
Odds are her life won’t end up
being a picnic if she gets what
she wants.
Picnic is being performed in
the Black Box Theatre at Georgetown’s East View High School,
4490 East University Avenue,
(Highway 29 immediately east of
I-30), west entrance.
The production is in its final
week and runs through August
16, Thursday through Saturday,
7:30 p.m., Sunday matinee at 2:30
p.m.
Tickets are $17 for adults
and $12 for students/seniors if
purchased in advance. If seats
are still available on the day of
performance, tickets may be purchased at the door for $20 adults
and $15 students/seniors.
Run time is two hours total, including a 15-minute intermission.
Tickets are available through the
Agape ticketing service at www.
ticketor.com/agapeactors or
call 512-88-STAGE. Rated: Adult
audiences and includes salty
language.
Peter Dossing is a recovering
stand-up comedian who was captivated by the theater at a very early
age and especially enjoys community theater productions. He can be
reached at [email protected]
NON-DENOMINATIONAL
Continued
Continued
Northside
Church of Christ
5B
Grace Fellowship Church
Christian Education ....... 9:30 a.m.
Worship Service and
Children’s Church ...... 10:30 a.m.
6600 S. Lakewood Drive
512-863-7690 Jack Ender, Pastor
Abundant Faith Church 3 Indian Dr.,
Round Rock. Pastor Art & Myrtie Cardenas. 512-258-8991
Free
NewChurch
Contemporary
Cafe’10:30 am
Worship
9:30
& 11:00
Quest
11:00a.m.
am
Small Groups.
Children
Birth-5th
grade
Ministries
during
both services
11:00 am
375
CR
375
CR245,
245,Georgetown
Georgetown
West
Williams Dr,
past
SunSun
City. City.
West
ononWilliams
Dr, 2½
2½miles
miles
past
869.9769
869.9769::::www.newchurchgtown.org
www.newchurchgtown.org
Church On The Rock - Georgetown 925
Golden Oaks Dr; Pas. Dennis Hattabaugh;
512-864-7713
Celebration Church Georgetown 1202
Rabbit Hill Rd; Joe and Lori Champion,
Pastors; 512-763-3000
Community Christian Church 4255 Sam
Bass Rd; 512-244-0310.
Hope United. Church 4611 Verde Vista,
Heritage Oaks Clubhouse; Pastor Ron
Trimmer; 512-876-9097.
Round Rock Christian Church 22
Chalice Way, Round Rock. Rev. Linda
McWhorter 512-244-3260.
Chisholm Trail Cowboy Church 1500 CR
120, Weir; Pastor Jay H. Humphreys; 512868-7245; chisholmtrailcowboychurch.org
Faith Community Church Georgetown
40201 Industrial Park Cir; Alton Sutter,
Pastor; 512-966-7002.
Granger Brethren Church 306 W.
Broadway, Granger; 903-265-2277
Open Road Biker Church 8420 North
I-35, Exit 268 on the Northbound frontage
road; Pastor Butch Horton 512-966-8817
Promiseland Georgetown Church 2806
Mesquite Ln; Darren and Edwina Jones,
Pastors; 512-863-9012.
Saving Grace Christian Bible Fellowship 411 College; Leroy Jones, Pastor
512-869-4111
Sonshine Christian Church 2806
Mesquite Ln; Dr. David Trumble, Minister;
512-863-9012.
PENTECOSTAL
Iglesia de Dios Comunidad de Esperanza 303 E. Morrow St; Pastores: Elias &
Sonia Rivera www.cdegt.org
PRESBYTERIAN
Services
9:15 a.m.
PRESBYTERIAN
Continued
First Presbyterian Church
Worship: 8:30am & 11:00am
Sunday School 9:40am
www.fpcgeorgetown.org
Dr. Michael A. Roberts, Pastor
703 Church St. • 863-3381
Christ
Presbyterian
Church
of Georgetown (PCA)
Join us Sundays
Worship at
10:30 am
Mitchell Elementary
School - 1601 CR 110
(Rockridge Ln.)
512.966.9644
cpcgeorgetown.org
Warm • Engaging • Biblical
Oak Grove Church 12951 RR 2338; Rev.
Walter Hoke, Pastor; [email protected]
gmail.com
QUAKER
Friends (Quakers) 4134 Williams Dr,
Friendly Computers; www.georgetownfriendsmeeting.org
SEVENTH-DAY ADVENTIST
Georgetown Seventh Day Adventist
5105 S. I-35; Pastor Evgeni Kovachev;
512-569-3061.
UNITY
Fellowship:
10:30 a.m.
Sunday School
Classes:
11:00 a.m.
All Are Welcome!
San Gabriel
Presbyterian Church
Sunday Worship 9:15 a.m.
Followed by classes for all ages
Nursery Available during church services
5404 Williams Dr. • Georgetown
512-868-0902
www.sgpcgeorgetown.org
A Positive Path for Spiritual Living
Sunday Service: 10:30 a.m.
Georgetown Chamber of Commerce
1 Chamber Way
www.unitygeorgetown.org
512.686.5432
UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
San Gabriel Unitarian Universalist
Fellowship 1322 E. University Ave; 512688-5069.
To list your worship services and
meeting times, contact the Sun
512-930-4824 [email protected]
6B
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Who to call ...
CONSTRUCTION, INC
512-930-9187
www.dunkinapool.com
REMODELING
Texas Doors
& Windows
• TRAILER REPAIRS
• DRUMS & ROTORS TURNED
AND MORE!
512-868-9924
10OFF
(512)
912-6898
%
Mike Tanguay
Tyler Tanguay
with this ad only!
224 W. 8th St. Georgetown
Mon-Fri 8:00am-5:30pm
www.txdoorsandwindows.com
COMPUTERS
DRYWALL
COMPUTER PROBLEMS?
Tape
Float
n Prime
n Texture
AMERICAN
LAND S CAPING
TECH•NESE CONSULTING
n,1 the language of technology
since 2010
Victor & Modene Marek
32 Years Serving
Landscaping
Georgetown!
Tree Trimming
Landscaping
Dove Leases
Wild Life
n
COMPUTER & NETWORK MOBILE SERVICE
• home/business server/ethernet/wifi setup
• backup/syncing solutions
• business process automation
• media server for home/office
• website design
Nick Batts
512-922-2649 **Sun City
software engineer
& Senior
[email protected]
Discounts**
CONCRETE
DAVID
SILVA CONCRETE
All Types of Concrete Construction
•OrangePeel
•MontereyDrag
•HandTrowel
•SmoothWall
•ClayPlaster
512-818-5871 • [email protected]
ELECTRIC
I WANT TO BE
Your Electrician and AC man!
512-910-8989
Free Estimates
Insured
HOLCOMB ELECTRIC, INC.
