Editorial 3 Music Box 25 Food News 30 The Buzz 8

Comments

Transcription

Editorial 3 Music Box 25 Food News 30 The Buzz 8
NEWS
Editorial
W W W . P L A N E TJ H . C O M U P D AT E D D A I LY
FREE
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Vol. 6 Issue 47
3
Reporting transparency
On Your Right
6
It’s all over
The Buzz
8-9
Planet Palate help
GTNP hunting
Gas Prices
Winter bookings
AR T/MUSIC
Galaxy
19
600” ski film
Music Box
25
Music to check out
Food News
30
Elevated Grounds
Art Beat
31
PAGE 11
by Jake Nichols
Off-season treats
PAGE 12
AND MORE...
HOROSCOPES
l
WEATHER
l
GOING GREEN
l
DINING GUIDE l
CLASSIFIEDS
2 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
INSPIRED BY
A World of Color
e
n
c
a LUTIONS
ING…
OFFER
p es
skin ty
d teen
n
a
y
il
ne, o
n and
cne-pro
ducatio
eting a g skin care e
g
r
ta
ucts
includin sis $60
in prod
r teens
tive sk
o
c
f
aly
e
f
ts
f
n
e
ly
skin an
atme
ALSO AVAILABLE:
• High
cial tre
a
f
g
in
y
Microdermabrasion, Custom
• Purif
SO
Chemical Peels and a full line of sun care,
anti-aging and hydrating skin care products.
Great Selection! Great Prices!
Welcome to Global Treasures’
best rug collection ever.
Mon - Sat 10am-6:30pm • 307-733-2427 • 500 S. Hwy 89, K-mart Plaza, Jackson
920 West Broadway
307.690.0622
125 E. Pearl Street, Lower Level
DAWN GERTSCH
Licensed Master Esthetician - UT
Licensed Esthetician - WY
307.732.AUTO(2886)
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 3
From the Editor’s Desk
OPINION by MATTHEW IRWIN
Surcharges, transparency and reporting
On Tuesday, I met with Jonathan Schechter, head of the
Charter Institute, which runs 1% for the Tetons, the area
nonprofit Planet JH wrote about last week (“Penny-pinching 1% for the Tetons) to the chagrin of the certain area
business. After some back-and-forth, finger-pointing and repiecing emails, phone calls, letters and the story itself (on
both sides), Schechter and I actually had a good conversation, the gist of which is this: I’m right and he’s wrong.
I’m joking. Schechter’s concern about our story is that it
didn’t reflect on the wonderful things 1% does and made
“much ado about nothing,” while portraying the organization and Schechter disparagingly. Moreover, he said that
he spoke with someone (he doesn’t remember whom) at
the Wyoming Department of Revenue, who provided information conflicting with our Dept. of Revenue source,
whose claim that they were already aware of possible
infractions and were planning action made certain our
decision to run the story. The discrepancy is to be determined, and I will gladly recant if we were wrong, but I have
confidence in the accuracy of Jake Nichols’ reporting.
Before I get any further – and I apologize to anyone who
feels outside; the story is still available online – I must say
this: The piece was not a slam on 1%, but an investigation
into questionable practices of certain 1% donors, an angle
itself which did not suspect malicious intent, only error,
but was nonetheless faced with defensive retorts.
The issue at stake in the story is transparency, and
Schechter agreed, if for different reasons, but he did say
that he would work with 1% members to ensure that if they
chose to include a surcharge to cover their 1% obligation
that they knew how to do it within the law and with ample
promulgation, giving customers the ability to opt out.
Members still have the
right, he said, to determine
1% for
for themselves if they want
the Tetons
to include a surcharge.
is a
But more important, I am
valuable
disheartened and ashamed
by the violence of the comcharity.
ments on our blog, which
appear to stem from the
same blind rage that dismisses the fact that actions described in the piece are true
and that some are potentially illegal. The personal attacks
on Nichols, through a number of communications, are
appalling and unwarranted. Nichols provided due diligence
to the businesses included in the article, offering each the
opportunity to comment.
One would hope that more business owners included in
the story would have responded like Bill Field of Mountain
High Pizza, who said that he had not been aware of the
accounting snafu described in the story, but had resolved
to change it. Others chose to act defensively, such as the
owners of Davies Reid, who said, “Screw the Planet!” and
requested that no more copies of Planet JH be delivered to
their store, respectively.
Nichols investigated and reported the story with the full
backing of Planet JH. Write to me with your complaints,
accuse the newspaper of wrongdoing, but do me a favor
and cool off first, and don’t attack us for doing what newspapers do, which is investigating and reporting on pertinent issues.
We hope that the majority of readers understand that
Planet Jackson Hole’s goal in telling this story is to inform
them about these practices, so that 1) they can decide for
themselves if they want to support the implicated companies; and 2) so that these companies can reevaluate their
policies. That 1% is a valuable charity shouldn’t prevent us
from investigating the practices of some of its members.
This is important: we are not calling into question 1%, only
certain of its members who likely made an accounting
error. The remaining members with whom we and
Schechter spoke, independently, are split on whether a surcharge is in the spirit of 1%, and we’ll check back with the
Dept. of Revenue. PJH
4 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
K
SINGLE TRAC
EDITORIAL CARTOON
by Nathan Bennett
Say what?!
Sponsored by NEW BELGIUM BREWING
“All bets are
off when someone urinates on
your living
room floor.”
Ridden hard /
Put away wet
Looks like we’ll be skiing the
pass before long, so before I sign
off for the year I want to give you
a little of my Irish Catholic guilt.
You have two choices facing you
right now: 1.) Finish up your last
bike ride, high five your buddy
and dump your bike into a deep
dark hollow of your garage; or 2.)
Finish ride, high five buddy and
proceed to your local bike shop
for an end of the season buffing.
These two choices leave you with
two very different experiences
come Spring: 1.) Dig through
aforementioned garage to find a
pile of mud, cobwebs, and sadness that was once your favorite
piece of gear; or 2.) Dig through
garage to uncover a gleaming
example of bike perfection ready
to rip while your buddies are waiting in long lines at the shop. Your
choice. Of course there are financial implications to consider, too.
You will most likely be treated to a
Fall Tune Special at your local
bike shop if you act now. Wow,
guilt-free spending, a rare find
these days.
— Scott Fitzgerald
Scott Fitzgerald is the owner of
Fitzgerald’s Bicycles.
LETTERS
Bad Home Ranch Decision
I can’t understand how the Town
Council could vote to spend 4+ million
dollars on a building the town doesn’t
need. On Monday 10/20 Mayor Barron,
Mark Obringer and Abe Tabatabai voted
to go forward with the construction of the
Home Ranch Center which includes
offices for the Chamber of Commerce, a
visitor center and public restrooms.
The visitor center would duplicate services provided by the existing visitor center
four blocks north. The existing building at
the parking lot on the corner of Cache and
Gill is still structurally sound and doesn’t
need to be replaced. The restrooms do
need to be remodeled and upgraded, and
the common area in the middle of the
building needs to be refurbished. There is
no demonstrable need for the Chamber of
Commerce to be moved to this location.
ON THE
COVER
S
T
A
Photographed Nov 3, 2008
for Planet Jackson Hole
by Neal Henderson of
www.ReactionPhoto.com
Cover design by Steven Glass
F
F
Since the town is approximately $145,000
over budget and it is virtually impossible for
the council to trim the budget four million
dollars, the financing for this project would
have to come in the form of an increase in
taxes. Cutting town services in order to fund
this costly and ill-conceived project would be
fiscally irresponsible at any time especially
now when we are in a major recession.
The Chamber of Commerce deserves a
larger office, but they should be able to
find adequate office space somewhere
other than the Home Ranch. In addition, a
project with a proposed cost of over four
million dollars should voted be on by the
public, not decided by three members of
the town council.
— Jim Hawley, Jackson
“Smokefree,”
not “Smoking Ban”
A slap on the wrist for running a mislead-
EDITOR
Matthew Irwin
[email protected]
ART DIRECTOR
Jeana Haarman
[email protected]
ADVERTISING SALES
Mary Grossman
[email protected]
Shannon McCormick
[email protected]
Jen Tillotson
[email protected]
DESIGNERS
Eric Balog
Steven Glass
Jen Tillotson
ILLUSTRATOR
Nathan Bennett
SENIOR REPORTER
Ben Cannon
[email protected]
STAFF REPORTERS
Jake Nichols
[email protected]
Henry Sweets
henr[email protected]
Robyn Vincent
[email protected]
COPY EDITOR
Robyn Vincent
CONTRIBUTORS
Aaron Davis
Mike Bressler
ing headline in the Jackson Hole Daily
(“Smoking ban resurfaces,” Angel,
10/27/08). In coining the smokefree issue as
a “smoking ban,” we play right into the tobacco industry’s playbook: distort the smokefree
discussion in order to divert attention away
from the real issue at hand - health.
The term “smoking ban” is promoted by
the tobacco companies and their allies.
Why? The term creates the inaccurate
impression that smokefree laws are a
threat to individual freedom. In reality,
smokefree policies equally protect and
promote an individual’s right to breathe
safe, clean air. Breathing is a right, not a
privilege. Using the term “smoking ban”
to describe the proposed amendment to
the Teton County Food Code significantly
distorts the goal of the proposal. The
Amendment would protect the public
from exposure to secondhand smoke in
indoor areas - a Class A Carcinogen - in all
Scott Fitzgerald
Judd Grossman
Teresa Griswold
Nancy Taylor
Jean Webber
Brooke Williams
ADDITIONAL MATERIALS
Rob Brezsny
Creators Syndicate
L.A. Times
Tribune Media Services
Universal Press
Washington Post
SUBSCRIPTIONS
Subscription rates are
$85 a year (52 issues)
national
newspaper
association
JACKSON HOLE
WYOMING
reduce
reuse
recycle
JH
printed on
recycled paper
locally owned
and operated
alternative
weekly network
PLANET JACKSON HOLE is published
every Wednesday. Copies are distributed free every week throughout
Jackson Hole and the surrounding
area. If you wish to distribute The
Planet at your business, call (307)
732-0299. ©2007.
PUBLISHER Planet Jackson Hole, Inc. I Mary Grossman I [email protected]
567 West Broadway, P.O. Box 3249, Jackson, WY 83001 l (307) 732-0299 l Fax (307) 732-0996
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 5
Teton County bars and restaurants, not
eliminate smoking in Teton County as the
article suggests.
Smokefree air is no longer controversial,
as the tobacco industry would like us to
believe. In 2006, the Report on
Secondhand Smoke from U.S. Surgeon
General declared the science of secondhand smoke was overwhelming; opinion
polls show that smokefree policies are
extremely popular with the public, and the
majority of the country now enjoys the
protection of smokefree laws. All
American workers should have the right to
breathe clean air while on the job, including restaurants and bar workers.
I hope the newspapers in Teton County
will accurately report on this in the future.
It’s about health, and it’s about time.
– Frieda K. Edgette, American
Nonsmokers’ Rights Foundation
Voluntary or Semi-Mandatory
The New Yorker film critic Pauline
Kael was said to have been shocked at the
results of the 1972 Nixon landslide as she
did not know anyone that voted for
Nixon. I suppose that kind of insularity
may explain the amazement of some
members of 1% For the Tetons (1%FTT)
over the skeptical reception given their
practice of charging their customers a surcharge of 1% in a manner that could be
perceived as surreptitious and view any
controversy regarding this mechanism as
a “red herring.”
It is presumptuous to believe that a
business’ clients automatically share the
owner’s worldview. And Cindy Parker
nails it [Penny pinching 1% for the
Tetons, October 29, 2009]: “It’s our political choice and maybe not every customer’s choice.”
The definitive issue here is not that this
tactic is devious or ill-intentioned, but
blurs the subtle, but still definable difference between a voluntary donation and a
semi-mandatory collection. I doubt that
on every transaction customers are adequately informed of the surcharge and
given an effortless means to opt out.
I would take exception to comparing a
fuel/fee surcharge with what some of the
1%FTT members are doing – I don’t see
little Shell or Exxon stickers on the sides
of aircraft or UPS trucks. If you want to
bask in the altruistic sunshine of supporting a cause, it seems reasonable that your
customers should not have to pay for the
Coppertone.
