Newsletter - Mt Erie Fire Department

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Newsletter - Mt Erie Fire Department
A Community Newsletter of the District 11 Mt. Erie Volunteer Fire Department • Spring 2011
Could It Happen Here?
Could this happen here? The
“Could this happen here?”
last major earthquake and tsunami
These four words were on the top of
along this fault happened between
everyone’s mind as they watched in
9 p.m. and 10 p.m. on January 26th,
horror as a 9.0 earthquake, followed
1700. The magnitude of the quake
by a 60-foot high tsunami, followed
was estimated at 9.0, the same as
by a nuclear meltdown devastated
the recent quake in Japan. The
Japan.
resulting tsunami destroyed native
The earthquake took place
villages here in the Northwest as
along a subduction zone off the
well as towns and
Japanese coastline,
villages as far away
and was triggered
An excellent Web site for
as Japan.
by the unrelenting
emergency
planning
is
found
How do we
pressure of tectonic
at www.redcross.org.
know the exact
plates grinding
Click on the “Preparing and
date and time
against each other.
of an earthThis earthquake,
Getting Trained” tab for a
quake more than
the fifth largest in
complete list of emergency
300 years ago?
recorded history,
supplies and training.
Historical records
created the tsufrom Japan and
nami. The tsunami
oral histories of Northwest Tribes,
inundated the nuclear power plant,
as well as physical evidence such as
causing the meltdown.
land levels, tree rings, and tsunami
Could this happen here? The
traces all point to this date and
geology features that led to the
time.
deadly Japanese quake are very
Could this happen here? The
similar to the geology that exists off
question is not could this happen
the Pacific Northwest coast. The
here, but when will this happen
Cascadia subduction zone, which
here. Scientific evidence points out
runs offshore from Vancouver
that these massive earthquakes hapIsland south to Northern
pen every 300-500 years. So techniCalifornia, lies between 30 and 70
cally, we could be overdue.
miles off the Washington coast.
Since our community sits on
This is where two tectonic plates,
an island linked to the mainland by
the very large Pacific Plate and the
bridges, chances are our small popusmaller Juan de Fuca Plate, come
lation would be one of the last areas
together. The larger Pacific Plate
helped by rescue personnel. If we did
is forcing itself under the Juan de
suffer an earthquake with a magniFuca Plate. When this unrelenting
tude of 8.0 or higher, all the bridges
pressure causes slippage, you get an
earthquake.
continued: see Japan, page 7 >
Chief’s
Comments
— by Chief Mike Noyes
Thank you for
taking the time to
read this edition
of our newsletter.
In 2010 the letter
was not completed
due to funding, and
time requirements
to produce the newsletter got the
best of us.
The newsletter is actually produced by two volunteers that do not
fight fires. Vince Streano and Eula
Palmer spend many hours tracking
down the stories and keeping me
on task to meet our deadlines for
publication. Thank you to both of
them; this would not happen without them.
In 2010 we began working with
the Washington Survey and Rating
continued: see Chief, page 4 >
IN THIS ISSUE:
Meet the Department................................ 2
Volunteer Firefighting................................. 2
Commissioner Profiles................................ 3
District Overview & Financials............... 4
Response Totals, 2010................................. 5
Incident Reports............................................. 6
Earthquakes & Tusnamis........................... 7
Be “Red Cross Ready”................................... 7
Wildfire: Help Us Help You....................... 8
COMMISSIONERS
Pat Cummings, Chairman
Cherry Dennis
Tom Walsh, Firefighter
Della Howard, District Secretary
VOLUNTEERS
Mike Noyes
Bob Parmley
Nick Atkinson
Lee Babarovich
Calvin Bridges
Rick Bunzel
Daniel Detschman
Jane Favors
Donna Gremmert
Billie Harris
Lance Henning
Gary Kramer
Craig Meiklen
Cheri Noyes
Kevin Noyes
Mike Pennington
Fritz Peterson
Lisa Peterson
Maria Shelman
Donny Smith
Vince Streano
Doug Thompson
Nate Yount
Steve Ziegler
Fire Chief/EMT
Assistant Fire Chief/
FR
Probationary
Firefighter
Firefighter
Firefighter
Firefighter/EMT
Firefighter
EMT
Support Officer
Firefighter
Firefighter
Lieutenant
Firefighter
Lieutenant/EMT
Captain/Safety
Officer/EMT
Firefighter
Captain/Training
Officer/EMT
EMT
EMT
Lieutenant/EMT
Public Information
Officer
Firefighter/EMT
Firefighter/EMT
Firefighter/EMT
EMERGENCIES
Dial 911
BUSINESS CALLS
(360) 299-1281
STATION LOCATIONS
Fire Station 1 – Dewey Beach
14825 Deception Rd.
Fire Station 2 – Lake Erie
4214 Wildwood Lane
NEWSLETTER EDITOR
Vince Streano
NEWSLETTER DESIGN/PRODUCTION
Baypointe Graphics
The Mt. Erie Fire Dispatch is written
and published by the volunteers of
the Mt. Erie Fire Department.
Photos © Vince Streano
2
Volunteer Firefighting:
A Satisfying Way to Give Back to the Community
— by Rick Bunzel
When my pager went off, I was
at a dinner party with a group of
friends. I had just filled my plate of
food and grabbed a few quick bites
as I listened to the details. I got a
shot of adrenaline as the dispatcher
described it as a house fire. I quickly
said goodbye to my host and scrambled out the door.
As I drove to the station I kept
glancing at the sky looking for
smoke. As I pulled into the station the bay door was open and
another firefighter was getting
dressed. I pulled on my protective
pants, boots, coat and helmet, and
mentally went
through what
to expect. Was
it a burnt pot
on the stove
or something
more? The radio traffic told
me this was not
a little kitchen
flare-up.
As we
arrived on
scene we were
directed to get
air packs and
go to the command post. As
the home came
into my view
I was amazed
at how quickly
the fire had
grown. The
entire front of
the home was
involved and
fire was venting through the
roof. This was big! Our assignment
was to take a hose line to the front
door and attack the fire from there.
We had 2-1/2” line, which can put
a lot of water on the fire, and got
some satisfaction as we were able
to darken the fire and limit the
amount of damage it was doing. It
took hours to finish the job, but
we had the satisfaction of knowing
that no one was injured and the fire
didn’t extend to any of the neighbors’ homes.
As we were cleaning up, several
of the neighbors stopped us to ask if
continued: see Give Back, page 3 >
Neighbors Helping Neighbors
< Give Back, continued from page 2
we needed anything and thanked
me for what I was
doing. I explained
it was a team effort and that we
all appreciated the
kind words.
The Mt. Erie
Fire Department
is looking for
new members.
Volunteer firefighters respond
from their homes
or businesses
when available.
There is a time
commitment to
get trained and
to maintain your
certifications.
Volunteers come
from all walks of
life—military,
professionals,
plumbers, doctors,
teachers, refinery workers, and college students are just of few of the occupations of people who find the time to volunteer. Requirements for volunteer
firefighting are passing a physical, a background check, and having a valid
driver’s license.
Many people ask me why I am a volunteer firefighter. They want to
know why volunteers are willing to put their lives on the line, and not even
get paid for the risk. Some do it to prepare for a career in the fire service and
others are motivated to give something back to the community. For me, it is
the satisfaction of rushing to someone’s urgent need, achieving a resolution,
then going back to my everyday life. We are doing important work: saving a
life, saving a neighbor’s home, or rescuing someone from a precarious situation.
So, if you have a strong desire to help, and you believe you have what
it takes to meet the challenges of volunteer firefighting, call Chief Mike
Noyes at 360-299-1281.
To learn more about becoming a fire department volunteer,
join us at one of our Monday meetings, held at 7 p.m. at our
fire stations. Or, email us at [email protected]
www.mteriefire.com
Introducing
District 11
Commissioners
Mt. Erie Fire District 11 is served
by three commissioners who are
elected to six-year terms of office.
PAT CUMMINGS
Pat is a retired Alaskan fisherman, and a current volunteer
for District 13. Elected in 2005.