GK HALL
CONSTRUCTION
residential
512-825-6687
ASK
ABOUT OUR
DISCOUNTS
A Georgetown Family Business
HARDIE SIDING • ROOFS • DECKS
WINDOWS/DOORS • KITCHEN/BATH RENOVATIONS
FLOORING • MASONRY • PAINT • DRYWALL
Free Estimates
512-565-0714
www.victormareklandscaping.com
www.marsdel.com
MOVING
ROOFING
FAMILY OWNED ROOFING COMPANY BASED IN GEORGETOWN
&
commercial
CONCRETE
Locally owned & opperated 27+ years
Gary Hall/Owner
(512) 930-3878
512-415-4590
NEWS RO
GOOD512-630-1440OFING
“Let Me Color Your World”
FREE, NO OBLIGATION
INSPECTIONS!!
CALL TODAY!
• Full Roof Replacements
• Insurance Specialists
• Asphalt Shingle & Metal Roof
• Bonded & Insured
• Interior/Exterior
• Residential
• Commercial
• Carpentry
Your local Christian Roofer
www.goodnewsroofing.com
ROOF DAMAGE?? We’ve helped our neighbors just
like you get a new roof due to damage they didn’t
even know was present. See what we can do for you!
512-508-1923
TAILORING
www.BratcherPainting.com
HANDYMAN
PA I N T I N G
HALLMARK SERVICES
HALLMARK SERVICES
Residential * Commercial
Residential • Commercial
GEORGETOWN’S
MASTER TAILOR
Shop
Interior/Exterior • Residential/Commercial
Master Craftsman
• Men & Women’s
Alterations
John Donohoe
o Jo
Building * Remodeling *NPainting
ll!
Residential *Building•Remodeling•Painting
Commercial
a
m
S
Too
Cabinetry•Doors•Windows
512-255-1664
b
• Great Rates
• Free Local Pick
Up & Delivery
Cabinetry
* Doors
RoomAdditions•PowerWashing
Remodeling
* Painting
* Windows
Building *
Free Estimates - References Available
Reasonable Prices • 40 years experience
Room
Additions
*
Power
Washing
G e orge *
t ow Windows
n C ha mb e r of C omme rce
Cabinetry * Doors
Serving Williamson
Over 36yrs Experience
5 1 2 - 2 Washing
4 0 - 4 Prices
2 1 0
Reasonable
* 40 years experience
Room Additions * Power
512-757-5527
• Siding & rot-wood replacement
• Sheet rock repairs
512-757-5527
• Wallpaper removal & wall texture
• COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL
• NEW CONSTRUCTION
• REMODELING
We specialize in old building renovations
512-930-5188
WWW.TATODDCONSTRUCTION.COM
Announcements
Newsprint end rolls for
sale! Useful for moving,
art projects, crawfish boils
and much more-use your
creativity! $.45/lb, Williamson County Sun, 707
S. Main Street, Georgetown.
Faith
Impact
Conference! Faith to
Live By! Friendly Will
Baptist Church. 706 W.
14th St., Georgetown.
August 18-20. 7:15pm
nightly. Free.
Automotive
2006 Jeep Wrangler X,
six-speed transmission,
straight six-cylinder engine, street tires like new.
63,000 mi. Red with black
soft top, excellent condition. Runs and looks like
new. This vehicle was
used as tow vehicle behind our motorhome and
has never been off road.
$15,000. Jim (626) 8254353.
BONDED & INSURED
EXPERIENCED EMPLOYEES
PROFESSIONAL, SAFE AND RELIABLE
• Pressure washer
000-000-0000
512-686-1980
www.mrhandyman.com
2002 Mustang wrecked
front end but good for
parts or you can repair it.
New tires that have never
been ridden on. A/C, engine, transmission are all
good. 176,000 miles,
$1500 firm. 512-7507307.
2006
PT
Cruiser, Tractor Service: Pasture
186,229
miles, standard shredding,
post holePM
drillHM_ServiceDir-Small_Grey.indd
2/7/07 110:55:27
transmission, runs good, ing. Rock is no problem.
needs
air-conditioner, 512-633-3958.
$1,500, OBO, 512-635Cut fertilizer cost, im3306.
2011 Black Rav4 80k
miles, brand-new tires,
single owner, full maintenance history on file, excellent condition. Asking
$16,500 O.B.O. 512-6350568.
1978 19’ Ski Supreme,
inboard, 351 Pleasurecraft Marine V-8, custom
cover, new trailer tires,
needs
some
repairs.
$1995.00, 512-869-9157.
2000 Ford Taurus SEL
4-door,200,000 mi. Runs
great, cold a/c, new battery, needs passenger air
bag repair. Kelly Blue
Book $1250, asking $800.
OBO. Contact 512-8695982 or 512-699-2999.
2006 Honda Element,
177,000
miles,
burnt
orange, excellent condition. Perfect for high
school or college student.
$4,795. Call 512-6953955.
Marine
Recreational
Vehicles
Admiral Storage 6608
Jim Hogg Drive. Self-storage, covered or open RV
and boat storage. Closest
to Lake Georgetown. 512508-0492 for lowest rates
in Georgetown.
Farm and Ranch
I buy goats. 512-5915865
prove soil, $22/acre. NTEXX15-5-5 application
increases growth and production. Also organic NTEXX + humus. Damon
Berry, 254-793-2318.
Pets
Dog Grooming. Private grooming salon
now accepting new clients. Over 28 years of
professional
dog
grooming experience.
Michele
512-9661746.
Lost and Found
Lost Giant Tortoise/
Turtle! Escaped from his
house near Lake Georgetown. Reward if found.
512-294-6933.
Call Barb Wilk
512-964-3606
County Since 1982
Georgetown
Chamber of Commerce
30+ YEARS Prices * 40 years
Reasonable
experience
STAR PAINTING
EXPERIENCE
Georgetown Chamber of Commerce
• Interior/Exterior painting
Are you the one to call?
Let people know!
n
n
n
n
Only $25/week (13 week commitment)
28,000 homes each week!
Over 112,000 copies distributed each month
Online at wilcosun.com
Insured & References Available
Call Suzanne Payne at 512-930-4824
or email [email protected]
512-699-0441
Garage Sales
311 Indian Meadow Dr.,
Sat
8/15,
7am-1pm.
Clothes, dishes, misc.
Huge Sale! Lots of
household
items,
antiques,
furniture,
clothes, books, misc.
Come
see!
Fri/Sat,
7:30am-12:30pm.
230
Baldwin, Hutto.
Moving Sale. 304 Debora
Dr. Georgetown. Fri/Sat,
Aug 14-15, 8am-4pm.
Tools, ladders, household
items, much more.
Estate Sale Longtime
Georgetown Residents.
2807 Gabriel View, Aug
15 Saturday 8-2 & Aug
16 Sunday 10-2. Go to
our website:
RenelEstateSales.com
for particulars & EstateSales.net for pictures.
House is full. Furniture,
kitchenwares,
books,
washer/dryer,
small
items, patio furniture,
linens, a huge array of
tools and more. No Children Allowed Inside.