–Darrell Hawkins
Jackson, Wyoming
BEST OF THE BLOG
EXCERPTS FROM WWW.PLANETJH.COM USER COMMENTS
On “Penny-pinching 1% for
the Tetons”
■ C’mon, Planet. What have you
accomplished here? These businesses are trying to do an unquestionably
good thing for the planet and our
community. They surely are not trying
to cheat the state out any revenue.
■ Regardless of where you stand
on “mending an ailing globe, profit
and greed”, or sucking on ideological
teats - there is one undeniable truth
about this article - it’s utter crap. ... I
am disgusted both at Mr. Nichols and
the Editors and Publishers of the
Planet. Being the head of Teton Power
- a renewable energy company and
proud member of 1% for the Tetons,
and that has been written about in
this very publication - I advocate tirelessly for the Earth. But in this case,
my closing comments are at odds
with my central ethos. Screw the
Planet!
■ You gotta love the complete moral
bankruptcy and ethical relativity of
those poo-pooing this story. Maybe
they should next try and accuse The
Planet of committing, the ever more
rare these days, Sin of Journalism
too! Good job, Jake. If all this is much
ado about nothing, why aren’t these
sneaky merchants paying this pittance themselves, out of their pockets, as agreed upon, instead of passing the buck, quite possible illegally?
■ (From PJH Staff) Jake Nichols
provided due diligence to the businesses included in the article, offering each the opportunity to comment.
One would hope that more of them
would have responded like Bill Field
of Mountain High Pizza, who said that
he had not been aware of the
accounting snafu, but had resolved to
change it. If we had a chance to do
the story again, we would make one
addition, which is that when we called
the Wyoming Department of Revenue,
officials there said that they were
already aware of erroneous surcharges, and they were gearing up
for action. PJH
LOG ONTO www.planetjh.com TO JOIN THE DISCUSSION.
LETTERS POLICY
Planet Jackson Hole welcomes your letters, but they stand a better chance of appearing in print if they are 300
words or less and contain sufficient contact information - full name, hometown and a means of reaching you (an
e-mail addess or phone number will do) - in the event that we need to contact you. We reserve the right to edit
them for grammar, punctuation, content and length. Also, Planet Jackson Hole will not publish anonymous letters
without darn good reasons; if you think you have a good reason, let us know, but, again, include contact information in all correspondence. Email your letters to [email protected]
Prices good 11/2 - 11/8/08
Planet Jackson Hole strives to promptly correct our mistakes and welcomes comments and information that may
call for correction or clarification. Please email [email protected] with any corrections or call us at 732-0299.
Planet Jackson Hole invites you to advertise in the
winter 2008-09 JACKSON HOLE NIGHTLIFE GUIDE
@
Jack
e
H
son ol
Full Color Brochure • Widely Distributed • Affordable
High-End Quality • In Print & Online • Bi-Annual Issues
Book your ad space NOW!
CALL 307.732.0299
PUBLISHED BY PLANET JACKSON HOLE, INC.
810 W. Broadway
Jackson, WY
307.734-8801
70 E. Little Ave
Driggs, ID
208.354.8915
6 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
On Your Right
OPINION by JUDD GROSSMAN
It’s all over except the crying
Andy Schwartz is a good sport. When I
ran into him at the P.O. on the day after I
endorsed his opponents for County
Commission, I braced myself for a stern
reproach, but he took my column with good
humor. Andy is a class act.
Post-partisanship
As I’m writing this, I’m hoping that John
McCain has pulled off a come-from-behind
victory, so that my wife won’t be in a bad
mood for the next four years. But since I
don’t know the election outcome, this is the
perfect opportunity to talk about how
America should come together now that
we’ve selected a new president.
It’s vital that our new president set aside
partisan acrimony, work together with
members of both parties to protect our
country and to allow our economy to get
back on track.
If McCain has won, I promise not to rub
it in, and If Obama is the guy, I will be rooting 100 percent for him to succeed. I will
assume that he has the best intentions. If I
think he’s on the wrong track, I will try,
through reasoned, respectful argument, to
prove that I have a better plan.
Blame Game
It’s been disappointing to see both
McCain and Obama join the mainstream
media in turning President Bush into a
punching bag. Bush deserves some blame,
but also some praise. My concern is our
political inclination to demonize our
opponents. It seems that each former president is blamed not only for everything
that happened on his watch, but also for
everything that follows for at least another
20 years. If we can’t find some modicum
of objectivity and recognize the good, or
at least good intentions, in our political
opponents, we will turn ourselves into
hypocrites when we are forced to eventually adopt some of their ideas. After all, no
one is wrong all the time.
The alternative is that with each shift in
the balance of power, new leaders - operating from the extremes of the political spectrum - will force our country’s policies to
swing from right to left as wildly as the
stock market has recently been swinging
up and down. I will be disappointed if, for
the next four years, I keep hearing about
“failed Bush policies.” If the only way to
win in 2012 will be to accuse either
Obama or McCain of being a complete
failure, then cynicism and political expediency will have trumped truth and honesty.
80-Percent Theory
At a meeting in his Jackson office, I
heard Senator Mike Enzi talk about his
version of the “80-Percent Theory.“ He
explained
that
Democrats
and
Republicans really only disagree on about
20 percent of the issues. He proposed that
if politicians concentrate on nurturing the
consensus they have on the other 80 percent, they will be able to accomplish a
great deal without becoming mired in partisan gridlock.
Moving forward
Here is where I think conservatives and
liberals can find that consensus:
Immigration Reform – Secure our borders,
and create fair and reasonable mechanisms
to allow legal immigration and enhance
guest worker opportunities.
Trade – Support free trade, but make sure
that America has unfettered access to the
markets of our trading partners.
Taxes – Let’s make our conservative and
liberal arguments about where the appropriate tax level should be; let the majority
implement it’s plan and monitor the results.
Supreme Court Justices - Look for justices
that are extremely qualified, no ideologues,
no litmus tests, no activists.
Defense - Do what it takes to protect our
country and our allies.
On the local level
We need to look for ways growth can help
us meet our shared goals of a community
with a variety of residential-, commercial-,
industrial- and office-use opportunities.
Make town more vital, but protect community character. Use new development to preserve open space and wildlife habitat. Let
the good ideas and concerns of both sides
help us shape policies that represent a broad
majority of the community.
■
It’s time to get out of partisan mode, tone
down the blame game, allow each other to
admit our mistakes, and get to work to solve
the challenges we face in our country and in
our own backyard.
And thanks, Andy, for not egging my
house on Halloween. PJH
Judd Grossman makes his living as a musician, but his favorite hobby is discussing politics. Grossman is
co-owner of Planet Jackson Hole Weekly. Respond at [email protected]
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 7
t
Wild Lives
r Traveling through central Utah a couple
eweeks ago, I drove past the field of huge
-new windmills at the mouth of Spanish
Fork Canyon. I had a great feeling, knowing that these windmills are generating
Ielectricity using a non-polluting, renewsable resource. I’ve seen windmills on beauetiful hilltops in California and Wyoming.
dAnd I’ve followed the Cape Wind controtversy over 130 possible wind turbines in
tNantucket Sound, which is being opposed
eby a group of very wealthy and influential
-Cape Cod residents who don’t want their
aocean views compromised. Although
-Robert Kennedy, Jr. may be America’s
most vocal and influential environmentalist, he has come out against the Cape
dWind project.
For me, the difference between the
Spanish Fork wind project and the others
sI’ve seen and read about comes down to
eone word: ambivalence, which occurs
when something or someone causes us to
ehave two contradictory impulses (usually
elove and hate). I realized that I am not
ambivalent about the Spanish Fork winddmills. While I love the idea that the wind
-generators lining the high ridges west of
yRock Springs are not contributing greenhouse gases to the atmosphere, I hate the
sloss of wildness, anytime, anyplace.
Since hearing about www.350.org, I’ve
become more comfortable with my own
rambivalence. If you’re not familiar with it,
350.org has as its goal the reduction of
greenhouse gases in the atmosphere to
p350 parts per million (ppm). This is the
yuniversally accepted limit, the ‘red line’
for human beings. More carbon than this
will cause irreversible damage to the earth
-and will dramatically change the way we
-live on Earth. Until I heard about 350.org,
tI knew we had a lot of work to do. I knew
sthere are dozens of technologies, shifts in
dpoint of view and personal habits, new
e
o
e
n
products to buy and use. Now, having a
number as a target, a gauge, takes away
some judgment and distills all of the questions down to one: how much carbon will
this project or idea keep out of the atmosphere? Besides that, the 350 team of great
young people running the organization
remind the rest of us that this movement
is about committing to an extended future
in which all life can flourish.
Scientists estimate that the current concentration of carbon is 387 ppm and rising. This means that we not only need to
stop increasing the carbon we’re putting
into the atmosphere, but begin reducing it
as soon as possible. In order to make
sense of this, I tried to find the ratios for
converting parts per million to tons of carbon dioxide. I found that my math is a bit
rusty
so
check
this
yourself:
http://www.hydrogen.co.uk/h2_now/journal/articles/2_global_warming.htm
One billion tons of CO2 in the atmosphere equals .85 ppm. Simple math suggests that to get from 387 to 350 we need
to reduce the amount of C02 we put into
the atmosphere by more than 31 billion
tons (37 ppm times .85). That’s a lot. We
need the Cape Wind project to reduce
greenhouse gasses by 734,000 tons/year
(.000624 ppm). We need to ‘offset’ the
two tons of gasses generated each hour in
each Learjet. And, imagine this: if each
American cut their C02 products by five
tons (estimates suggest that we generate
20 tons each per year compared to a world
average of four) that would reduce the carbon dioxide in the atmosphere by over one
ppm (275 million people at 5 tons/person
equals 1.17 ppm) all by ourselves.
Imagine.
It all adds up. Can we do it? What if we
don’t? If we kill the world, the wild hilltops or ocean views we were unwilling to
sacrifice to wind mills won’t matter. PJH
Brooke Williams is a local environmental writer and is working on a book showing
the relationship between wildness and sustainability.
The opinions expressed on these pages do not necessarily reflect the opinions or ideas of the
Planet staff. Planet Jackson Hole invites readers to submit contributions, no matter what
side of the fence you sit on. For more information or for contributor’s guidelines,
call us, visit our website or email us at [email protected]
y
www.planetjh.com
adoption awareness month
Ambivalence
a w a r e n e s s
m o n t h
*An estimated 1.3
million couples in the
U.S. are waiting to
adopt a child.
*Approximately 1.3
million children die
by abortion each
year in the U.S.
ADOPTION
THE CHOICE YOU AND YOUR BABY CAN LIVE WITH
For more information on adoption:
birthmothers.org optionline.org bethany.org wyomingcs.org
* Statistics from National Council for Adoption, Planned Parenthood
Right to Life of Teton County • P.O. Box 8313, Jackson, WY 83002 • 733-5564 • Elaine Kuhr
adoption awareness month
OPINION by BROOKE WILLIAMS
a d o p t i o n
8 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
The Buzz
In worrisome debt, café owner seeks help
Natural gas
PLANET PALATE OWNER HAS FEW OPTIONS.
CONFUSION & PRICE DROPS.
by Ben Cannon
Recent passersby of Planet Palate, the organic café on N.
Glenwood, may have noticed the distressed tone of a note hanging
on the restaurant’s door. While it is not uncommon for a restaurant to go dark this time of year, this notice is clearly a move of
desperation for a small business in deep financial trouble.
“The full responsibility to continue operating can no longer be
carried by me alone,” wrote Planet Palate owner Amy Young,
who opened the organic restaurant almost a year ago to the day.
For Young, opening an organic café was a dream. With no business plan and little experience managing a business with lots of
overhead, she rented the space in the historic N. Glenwood building, investing considerable time and money to renovating it. The
result was a stylish yet muted interior meant to match the
thoughtfulness of the foods served therein. Yet the remodel also
delayed opening, and, coupled with the startup investment
required to outfit a forward-thinking café – from tableware and
imported teapots to heavy kitchen equipment and industrial
juicers – Young personally took on heavy debt before Planet
Palate served its first cup of coffee.