CHERRY DENNIS
Cherry is co-owner of Serenity
Farm and a former Mt. Erie
volunteer. Elected in 2007.
TOM WALSH
Tom is a retired City of Seattle
firefighter and former Mt. Erie
volunteer. Elected in 2009.
3
< Chief, continued from page 1
Bureau (WSRB). They evaluate the
fire protection capabilities of a fire
district and set the fire protection
class for the insurance companies
that use them. They examine the
water systems, fire department
equipment, training and operations,
and dispatching capabilities. The
last time this was done was around
1979. We have been notified that
the District has improved from a
Class 8 to a Class 7 rating. We are
working with the WSRB to find
ways to improve and reach a better
rating. Please contact your insurance carrier to evaluate your rates.
The Board of Commissioners
and members brought the
District in on budget once again.
Expenditures were authorized from
the reserves for the payoff of our
property at Station 1 on Deception
Road. The District enters 2011 debt
free. This action saved the District
the interest due on the loan by paying it off early. Included in this report are our financial expenditures
and income, response totals and
times, District facilities, equipment
improvements, and acquisitions.
District Overview
DISTRICT FINANCIAL SUMMARY
Station 1 at 14825 Deception Road
Income from Taxes.................................................................................................................................$324,142
Other Income (rentals, charge for classes)...................................................................................... $28,471
Income from Grants...................................................................................................................................$1,903
Income from Medic 1 Levy for EMS Supplies..................................................................................$3,500
(2 Fire Stations)
Total square feet owned.....................12,000
Operated for emergency svcs....... 7,000
Leased space............................... 3,000
Community hall........................... 1,500
TOTAL INCOME............. $358,016
Wages and Stipends (annual)............................................................................................................. $50,008
Station 2 at 4214 Wildwood Lane
Total square feet..........................................4,100
Operated for emergency svcs....... 4,100
Commissioners (3):
District Secretary:
Fire Chief: Assistant Fire Chief: Firefighters (20): $3,708 ($103 monthly per commissioner)
$4,800
$9,300
$7,200
$25,000
Operating Supplies................................................................................................................................. $52,536
Includes protective clothing, consumables for medical responses, station maintenance
supplies (paint, oil for trucks, repair items for buildings and equipment, etc.), fuel for
apparatus, and tires for apparatus.
Small Tools and Minor Equipment.................................................................................................... $12,581
Tools and hoses needed to equip the apparatus to have the tools on scene. In 2010 we
bought our 2nd “thermal imaging camera” which allows us to look for heat and fire in
smoke-filled rooms and locate victims in smoke and darkness. A camera costs $10,000.
Professional Services.................................................................................................................................$7,233
Expenditures for our website maintenance, immunizations for responders, attorney fees,
and physicals.
Apparatus
• 3 fire engines
• 1 3,000-gallon water tender
• 2 wildland response trucks
• 1 ambulance (District does not transport)
• 1 utility vehicle – 1 ton pickup
Utilities......................................................................................................................................................... $18,700
This includes telephone, power, water, propane, furnace oil, and garbage.
Repairs and Maintenance..................................................................................................................... $33,276
Covers the parts for repairs and preventative maintenance for buildings and apparatus.
Training........................................................................................................................................................ $29,276
Training is vital for firefighters to maintain their basic skills and learn new techniques.
Annually, the District drills 45 Monday nights for 2-hour sessions. Many members attend
classes outside the normal drill nights, traveling as far away as Washington, D.C. to the
National Fire Academy. Members receive textbooks to allow self-study and advancement
in skills. The average cost of a class out of the District is $250.
Total hours of training attended: 3,083
Total hours of instruction given to other organizations: 500 (by members of Fire District 11)
Expenditures not projected from adopted 2010 budget:
Payoff of property at Station 1 ( Dewey Beach )........................................................................ $35,000
($35,000 used from reserves allowed us to prevent another finance charge)
Installation and certification of breathing air compressor.......................................................$4,500
TOTAL EXPENSES.......... $243,110
All unused revenue goes into an account for unforeseen emergency expenses and future equipment purchases.
