leading The Hincks

Transcription

leading The Hincks
The Hincks-Dellcrest Foundation *Attention Mailroom Personnel:
Please reroute if necessary!
440 Jarvis Street
Please inform us if address or contact has changed.
Toronto, ON M4Y 2H4
If undeliverable to addressee, return to sender.
TEL: (416) 924-1164
Return postage guaranteed.
FAX: (416) 924-9808
Serving Children,
Supporting Families,
Strengthening Communities
Looking back on a car eer
leading The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
LEFT:
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE
SPRING - SUMMER 2010
With Lincoln Alexander, former Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, at the Raise A Child’s Smile gala in 2006
With longtime Hincks-Dellcrest supporter Gail Appel at the Raise A Child’s Smile gala in 2008
RIGHT: With Psychiatrist-in-Chief Marshall Korenblum at John’s Hincks-Dellcrest Centre retirement party
CENTRE:
After more than 23
years of leadership,
I N S I D E
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
welcomes Donna Duncan,
Interim President and
Chief Executive Officer
PAGE. 2
Innovative training tools
enhance learning for the
next generation of mental
health professionals
PAGE. 2
Hearts for HincksDellcrest heats up February
PAGE. 2
Volunteering opened up
a world of possibilities
at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
PAGE. 3
John F. Spekkens has
retired as President
and Chief Executive
Officer of The HincksDellcrest Centre.
John’s expertise, commitment, and vision have
enabled The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre to make a
significant and lasting difference in the lives of
countless children and families. We thank John
for his contributions to The Centre and to the field
of children’s mental health.
DON'T MISS OUT! GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY:
(416) 924-1164, ext. 3343 or [email protected]
One highlight was facilitating the merger of the
two children’s mental health centres that resulted
in the creation of The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre in
1998. As Director of the Dellcrest Children’s
Centre, I worked together with Dr. Freda Martin,
who was leading the C.M. Hincks Treatment
Centre, to bring about this amalgamation.
We focused totally on the strategic reasons to
merge. We both saw significant long-term benefits
to our organizations if we provided service as a
single entity. Ultimately, we knew that our two
organizations would complement each other and,
most importantly, could provide better service to
children and families if we worked together.
We recently spoke with John about his time with
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre and his commitment
to children’s mental health.
What has kept you committed to The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, and to children’s
mental health, for so many years?
Raise a Child’s Smile is published semi-annually
by The Hincks-Dellcrest Foundation
440 Jarvis Street, Toronto, ON M4Y 2H4
Tel: (416) 924-1164 Fax: (416) 924-9170
www.hincksdellcrest.org
Charitable Registration number:
89449-2487-RR0001
Editor-in-Chief: Annabel Bassin
Managing Editor: Caroline Horcher
Feedback and Subscription Changes:
[email protected]g
or (416) 972-1935, ext. 3244
What would you consider a highlight of
your career?
Children’s mental health is a cause that I consider
to be very, very worthwhile. The ability to make a
difference in the lives of children and families by
lessening the impact of mental health problems is
something that has always kept me inspired. A total
of 35 years as CEO in children’s mental health has
shown me how much the field has evolved and
improved in its ability to provide assistance to
children and youth, and to their families.
I’ve also been extremely motivated by the board
and staff at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. From the
leadership team to the front line workers who deal
directly with clients, I’ve had the privilege of working
with excellent, committed people who truly care
about their work.
What are your thoughts as you leave The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre?
My 23 years at Hincks-Dellcrest have been a great
opportunity, both challenging and rewarding.
I wouldn’t trade them for anything.
I truly feel that our current clinical staff team is the
best, most committed group of people that we’ve
ever had at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. That’s
what makes or breaks an organization and, most
importantly, ensures that clients receive first-rate
service. From an administrative standpoint, the
strong staff team will also make the transition to a
new CEO much easier.
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre is a dynamic organization, and it will change in the next 23 years just as
it has changed dramatically since I started.
Nothing is ever static. The key is to preserve the
best strengths of the organization, while always
evolving to meet the changing needs of children,
families, and communities. ■
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE 1.
The Hincks-Dellcr est Centr e welcomes
Donna Duncan, Interim President
and Chief Executive Officer
We are pleased to announce that Donna Duncan has joined The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre as Interim President and Chief Executive
Officer. Donna will work with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s staff,
board, partners, and other stakeholders to renew the Centre’s
organizational vision and establish a framework for recruitment of
a permanent President and CEO.