Opening with a limited menu, Planet Palate eventually expanded its holistic foods options with full breakfast and lunch menus
and a counter stuffed with organic treats, including “living” foods
believed to have greater nutritional value. At the beginning of this
year, Young began a dinner service, bringing to the valley the
only full menu of Indian foods.
The café grew a customer base along the way, yet a respectable
debut did not offset Young’s deepening business debt, which
soon spilled over into her personal life. Her credit cards are
maxed out, and her credit rating – once perfect, she said – has
dropped out from beneath her. She owes money to the IRS and
the state of Wyoming. To pay her staff through the last pay peri-
ANDREW WYATT
by Henry Sweets
Amy Young outside Planet Palate.
od, Young has had to focus on her gardening business, an established venture that took backseat while she poured herself into
Planet Palate. The power company is threatening to cut off electricity to the café by the end of the week.
Already a risky candidate for a bank loan, the current economic crisis did not help.
“Even though the café had a great year, our debt is just so
high,” she said.
So Young has turned to the Jackson Hole community for
investors to help her reopen Planet Palate. Without some financial intervention, it seems doubtful she will be able to reopen in
the coming weeks.
“A lot of people appreciate the place,” she said. “I think there
are people out there who can help invest in the restaurant.”
Young said she has learned over the course of the last year how
to keep costs down and to make the restaurant viable. She also
now realizes she went into business undercapitalized but is
searching desperately for a chance to make it work.
“This may sound silly, but I firmly believe this is like a calling
of mine,” Young said. Her contact info can still be found on the
door at Planet Palate. PJH
Hiking and hunting: staying safe in GTNP
By Matthew Irwin
Most residents of Teton County are probably aware of hunting in the northeast corridor
of Grand Teton National Park and on the east
side of John D. Rockefeller Memorial
Parkway, but out-of-town visitors and other
residents thinking about hiking in the area
might benefit from signage or other notification, according to officials.
As of yet, there are no signs warning hikers
at trailhead kiosks, where bear warning signs
are abundant.
“It never hurts to remind people, but I would
hate to cause more concern than is warranted,”
said Wyoming Fish and Game spokesperson
Mark Gocke. “I would hate for people to not go
into the park because they were afraid [of getting shot].” He said that he hoped hikers weren’t
detracted for fear of bear attacks.
GTNP zones 75 and 79, roughly the areas
north and east of the park road after Jackson
Lake and Moran junctions, are available to
around 1,000 hunters with special permits
each year, according to GTNP spokesperson
Jackie Skaggs, who added that hunters may
not “actively hunt” within a quarter mile of
the park road.
She also noted that hunters must carry a
safety-training card, which park rangers diligently check. Both Skaggs and Gocke pointed
out injuries from reckless drivers on the park
roads are a much greater concern.
They also said that their agencies will consider placing signage next year – Skaggs identified the Sheffield Creek trailhead and the
Two Oceans and Emma Matilda trailhead as
viable locations – but both emphasized that
no hikers have ever been injured by hunters in
GTNP.
In 33 years of park service, Skaggs can
think of only one time when a hunter was
fatally injured in the park, and he was shot
when a rifle accidentally fired in camp.
The U.S. government initiated the elk
reduction program for GTNP in 1950, in part
to protect elk mortality rates endangered by
“an annual winter feeding program on the
National Elk Refuge, which sustains high
numbers of elk with unnaturally low mortality rates,” according to an Oct. 6 GTNP press
release.
Special hunting permits allow hunting from
Oct. 11 in Zone 79 and from Oct 18 in Zone 75
to Nov. 30. About 30 percent of hunters turn in
tags each year, and Skaggs said that around 180
elk have been killed in the park this year. PJH
Jackson Hole residents who
heat their homes with natural gas
might
see
heating
costs
decrease by about 10 to 20 percent before this winter hits,
Lower Valley Energy Chief
Financial Officer Mike McBride
said. But in the fluctuating world
of natural gas prices, nothing is a
guarantee.
Rates for LVE customers
increased by 43 cents to $1.62
per BTU last May and this summer, the price of gas continued
to rise. The Wyoming Public
Service Commission (PSC),
thinking the price increases
would be passed on to consumers, embarked on a statewide
advertising campaign, warning
Wyomingites that they might pay
as much as 80-percent more this
winter, compared to last. They
hosted as many as 30 town hall
meetings across the state in
early fall to help citizens prepare
for the price spike, and then the
price of gas began dropping, and
it continues to drop.
Most LVE customers heat their
homes with electricity, which is
the cheapest form of heat now in
Jackson. But after the PSC
announcement of potentially
spiking gas prices, which did not
coincide with a notice to LVE,
spread to Jackson Hole, LVE
received a slew of phone calls
from stymied customers, marketing director Brian Tanabe said.
Now the company is wading
through the requisite rate
decrease process to bring lower
prices to customers - hopefully
by December of this year. That
news comes a few days after the
PSC rescinded their earlier predictions, and said the gas rate
increase would bring statewide
rates to about 20-percent higher
than last year, much lower than
originally anticipated.
“This really illustrates, more
than anything else, how volatile
and difficult to predict natural
gas pries really are,” Christopher
Petri, head of the WPSC said. PJH
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 9
Chamber enters housing dialogue
COMMUNITY MUST FIND ‘FLEXIBILITY,’ DIRECTOR SAYS.
And to square up with those official
decisions, different groups need to
The Jackson Hole Chamber of understand what parts of their view
Commerce has thrown its weight into should be more f lexible.
“There are a lot of different views out
the debate of what to do about workthere, I don’t think any of them are
force housing.
Ratified by each of the Chamber’s exclusive of one another where one view
have
some
validity,”
board of 27 member businesses, its doesn’t
O’Donoghue said. “I think
Workforce Housing Principles
what is required is that the
declaration states that 65 per“What needs
various perspectives that
cent of the valley’s workers
form a circle around the
need to be housed in Jackson
to be checked
eventual product called the
Hole, and the Comprehensive
at the door are
Comp Plan … need to be
Plan needs lucid language
egos and
willing to take a step toward
identifying where that housing
points of view
the middle to work togethshould go.
er.”
Chamber Director Tim that don’t have
“Community Character”
O’Donoghue said the princiflexibility.”
is an emblematic phrase
ples represent the voice of the
– Tim
that refers to something
Jackson Hole business comO’Donoghue
vaguely def ined, but the
munity in the Comp Plan revipreservation or resurrection
sion process.
of which is said to be imperO’Donoghue said he hopes
the issue can be pulled out of politically ative in Teton County. O’Donahue said
charged arenas and put into open dis- the best way to find community characcussions between different stakeholders ter is to sit down and discuss common
about how to reconcile seemingly goals.
“I would say that what needs to be
opposed viewpoints. In a telephone
interview, the Chamber director dis- checked at the door are egos and points
cussed ways to find that happy medium. of view that don’t have any f lexibility,”
O’Donoghue said different parties are he said. “The point is, really, to stop
circled around a solution, and all need defending our turf and start working
to take a step towards the middle to together, and in doing so we will prove
that we do have community character.”
achieve it.
The Workforce Housing Principles
“Some of the earlier discussions
ref lected a false dichotomy between document requests “continued exploworkforce housing and preservation of ration of diverse and creative housing
wildlife habitat or scenic corridors, and solutions.”
He said the Days Inn proposed converyou had to choose between the two,”
O’Donoghue said. “But it is a false sion to deed-restricted affordable housdichotomy. We can merge the two views ing is an example of a creative solution
for a solution that addresses primary that didn’t exist six months ago, and
concerns about preservation of wildlife thinks a gamut of other creative soluhabitat and scenic corridors and also tions could come from disarmed comprovide workforce housing; and it’s a munity dialogue.
But what can the chamber do?
matter of where you place [the work“I think it is somewhat public knowlforce housing.]”
The Workforce Housing Principles edge is that there is a triple bottom line
document requests specific measures that exists for a community, he said.
from the new comprehensive plan that “Success is not just derived from its
will ensure the “predictability and guid- economy but also its social and environance regarding the location of the hous- mental health. I think the chamber can
ing.” O’Donoghue also said elected offi- provide a voice of balance between those
cials should “exercise their political three factors, and I think the comp plan
responsibility to make decisions that should ref lect our values on the triple
may be difficult but necessary of where bottom line and not just the single bottom line.” PJH
workforce housing needs to occur.”
by Henry Sweets
10 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
We’re Having A Party
And You’re Invited
Come celebrate the
Grand Opening
of the new Wells Fargo in Jackson
Friday, November 7, 2008 from 4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
■ Enjoy the music of Cowboy Logic.
■ Chili, dessert and refreshments will be served.
■ Wells Fargo Stagecoach on display.
Join us for a ribbon-cutting ceremony and
community donation presentation at 5:30 p.m.
Visit us at Jackson West
© 2008 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC.
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 11
JHMR reacts to economic downturn
RESORT RELIES ON LOW GAS PRICES, AIR FARE AND MARKETING PARTNERSHIPS.
In town, the Wyoming Inn revealed a 15-percent decrease in
advanced reservations in comparison with 2007, according to
While Jackson Hole Mountain Resort remains optimistic about front office manager Armando Morales. Though the Elk Country
the upcoming winter season, reservations for the 42-year-old ski Inn and Cowboy Village have only seen a two and five-percent
decrease, respectively, according to owner Clarene Law.
spot are in a considerable slump compared with 2007.
JHMR has launched an aggressive marketing campaign –
“On average, bookings are 25- to 30-percent down from last
including stronger ties with the
year,” said brand director Anna Olson.
Wyoming Office of Tourism and close
Reservations at JHMR’s primary bookpartnerships with ski and lifestyle coming agent, Central Reservations, have
panies
like
Marmot
and
dipped even lower than that, she added.
Backcountry.com – to decrease the reserYet, JHMR officials are hopeful that a
vation deficit. But when asked whether
recent decrease in airline fares and gas
or not the resort would offer less expenprices continuing to plummet will boost
sive ski packages or passes, Olson said
the resort’s business.
that booking agents, like Central
“American Airlines dropped its domesReservations, have put together lodgingtic fuel surcharge from about $160 down
based packages, but the resort does not
to $30,” Olson noted. “Airline fares are
plan to offer discounts. Representatives
obviously the first hurdle for people and
at Central Reservations did not return a
with prices coming down that will certainphone call for comment.
ly help us.”
In September, the Wyoming Office of
According to Olson, a decline in gas
Tourism sponsored a media reception in
prices will also drive local and regional
New York City to sway magazine traveltraffic – 35 percent of the resort’s market
writers to spotlight JHMR. The Office
– to the Village.
will have a pivotal role in publicity for
Although a decrease in gas prices
the tram’s unveiling on Dec. 19, includappear to be temporary, costs are predicting providing a satellite media truck for
ed to decline, at least for the winter seathe evening that will enable national
son, according to Dick O’Gara, director
media to conduct interviews with onsite
of the Wyoming Center for Business and
participants. The Office will also foot
Economic Analysis out of Cheyenne.
Last Thursday, JHMR’s tram car one
the bill for out-of-town journalists to
“This is a temporary blitz in energy
was lifted to the skies.
cover the event.
prices,” he said. “The reason prices are
Directly following a decline in tourist traffic this summer, the
down is because we’re seeing aggregate demand at national and
global levels, this is a temporary phenomenon; we may get a six- Wyoming Office of Tourism allocated an additional $175,000 to
its winter marketing campaign. “After seeing that airline reservamonth reprieve, but not 12 months.”
Although talk of a recession is turning into a reality - even in tions were down and Yellowstone was having cancellations, you
the valley - resorts like Four Seasons and Snow King were reluc- can’t wait until the last minute to throw something together,”
tant to disclose details regarding the economy’s effects on busi- explained Diane Shober, director of the Wyoming Office of
ness. “I’d rather not discuss numbers,” said director of public Tourism.
Despite the effect that a decrease in JHRM tourism and the absence
relations at Four Season’s Jackson Hole, Greer Terry. “We just
kind of have to wait and see; we’re not in the typical peak window of other visitors could place on the local economy, most hotel and
[for advanced bookings] just yet; we really don’t know what’s town officials believe that snow will be the determining factor.
“People come here to ski in the winter time – skiing is the No.
going to happen.”