605 Del Prado, Fri 8/15,
8am-1pm;
Sat
8/16,
8am-12n. Desk, entertainment center computer table, double bed,
clothes, misc.
Great Estate Sale. Friday
Aug 14- Sun Aug 16. 9am
daily 11am Sunday. You
must call or email me for
the address in this advertising restricted community. Go to steinbachauctions.com for contact info
and photos or call 512639-7415.
Moving Sale, 110 Creek
Dr. Georgetown. Sat 8/
15, 8am-3pm. Kitchenware, linens, lawncare,
hand & power tools, pool
accessories, Christmas,
etc.
Antiques
The Wood Shop. Antique
restoration, stripping, refinishing and furniture repair. Just past Walburg
(FM 972) right on CR331,
call for directions and information 512-863-7706.
• Repairs
• Replacement
• New Roof
• Metal Roof
• Steep Roof
• Low Pitch Roof
• Commercial
• Residential
[email protected]
www.texastraditionsroofing.com
PAINTING
Free Estimates
Over 30 Years Experience
Foundations • Driveways • Patios • Site work
We can meet all your roofing needs
Call today for a free inspection
Make your move to a Senior
Living Community manageable.
Jane McKinney
www.simplesolutionsdownsize.com
512.590.9411 • [email protected]
•Ceiling Fans & Fixtures
•Bulbs & Ballasts
•Additions & Remodels
512-299-3445
CONSTRUCTION
Will not be undersold!
Relocation & Downsizing
Made Easy
Electric & A C, LLC
Residential or
Commercial
Insured
512-818-3822
All types of remodeling,
inside and out.
Simple Solutions
Slabs • Drives • Walks • Patios
Roadwork • Metal Buildings
512-863-4650
512-917-4009
Georgetown Family Business Since 1988
Same Crew for 15 yrs
Co m m e r c i a l / Re s i d e n t i a l
Xeroscape • Lawn Maintenance
Mulch • Tree Trimming
Flowerbed Design
n
AFTER HOURS EMERGENCY RESPONSE
CONSTRUCTION
5 1 2 -8 4 3 -0 9 5 5
To Achieve Your Dreams Remember Your ABC’s
Entry & Patio Door
Replacement, Window
Replacement, and
Glass Services!
Call Today!
30 Years
Experience
To Achieve Your Dreams Remember Your ABC’s
• TUNE-UPS • SHOCKS
COMPUTER DIAGNOSTICS
BRAKES
512-956-1745
Avoid negative sources, people, places, things, and habits.
Avoid negative sources, people, places, things, and habits.
Believe in yourself.
B
elieve
in
yourself.
Consider
thingsthings
fromfrom
every
angle.
Consider
every
angle.
Don’t give
Don’tup
give
and
up don’t
and don’t
givegive
in. in.
Enjoy
life today,
yesterday
is gone,
tomorrowmay
may never
never come.
Enjoy life
today,
yesterday
is gone,
tomorrow
come.
Family
and friends
are hidden
treasures,
seek
themand
and enjoy
enjoy their
Family and
friends
are hidden
treasures,
seek
them
theirriches.
riches.
Give more than you planned to.
Give more
than you planned to.
Hang on to your dreams.
Hang on
to your dreams.
Ignore those who try to discourage you.
Ignore those who try to discourage you.
J
ust
do
it.
Just do it.
K
eep
trying
no matter how hard it seems, it will get easier.
Love yourself,
Keep trying
firsthow
and most.
no matter
hard it seems, it will get easier.
Make it happen.
Love yourself,
first and most.
ever lie, cheat or steal, always strike a fair deal.
Make itNhappen.
Open your eyes and see things as they really are.
Never lie, cheat or
steal, always strike a fair deal.
Practice makes perfect.
Open your
eyes
and see
things asnever
they quit.
really are.
Quitters
never win
and winners
Practice makes perfect.
R
ead,
study
and
learn
about
everything important in your life.
Quitters
never
win and winners never quit.
Stop
procrastinating.
Take control
of your
own destiny.
Read, study
and learn
about
everything important in your life.
Understand yourself in order to better understand others.
Stop procrastinating.
Visualize
Take control
ofit.your own destiny.
Want it more than anything.
Understand yourself in order to better understand others.
Xcellerate your efforts.
Visualize
Youit.are unique of all God’s creations, nothing can replace you.
Want itZmore
than
anything.
ero in on
your
target and go for it.
Xcellerate your efforts.
You are unique of all God’s creations, nothing can replace you.
Zero in on your target and go for it.
Mike’s Automotive
WELDING
Industry
Professional
since 1993
DOORS/WINDOWS
For Quality Auto Care
AC
Adrian Duncan
[email protected] • texasgreengrounds.com
CELL: 512-844-6664
AUTOMOTIVE
gre e n o u n ds.c
gr
512-639-7073
Veteran Owned & Operated
Commercial • Residential
Insured • Bonded
George Stanley, Owner, U.S. Army, Retired
512-869-8139
TACL11393C
Dunk in Pools
Build • Design • Remodel • Water Features • Repairs
r o u n d s Ma i n t e n
, LLC .
Over 30 Years Experience
FREE ESTIMATES
xas
Te
CALL GARY TODAY!
en G
an c e
BOWIEN HEAT & AIR
•Residential & Commercial Construction
•Interior & Exterior Remodeling
•Custom home Construction
POOL
Texas Green Grounds
MainTenance, LLc
om
JACK JOHNSON
LANDSCAPING
re
CONTINUED
Texas G
CONSTRUCTION
A/C
Antique radios repair &
sales, models displayed
at www.vadaxradio.com,
512-221-1335.
All About Kids Daycare.
Now enrolling infants to 5
years. 512-966-8736. Fifteen years experience. All
meals provided. First
month discount.
Fuller Brush/Stanley
Home Products, call your
local distributor 512 4508097 for a free catalog. A
tradition of quality since
1906.
A great Christmas or
Birthday gift. I convert
your 35mm color slides,
VHS, Betamax tapes, and
reel movies to DVDs!
Play on your computer or
TV. Bill Warner, 512-8680944 for reasonable rates.
Miscellaneous
Furniture
Child Care
GEORGETOWN
MINI STORAGE
Shop &
Compare
( No D e p o s i t )
Competition
1 0 x 1 0
1 0 x 2 0
1 0 x 3 0
$102
$160
$230
Y o u Pa y
$ 6 9
$ 1 1 9
$ 1 4 9
Across from High School
512-863-0197
Samsung refrigerator,
stainless, $800. Kenmore
W/D white, electric $300
both. Shabby-chic white
hutch $350. L-shaped
couch, seafoam blue
$750. 512-698-5050.
Large Beige Lazy-Boy
recliner less than 1 year
old, excellent condition,
$450 firm. Call 361-2440488.
Continued on 7B
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
Take advantage of figs thriving here
W
e’re very fortunate to live in
an area where fig trees grow
so well, and harvest time is
right around the corner.
I love figs — always have,
always will. My favorites for snacking
are dried Calimyrna; they’re sweet,
chewy, and have the slightest background note of anise flavor.