Known as a strategic and creative thinker and a team-builder,
Donna brings more than 20 years of experience working with
government and the broader public sector, both as an employee
and as president of her own company. She has served on transition
Volunteering
opened up a world
of possibilities
at The Hincks-Dellcr est Centr e
teams and, with a focus on development of strategic, sustainable
relationships, has provided support to a wide variety of organizations
through decision-making cycles and processes.
Donna also played a key role in positioning the Centre for Addiction
and Mental Health (CAMH) to receive government approvals and
funding to launch its $400 million redevelopment project in 2006.
Please join us in welcoming Donna Duncan to The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre as we look to the future with unwavering commitment to
the children, families, and communities that we serve. ■
Ramani at the York Centre Early Years Centre, located at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre's Sheppard site
Innovative training tools enhance learning
for the next generation of mental health pr ofessionals
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre has a long history as a teaching centre,
providing students with educational placements in psychiatry,
psychology, and social work. As students conduct therapy sessions
with patients, they are frequently aided by unique training tools such
as earpieces, one-way mirrors, videotaping, and audiotaping. With
consent of the patient (no session is observed or recorded without
prior permission), these tools allow supervisors to objectively view the
session, provide feedback, and most effectively interpret and improve
the student’s work with children and youth.
Dr. Marshall Korenblum, Psychiatrist-in-Chief at The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre, frequently supervises psychiatry students with these tools and
is enthusiastic about their use. “This is one of the most unique and
beneficial aspects of The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s training program,”
he says. “Time after time, I hear from students that they’ve never
before had the benefit of this type of feedback in their training.”
Dr. Korenblum says that earpieces and one-way mirrors are among
the most cutting-edge tools – and the most intriguing to patients.
“The supervisor observes the session from behind a mirror and is able
to interject suggestions directly into the student’s earpiece while the
session is taking place. It’s similar to how TV producers talk to news
anchors while they’re on the air. And the children and families we
work with are always invited to come behind the glass to see the
supervisor or team that is assisting with their treatment.”
There are many advantages to directly capturing the details of a therapy
session. It allows the student to conduct the session without the
disruption of taking notes, while the supervisor can observe body
language and other visual cues that may have otherwise been
missed. Patients receive the guidance and expertise of an additional,
more experienced therapist who has viewed their session first-hand.
It also adds up to a richer training experience for the students, according
to Dr. Korenblum. “In evaluating the training process, the students
consistently report that these tools have been enormously helpful to
their learning,” he says. “These are incredibly valuable learning tools
and The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre really is at the forefront in their use.” ■
Hearts for Hincks-Dellcrest
Thanks to all Hincks-Dellcrest supporters who helped heat up February
at Hearts for Hincks-Dellcrest, a new fundraiser that took place above
the Hard Rock Café in downtown Toronto. Guests danced to the
fabulous live music of The Sneaky Castros and The Tectonics. Both bands
generously donated their time to support children's mental health. ■
LEFT: The Sneaky Castros featured Hincks-Dellcrest board member John Wright
(right) on bass guitar
RIGHT: Hincks-Dellcrest board chair Calvin Younger with George Smitherman,
former MPP for the riding of Toronto Centre, home of The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre (Jarvis site)
2. RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE
heats up Febr uary
Ramani Jayakumar first joined The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
as a volunteer. Thirteen years later, she has played a key role in the
success of a number of prevention and early intervention services
at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre.
Ramani was a new Canadian in 1995, having recently emigrated
from India. She had completed a master’s degree in social work and,
for more than a decade, had managed a number of children’s programs
and worked for an adoption agency.
Packing up her life and moving to Canada was a major decision,
but one she and her husband felt was right for their family and
their future. “There was a need for social workers in Canada,
especially people who could speak different languages,” recalls
Ramani. “The professional prospects were good, and with two young
children, we felt that we could give them a better life here.”
Upon arriving in Toronto, Ramani enrolled in a short adult learning
centre course to brush up on resume writing and job hunting. The
course concluded with a two month volunteer job placement.
Ramani was placed with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, enjoying the
work so much that she decided to remain a volunteer once her
placement ended. Ramani volunteered at least twice a week in
the Community Prevention Program.