Snow King Resort general manager Dana Ahrensberg blames 1 activity in terms of participation and visitation,” said Tim
political uncertainty and weather for the absence of early-placed O’Donahue, director of the Jackson Hole Chamber of
reservations. “Advanced bookings are off,” he stated, adding that Commerce. “And people who come here to ski need lodging,
it’s because of “a period of indecision; there’s no closure; we food, shopping; they need other activities besides skiing so if the
haven’t had an election; it hasn’t started snowing; people are mountain resort drops – it will be very interrelated. But if the
snow is good, they’re going to come.” PJH
wearing t-shirts at Denver football games.”
RANDY SHACKET
by Robyn Vincent
920 West Broadway
Got an item for the
GALAXY CALENDAR
OF EVENTS?
Upload your own events at www.planetjh.com
Click on “Galaxy Calendar,” then “Add Event”
ENTRIES WILL BE APPROVED QUICKLY
• Daily events scroll on planetjh.com homepage.
• Email your events to: [email protected] for
publication in our print version.
PRO-CHOICE
Because abortion
is nobody’s choice
but hers.
Pro-Choice
America
calls on
Pro-Choice
Independent
Voters
to back a
Pro-Choice
Democratic
Candidate
- PAID FOR BY THE KCR COALITION FOR PRO-CHOICE
KRISTYNE CRANE RUPERT
WWW.NARAL.ORG
307.732.AUTO(2886)
12 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 13
on
s
k
c
a
J
se
e
o
o
h
T
M to
.
e
n
l
o
n
o
s
i
H te
ea
s
a
sk ther
ano
It’s late Wednesday night. The internal biorhythmic clock of most mortals has told them to
wind down for bed. When assistant coach
Bryan Korpi blows the whistle that begins the
‘breakout drill’ for the Jackson Hole Moose,
speedy winger Dan Stasny takes pass on his
backhand in full flight, dekes a defender, and
buries the puck behind the goaltender. The play
covers 180 feet in about four seconds. In hockey, there’s a reason it’s called “the rush.”
The indisputable ‘fastest game on earth’ is
not for the feint of heart. Players armed with a
stick and a grudge skate at nearly 30 mph.
Pucks
travel
routinely
at
90
mph.
Disagreements in ice hockey are often settled
in bare-knuckled fashion on a sheet of ice,
while referees stand helplessly by and rabid
fans pound on Plexiglas designed to protect
them from the violence inside.
Is it any wonder a hockey player is recognized by his smile?
TJ Thomas has donated teeth to the game he
grew up playing in Minnesota. Thomas never
made it to the end of the Moose intersquad
scrimmage Wednesday night. He left the ice
doubled over, blood trailing behind him to the
locker room after taking a puck to the face. No
big deal for the feisty forward whose speed
keeps him out of most trouble. Usually.
“The worst game I was ever in was in 2000,”
Thomas recalled. A guy from the Minnesota
Bucks sucker punched me; cracked my nose
open and took me out of the game. He was mad
about getting dumped by his Russian girlfriend
and took it out on me.”
Brian Upesleya (25), Josh Theken (13), Chris DeMarco (71), and Dan Stasny (16) celebrate
another Moose goal.
Like a lot of players, Thomas was put on
skates before kindergarten. He helped his high
school team win a state championship and headed straight for Jackson Hole in 1993. The Moose
were the Grizzlies then, and Thomas pulled on
his trademark No. 7 sweater to join Dustin Stolp
as one of the original players on the Moose team
which began its inaugural season in 1997-98.
The Jackson Hole Moose hockey club competes in the Senior A division of the USA
Hockey Association. It is one of the highest
levels of amateur hockey a player can participate in without being paid. Most Moose
skaters played college hockey at a major
school. Some players dabbled in the big time,
cashing paychecks in minor leagues like the
East Coast Hockey League (ECHL) and various semi-pro leagues.
One thing all Moose players have in common
is a need for speed and a desire to continue
to play the game they grew up on at a competitive level.
Jeff Bloomer became a Moose in 1998. The
NEAL HENDERSON/REACTIONPHOTO.COM
by Jake Nichols
son of a top level, National Coach-In-Chief at
USA Hockey, Bloomer played at an elite hockey
prep school (Northwood) in Lake Placid with
retired Philadelphia Flyers star defenseman
Chris Therien. He studied coaching at Adolphus
Gustavus and, after assisting in Great Falls,
Mont., eventually landed a head coaching job in
Casper, Wyo.
“I inherited a team that was 3-21,” Bloomer
said. “We were terrible. The team folded at the
end of that year.”
Bob “Howie” Carruth hired Bloomer to play
and coach for the Moose in 1998. He anchored
the blue line for the Moose for four years before
hanging up his skates to coach the team in
2002. In his debut season, the rugged defenseman scored 13 goals in 22 games while leading
the team in penalty minutes.
Penalties may be a prerequisite to coaching
the Moose. The current Moose coach is Adam
Patterson who, during seven seasons on ice
before moving behind the bench, racked up an
enormous 364 minutes in the ‘sin bin.’
see Hockey page 15
14 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
old gang at the Wilson rodeo
grounds, setting up that ancient rink
where it all began.
“Pastries and coffee are a tradition,”
Maggie Hagen told one newcomer last
weekend at the annual volunteer rink
assembly in Wilson. “Someone always
brings those right after it rains … which
is also a tradition.”
“One of these years we’re going to
resemble the old-timers’ barbeque
out here,” Dick Rice told no one in
particular while the rain drizzled
through his beard. He took extra care
mating two ends of tattered board
sections plastered white and pocked
with puck scuffs. “God, I miss bashing into these things.” PJH
JAKE NICHOLS
The year was 1976. Firewood was $65 a cord.
Disco night was all the rage, though not at the
Stagecoach; rather Dietrich’s Discothèque at the
Alpenhof and the mirrored ball was brand new. The
Happy Hound served the best burgers and malts in
town and a three-bedroom house on Deloney listed
for $49,000.
Enter a band of hooligans who couldn’t sit still for
the winter. A few of them are still around. Guys like
Paul Rice, Paul Gilroy, Mike Evans, Porgy
McClelland, Phelps Swift, Larry Anderson, Bill Resor
and Jeff Huit. Led by the undisputed godfather of
hockey in the hole, Skip Wright-Clark, and self-admittedly fueled by Bud and Big Macs; they didn’t know
it then but the wild bunch Zambonied the way for the
slick skating stars of the current Jackson Hole
Moose hockey team.
“It all started in 1976,” remembered WrightClark. “I was on the Rec board and I begged them
for $400 to build a rink, which they finally gave me.
II then went to Jackson Lumber and conned free
wood out of them for the boards and used the
money on jerseys.”
Next, Wright-Clark went to the town and asked to
build a rink at the site of the current Parks & Rec
swimming pool. When asked by then-mayor Ralph
Gill what he would need, he responded: Four shovels
and two pieces of fire hose.
“Well, you would have thought I asked for the
Golden Goose,” Wright-Clark said. “But we built it;
under budget and ahead of schedule. The county
never did anything like that then and hasn’t since.”
That began the Stampede. Jackson’s first hockey
team, although some old-timers remember loosely
organized attempts at an ice hockey club in the ‘50s.
After a few years, the rink was moved to Wilson
where the Stampede tried to coax teams from Casper,
Salt Lake, Boise, and Sun Valley to come play.
“We just couldn’t get many teams to come here
and play us because we never knew what the
weather was going to be like,” Wright-Clark said.
“Sun Valley would always come because they didn’t care if we couldn’t play, they would just hang
out and drink.”
Wright-Clark’s teammate and roommate on the
road, Dick Rice, also recalled the tribulation of playing on an outdoor rink. “I remember the time we
shoveled the rink off four times it was snowing so
hard. We never did get to play that night.”
Rice said the Stampede groomed the surface not
with a Zamboni but a tractor. “Our original tractor
was a Ferguson. This was made even before
Massey-Ferguson. We borrowed it from the Resors.
Jane Pillsbury Resor was a big hockey nut. She
played goalie for us all the time in Wilson.”
“Jane was so into hockey,” Rice said. “I remember these figure skaters came out one time and were
down on one end of the ice crowding us into half the
rink. That was OK. Then they told us to get off
because they wanted to skate and Jane got right in
their face and said this is a HOCKEY rink.”
Wright-Clark grew up playing hockey during
World War II in Rye, NY; a stone’s throw from the
Connecticut border. At age 39, he played mostly in
goal for the Stampede, who won four out of five
state championships in Casper tournaments from
1976 to 1981.
The Stampede was formidable then, usually getting the better of teams like the Casper Lynx, Salt
Lake Flyers, and the Boise Blades. Their toughest
foe then, as it is today, was the Sun Valley Suns.
Self-proclaimed ‘Kings of amateur hockey,’ the Suns
were nasty on the road and simply miserable to play
against in their own building.
“I remember playing the Suns in 1980,” WrightClark said. “It was my first road trip with the team
and Tom Evans was our new rookie. Tommy scored
five goals that night and I ran into some giant of a
guy named Steve Haney. Used to play in the LA
Kings organization. He put me on my ass. Man, I
loved it.”
The Stampede eventually gave way to the
Grizzlies, who were part of a short-lived, eight-team
league called the American Frontier Hockey League.
For four years, the Grizzlies underwhelmed crowds
with a mucking, penalty-filled style until the league
Rice, Resor and Anderson (in white) battle for the puck in the 70s.
folded in 1997.
Bob Carruth announced the new Jackson Hole Moose
team in 1997, promising, “You’re going
to see some great hockey here. This is
the closest thing to a minor league pro
sport this town will see.”
The club was coached by North
Dakota College standout Tom Evans
and featured Scott Gentry (now a referee for Moose home games), Todd
Crabtree (a Maple Leaf draft pick out
of high school), and former Sun
Valley player Bryan Korpi (now the
Moose assistant coach). The club
went 8-13-1 in their inaugural 199798 season; their only losing record in
11 years.
Skip Wright-Clark still remains
tied to the Jackson Hole hockey. He
handles business affairs for the
Moose and is the team’s president,
although he expects to be stepping
Jeff Bloomer (present), Larry Heikkila (1985), Justin Martin (present), Scott Smith
back some this year. Every
(1983), TJ Thomas (present), and Mike Bishop (1978) bridge the old and the new.
November finds Wright-Clark and the
JAKE NICHOLS
by Jake Nichols
COURTESY OF JACKSON HOLE STAMPEDE HOCKEY CLUB
Back outside where it all began
Dick Rice and Skip Wright Clark assemble battered boards of the Wilson hockey rink.
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 15
from Hockey page 13
But the all-time instigator and agitator
for the Moose is fan favorite Dustin
Stolp. ‘DaBizz’ never met a sentence
that didn’t need an f-bomb to spruce it
up. His on-ice chatter is nonstop and
when trouble brews, it’s a good bet
Stolp is in the middle of it.
Stolp’s hardnosed style comes in
handy at least twice per season when
the Moose tackle their archrivals, the
Sun Valley Suns. Bloodletting matches
with the Suns are always the highlight
of both teams’ seasons. The final score
is for bragging rights, but hostility
marks the time span between goals.
Second-year man Justin Martin sums
up the fondness the Moose have for
their ski resort nemesis. “I hate those
bums,” he said.
“They have the worse rink we play at
because of their fans,” Thomas said.
“This one year, a wife of one of the Suns
grabbed a two-by-four that was used as a
barricade and wonked one of our guys
with it in the back of the head when we
were heading for the locker room after
the game.”
This year, the Moose may be in for a
tumultuous season. Turnover is the problem. The hometown hockey club has lost
the brothers Hannafin (Brian and Sean)
back to their hometown of Boston and
longtime mainstay defenseman Chris
DeMarco told the team he would not be
able to play much this year because of
work commitments. The team’s top scorer, Greg Gripentrog, who has battled serious head injuries, has also called it quits.
Last season’s rookie crop was deep,
led by stellar net-minder Nick Aulich.
Dan Stasny and Justin Martin provided
much-needed scoring punch in ’07-’08
and will be called upon again for
offense. Grinders Chris Simpson and
Dominic Sereno have moved on, so the
team will look to Alaska native Bryan
Upesleja – just call him ‘Oops’ – to
continue the physical play that marked
his rookie campaign last winter.