4
Neighbors Helping Neighbors
2009 Average Response Time Per Station
Response Totals for 2010
Fire Total..................................................... 33
Auto fire alarms....................................... 11
Structure fires..............................................2
Chimney fires..............................................1
Vehicle fires...................................................4
Brush/wildland fires.................................1
Illegal burning.......................................... 11
Electrical fire.................................................0
Small equipment......................................1
Hazmat............................................................1
Other................................................................1
Public Service Calls Total.................... 15
Public assistance.......................................2
Tree/powerlines down....................... 12
Utility problem...........................................1
Medical Responses Total..................122
STATION
# INCIDENTS
1 - Station 1
Average Response in Minutes
(Dispatch to Arrived)
12
8.99
165
11.99
2 - Station 2
5
11.11
B11 - BATT 11 only
1
13.68
1 & 2 - Full Alarm
Average Response Time Per Zones
Zone
Area Name
Minutes
# Responses
11A
Dewey
11.74
94
11B
Lake Erie
13.67
71
11C
Haddon Rd.
15.37
19
11D
Fidalgo Hts.
13.02
8
Medical aid.............................................. 116
Rescue (non-fire).......................................6
Motor Vehicle Accidents (MVA)....... 24
Autos............................................................. 23
Boat/Watercraft..........................................0
Other (Bicycle)............................................1
Mutual Aid Given................................... 20
Anacortes FD............................................ 13
Fire District 13.............................................2
North Whidbey District 2.....................0
Mutual Aid Received............................... 2
The District received a free air compressor
for filling air bottles from Shell Puget
Sound Refinery Fire Brigade; $4,500 was
spent to place this unit in service. Purchase
of this unit new would have been near
$25,000. This allows firefighters to train
more with their air masks on drill nights
and immediately place our breathing
apparatus in service at the station.
www.mteriefire.com
5
2010: Incidents by Day of the Week
2009: Incidents by Day of the Week
DAY OF WEEK
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
TOTAL
# INCIDENTS
22
31
26
24
45
36
33
217
DAY OF WEEK
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
Friday
Saturday
TOTAL
# INCIDENTS
39
42
31
44
40
37
51
284
2010: Incidents by Hour
HOUR
CALLS HOUR
CALLS
00:00 - 00:59
6
12:00 - 12:59
12
01:00 - 01:59
6
13:00 - 13:59
15
02:00 - 02:59
6
14:00 - 14:59
5
03:00 - 03:59
4
15:00 - 15:59
18
04:00 - 04:59
2
16:00 - 16:59
17
05:00 - 05:59
7
17:00 - 17:59
12
06:00 - 06:59
3
18:00 -18:59
9
07:00 - 07:59
15
19:00 - 19:59
11
08:00 - 08:59
7
20:00 - 20:59
9
09:00 - 09:59
11
21:00 - 21:59
10
10:00 - 10:59
8
22:00 - 22:59
7
11:00 - 11:59
11
23:00 - 23:59
6
2006 - 2010: Incidents by Year
6
YEAR
2006
2007
2008
2009
2010
COUNT
230
226
254
284
217
Neighbors Helping Neighbors
< Japan, continued from page 1
linking us to the mainland would be
damaged or destroyed. Other areas
with higher populations would be
higher priority for rescue teams.
Fidalgo Island residents need to
have emergency supplies on hand
to survive for at least a week. This
includes water, food, batteries, gasoline, and emergency medial supplies. Ideally, these supplies would
be stored someplace accessible even
if your house was destroyed. A garage or storage shed might be a good
choice. Your family members also
need to have a meeting location
identified and a designated contact
person outside western Washington
in case of emergency. An excellent
web site with the information you
need for your emergency planning is
hosted by the American Red Cross
at www.redcross.org. Click on the
“Preparing and Getting Trained”
tab for a complete list of emergency
supplies and training.
Earthquakes and Tsunamis:
A harsh reality
As I finish writing articles and
getting the data together for this
newsletter, I have one eye on the
TV, watching brother and sister
firefighters and emergency workers
at the out-of-control powerplant
that will mean their ultimate deaths
and searching rubble in snowy and
freezing conditions. Watching this,
days after the initial quake and tsunami, reminds me that we will also
be on our own for a week or more
after our quake happens.