Fig trees are native to the Middle
East. They’ve been cultivated as an
important food crop since ancient
times. They like dry, sunny areas
and — on average — aren’t too particular about soil type. They’re also
drought-tolerant. Here in Texas, they
grow to be more of a large shrub than
a tree, and can reach heights of over
30 feet.
The fruit itself is a botanical
oddity. It’s actually a swollen portion
of stem that contains a multitude of
tiny hidden flowers that eventually
mature into many tiny fruits, each
producing an individual seed. These
hidden flowers are pollinated by a
certain species of wasp that’s able
to crawl inside the immature fig
through a small hole at the bottom.
Figs must ripen on the tree, and
once picked don’t last long or travel
well. Therefore, most fig production
goes to dried figs that can withstand
the rigors of storage, distribution,
and sale.
However, fully ripened fresh figs
are delicious and, depending on the
variety, taste like a combination of
peaches and strawberries. Take advantage of them when available.
Following are some great ways to
use figs when the harvest comes in:
Quail with Figs and Balsamic
Vinegar
Add to a saucepan one 12-ounce jar
of fig preserves, 1/2 cup dry red wine,
three tablespoons balsamic vinegar,
two teaspoons whole-grain mustard,
and 1/2 teaspoon coarsely ground
black pepper. Bring the mixture to a
boil over medium-high heat, turn it
down to low, and simmer for about 10
minutes. Place half of this mixture in
the refrigerator in a covered container; let the other half sit out.
G’TOWN
CHEF
Mike D’Amelio
Lay out eight semi-boneless quail
on a parchment-lined baking sheet,
and sprinkle with kosher salt. Bake
the quail in a preheated 450-degree
oven for 10 minutes.
Remove the quail from the oven,
brush generously with the warm fig
mixture, turn the oven down to 400
degrees, and bake for another 30 minutes. Baste the quail with the leftover
warm fig mixture every 10 minutes
until done.
To make the sauce, mix the chilled
fig mixture in a saucepan with two
tablespoons of dry red wine. Cook the
sauce at medium, stirring frequently, until well heated. Serve with the
roasted quail.
Fig Ice Cream
Melt two tablespoons of butter in
a large non-stick pan over medium
heat. Add four cups coarsely chopped
fresh figs (stems removed) and 1/2
cup brown sugar. Cook the mixture
for 10 minutes, stirring occasionally.
Stir in 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon and
remove the pan from the heat.
Mix one cup plus two tablespoons
sugar, three tablespoons flour, and 1/4
teaspoon salt in a saucepan. Slowly
whisk in one cup whole milk and
1 1/2 cups half-and-half. Cook this
mixture over medium heat, stirring
constantly, for about 15 minutes until
it starts to thicken. Remove from
Continued from 6B
Building Trades
Yard Work,
Landscaping
Buddy’s
Georgetown
tree trimming, yard mowing, haul off. Free estimates. 512-508-6555.
Miller’s Tree Service Almost never underbid.
Trimming, pruning, roof
clearing, firewood, stump
grinding, haul-off. Free
estimates. Insured. 512869-1012.
Jimenez Tree Service &
Landscaping. Trimming,
removal, flower beds,
mulch, patios, stump
grinding, lot clearing, retaining walls, fence. Insured. Free estimates.
Jose, 254-541-9453
Jacinto,
254-541-9452
www.254treeservice.com
Jack’s Bobcat Service
brush cleaning, tree removal, mowing, spread
gravel, 512-635-7007.
www.victormareklands
caping.com.
Trees,
Shrubs & Landscaping,
Pruning, Removal, Hauling, Flower Beds, Top
Soil. General yard work.
32 years serving the
Georgetown area. Victor
Marek, Toll Free 888-9453822 or cell 512-8183822.
Handyman
Services
Brad’s Handyman
5 1 2 .8 4 4 .6 6 6 4
[email protected]
Tools of the
Trade
Construction, remodel,
repair, kitchen, bath,
garages,
storage,
decks, patios, barns,
fencing. All types of
construction. 512-6354553, Bo Stearns, lifetime resident.
Elder’s Paint Contracting Custom residential
painting. Pressure washing & carpentry available.
Jerry Elder, 512-931-2864
Rock, brick, concrete,
masonry work. Georgetown and all surrounding
areas. Free estimates.
Call Paul Farmer, 512258-1435.
Don’s Paint & Maintenance.
Interior/exterior
paint specialist. Since
1978. Local. Brush/roll
only. Pressure washing
and light carpentry available. Call Don, 930-2649.
Sheetrock repair, wallpaper, popcorn removal,
remodel, hang, tape, float,
texture. Insured. Paul
Sandelovic Drywall. Since
1975. 512-923-9610
Services
Welding-Sandblasting/
Powder
Coating-Machining. Email:
georgetownmakershop
@gmail.com,
512-8685557.
Furniture Refinishing,
25 years experience. Free
estimates, call David 512587-5279.
Private Chef Services
specializing in customized private dinner parties in the comfort of your
own home. For more
information go to
www.GeorgetownChef.com
or call 512-410-4854.
Webers Upholstery Reupholster your furniture.
Will do leather, vinyl, fabrics. Also do headliners.
254-527-3998.
Elder Care
Caregiver CMA looking
for full or part-time employment specializing in
Alzheimer’s disease. Dependable and excellent
references,
512-8689339.
Carpentry, 45yrs exp.,
indoor painting. Punctual
and never any money up
front. 512-718-8960.
Have truck will haul.
Garage clean-out, tree
debris, appliances, summer clean up. All your
hauling and cleaning
needs. Reasonable rates.
512-635-1971
Handyman Service &
Repair. Electrical, drywall,
framing, additions, decks
and haul-off. References
available. Local since
1990. $45/hr. 512-9665856.
Gilbert Carpentry, Drywall repair, kitchen cabinet repair, bathroom tile,
painting, door hardware,
ceiling fans, light fixtures,
repairs decks. 818-4000690, 512-868-5992.
Employment
Immediate employment
for auto mechanic, 3-4
yrs. experience. Contact
Miguel Cardona. 512-8636363. Referred by Aurora.
Immediate Openings. Fiberglass/plastic Product
Mfg. in Walburg has several openings for production workers. Training provided. Please call 512868-0346 to apply or fax
resume to 512-868-0351.
Keller
Landscaping:
Help Needed! Driver’s License preferred, but not
required. 512-930-4769.
Tally’s Lawn & Landscaping, hiring for lawncare and landscaping experience. Willing to pay
$11-$12 an hour. Please
call 512-626-5022.
Detailer
needed
for
horse trailer service department in Jarrell. Call
Katie 512-746-2515.
heat.
Whisk two eggs in a mixing bowl,
and slowly add one cup of the hot
half-and-half mixture to the eggs
while whisking vigorously. Do this
very slowly or you’ll end up with
scrambled eggs. When fully mixed,
slowly pour the egg mixture into
the pan containing the rest of the
half-and-half mixture while whisking
vigorously.