Assistant coach Korpi said while
turnout for the team’s first practice was
light – 18 players when 35 or so were
expected – he expects the roster to fill
in with late walk-ons as they are cut
from semi-pro leagues back East.
“This will be an interesting year with
all the turnover,” Thomas admitted. “The
new players coming in will make the
Moose exciting. The one thing that
always stays the same is the great support of the town and the fans. Our fans
are the best.”
The Moose play the Missoula
Cuttroats, 7:30 p.m., Fri. and Sat. PJH
Moose hockey hall of fame
by Jake Nichols
The Jackson Hole Moose hockey
club has had their share of brushes
with fame beginning with Wade
Clarke. Son of hockey legend Bobby
Clarke, Wade played five seasons
with the Moose from 1998 to 2003,
collecting 83 career points.
Minnesota Golden Gopher standout Nate Miller made a brief stop
with the Moose. He played for only a
weekend in the 2003-04 season,
netting four goals. He did the same
in 2004-05. Miller worked his way
up the ranks in the LA Kings organization, playing two full seasons for
the Kings’ AHL affiliate from 2000 to
2002. He appeared in only a few
preseason games in the NHL during
that span.
Miller is probably best known for
playing the role of John “Bah”
Harrington in the movie Miracle. The
2004 film starring Kurt Russell told
the true story of Herb Brooks
(Russell), the player-turned-coach
who led the 1980 U.S. Olympic
hockey team to victory over the
seemingly invincible Russian squad.
Joe Casey parlayed his Moose
career into a shot at the big time in
2006. The team captain and all-time
leading scorer decided to follow his
dream of getting paid to play at the
ripe old age of 31. He accepted an
offer from the Rio Grande Valley
Killer Bees squad of the Central
Hockey League. Casey played half
the season for the Bees before an
injury forced him to retire from pro
hockey forever.
He has since returned to the
Moose to pile up yet more career
numbers for the team he joined out
of college at the University of
Denver in 2000.
Catch Casey doing his best 40
Year Old Virgin imitation for a waxing
spa in Hidalgo, Texas at www.killerbeehockey.com/videos/index.php?m
=video&v=31. It’s classic. PJH
Violence in the locker room
Just when you thought the violence in hockey was contained to
the ice surface, longtime Moose
player-coach Jeff Bloomer shares
some tales of terror from the locker
room.
Pizza guy gets ‘delivered’
“There was this one game – I
guess it was in 2000 – we had
played horribly, and we were just
getting belittled by Tom [Evans].
He was calling us a bunch of
sissies and cowards. How we
couldn’t do anything right. Well,
this pizza delivery guy comes in,
and he didn’t know who Tom was.
He knew a couple of guys on the
team and he walked over to them
and put a hand on their shoulder
and said, ‘These guys don’t
deserve that. They’re playing as
hard as they can.’ Tommy just
looks at him and says, ‘Who the
fuck is this?’ And picks the guy up
and throws him out of the locker
room.”
Mascot massacre
“It was between periods, and I
was following [Bob] Carruth to the
locker room. He was the goalie
then. There sitting at Carruth’s
locker was the Moose mascot. In
those days, the mascot used to
jump barrels between periods. Bob
had had a bad period and we were
getting whipped again, and here is
this guy in the Moose costume sitting at his space, drinking a fifth of
Beam. Carruth never said anything.
He just started pounding on him.”
Murder scene
“Eric Rahilly [former Moose and
local bullrider] and Greg
Gripentrog are one and two, first
guys into the locker room between
periods. ‘Gripper’ is mad at the
game we are having and swings
and breaks his stick on this column in there when you walk in.
The shaft of the stick flies right
into the back of Rahilly’s head and
impales itself there. Rahilly hits
the floor out cold.
“By the time I walk in next, it
looks like a crime scene. Gripper is
sitting at his locker, head in hands,
balling. Rahilly is facedown on the
floor with a hockey stick sticking
out of the back of his head.” PJH
NEAL HENDERSON/REACTIONPHOTO.COM
by Jake Nichols
The two original Moose, Dustin Stolp and TJ Thomas, have played together for more than a decade.
16 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
Behind the bench with
coach Adam Patterson
by Jake Nichols
to add some toughness and steadiness
on defense.
PJH: Talk about some of this year’s
opponents.
AP: Our schedule this year is strong
as always. We have new teams from
Missoula and the Salt Lake area visiting
in November. The Moose always enjoy
hosting the highly touted rivalries
against Sun Valley and McCall. Trail,
British Columbia has also come onto
the radar as a predominant foe of the
Moose.
PJH: Speaking of rivalries, how much
more difficult is it beating teams like
Sun Valley on the road at their place?
AP: The only difficulty we experience
going to Sun Valley, or anywhere on the
road, is bringing a full squad. Many of
Planet Jackson
High
Hole:
turnover
this
year, Patty. How
will you replace
the loss of Brian
and
Sean
Hannafin, Chris
DeMarco, Greg
Gripentrog,
Aaron
Ackley,
Coach Adam
and possibly Joe
Patterson
Casey?
Adam Patterson: Casey and Ackley are
playing. We don’t have to pull Mike
Sullivan and Bryan Korpi out of retirement
just yet. The only players lost to the Moose
are the Hannafins and
Gripentrog. DeMarco has
“TJ [Thomas] usually starts
run into work issues and
everything and either Dustin
has schedule conflicts, but
Stolp or Jeff Bloomer - assumwe’re hoping to use his
open weekends on the ice.
ing Jeff’s not already in the
Gripentrog will be by far
penalty box - finish it. It’s
the greatest loss of this
been that way for years.”
bunch. Gripper dedicated
many winters to the Moose
and was a steady contributor, day-in and the guys on our team have wives, kids
and job issues that prevent any serious
day-out.
On the flip side, out of the six players travel.
PJH: What about the ‘Jackson Hole
the Moose recruited last year for fresh
legs, three have remained a solid part effect?’ Teams from sea level wear
of the community. Justin Martin, Bryan down at elevation late in the game don’t
Upesleja and Nick Aulich will be they?
AP: The altitude benefits us when we
returning.
play teams from Minnesota, New York
PJH: And this season’s rookie crop?
AP: The rookie class for the upcom- and other low-lying areas. That luxury,
only
runs
so
deep.
ing season includes [goalie] Dan however,
Ambrowski who played at Norwich and Unfortunately, we lose that advantage
should help plug any leaks in the when we are on the same playing field
crease. John Amory, out of Boston, is a with our neighboring mountain rivals.
PJH: If the rough stuff gets started,
great addition to our defensive unit. He
should be steady with the puck while who on the Moose is likely the one who
providing offense. Nate Teske is also started it? Who is the one who is likely
going to be a great addition to our line- to end it?
AP: That’s simple. TJ [Thomas] usualup. He’s from Wayzata, Minn. Also,
keep an eye on our new local pickup, ly starts everything and either Dustin
Cal Brackin. He adds a lot of energy, Stolp or Jeff Bloomer – assuming Jeff’s
and works hard every shift. Although not already in the penalty box – finish it.
not a true rookie, look for Nate Dolentz It’s been that way for years. PJH
920 West Broadway
Chicks with sticks
flock to ice hockey
by Jake Nichols
It may be the last thing expected. A hardnosed sport steeped
in a tradition of equal parts courage, bravado, and blood, suddenly becoming popular with women. But the sport of ice hockey is fast becoming a big hit with a generation of gender-exclusive participants who look more like, well, ‘broads’ than ‘Broad
Street Bullies.’
The tide turned when Cammi Granato captained the U.S.
women’s hockey team to a gold medal at the 1998 Winter
Olympics. Granato was high profile thanks to her older brother’s regular gig as a professional hockey player for the New
York Rangers. Suddenly women across the nation were trading
in their field hockey clubs for skates and shoulder pads.
In Jackson Hole, the women’s program has grown by great
strides. The valley has no shortage of women athletes who
think nothing of strapping on a helmet and heading downhill.
Hockey was a natural next step.
“Athletic women have a very likely chance of picking up the
sport,” AJ Cargill said. Cargill, a former world champion extreme
skier, took up the sport a few years ago. “We’ve had several field
hockey girls take to it because they already had great balance.
Megan Field from the
It’s sometimes fun to just fall down and figure it out.”
2005 hockey calandar
Jackson Hole women’s hockey now fields three teams and a
total of 45 participants, ranging in age from 15 to 50. The teams – A (Passers), B (Chuters), and
C (Venom) – are ranked according to skill level. They practice two or three times a week and take
part in tournaments throughout the Mountain West. Take part? Make that ‘win.’
In September, the chicks with sticks took off for Breckenridge, Colo., to enter a tournament they
knew little about. They brought a mix of their A team and B team talent to a tourney that featured
some of the best women hockey players in Denver and Boulder. After dropping their first two
games to Aspen and Breckenridge, JH women’s hockey team rattled off three straight victories to
claim top spot at the event.
Powered by the stingy net-minding of Amy Lyons, offensive workhorse Canadian Megan Field,
and high school phenom Hayden Shea, 15, the women of Jackson Hole have become the team to
beat at every invitational.
This past weekend, the women’s A team placed second in the Women’s Harvest Classic tournament in Boise. The Passers were beaten in a shootout after standout goalie Amy Lyons was lost to
an injury.
Next up for the women are events in Park City, UT (Dec. 12 through 14), Missoula, Mont. (midJanuary), Sun Valley, Idaho (March), and Ogden, Utah (April). The team also hosts the Debra
Doom Cup tournament every year at Snow King Center. It is scheduled for January 30 - February
1, 2009.
Despite all their success in pads, it’s off the ice that the women of hockey have raised the most
eyebrows. Their enormously successful and sexy calendar has been an ingenious fundraiser for
the program while exposing the ladies of the sport in a softer light.
Cargill credits good coaching for much of the women’s success on the ice. This year, Moose regular John Frechette takes over head coaching duties from TJ Thomas.
The teams are always looking for new players. Interested women can contact Kath Roe at 7339106. A low-pressure Hockey 101 is being offered new this year which will put newcomers to the
sport under the tutelage of some of the players.
“It’s amazing how good of a time you can have as an adult in a team sport, just getting a good
sweat on,” Cargill said. PJH
307.732.AUTO(2886)
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l August 23-29, 2006 17
Council Chronicles
TOWN COUNCIL NEWS by JAKE NICHOLS
Burn baby burn; coy council; holy land; toddler time
“Lighters Up” – Lil’ Kim
The city of Jackson’s burn week is perfectly timed for Nov. 8
through 16. Just when most dutiful American patriots have accumulated a garage full of campaign paraphernalia – signs stuck on
your lawn, flyers under the wiper, scraped-off bumper stickers –
here is the chance to torch the whole pile. Toss in a few stems
and seeds and breathe deep, get high, on your Ballot Bonfire. Oh,
and call dispatch first, 733-2331. Let ‘em know you’re smokin’.
To be continued
The council meeting before an election is always like this.
Developers who would normally be chomping at the bit to erect
their phallic towers suddenly don’t want anything to do with the
lame ducks sitting in a row on the council. The thinking is: why
waste time – sometimes known as money – whining and dining
politicos Mark Barron, Abe Tabatabai, and Mark Obringer,
when it could be Mike Lance, Greg Miles and Louise Lasley sitting in those cushy, high-backed chairs getting all the sugar?
Miller Park Lodge preferred a continuation of discussion on
the easement of their alley at 155 North Jackson Street. Willow
Street Partners, LLC also opted to wait until the council’s next
meeting on Nov. 17, when things are more ‘shook out.’ In fact,
the LLC doesn’t seem to be in a hurry to do anything at the corner of Pearl and Willow.
Dave Larson is representing the applicant who was on the
docket to request a reconsideration that would amend their
PMD project and buy three years to secure a Final
Development Plan and five years to nail down a building permit.
Larson has proved he has patience. He represented Smith’s
when the council didn’t want them in Jackson. Larson waited.
The council changed its mind. When the council voted 3-2 in
January 2002 to deny Smith’s the liquor license forked over by
Spirits of the West, Larson waited … and not very long.
Councilman Chris Kirk cracked the next day and switched his
vote. The champagne flowed.
It’s unanimous: Christ and kids are OK
Jesus can move mountains. So a lot line shouldn’t be much
trouble. It wasn’t. The council voted unanimously after about .3
seconds of discussion to allow the Jackson Church of Christ a
boundary line adjustment that would better accommodate construction of a single-family home to their east.