While still a volunteer, Ramani was instrumental in implementing
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s Learning Through Play parent education
program in India. She recalls this as one of her most meaningful
accomplishments. “I was able to help give something back to my
home country that was really needed,” she says. “To be a part of
the international team, and to see the support that The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre offers to countries on an individual basis, was really special.”
In 1997, Ramani joined The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre as a full-time
staff member. She was hired as a home visitor in the Healthy
Babies, Healthy Children program, providing advice and support
for expectant mothers and families with young children. She
became supervisor of the program the following year.
Ramani returned to school part-time in 2001, attending York University
to supplement her education with a Canadian master’s degree in social
work. She notes that her colleagues at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
were very supportive of her decision. “The encouragement given by
my program director, manager, and the whole team was incredible.”
In 2003, the Ontario Early Years Centre program for parents and
children was established at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. Ramani
has been the Manager of the York Centre Early Years Centre since
that time, overseeing programs on early learning and literacy,
early child development, and pregnancy and parenting.
Ramani looks back on her volunteer experience with Hincks-Dellcrest
as a valuable part of her career and personal development. “I was
helping others, and helping myself at the same time,” she says.
“Volunteering is an important way to look beyond your own
needs and contribute to society.”
“At the same time, the opportunities that The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre provided were very valuable for my professional growth, and
gave me time and experience to adapt to a new country and a new
culture,” she emphasizes. “If The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre hadn’t given
me the opportunity, I never would have achieved what I have today.”
Ramani remains inspired by her work at The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre. “There’s a great deal of satisfaction that comes with
knowing we’re supporting people who need help,” she says. “To
see the results of your work every day, in children as young as
newborns, and to see the difference we make in parents’ lives by
giving the opportunity to learn, experiment, and interact with
their children, always motivates me.”
“At the end of the day, a smile on a child’s face is the most
rewarding thing I can think of.” ■
For information on volunteer opportunities
with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, please contact Sue Lam at
[email protected] or (416) 633-0515, ext. 111.
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE 3.
The Hincks-Dellcr est Centr e welcomes
Donna Duncan, Interim President
and Chief Executive Officer
We are pleased to announce that Donna Duncan has joined The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre as Interim President and Chief Executive
Officer. Donna will work with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s staff,
board, partners, and other stakeholders to renew the Centre’s
organizational vision and establish a framework for recruitment of
a permanent President and CEO.
Known as a strategic and creative thinker and a team-builder,
Donna brings more than 20 years of experience working with
government and the broader public sector, both as an employee
and as president of her own company. She has served on transition
Volunteering
opened up a world
of possibilities
at The Hincks-Dellcr est Centr e
teams and, with a focus on development of strategic, sustainable
relationships, has provided support to a wide variety of organizations
through decision-making cycles and processes.
Donna also played a key role in positioning the Centre for Addiction
and Mental Health (CAMH) to receive government approvals and
funding to launch its $400 million redevelopment project in 2006.
Please join us in welcoming Donna Duncan to The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre as we look to the future with unwavering commitment to
the children, families, and communities that we serve. ■
Ramani at the York Centre Early Years Centre, located at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre's Sheppard site
Innovative training tools enhance learning
for the next generation of mental health pr ofessionals
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre has a long history as a teaching centre,
providing students with educational placements in psychiatry,
psychology, and social work. As students conduct therapy sessions
with patients, they are frequently aided by unique training tools such
as earpieces, one-way mirrors, videotaping, and audiotaping. With
consent of the patient (no session is observed or recorded without
prior permission), these tools allow supervisors to objectively view the
session, provide feedback, and most effectively interpret and improve
the student’s work with children and youth.
Dr. Marshall Korenblum, Psychiatrist-in-Chief at The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre, frequently supervises psychiatry students with these tools and
is enthusiastic about their use. “This is one of the most unique and
beneficial aspects of The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s training program,”
he says. “Time after time, I hear from students that they’ve never
before had the benefit of this type of feedback in their training.”
Dr. Korenblum says that earpieces and one-way mirrors are among
the most cutting-edge tools – and the most intriguing to patients.