The District trains in search
and rescue and in identifying which
areas are exceptionally vulnerable to
tsunami and landslides. We are volunteers; many of us may be at work
and stuck there having a limited
initial response. Mutual aid will not
be available as they will have their
own issues to deal with. We may not
be able to get around due to road
and other infrastructure damage.
You need to begin preparing
to help yourself for at least seven
days. Please go to the Red Cross
website (www.redcross.org) or stop
by their office on T Avenue for the
Island Chapter in Anacortes. They
can provide you with easy information on how to protect yourself
and which supplies to keep at your
home.
I was notified of the tsunami advisory Friday morning around 2:00
a.m., hours before the estimated
arrival here in the Northwest. No
evacuations were deemed necessary
due to the direction of the water
and our location. I was out that
morning asking those who were
on the beaches to please be careful and keep a watchful eye out or
just stay off the beaches for the day.
Our measurement was somewhere
around 0.9 feet of surge.
Be “Red Cross Ready”
General Preparedness
Earthquake
Tsunami
Get a Kit • Make a Plan • Be Informed
Drop • Cover • Hold On
Prepare • Move Quickly • Monitor
Be Red Cross Ready Checklist
Did You Know?
Be Aware of the Signs of a Tsunami
rI know what emergencies or disasters
are most likely to occur in my
community.
rI have a family disaster plan and have
practiced it.
rI have an emergency preparedness
kit.
rAt least one member of my
household is trained in first aid and
CPR/AED.
rI have taken action to help my
community prepare.
Doorways are no stronger than any
other part of the structure. During an
earthquake, get under a sturdy piece of
furniture and hold on.
If you are in bed, stay there, curl up and
hold on. Protect your head with a pillow.
mA strong earthquake lasting 20
seconds or more near the coast.
mA noticeable rapid rise or fall in
coastal waters.
If you are outside, find a clear spot and
drop to the ground (away from buildings,
power lines, trees, streetlights).
If you hear an official tsunami warning
or detect signs of a tsunami, evacuate
at once. Take your emergency kit. Get
to higher ground. Return home only
after local officials tell you it is safe.
If you are in a vehicle, pull over to a
clear location and stop. If a power line
falls on your vehicle, do not get out.
Wait for assistance.
Use caution when re-entering
buildings. Tsunami-driven floodwater
may have damaged them where you
least expect it. Step carefully.
This information is excerpted from www.redcross.org; please visit their site for complete information.
Integrate their Safe and Well Internet-based tool into your emergency communications plan.
www.mteriefire.com
7
Mt. Erie Fire Department
14825 Deception Road
Anacortes, WA 98221
PRSRT STD
U.S. Postage PAID
permit no. 106
blaine, wa
Wildfire: Help Us Help You
Create a 30- to 100-foot safety zone around your home
Within this safety zone you can take steps to reduce potential exposure to flames and radiant heat. Homes built
in forest lands should have a minimum safety zone of 100 feet. If your home sits on a steep slope, standard protec­tive
measures may not suffice. Go to the District web site at mteriefire.com for more information and links.
Other things you can do to help us
defend your house before fire strikes!
4
District firefighters train with Washington
Department of Natural Resources to
recertify as wildland firefighters. Annually,
firefighters from all over northwest
Washington come to District 11 to receive
their training.
Rake leaves, dead limbs, and twigs. Clear all flammable vegetation.
4 Remove leaves and rubbish from under structures.
4 Remove limbs within 15 feet of the ground.
4 Remove dead branches that extend over the roof.
4 Prune tree branches, shrubs within 15 ft. of stovepipe or chimney outlet.
4 Ask the power company to clear branches from powerlines.
4 Remove vines from the walls of the home.
4 Mow grass regularly.
4 Clear a 10-foot area around propane tanks and the barbecue. Place a
screen over the grill: use nonflammable material with mesh no coarser
than one-quarter inch.
4 Regularly dispose of newspapers and rubbish at an approved site. Follow
outdoor burning regulations.
4 Place stove, fireplace, and grill ashes in a metal bucket, soak in water for
2 days, then bury the cold ashes in mineral soil.

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