Kristine Jackson’s request to bump enrollment at her daycare
from six to 10 was granted by the council with equal ease. Mayor
Barron took the opportunity to express the city’s gratitude for a
dying enterprise.
“I would like the opportunity to let you know that the council
feels these neighborhood daycares are extremely important to the
community,” he told Jackson.
In other business
Audrey Cohen-Davis began first reading of a new ordinance
that would make straightforward the Exposition License fees the
city thought it was getting ripped off on.
“It’s too bad Rachel [Fuller] isn’t here. I know she’s worked
her tush off on this job,” the mayor said. Fuller ‘continued’ herself too, helping the meeting clock out at record 19 minutes, right
after Bob Lenz passed gas.
“I attended the gas meeting last week,” Lenz shared with the
council. “All the ski resorts are pulling in their horns, tightening
their belts, praying for snow and waiting for the nation to work
its way through this economic problem.”
Amen, brother. PJH
Comment instantly on every story
at www.planetjh.com
“Life is too short
to pick flowers anywhere else.”
- Jerry
Pick of the week:
Char-Ral Floral
180 N. Center St.
Downtown 733-2500
Safari
Sunset
$1 per stem
For optimum performance and
safety, we recommend you read
the owner’s manual before
operating your Honda
Power Equipment.
©2007 American
Honda Motor
Co., Inc.
Al Ritmo
˜
de la Montana
Domingos
9pm-Media Noche
96.9 KMTN
733-5686
CERTIFIED DEALER
Sales • Service
Repair • Warranty
3510 South Park Dr., Jackson • 307.733.4684
Monday - Friday 9-6 • Sat 9-4 • www.jhcycle.com
18 August 23-29, 2006 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
Them On Us
JACKSON HOLE IN THE NEWS by JAKE NICHOLS
Teton-inspiration; valley smoke
GOING GREEN
by Nancy H. Taylor
Author of “Go Green: How to Build an
Earth-Friendly Community"
Sponsored by
For Ourselves, our Children, and our World
Presidential Climate Action Plan
Think Non-Toxic
For Ourselves, our Children, and our World
END OF SEASON SALE!
45% off all upholstered organic/chemical free furniture
15% off all in store inventory of non-toxic paints and stains
20-40% off many select houseware, clothing and linen items
Insulating for winter?
Think about Ultra-Touch.
Recycled blue jean insulation
Mon-Sat 9am-5pm
180 N. Center Street #1 Next To Char Ral 733-2152
Think Non-Polluting
Consider Your Fellowman
Consider Your Health
and a list of climate experts ready to
help you.
The report urges, “ We must begin
now. The promising early signs of economic renewal must grow into a
national mission. Each year we postpone the transition, the window of
opportunity
closes
farther
as
American competitiveness declines,
the costs of climate change and fossil
energy dependence grow and other
nations capture the huge global market for clean technologies.”
We know that together we can do
this. The Brookings Institution says
that we have the talent to implement
this plan. Businesses across America
have already launched their climate
neutral plans. Green buildings are
being built that use much less energy,
and colleges and universities are committed to having carbon neutral campuses. So, let’s get going.
In Green We Trust,
Citizens of America
www.climateactionproject.com
Consider Your Air and Water
Think Socially Responsible
Dear Mr. President-Elect,
Hopefully, by today it will all be over
and you will breathe a sigh of relief, as
will the country.
Just know that many bright people
have been doing their homework while
you were out on the campaign trail.
They are ready to present an action plan
for the first 100 days of your Presidency
as to how you can best begin to address
climate change. We know that you have
a troubled economy to tend to, but this
economy with all of its failings is still
inextricably linked to our climate.
The University of Colorado has
engaged scientists, policy makers, business people and others to come up with
the Presidential Climate Action Plan
(PCAP). Rather than dictate what you
should do, this plan offers a menu of
choices for your administration to consider and then implement. Each suggested action has been researched by
experts and will mitigate some portion of
U.S. Green House Gas (GHG) emissions.
There are Web sites, white papers,
Joke of the week: How will the U.S. pay
for the multitrillion-dollar obligations to
people on Social Security and Medicare as
the baby boomers age?
“The first thing is for the politicians to get
together and think seriously about how we are
going to solve these problems.” We’re not sure
which is funnier; the “working together” part
or the “think seriously” bit.
The man behind the punch line is internationally renowned economist Robert Clark.
The 59-year-old teaches at N.C. State
University. He made our JH radar when he
told the News & Observer in North Carolina
that the inspiration for such observations
came from his beautiful surroundings at his
second home at the base of the Tetons.
■
“Though Barack Obama has made
inroads in some Republican states, he doesn’t stand a chance in Wyoming,” wrote
Michael Buchanan for the BBC. From all
the way across the pond, Wyoming’s cowboy attitude is plainly evident. “The cowboy
is ingrained in the DNA of Wyoming,”
Buchanan stated.
“Wyoming may not however be another
complete write-off for the Democrats,”
Buchanan closed, alluding to Gary
Trauner’s legitimate shot of beating
Republican Cynthia Lummis. “They have a
chance of winning a House seat here which,
were it to happen, would result in the first
Democrat in 30 years being sent to
Washington to represent Wyoming.
■
OK, after you get past the fact that there
is actually something called the
International Premium Cigar & Pipe
Retailers Association, rest assured they are
not digging the revived take about trying to
pass a smoking ban in Jackson.
The IPCPRA called the proposal to ban
smoking in all bars and restaurants a
“bridge to nowhere,” cashing in on the suddenly chic phrase. Their press release dated
Nov. 1 quotes Chris McCalla, legislative
director of IPCPR, as saying the marketplace in Jackson is regulating itself just fine
given that only one bar remains for smokers
– the Virginian.
“The Jackson Town Council has it right: a
smoking ban is not necessary. The Teton
County Board of Health should be devoting
its resources to more important matters,”
McCalla suggested.
■
Arch Coal, a major coal mining company
in Wyoming and huge University of
Wyoming sports backer announced last
week they were cutting back operations at
their Black Thunder mine in the Powder
River Basin. The news came just days after
Arch announced healthy profits for the
third quarter this year.
Arch blamed the slowdown on lower coal
prices in Wyoming as compared to mines in
the East. The St. Louis-based miner blamed
weakened spot prices for coal in conjunction with the worsening worldwide financial
problems. In addition, coal mined in
Wyoming fetches a lower price on the market than coal mined in Appalachia because
the Eastern coal produces more heat when
burned.
The story was published in CNN Money.
■
An interesting election story appeared in
South Korea’s Ohmy News International.
The news agency was wrapping up a series
of reports documenting conversations along
the 1,800 miles of U.S. 89 that stretches
from Mexico to Canada. The Korean
reporter asked everyone he met three questions: What is the most pressing problem for
America? Who do you think will win the
2008 presidential election? What does the
future hold?
Excerpt: “As you drive into Jackson, Wyo.
from the south on U.S. 89 one of the first
things you see is Albertson’s. It’s perhaps the
biggest, most fully stocked supermarket I’ve
ever seen, and includes a Tully coffee counter,
a reading center with working fireplace and
rustic wooden tables with free Wi-Fi. Its huge
parking lot extends from its front door to the
Days Inn to the south.”
The reporter managed to find one
Russian at Albertson’s – go figure – who
had sobering news for Red, White and Blue.
“America’s going to lose power to China,
Europe, and Russia,” he warned.
■
As so often is the case, the truck involved
in a fatal crash recently on Teton Pass was
overloaded. Florita Vega, 35, died Oct. 30
when a semitrailer driven by her husband
Gilberto Riojas crashed on a runaway truck
ramp on the pass. Wyoming Highway Patrol
reported the truck was 18,000 pounds heavier than the 60,000-pound weight limit. The
Casper Star-Tribune ran the follow up. PJH
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 19
GALAXY
Arts, Events and
Entertainment Calendar
Remembering the time it snowed 600”
NEW DARRELL MILLER FILM DOCS JACKSON HOLE WINTER 07/08.
With Halloween 2008 now in the
rearview of time, have you already laundered, folded and wistfully stowed away
your ceremonious freak flag to the great
footlocker of the future? If so (or not,
whatever), you might find solace in the
knowledge that it is time for yet another
beloved annual event, one that has
become an autumn ritual to many.
The upcoming weekend will see the
world premiere of 600”, the latest ski
and snowboard film from Darrell Miller.
The eighth movie in as many years for
Miller’s Storm Show Studios, 600”
highlights some of the banner 2007/08
winter for a cadre of devoted Jackson
Hole skiers and riders largely unknown
outside of Jackson Hole. (Most of them
are rather anonymous as top athletes
within the valley as well.)
While Miller’s last film, 2007’s 300”,
satisfactorily made do with footage
culled from the lackluster winter of
2006/07, considered one of the worst
seasons in recent memory, 600” captures some of the excitement of last
winter, remembered among even longtime Jackson Hole skiers as one of the
best since the mountain resort began
attracting diehards more than 40 years
ago.
With 600”, Miller does not veer far
from the formula that he has developed
over the course of the last eight years.
He films, and is filmed by, local skiers
and snowboarders riding some of the
most storied backcountry terrain in the
Stop by
The Liquor Store
for the COLDEST
BEER in town
TRISTAN GRESZKO
by Ben Cannon
Andrew Whiteford goes huge out of bounds at JHMR.
world. On a chronically shoestring
budget, Miller and friends collectively
pitch hundreds of hours in (true, they
would be out there anyway) either holding cameras or trying to go big for one.
For Jackson Hole, that of course means
gratuitous shots of playing in the deep
powder, especially throughout the many
storms that consistently unloaded so
much snow in the valley last year. It also
Lounge
The
HOMETOWN
friendly people
@ Snow King Resort
HAPPY HOUR
4:00-6:00pm
$3 Drafts / $7 Martinis - You pick em’
… or join
us in the
Saloon
for DAILY
drink
specials
HAPPY HOUR
Mon-Fri 4-7pm
means 600” contains footage of local
riders – some relatively known, others
largely unheard of – ripping through
and over the fat bands of rock that have
become so identifiable (to those who
ski here or know it from film) as the
area in and around Jackson Hole
Mountain Resort. While a Miller film
may not have large appeal in the broader action sports film industry, where
hefty corporate sponsorships buy helicopter time, 600”, like previous Miller
films, does resonate with a characteristically core Jackson Hole audience.
“I make it for this place, for sure,”
Miller said in his home studio this week.
“It’s rewarding all the way around – not
so much financially – but people get
stoked on the flicks. And they get fired
up for the premiere.”
Before a powder-riding sequence
early in the 45-minute flick, Jason King,
a snowboarder who pays his rent not
through any sponsorship deals, but by
moonlighting at Blu Kitchen, announces
laconically his intent, “find God” in perfect turns – “again.”
Later in the film, when the antes have
been raised, local artist and skier Mike
Tierny finds a hard landing after
launching his person off of one sizable
cliff. Unfazed, Tierny charges it again –
a symbol of the indomitable streak in
Jackson Hole ski culture and, indeed,
of the spirit of Miller’s films.
The Storm Show Studios premiere of
600” screens Friday night in the Grand
Teton Ballroom at Snow King Resort.
Doors open an hour before the 6 p.m.
and the 9 p.m. show times. Tickets are
$12 in advance and $15 the day of the
show and available at JH Wine Co,
Teton
Village
Sports,
Wilson
Backcountry and Cloudveil. Snake
River Beer (natch) and various cocktails
will be served, while Four4 deejays spin
and goods, including a JHMR season
pass, are raffled. After-party to follow at
some bar called 43 North. PJH
*some restrictions apply
HOURS OF OPERATION 1:00 - 10:00PM
733-2792 750 W. Broadway
400 E. Snow King Ave. • Jackson, WY
307-734-3236 • www.snowking.com
Proud sponsor of JH Moose Hockey
20
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
JUDD GROSSMAN BAND
GALAXY CALENDAR
“Not your typical wedding band.”
Your week starts here
WEDNESDAY5
307-690-4935 • www.juddgrossman.com • Download Judd Grossman songs from iTunes.
tea social
Third week of every month, 6-9pm • 20% OFF EVERYTHING in the store.