Combine this well with the
cooked fig mixture. Refrigerate the
whole thing for at least two hours or
overnight. Just before making the
ice cream in an ice cream maker,
combine the chilled fig mixture with
two more cups half-and-half and two
tablespoons of vanilla extract.
Note: To make maple-fig ice cream,
replace 1/2 cup of sugar with 1/3 cup
of pure maple syrup.
Fig Appetizers
Toast 1/4 cup of raw shelled pistachios in a dry skillet over medium-high heat for about two minutes.
Let the nuts cool, then coarsely chop
them.
Remove the stems from eight fresh
figs and cut them in half lengthwise.
Place them on a serving dish, cut side
up. Press the cut surface of each fig
half with the backside of a teaspoon
to create a shallow cavity.
Place a small spoonful of fresh
ricotta cheese in each cavity, sprinkle
with chopped pistachios, drizzle with
honey, and serve.
Grilled Figs
These are great on a salad, as a side
dish, or just for snacking.
Remove stems from fresh figs and
cut in half lengthwise. Brush the fig
halves with olive oil and season with
salt and pepper. Grill over high heat,
cut side down, until the surface of
the figs just starts to char. Remove to
a serving plate and let cool slightly
before eating.
Mike D’Amelio is a private chef. You
can reach him at [email protected], or through his website
at www.GeorgetownChef.com.
Nursery Director needed
for G’town Church. PT=13
hours per week. Must
have experience with
childcare and / or administrative experience with
caregivers of children.
Must be able to plan, organize and supervise.
Must have ability to relate
well with children, church
staff, members and parents. Email resume by
August
17th
to
[email protected]
c.
New Images Salon has
openings for stylists and a
private room for aesthetician, massage, etc. Call
Kathy, 512-869-9560.
Want free golf? Come
join the Marshal’s staff at
Georgetown
Country
Club. Contact Kyle Phelan 512 930-4577 x223.
Not ready to retire?
Experienced professional
with great communication
skills: work in a corporate
office (Austin) OR from
home? DJM Sales, an 18
year old company has the
perfect opportunity for
you. Competitive base
salary, plus commission.
Computer proficiency REQUIRED. Sales experience is a plus, but not
required! Contact Arielle
for information and to
apply!
[email protected]
.com (512) 337-8100
www.yourdjm.com
Liberty Hill ISD Hiring
Bus
Drivers
$14.50$14.80/ Hr. Liberty Hill
ISD is Now Hiring Bus
Drivers for the 2015-2016
School Years. Great pay
and benefits with summers off. No experience
needed. Paid training to
obtain Class B CDL with
P and S endorsements.
Must have safe driving
record. Pass background
check, drug test and DOT
physical exam. Must have
exceptional attendance
and punctuality. Part-time
schedule 20+ hours a
week, great for retired individuals, college students or parents of school
aged children. Please apply online (must be 21).
www.libertyhill.txed.net
under “Employment Tab”.
For further information
contact the Transportation Department at 512379-3250.
Immediate opening for
full-time day shift experienced wait-staff, part-time
evening wait-staff and line
cook. Apply at Georgetown Country Club, 1500
Country Club Rd.
Part-time Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday. Hours
are12pm-5pm. Great customer service, counter &
backroom duties. Pick up
application at Orange
Leaf Frozen Yogurt, Wolf
Ranch.
TNT Farms: Part-time
barn help needed (5 hours
per day-20 hours per
week). Must have own
transportation and familiar
with horses. Flexibility in
schedule required. 512876-7797.
Apartment
complex
seeking a HVAC tech,
certification
preferred;
must pass background
check. Benefits offered.
EOE. Call 512-863-5992,
fax resume: 512-8199750.
Taylor Auto Credit. Apply in person at Corporate
Offices, 1912 N. Main St.,
Taylor, TX. or email resume
to
[email protected]
.com. Hours 9am-6pm, 5
days/week, Sales associate and account rep position available in Georgetown, bilingual and TDL
required, likes people,
computer skills a plus.
Great benefits, paid vacation, holidays, medical
insurance, 401K. Great
pay, salary +commission.
Company in business for
25 years.
Office Assistant needed
for G’town Church. PT
=15 hours per week. Must
have computer skills.
Must possess the ability
to multi-task and meet
deadlines. Experience in
Publisher is desired. Must
exhibit a personable and
friendly disposition. Email
resume by August 17th to
[email protected]
c.
Residential Wireman &
Serviceman,
Holcomb
Electric Inc. 512-9303878.
Very busy Georgetown
FP looking for dependable
MA to work FT, M-F 117pm. Some Saturdays 9Noon required. Fax resume to 512-868-1527 or
email
to
[email protected]
Help Wanted: Laurie’s
Tea Room, food server/
kitchen help, 612 S.
Main St. Georgetown,
512-863-5875.
Childcare facility looking
for FT & PT teacher and
floater. Must be experienced, mature, dependable, with HS diploma.
512-869-3338.
Hiring Servers!! The
Monument Caf‚ and El
Monumento in Georgetown is now accepting applications for friendly, energetic, motivated individuals who thrive in a
fast-paced, team-oriented
environment. Restaurant
experience is preferred
but not necessary. We
are looking for professional Servers for both
morning and evening
shifts. We have been a
solid and stable restaurant in Georgetown for
over 18 years, and we are
now offering you a
chance to become a part
of something special. We
offer: A Professional and
Positive work environment, Paid Vacation,
Meal Plan, Full and parttime positions. Some
weekend availability is required. Applicants should
demonstrate superior energy, intelligence, work
ethic and commitment to
providing genuine hospitality. Please fill out our
employment application
at
www.hr7exec.com/apply/
mmt. Monument Caf‚
Group, LLC, takes pride
in the quality of our team
members, food, service
and facilities. Find out
more
at
www.themonumentcafe.
com
Drivers-Company & O/
Op’s: Get Home MoreSpend Time w/Family &
Friends!
Dedicated
Lanes! Pay and Benefits
YOU Deserve! 855-5822265
7B
Volunteers needed
Want to help out in your community? A new feature in the Life
section will be an on-going list of volunteer opportunities. Here are a
few:
BREAST CANCER RESOURCE CENTERS
Volunteers are wanted to assist clients with important tasks like
transportation to appointments and treatment, lawn care for those
unable to do it themselves, companionship, running errands and
delivering food. Contact [email protected] for more info and training.
EXCEPTIONAL GEORGETOWN ALLIANCE
The Exceptional Georgetown Alliance needs volunteers for the
seventh annual 5K
Boo Run on Saturday, October 31, in San Gabriel Park. Contact Dede
Harper via email at [email protected], or www.
exceptionalgeorgetown.org for more information.
FAITH IN ACTION GEORGETOWN
Faith in Action Georgetown invites everyone 18 years or older to join
its Driving Force. Help senior neighbors stay healthy and independent
by driving them to appointments, the grocery store, and other
places. Schedules are flexible. Other volunteer opportunities are also
available; call the volunteer coordinator at 512-868-9544.