“The supervisor observes the session from behind a mirror and is able
to interject suggestions directly into the student’s earpiece while the
session is taking place. It’s similar to how TV producers talk to news
anchors while they’re on the air. And the children and families we
work with are always invited to come behind the glass to see the
supervisor or team that is assisting with their treatment.”
There are many advantages to directly capturing the details of a therapy
session. It allows the student to conduct the session without the
disruption of taking notes, while the supervisor can observe body
language and other visual cues that may have otherwise been
missed. Patients receive the guidance and expertise of an additional,
more experienced therapist who has viewed their session first-hand.
It also adds up to a richer training experience for the students, according
to Dr. Korenblum. “In evaluating the training process, the students
consistently report that these tools have been enormously helpful to
their learning,” he says. “These are incredibly valuable learning tools
and The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre really is at the forefront in their use.” ■
Hearts for Hincks-Dellcrest
Thanks to all Hincks-Dellcrest supporters who helped heat up February
at Hearts for Hincks-Dellcrest, a new fundraiser that took place above
the Hard Rock Café in downtown Toronto. Guests danced to the
fabulous live music of The Sneaky Castros and The Tectonics. Both bands
generously donated their time to support children's mental health. ■
LEFT: The Sneaky Castros featured Hincks-Dellcrest board member John Wright
(right) on bass guitar
RIGHT: Hincks-Dellcrest board chair Calvin Younger with George Smitherman,
former MPP for the riding of Toronto Centre, home of The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre (Jarvis site)
2. RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE
heats up Febr uary
Ramani Jayakumar first joined The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
as a volunteer. Thirteen years later, she has played a key role in the
success of a number of prevention and early intervention services
at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre.
Ramani was a new Canadian in 1995, having recently emigrated
from India. She had completed a master’s degree in social work and,
for more than a decade, had managed a number of children’s programs
and worked for an adoption agency.
Packing up her life and moving to Canada was a major decision,
but one she and her husband felt was right for their family and
their future. “There was a need for social workers in Canada,
especially people who could speak different languages,” recalls
Ramani. “The professional prospects were good, and with two young
children, we felt that we could give them a better life here.”
Upon arriving in Toronto, Ramani enrolled in a short adult learning
centre course to brush up on resume writing and job hunting. The
course concluded with a two month volunteer job placement.
Ramani was placed with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, enjoying the
work so much that she decided to remain a volunteer once her
placement ended. Ramani volunteered at least twice a week in
the Community Prevention Program.
While still a volunteer, Ramani was instrumental in implementing
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre’s Learning Through Play parent education
program in India. She recalls this as one of her most meaningful
accomplishments. “I was able to help give something back to my
home country that was really needed,” she says. “To be a part of
the international team, and to see the support that The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre offers to countries on an individual basis, was really special.”
In 1997, Ramani joined The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre as a full-time
staff member. She was hired as a home visitor in the Healthy
Babies, Healthy Children program, providing advice and support
for expectant mothers and families with young children. She
became supervisor of the program the following year.
Ramani returned to school part-time in 2001, attending York University
to supplement her education with a Canadian master’s degree in social
work. She notes that her colleagues at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
were very supportive of her decision. “The encouragement given by
my program director, manager, and the whole team was incredible.”
In 2003, the Ontario Early Years Centre program for parents and
children was established at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. Ramani
has been the Manager of the York Centre Early Years Centre since
that time, overseeing programs on early learning and literacy,
early child development, and pregnancy and parenting.
Ramani looks back on her volunteer experience with Hincks-Dellcrest
as a valuable part of her career and personal development. “I was
helping others, and helping myself at the same time,” she says.
“Volunteering is an important way to look beyond your own
needs and contribute to society.”
“At the same time, the opportunities that The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre provided were very valuable for my professional growth, and
gave me time and experience to adapt to a new country and a new
culture,” she emphasizes. “If The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre hadn’t given
me the opportunity, I never would have achieved what I have today.”
Ramani remains inspired by her work at The Hincks-Dellcrest
Centre. “There’s a great deal of satisfaction that comes with
knowing we’re supporting people who need help,” she says. “To
see the results of your work every day, in children as young as
newborns, and to see the difference we make in parents’ lives by
giving the opportunity to learn, experiment, and interact with
their children, always motivates me.”
“At the end of the day, a smile on a child’s face is the most
rewarding thing I can think of.” ■
For information on volunteer opportunities
with The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, please contact Sue Lam at
[email protected] or (416) 633-0515, ext. 111.