Come enjoy a SOBER environment and meet new friends.
Teas by
Mon. - Sat. 9-3, 365 W. Broadway, 307-733-0365
center theater
Center for the Arts presents
november 9
SUNDAY
TICKETS $25/$10
7:00PM
Davide Cabassi
A finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition, the Italianborn Cabassi was featured in the documentary about the 12th quadrennial
competition, “In the Heart of Music,” and won the Italian Critics Award for
"Best Debut Recording of the Season."
Center for the Arts presents
november 28
FRIDAY
TICKETS $20
7:30PM
Pianafiddle
Lynn Wright – the former ragtime piano preacher of Jackson Hole – returns to
his old stomping ground with his new musical partner, classically trained violinist
Adam DeGraff, to play bluegrass, jazz, old time, blues, Celtic, klezmer and any
other kind of music that turns them on.
tickets
Center Box Office 265
S. Cache Street
307.733.4900
www.jhcenterforthearts.org
by phone
online
all programs,
artists and dates
subject to change
also coming
November 5,
Films by Shannon Plumb: The Art Association presents edgy, hilarious New York
filmmaker Shannon Plumb. Plumb directs, acts, creates the sets and props, and often even shoots
short, funny films about humanity's endearing imperfections. In the Studio Theater. FREE!
November 19 & 23,
Fall Concerts: The all-volunteer music ensembles present their annual
fall concerts in the Center Theater. The Jackson Hole Symphony Orchestra plays at 7:30 p.m. on
Wednesday, Nov. 19, and the Jackson Hole Community Band strikes up at 3 p.m. on Sunday, Nov. 23.
FREE!
Music
■ Karaoke, 9 p.m., at the Virginian Saloon. 739-9891. No
Sports & Recreation
■ Open Gym Adult Basketball, 7 to 9 p.m., at the Recreation
Cover.
Center. 739-9025.
■ Contract Bridge, 1 to 3:30 p.m., in the Meeting Room at
the Recreation Center. Meets weekly. 733-2969.
Art
■ Shannon Plumb Talk, 7 p.m., in the Center’s Studio
Community
■ Narcotics Anonymous, 5:30 p.m., in the Wapiti room
Theater, above the Theater Lobby. The Art Association
hosts New York film artist Shannon Plumb for a screening and conversation. Plumb has made 100-plus short
films – directing, acting, creating all the sets, props and
costumes, and often even filming herself – that focus on
the endearing imperfections of the human species. The
ArtTalk event is in advance of the Nov. 7 opening of her
film installation “Paper Collection,” her take on the fashion world. 733-6379.
below the ER at St. John’s hospital. The only requirement
for membership is a desire to stop using. If you have a
drug problem, NA can help. Free. 413-6850.
■ Workshop: Mastering Great Presentations, 8:30 to 11:30
a.m., at St. John’s Episcopal Church, in Hansen Hall. Does
the idea of standing in front of an audience and speaking
about your nonprofit organization sound as appealing as
a root canal? Fear not! With some simple tips and a little
practice, participants will be able to deliver a great presentation that will leave their audience asking for
more – and ready to act. Guaranteed to be painless. Pre-registration is required. $40.00, scholarships available. To register, contact Susan
Eriksen-Meier. 739-1026 or [email protected]
■ Foreign Policy Discussion Series, 6 to 7 p.m., in
the Ordway Auditorium at the Teton County
Library. Philanthropy & Foreign Aid: New
Players, New Goals? Watch a short foreign policy video and join a conversation led by Nicole
Prater of Wyoming Global Leadership
Exchange and Matthew Taylor of the Friess
WEDNESDAY Shannon Plumb Talk, 7 p.m., in the Center’s Studio
Family Foundation for the Great Decisions disTheater, above the Theater Lobby. The Art Association hosts
cussion series. No sign-up necessary. Drop-ins
New York film artist Shannon Plumb for a screening and conwelcome. 733-2164 ext. 135.
versation. The ArtTalk event is in advance of the Nov. 7 openHealth & Fitness
ing of her film installation “Paper Collection,” her take on the
■ Affordable Community Acupuncture, 4 to 7 p.m.,
fashion world. 733-6379.
at the Wilson Acupuncture & Healing Arts Center in
the Aspens. Drop-ins welcome. $30-50. 734-0808 or
Dance
www.WilsonAcupuncture.com.
■ Dancers’ Workshop Wednesday Classes at the Center for
■ Water Aerobics, 9 to 10 a.m., at the Recreation Center.
the Arts. Pilates Mat, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Power Jivamukti
739-9025.
Yoga, noon to 1:15 p.m.; Beginning Ballet, noon to 1:30
■ Step Plus Class, 12:10 to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
p.m.; Belly Dance, 6:30 to 7:30 p.m. $16 drop-in, 5 classCenter. 739-9025.
es/$60, or 10/$100. 733-6398.
■ Aqualogix Fitness Class, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., at the
Kids & Families
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Club, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Gym, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Music
Center. 739-9025.
■ Alta Storytime, 11 to 11:45 a.m., at St. Francis of the ■ Mike Thunder and Vert One spin tunes, 10 p.m., at Town
Tetons Church, Alta. Enjoy stories, crafts, puppet shows Square Tavern. No Cover.
and play with library staff. For ages five and under. Free. Dance
■ Dancers’ Workshop Thursday Classes at the Center for the
353-2505.
■ Kid’s Club After-school Program, 3 to 6 p.m., in the Arts. Cardio Kickboxing, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Power Yoga,
8:30 to 9:45 a.m.; Tae Kwon Do, 6:15 to 7:30 p.m.;
Jackson/Colter Schools’ Gyms. 739-9025.
Cardio Hip Hop, 6:15 to 7:30 p.m.; Contact
THURSDAY6
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 21
Improvisation, 6:15 to 7:30 p.m. $16 drop-in, 5 classes/$60, or 10/$100. 733-6398.
Forecast for Jackson Hole
Week of 11/5
WEDNESDAY
THURSDAY
FRIDAY
SATURDAY
SUNDAY
MONDAY
TUESDAY
Snow showers;
1-2 inches likely
Chilly with partial
sunshine
Mostly cloudy
Snow mixing with
rain possible
Cloudy and chilly
Chance of snow
Snow, possibly
mixing with rain
Kids & Families
■ Toddler Gym, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Club, 8:30 a.m. to noon, at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Time, 10:05 to 10:25 a.m., in the Storytime
Room at the Library. Offered for children ages 3 and
younger featuring books, songs, finger plays and flannel
board acts. Free.733-2164 ext. 103.
■ Kid’s Club After-school Program, 3 to 6 p.m., in the
Jackson/Colter Schools’ Gyms. 739-9025.
■ Storytime, 10:30 to 11 a.m., in the Ordway Auditorium at
the Library. Every Thursday. Kids ages 4 to 7 are invited
to join librarians featuring a different theme each week
with related tales and activities. Free. 733-2164 ext.
103.
34°
17°
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset
7:04 a.m.
5:08 p.m.
1:24 p.m.
11:25 p.m.
39°
15°
39°
17°
Sunrise
7:05 a.m. Sunrise
7:07 a.m.
Sunset
5:07 p.m. Sunset
5:06 p.m.
Moonrise 1:48 p.m. Moonrise 2:10 p.m.
Moonset
none Moonset 12:32 a.m.
40°
22°
40°
19°
37°
18°
37°
20°
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset
7:08 a.m.
5:05 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
1:40 a.m.
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset
7:09 a.m.
5:04 p.m.
2:51 p.m.
2:49 a.m.
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset
7:11 a.m.
5:03 p.m.
3:15 p.m.
4:02 a.m.
Sunrise
Sunset
Moonrise
Moonset
7:12 a.m.
5:01 p.m.
3:42 p.m.
5:19 a.m.
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2008
;bcbag[X
Sports & Recreation
■ Lunch Hour Basketball, noon to 2 p.m., at the Recreation
Regional Forecast
CITY
Bozeman, MT
Casper, WY
Driggs, ID
Grand Teton N.P.
Idaho Falls, ID
Missoula, MT
Pinedale, WY
Riverton, WY
Rock Springs, WY
Salt Lake City, UT
Yellowstone N.P.
WED.
HI/LO/W
36/18/sf
42/25/c
34/17/sf
31/14/sf
38/23/pc
38/22/sf
34/11/sf
37/22/sf
33/22/sf
47/28/c
32/10/sf
THU.
HI/LO/W
43/24/pc
43/25/pc
38/19/pc
37/14/pc
45/21/pc
41/27/pc
37/14/pc
42/21/s
36/22/pc
47/31/pc
33/16/pc
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy,
c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain,
sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice
E\WXg[X9E88GbjaF[hgg_X
beg[X&ebhgXfUXgjXXa
=TV^fbaTaWGXgbai\__TZX
Center. 739-9025.
Mind, Body & Spirit
■ Laughter Yoga Workshop, 7 to 8 p.m., at the One Center,
FV[XWh_XYTeX\aYbe`Tg\baVTaUXYbhaWTgjjj!fgTegUhf!Vb`TgXTV[fgbcTg[bgX_YebagWXf^fTaWbag[XUhfXf!DhXfg\baf2*&& '(%$
149 E. Pearl. Join Kelli Jones, certified laughter yoga
instructor. Free! 690-0571.
Community
■ Business Over Breakfast, 7:30 to 9 a.m. at the Virginian.
Cover TBA.
■ Jazz Night, 7 p.m. to 10 a.m., in the Granary at Spring
editions by Ben Roth, Travis Walker, Ben Carlson, Rachel
Kunkle Hartz, Aaron Wallis, Tristan Greszko, Wendell
Field, and Rich Goodwin. 699-0836.
■ First Fridays, 5 to 7:30 p.m., at Lyndsay McCandless
Contemporary. Local art and a veggie-oil Mercedes will be
on display.
■ Voices of Our Land: Paintings by Cynthia Guild Stoetzer, 5 to
8 p.m., at Muse Gallery. Idaho artist Cynthia Guild
Stoetzer will be featured in a unique solo show this
November at J.H. Muse Gallery. She recently won
Idaho’s 2008 governors award for Excellence in the Arts.
A portion of the show’s proceeds will go directly to help
conserve the Idaho region’s natural beauty.
Please join us as we discuss issues, concerns, and successes with other area businesses and organizations.
New Chamber Members are encouraged to attend so
that they may introduce themselves and meet other
Members. Business Over Breakfast also has time set
aside for networking and space for you to display your
business promotional materials. Pursue Balance and
RRR Business Leaders will present discussions about
local efforts to green our community. $15 for Chamber
members and $20 for non-members. 733-3316.
Creek Resort atop East Gros Ventre Butte. Featuring Keith
Phillips on piano, Mike Rossi on bass, Ed Domer on
drums. No Cover.
■ Dark Cheddar plays rock and reggae, 7:30 to 11 p.m.,
at the Silver Dollar Bar in the Wort Hotel. No Cover. 7323939.
■ Bob Stevens plays classics, 9 p.m., at the Virginian
Saloon. No Cover. 739-9891.
Health & Fitness
■ Affordable Community Acupuncture, 4 to 7 p.m., at the
Gallery at the Center for the Arts. Jackson Hole resident
Seth Turner spent three seasons living, working and photographing at McMurdo station,
Antarctica. He found a landscape whose wild
topography is contrasted by its subtle, almost
monochromatic palette. 733-6379
■ Shannon Plumb: “Paper Collection,” 5:30 p.m.,
in the Artspace gallery at the Center for the Arts.
Plumb has made 100-plus short films – directing, acting, creating all the sets, props and costumes, and often even filming herself – that
focus on the endearing imperfections of the
human species. Her film installation “Paper
Collection,” is her take on the fashion world.
FRIDAY Voices of Our Land: Paintings by Cynthia Guild Stoetzer, 5 to
733-6379.
8 p.m., at Muse Gallery. Idaho artist Cynthia Guild Stoetzer will
■ The Teton Artlab Print Collaborative, 6 to 8 p.m.,
be featured in a unique solo show this November at J.H. Muse
at Teton Artlab, 135 N. Cache #5 next to Teton
Gallery. She recently won Idaho’s 2008 governors award for
Thai. Affordable, hand made work by some of
Excellence in the Arts. A portion of the show’s proceeds will go
the region’s best artists. The Teton Artlab Print
directly to help conserve the Idaho region’s natural beauty.