UNITED WAY OF WILLIAMSON COUNTY
The United Way of Williamson County is planning its Day of Caring
for Friday, September 11, in conjunction with the National Day of Service
and Remembrance. From 9 a.m. to noon, volunteer projects will take
place to help local nonprofit agencies, schools and parks, whether it’s
painting or light construction work, sorting donations, building trails,
spending time with senior citizens, or reading with children. For more
information, visit https://unitedwaywilco-day-of-caring.eventbrite.
com/.
LITERACY COUNCIL OF WILLIAMSON COUNTY
The Literacy Council of Williamson County is a health-based family
literacy program in southeast Georgetown. Training will be provided
and the commitment is three to four hours weekly for one year.
For more information, contact Robert Pinhero at 512-869-0497 or
[email protected]
BROOKWOOD IN GEORGETOWN
There are new opportunities to step up “BiG” by working side-byside citizens in enterprises like horticulture, pottery, jewelry, cards and
granola. Volunteers can work a few hours or all day Monday through
Thursday. They can also come in during the lunch hour to eat and
socialize with the citizens to give supervisors a break. Volunteers are
needed for four-hour shifts to cashier and explain BiG’s mission to
customers at the shop, 202 South Austin Avenue in Georgetown. To
learn more about the program, tours are every Wednesday at 12:30
p.m. To volunteer, contact Robin at [email protected]
Legacy Hills Grille at
Sun City will be opening soon and we want
you to become a member of our team. We
are a full service restaurant and bar and
need
experienced
waitstaff, cooks, bussers, and dishwashers. We have several
positions
available.
Give us a call at 512688-5213.
Ranch work: must have
truck for hay pickups: fixit
skills: barn and yard
maintenance.
Flexible
hours. 5 miles from courthouse east side. Background check. $12 phr.
512-948-8990.
Grace Epicopal School
hiring certified teacher for
Pre-K class. Part-time job
and full-time fun. 512-8636214 or [email protected]
graceschool1992.org.
The Wood Group is hiring Direct Care Staff for
Residential facility in
Georgetown. F/T and P/T
shifts available. Entry level position, no certification
required. To apply visit
our
website
www.thewoodgroup.us
and fax application to our
corporate office, 940-7670466. For questions call
512-819-0630.
Newspaper
carriers
wanted for the Georgetown/Weir/Granger areas.
Carriers are Independent
Contractors and are paid
on a per piece basis.
Route earnings average
$900 to $1200 per month.
Must a valid driver’s license and current vehicle
insurance. For information
email your name, phone #
and
zip
code
to:
[email protected]
Solomon Corporation, a
Transformer Repair Facility is accepting applications for Entry Level
Positions, Assembly &
Dis-Assembly, Sanding/
Painting,
Shipping/Receiving and Stacking/
Winding Cores. Technical
position - Recloser Repair. Apply on-line at
www.solomoncorp.com,
send
resume
to
[email protected]
om or fill out application at
100 Cooperative Way,
Georgetown, TX 78626.
EOE.
Customer Service, immediate opening for Sales
Clerks. Dry cleaning drop
store in Georgetown and
Round Rock. Good pay.
512-534-1159.
$500 sign on bonus.
CL&L Trucks Hiring CDL
drivers. Brand new 2014
dedicated trucks. Home
every 36 hours. Competitive package includes
health insurance, paid vacation, company 401k, Bi
annual raises and guaranteed $700 a week minimum. Must be 25 yrs of
age and 2 years driving
experience. 254-527-3342
Ask for Lacey or Tom.
Work Wanted
Experienced editor offers proofreading, writing,
editing. Call 816-6682410
or
email
[email protected]
Real Estate,
Residential
ONE OF A KIND multi
use property only 4.5
miles from Wolf Ranch on
2.64 acres; executive
style home; ltd restrictions; huge 1500 sf workshop; bring business,
kids, animals to 450
Chaparral Rd! Pamela
Mehl, Realtor, Scenic Realty, 512-872-5971
For Sale by owner: Condo 2BD/2.5BA, 2 gated
underground
garages,
stainless Thermador applicances,
hardwood
floors, large balcony with
beautiful views of Ruidoso,
New
Mexico.
$329,000. 210-602-2800.
10 Acre hilltop with pond
and trees on paved road.
No mobiles, $105,000.
East of Taylor, Thrall ISD,
512-659-2069.
I Buy Houses and land.
All cash, fast closing, any
condition. 512-377-9463
Darling 3/2/2, 1-story
Meadows of Georgetown,
cul-de-sac. Open kitchen/
dining area, pantry, double sink, master bathroom, walk-in closet, ceiling fans, large fenced
yard. LAWN CARE INCLUDED.
NO
pets,
smoking. $1250+deposit.
Available 9/01. Hometown
Realty, 512-255-1569.
Acreage and Lots
1.2 ac., I-35 Jarrell
6 ac., I-35 Salado
10 ac. tracts E of Georgetown
20 ac. native oaks, home,
guest house
25 ac. wooded W Salado
U/C
50 ac., I-35 Belton
50 ac. S of Salado, pond
and barn
93 ac. Holland SOLD
Century 21 Bill Bartlett
Salado 254-947-5050
Rentals,
Residential
Georgian
Apartments
Spacious 1 BR, quiet
complex in historic district. Pool, laundry facility,
patio/balconies. 1700 S.
Austin Ave. 930-0933
Katy Crossing, 4BD/
2BA/2CG, fenced yard,
1640sqft. Small pets OK.
$1400/mo., 12-mo. lease.
$1300 dep. Spyglass Investments, LLC. 512-5877934.
Quite country living in
Georgetown,
spacious
studio guest house in the
trees w/pool, private parking, washer/dryer hookup, storage available. Utilities/lawn care paid.
Contact:
[email protected]
3BD/2BA/2CG
House
for Lease. 117 Orange
Tree,
Crystal
Knoll.
1378sq. One small pet
considered.
$1300/mo.
Yard maint. incl. 512868-0091.
TEXAS
TRADITIONS
404 SABINE DRIVE, 55+
COMMUNITY,
$1495/
MONTH, 2BR/2BA. Appliances included, gas/
electric, 2 car garage,
decorative landscaping,
hardwood/tile
flooring,
covered patio in front and
back, 1571 sq ft. No pets,
non-smoking. PILGRIM
MANAGEMENT
COMPANY (512)869-2638.
www.pilgrimmanagemen
t.com
2BD Apartment,
full
kitchen, fireplace, utility
and storage room, covered patio, no pets, call
for appointment, $800/
mo. 1 year lease, 512863-8568, 512-818-0553,
Jim Caskey.
804 Dunman, Georgetown. 3BD/2BA, garage,
lrg. fenced yard. Tile and
wood vinyl floors. $1200/
mo,
$1,000/sec.dep.
Available now. 512-7977892, 512-797-7894.