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE 3.
The Hincks-Dellcrest Foundation *Attention Mailroom Personnel:
Please reroute if necessary!
440 Jarvis Street
Please inform us if address or contact has changed.
Toronto, ON M4Y 2H4
If undeliverable to addressee, return to sender.
TEL: (416) 924-1164
Return postage guaranteed.
FAX: (416) 924-9808
Serving Children,
Supporting Families,
Strengthening Communities
Looking back on a car eer
leading The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
LEFT:
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE
SPRING - SUMMER 2010
With Lincoln Alexander, former Lieutenant-Governor of Ontario, at the Raise A Child’s Smile gala in 2006
With longtime Hincks-Dellcrest supporter Gail Appel at the Raise A Child’s Smile gala in 2008
RIGHT: With Psychiatrist-in-Chief Marshall Korenblum at John’s Hincks-Dellcrest Centre retirement party
CENTRE:
After more than 23
years of leadership,
I N S I D E
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
welcomes Donna Duncan,
Interim President and
Chief Executive Officer
PAGE. 2
Innovative training tools
enhance learning for the
next generation of mental
health professionals
PAGE. 2
Hearts for HincksDellcrest heats up February
PAGE. 2
Volunteering opened up
a world of possibilities
at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre
PAGE. 3
John F. Spekkens has
retired as President
and Chief Executive
Officer of The HincksDellcrest Centre.
John’s expertise, commitment, and vision have
enabled The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre to make a
significant and lasting difference in the lives of
countless children and families. We thank John
for his contributions to The Centre and to the field
of children’s mental health.
DON'T MISS OUT! GET YOUR TICKETS TODAY:
(416) 924-1164, ext. 3343 or [email protected]
One highlight was facilitating the merger of the
two children’s mental health centres that resulted
in the creation of The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre in
1998. As Director of the Dellcrest Children’s
Centre, I worked together with Dr. Freda Martin,
who was leading the C.M. Hincks Treatment
Centre, to bring about this amalgamation.
We focused totally on the strategic reasons to
merge. We both saw significant long-term benefits
to our organizations if we provided service as a
single entity. Ultimately, we knew that our two
organizations would complement each other and,
most importantly, could provide better service to
children and families if we worked together.
We recently spoke with John about his time with
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre and his commitment
to children’s mental health.
What has kept you committed to The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre, and to children’s
mental health, for so many years?
Raise a Child’s Smile is published semi-annually
by The Hincks-Dellcrest Foundation
440 Jarvis Street, Toronto, ON M4Y 2H4
Tel: (416) 924-1164 Fax: (416) 924-9170
www.hincksdellcrest.org
Charitable Registration number:
89449-2487-RR0001
Editor-in-Chief: Annabel Bassin
Managing Editor: Caroline Horcher
Feedback and Subscription Changes:
[email protected]
or (416) 972-1935, ext. 3244
What would you consider a highlight of
your career?
Children’s mental health is a cause that I consider
to be very, very worthwhile. The ability to make a
difference in the lives of children and families by
lessening the impact of mental health problems is
something that has always kept me inspired. A total
of 35 years as CEO in children’s mental health has
shown me how much the field has evolved and
improved in its ability to provide assistance to
children and youth, and to their families.
I’ve also been extremely motivated by the board
and staff at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. From the
leadership team to the front line workers who deal
directly with clients, I’ve had the privilege of working
with excellent, committed people who truly care
about their work.
What are your thoughts as you leave The
Hincks-Dellcrest Centre?
My 23 years at Hincks-Dellcrest have been a great
opportunity, both challenging and rewarding.
I wouldn’t trade them for anything.
I truly feel that our current clinical staff team is the
best, most committed group of people that we’ve
ever had at The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre. That’s
what makes or breaks an organization and, most
importantly, ensures that clients receive first-rate
service. From an administrative standpoint, the
strong staff team will also make the transition to a
new CEO much easier.
The Hincks-Dellcrest Centre is a dynamic organization, and it will change in the next 23 years just as
it has changed dramatically since I started.
Nothing is ever static. The key is to preserve the
best strengths of the organization, while always
evolving to meet the changing needs of children,
families, and communities. ■
RAISE A CHILD’S SMILE 1.

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