Mobile Homes
For Rent
Mobile home for rent
20239 McShepherd Rd.
2BR/1.5BA. W/D connections, large covered
porch, large yard. $525/
month-plus deposit. 512930-0927, 512-876-8290
Continued on 8B
The Williamson County Sun
Office Hours: 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. Monday through Friday
Closed Saturday & Sunday
Phone: 512.930-4824
Email: [email protected]
Fax: 512.868.0314
Mail: P.O. Box 39, Georgetown, Texas 78627
Office: 707 Main Street, Georgetown, Texas 78626
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8B
I
The Williamson County Sun, August 12, 2015
It’s time to share recipes from friends
have four great new recipes this week from friends
and neighbors.
It seems to be an almost-universal truth that
people who love to cook also
love to talk about, and share,
recipes. Lucky for me that
that’s the case!
Samantha’s Chicken with
Sun-dried Tomato Cream
Sauce
8 bone-in, skin-on chicken
thighs
Kosher salt and freshly
ground black pepper, to taste
3 T. unsalted butter, divided
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 t. red pepper flakes, or
more to taste
1 cup chicken broth (homemade is always best)
1/2 cup heavy cream
1/3 cup julienned sundried tomatoes in olive oil,
drained
1/4 cup freshly grated
Parmesan
1/4 t. dried thyme
1/4 t. dried oregano
1/4 t. dried basil
1/4 cup basil leaves, chiffonade (cut into thin strips)
Heat oven to 400 degrees.
Season chicken thighs with
salt and pepper to taste. (I’m
Legal Notices
PROJECT PROPOSAL
NOTICE
REQUEST FOR
PROPOSALS
American Constructors, Inc.
will receive subcontract and
material proposals for the
Burnet CISD Multi-Campus
Renovation
Package
2
(Shady Grove ES & Burnet
High School). Proposals are
due on or before Thursday,
Shrimp and Okra Hush
Puppies
n
One evening last week,
Linda McCalla and I had
dinner in the home of Cindy
Posey, and she whipped up
these three new recipes that
were really delicious. This
first one is a wonderful way
to prepare summertime
produce, and is slightly
spicy and so tasty! It is
pronounced “mock shoe”
and is otherwise known as
Cajun corn.
n
A few weeks ago at a Heritage Society Third Thursday
gathering, Michael Walton
was raving about this dish
that his wife Samantha had
prepared for dinner.
I asked, and she was nice
enough to share the recipe!
Isn’t it nice to have your
cooking appreciated by
those you love?
but I’ve never met a hush
puppy I didn’t like! These
were just fantastic.
minutes.
Serve immediately, garnished with fresh basil if
desired. Serves 8. Samantha
Walton.
COOK’S
CORNER
Laurie Locke
Cindy’s Maque Choux
always generous.) Melt 2 T.
butter in large oven-proof
skillet over medium heat.
(You might want to add
just a little olive oil to keep
butter from burning.) Add
chicken, skin-side down, and
sear both sides until golden
brown, about two to three
minutes per side. Set aside.
Melt remaining tablespoon butter in skillet.
Add garlic and red pepper
flakes and cook, stirring
frequently, until fragrant,
about one to two minutes.
Stir in chicken broth, heavy
cream, sun-dried tomatoes,
Parmesan, thyme, oregano
and basil.
Bring to a boil; reduce
heat and simmer until
slightly thickened, about
three to five minutes. Return
chicken to skillet.
Place into oven and roast
until completely cooked
through, reaching an
internal temperature of
175 degrees, about 25 to 30
August 20, 2015 at 2:00 pm
CST. Interested parties may
obtain further information
from
our
website
www.acitexas.com.
American Constructors, Inc.
4330 Gaines Ranch Loop,
#230
Austin, Texas 78735
Phone: 512/328-2026
Fax: 512-328-2520
[email protected]
PUBLIC NOTICE
The Round Rock ISD will be
accepting sealed bids for:
Fire Alarm Inspections,
1 cup self-rising yellow
cornmeal mix
1/2 cup self-rising flour
1 cup medium-size raw
shrimp, chopped
1 t. Creole seasoning
1/2 cup frozen diced onion,
red and green bell pepper,
and celery...thawed
1/2 cup frozen cut okra,
thawed and chopped
1 large egg, lightly beaten
3/4 cup beer
Canola oil
1/4 lb. (4 oz.) spicy smoked
sausage, diced
1/2 cup chopped sweet
onion
1/2 cup chopped green bell
pepper
2 garlic cloves, minced
3 cups fresh corn kernels
1 cup sliced fresh okra
1 cup peeled, seeded and
diced tomato
Creole seasoning, garlic
powder, salt and pepper to
taste.
Stir together the cornmeal mix and flour in
large bowl until combined.
Sprinkle shrimp with Creole
seasoning. Add shrimp,
onion mixture and okra to
cornmeal mixture. Stir in
egg and beer and mix just
until moistened. Let stand
five to seven minutes.
Pour oil to depth of four
inches into a Dutch oven or
cast iron skillet. Heat to 350
degrees. Drop batter by level
tablespoonfuls into hot oil
and fry, in batches, two to
two 1/2 minutes on each side
or until golden brown. Drain
on paper towels.
Serve immediately or
keep warm in low oven (225
degrees) for up to 15 minutes. Cindy Posey.
Note: if you can’t find
the frozen, chopped onion
mixture, just use fresh ingredients in equal proportions to
make 1/2 cup total.
Sauté sausage in large
skillet over medium-high
heat for three minutes or
until browned.
Add onion, bell pepper
and garlic and sauté five
minutes or until tender.
Add corn, okra, and tomato;
cook, stirring often, for 10
minutes.
Season with seasonings to
taste. Serves 4-6. Cindy Posey.
n
I don’t know about you,
Service, Repair & Installation
Bid#PE16-007
Opens 2:00 pm,
August 25, 2015
Solicitation will be opened at,
and documents may be obtained from the RRISD Purchasing Dept, 16255 Great
Oaks Dr Ste 200, Round
Rock, TX 78681, (512) 4646950 or at
www.roundrockisd.org.
Vendors are encouraged to
register in the District’s
eROC Electronic Procurement Program online at
http://www.roundrockisd.org/
n
index.aspx?page=2348
future bid opportunities.
for
PUBLIC HEARING
CITY OF WEIR
WILL BE HOLDING A
PUBLIC HEARING ON THE
2015-2016 BUDGET
Thursday , September 10,
2015, 7:00 p.m.
NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
TO ALL INTERESTED
PERSONS THAT:
The City of Weir, Texas will
discuss the 2015-2016 City
budget. The City of Weir will
hold a Public Hearing at 7:00
p.m. on Thursday, the 10th
day of September 2015, at
the City of Weir, City Hall,
2205 South Main St. in regard
to the 2015-2016 Budget.
The City encourages all citizens to participate in this
meeting for the Budget and to
make their views known at
this public hearing.
By order of the City Council
of the City of Weir, Texas.
This the 6th day of August,
2015.
Mervin Walker
This salad was the perfect
cool and refreshing side for
the spicier entree!
Watermelon and Feta
Salad
3 1/2 lbs. seedless watermelon (rind removed), cut
into 1-inch cubes (6 cups)
2 T. fresh lime juice
1/2 cup fresh basil leaves,
cut into thin strips
Coarse salt and ground
black pepper
4 oz. feta cheese, broken
into small pieces, 1 cup
In large bowl, combine
watermelon, lime juice and
half the basil; season with
salt and pepper. Toss to
combine.
Divide among four plates,
scatter cheese and remaining basil on top. Serves 4.
Cindy Posey.
n
Great tastes for summertime suppers....thanks to
Samantha and Cindy for
sharing! I’m just waiting
for that first little breeze of
autumn to blow through,
giving us hope for cooler
weather before too long.
In the meantime, enjoy
those fresh tomatoes and
other produce that summertime brings! Have a good
week!
Laurie Locke is a psychotherapist in Georgetown, and
was the original owner of
the food businesses Laurie’s
and Laurie’s Too. She continues to cook, entertain and
stay involved in the foodie
community. Contact her at
[email protected]
Mayor, City of Weir
Attest: Julia Navarrette
Secretary, City of Weir
No. 15-0492-CP4
IN COUNTY COURT
AT LAW NO. 4
WILLIAMSON COUNTY,
TEXAS
IN THE ESTATE OF
JOHN GEORGE DAVID
REDRUPP, DECEASED
NOTICE TO CREDITORS
Notice is hereby given that on
July 21, 2015, JAN ERIK REDRUPP qualified for Letters
Testamentary upon the Es-
Sun City
composer
wins
contest
M.L. Daniels of Sun City
recently won the Texas Orchestra Director’s Association
composition contest.
The music composer conducted a composition at a convention in San Antonio. It’s the
third time he’s won the contest.
He won it in 1999 and 2007.
Mr. Daniels studied at
Abilene Christian University
after serving three years in a
U.S. Air Force Band. He completed his doctorate at the University of North Texas, where
he studied with Samuel Adler.
He joined the music faculty
at ACU in 1959 after teaching
at the high school level. He
taught at the university in
Abilene, Texas, for 34 years,
serving as the music department chairman in the 1960s
and 1970s.
He retired in 1993 and
moved to Austin before moving to Sun City earlier this
year.
He has over 100 published
compositions, including works
for brass ensemble, solo wind
instrument and piano, full orchestra, string orchestra, band
and string quartet. He is a fourtime winner of the National
School Orchestra Association
Composition Contest.
For the past few years, he
has served as the orchestra
composer-in-residence for the
Williamson County Symphony Orchestra.
tate of JOHN GEORGE DAVID REDRUPP, Deceased.
Such Letters were granted to
the Independent Executor by
the Honorable County Court
at Law No. 4 of Williamson
County, Texas, in Cause No.
15-0492-CP4, pending upon
the Probate Docket of said
Court.
All persons having claims
against said Estate are hereby instructed to present the
same within the time prescribed by law to the personal
representative in care of the
personal representative’s at-
torneys at the address shown
below:
JAN ERIK REDRUPP
c/o Nance & Simpson, L.L.P.
2603 Augusta, Suite 1000
Houston, Texas 77057
Notice is hereby given that
the City of Florence will
hold a Public Hearing August 24, 2015, at 6:00 pm,
to hear public comment on
the proposed 2015/2016
budget. The hearing will be
located at the Florence City
Hall, 106 South Patterson,
Florence, Texas, 76527.
WATER DISTRICT NOTICE OF PUBLIC
HEARING ON TAX RATE
NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING
ON TAX RATE
The West Williamson County Municipal Utility District No. 1 will hold a
public hearing on a proposed tax rate for the tax year 2015 on Tuesday,
August 25, 2015, at 6:00 P.M. at the offices of Gray Engineering, Inc., 8834
North Capital of Texas Highway, Suite 140, Austin, Texas 78759.
The Williamson County Municipal Utility District #26 will hold a public
hearing on a proposed tax rate for the tax year 2015 on September 4, 2015 at
noon at the Cimarron Hills Clubhouse located at 200 Cimarron Hills Trail
West, Georgetown, Texas 78628.
Your individual taxes may increase or decrease, depending on the change in
the taxable value of your property in relation to the change in taxable value
of all other property and the tax rate that is adopted.
Your individual taxes may increase or decrease, depending on the change in
taxable value of your property in relation to the change in the taxable value
of all other property and the tax rate that is adopted.
FOR the proposal:
AGAINST the proposal:
PRESENT and not voting:
ABSENT:
FOR the proposal:
Directors Jones, Dickehut and Unger
None
None
Directors Frazee and Hutcheson
The following table compares taxes on an average residence homestead in
this taxing unit last year to taxes proposed on the average residence homestead this year.
Last Year
This Year
Total tax rate (per $100 of value)
$0.9000 / $100
$0.9000 / $100
Adopted
Proposed
Difference in rates per $100 of value
$ 0.0000 / $100
Percentage increase/decrease in rates (+/-)
Average appraised value
General exemptions available
(excluding senior citizen’s or disabled
person’s exemptions)
$
$
$
-
$
$0.0%
-
Average appraised Value
-
General exemptions available
(excluding senior citizen’s or disabled
person’s exemptions)
$-
$-
Average taxable value
Tax on average residence homestead
NA
NA
Average taxable value
$
-
$
-
Tax on average residence homestead
$
-
$
-
Annual increase/decrease in taxes if
proposed tax rate is adopted (+/-)
and percentage of increase (+/-)
The following tables compare the taxes on an average residence homestead
in this taxing unit last year to taxes proposed on the average residence
homestead this year.
Last Year
This Year
Total Tax Rate (per $100 value)
$0.9000/$100
$ 0.9000/$100
Adopted
Proposed
Difference in rates per $100 of value
Percentage increase/decrease in rates (+/-)
0.00%
-
AGAINST the proposal:
PRESENT and not voting:
ABSENT:
Directors Gatewood, Ficken,
Burns and Jensen.
None.
None.
Director Headley.
$ 0.00 %
NOTICE OF TAXPAYERS’ RIGHT TO ROLLBACK ELECTION
If taxes on the average residence homestead increase by more than eight
percent, the qualified voters of the district by petition may require that an
election be held to determine whether to reduce the operation and maintenance tax rate to the rollback tax rate under Section 49.236(d), Water
Code.
Annual increase/decrease in taxes if
proposed tax rate is adopted (+/-)
and percentage of increase (+/-)
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NA
NOTICE OF TAXPAYER’S RIGHT TO ROLLBACK ELECTION
If taxes on the average residence homestead increase by more than eight
percent, the qualified voters of the district by petition may require that an
election be held to determine whether to reduce the operation and maintenance tax rate to the rollback tax rate under Section 49.236(d), Water
Code.
Note: WCAD reports no average appraised values for 2014 or 2015.

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