Collaborative is a program that introduces
local artists to the art of printmaking and facilitates the exchange of ideas and techniques in a safe, Dance
non-toxic environment. To date, the project has produced ■ Dancers’ Workshop Friday Classes at the Center for the
Wilson Acupuncture & Healing Arts Center in the Aspens.
Drop-ins welcome. $30-50. 734-0808 or
www.WilsonAcupuncture.com.
■ Yoga, 8 to 9:15 a.m., at the Recreation Center. 7399025.
■ Yoga Class, 12:10 to 1 p.m., at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
■ Aqualogix Fitness Class, 9 to 10 a.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
FRIDAY7
Film
Storm Show Studios premieres its new film, 600”, at 6 pm
and 9pm in the Grand Teton Ballroom at Snow King Resort.
Tickets are $12, or $15 the day of the show.
Music
■ Jazz Night, 7 to 10 p.m., in the Granary at Spring Creek
Ranch atop East Gros Ventre Butte. With Bill Plummer on
bass, Leroy Plock on piano, Mike Calabrese on drums.
No Cover. 733-8833.
■ DJ Thunder and DJ Kenny spin tunes, 9 p.m., at 43 North.
920 West Broadway
Art
■ Seth Turner: Antarctica, 5:30 p.m., in the Artspace Loft
Arts. Pilates Mat, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Ballet Workout, 9:30
to 10:30 a.m.; $16 drop-in, 5 classes/$60, or 10/$100.
733-6398.
Kids & Families
■ Toddler Club, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Gym, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Kid’s Club After-school Program, 3 to 6 p.m., in the
Jackson/Colter Schools’ Gyms. 739-9025.
Sports & Recreation
■ Tugboat Memorial Ski Swap, 4 to 8 p.m., at the Driggs
community center. Proceeds to benefit the Grand Targhee
Ski Team. (208) 354-4878.
Classes & Lectures
■ Chinese Craft & Ribbon Dancing, 2 to 3 p.m., in the Ordway
Auditorium at the Teton County Library. Kids ages 5 to 8 are
invited to learn about Chinese culture with a hands-on
craft making lanterns and fans and to join in a ribbon folk
dancing activity. Sign up required. 733-2164 ext. 103.
Community
■ Wells Fargo Grand Opening in Jackson, 4 to 6 p.m., at the
West Branch of the Wells Fargo Bank, 50 Buffalo Way.
Locals are invited to the grand opening of Wells Fargo in
Jackson. The celebration will include an appearance by
the Wells Fargo stagecoach, a ribbon-cutting ceremony,
musical entertainment, giveaways and complimentary
refreshments. In keeping with Wells Fargo’s long-standing commitment to the local communities it serves,
checks totaling $80,000 will be presented to local organizations. 739-3149.
Health & Fitness
■ Water Aerobics, 9 to 10 a.m., at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
307.732.AUTO(2886)
22
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
GALAXY CALENDAR FROM PAGE 21
WINE & SPIRITS
BEST
LOCAL
DISCOUNT
ON WINE
AND
LIQUOR
Home of the
MOST UNIQUE
WINE SELECTION
in the valley.
SHOT OF THE WEEK
by Randy Shacket
J
A
15%
OFF
No minimum
purchase.
Specializing
in
Italian
wines
w
734-5766
945 W. Broadway
Jackson
(under the huge
American flag)
Jackson residents casted their vote Tuesday morning at the Senior Center.
DORNAN’S
The holidays are
almost here!
Be prepared &
book your
holiday parties
in advance!
Holidays
■ Artisans Giving Back Holiday Gift Show, 10 a.m., at the
Sports & Recreation
■ Open Gym (Adults Only), 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., in the
Red Lion, Idaho Falls. Local artisans selling handcrafted
items. Daily raffle with raffle ticket proceeds supporting
the Haven, Equine Rescue, and Habitat Aid Initiative.
Debbie Orme, [email protected]
Music
■ Dark Cheddar plays rock and reggae, 7:30 to 11 p.m.,
at the Silver Dollar Bar in the Wort Hotel. No Cover.7323939.
■ Keith Phillips solos piano, 6:30 to 9:30 a.m., in the
Granary at Spring Creek Resort atop East Gros Ventre
Butte. No Cover.
PIZZA • CALZONES • PASTA • SALADS
Open daily 11:30am-3pm; Sat & Sun 11:30am-5pm
OVER 1,600 VARIETIES AVAILABLE
Arts. Pilates Mat, 9 to 10 a.m. $16 drop-in, 5 classes/$60, or 10/$100. 733-6398.
SATURDAY8
Pizza & Pasta Co.
Wine Shoppe & Spur Bar
■ Aqualogix Fitness Class, noon to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
Contact Dawn
307.733.2415 Ext. 305
[email protected]
Recreation Center Gym. 739-9025.
■ Open Swim, 1 to 9 p.m., in the Recreation Center Gym.
739-9025.
■ Open Gym, 1 to 9 p.m., in the Recreation Center Gym.
739-9025.
■ Tugboat Memorial Ski Swap, 4 to 8 p.m., At the Driggs
Community Center. Proceeds to benefit the Grand Targhee
Ski Team. (208) 354-4878.
J
Mind, Body & Spirit
■ Flu Shots Available, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m., in the Smith’s
Plaza. St. John’s Family Health & Urgent Care will have
flu shots available. No appointment is necessary.
Getting the vaccine is your best protection against this
disease. $15 for adults and $10 for children.
t
739-8999.
Outlying
■ Alpine Farmers Market, 10:30 a.m. to 3 p.m.,
at Tavern on the Greys RV Park just south of
Alpine Junction. 690-2614.
Open Daily 10am-6pm; Bar 10am-6pm
Trading Post Grocery
Open Daily 8am-6pm
Gift Shop
Open Daily 10am-5pm
Spur Cabins
LOCATED ON THE BANKS OF THE SNAKE RIVER
WITH TETON VIEWS
733-2522
WE WILL BE
CLOSED TO
THE PUBLIC
NOV 3 - DEC 3.
For upcoming events
check out our website
WWW.DORNANS.COM
307-733-2415
Moose, WY
12 miles north of Jackson
SUNDAY9
Music
■ The Legendary Stage Coach Band plays, 6 to 10
SATURDAY Keith Phillips solos piano, 6:30 to 9:30 a.m., in the
Granary at Spring Creek Resort atop East Gros Ventre Butte. No
Cover.
Dance
■ Dancers’ Workshop Saturday Classes at the Center for the
p.m., at the Stagecoach Bar in Wilson. No cover.
733-4407.
■ Classical pianist Davide Cabassi, 7 p.m., at the
Center Theater. $25 for adults, $10 for students.
733-4900 or jhcenterforthearts.org.
T
Sports & Recreation
■ Open Swim, 1 to 7 p.m., in the Recreation Center Gym. t
739-9025.
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 23
■ Open Gym, 1 to 3:30 p.m., in the Recreation Center Gym.
Cover TBA.
739-9025.
■ Open Gym Volleyball, 4 to 7 p.m., in the Recreation Center
Gym. 739-9025.
■ Open Gym (Adults Only), noon to 1 p.m., in the Recreation
Center Gym. 739-9025.
Dance
■ Dancers’ Workshop Tuesday Classes at the Center for the
Jackson Town Hall. Plans for the Christmas Bird Count will
be reviewed. [email protected]
Arts. Cardio Kickboxing, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Power Yoga,
8:30 to 9:45 a.m.; Ballet Workout, 9:30 to 10:30 a.m.;
Quick Fitness, 12 to 12:45 p.m.; Intro to Pilates, 5:15 to
6:15 p.m.; Tae Kwon Do, 6:15 to 7:30 p.m.; Power Yoga,
6:15 to 7:30 p.m.; Intermediate Modern, 6:15 to 7:30
p.m.; Capoeira, 7:30 to 9 p.m. $16 drop-in, 5 classes/$60, or 10/$100. 733-6398.
MONDAY10
Kids & Families
■ Toddler Gym, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Community
■ November Meeting of the JH Bird Club, 7:30 p.m., at the
Dance
■ Dancers’ Workshop Monday Classes at the Center for the
Arts. Pilates Mat, 8:30 to 9:30 a.m.; Intermediate Ballet,
6:15 to 7:30 p.m.; Intro to Flamenco, 6:15 to 7 p.m.;
Flamenco, 7 to 8 p.m. $16 drop-in, 5 classes/$60, or
10/$100. 733-6398.
Film
■ Teen Movie Matinee: “Angus,” 3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., in the
Ordway Auditorium at the Teton County Library. Watch how
high school underdog Angus Bethune prevails when a
practical joke goes awry, leaving egg all over his rival
Rick’s face (Rated PG-13). This movie is based on the
short story “Angus Bethune,” written by Chris Crutcher,
who visits the library November 20. 733-2164 ext. 247.
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Club, 8:30 a.m. to noon, at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
■ Toddler Gym, 9:30 a.m. to noon, at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
■ Toddler Swim, 10 a.m. to 11:30 a.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Time in the Storytime Room at the Library, 10:0510:25 a.m. and 10:35-10:55 a.m. Offered for children
ages 3 and younger featuring books, songs, finger plays
and flannel board acts. 733-2164 ext. 103. Free.
■ Kid’s Club After-school Program, 3 to 6 p.m., in the
Jackson/Colter Schools’ Gyms. 739-9025.
Sports & Recreation
■ Lunch Hour Adult Basketball, noon to 2 p.m., at
MONDAY Teen Movie Matinee: “Angus,”
3:30 p.m. to 5 p.m., in the Ordway
Auditorium at the Teton County Library.
Watch how high school underdog
Angus Bethune prevails when a practical joke goes awry, leaving egg all
over his rival Rick’s face (Rated PG13). This movie is based on the short
story “Angus Bethune,” written by
Chris Crutcher, who visits the library
November 20. 733-2164 ext. 247.
Kids & Families
■ Toddler Gym, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Club, 8:30 a.m. to 1 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Toddler Swim, 10 to 11:30 a.m., at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
■ Kid’s Club After-school Program, 3 to 6 p.m., in the
Jackson/Colter Schools’ Gyms. 739-9025.
Sports & Recreation
■ Open Gym Adult Basketball, 7 to 9 p.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
Community
■ Anorexics and Bulimics Anonymous meeting, 6 p.m., in
the Eagle Classroom at St. John’s Hospital. Free. 6908442 or [email protected]
Health & Fitness
■ Water Aerobics, 9 to 10 a.m., at the Recreation Center.
739-9025.
■ Body/Sculpting Fitness Class, 12:10 to 1 p.m., at the
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
■ Aqualogix Fitness Class, 5:15 to 6:15 p.m., at the
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
TUESDAY11
Music
■ Bootleg Flyer jams rock and country, 7:30 to 11 p.m.,
at the Silver Dollar Bar in the Wort Hotel. No cover. worthotel.com or 733-2190.
■ DJ Thunder and DJ Kenny spin tunes, 9:00, at 43 North.
Rally’s or Bust!
Convenient location.
Self & full-service grooming.
Friendly & professional service.
Doggie daycare & boarding.
LIVE MUSIC
7:30 - 11:30pm
November 7-8
BOB GREENSPAN
November 11
Bluegrass Tuesday
BOOTLEG FLYER
the Recreation Center. 739-9025.
■ Open Gym Volleyball, 7 to 9 p.m., in the
Recreation Center Gym. 739-9025.
Mind, Body & Spirit
■ Lite Lunch Diabetes Presentation, noon to 1 p.m.,
in the Moose-Wapiti classrooms at the St. Johns
Medical Center. Samuel L. Abbate, MD, will present St. John’s Lite Lunch program on “Living
with Diabetes.” Dr. Abbate has served on the
National Board of the American Diabetes
Association, American Diabetes Association
Research Foundation, and the National Diabetes
Education Program of the National Institutes of
Health and is passionate about the prevention of diabetes and the proper management of this disease in the
hospital and the outpatient setting. 739-7244.
Broadway at Glenwood • 733.2190
www.worthotel.com
Health & Fitness
■ Affordable Community Acupuncture, 4 to 7 p.m., at the
BULL MOOSE SALOON
Wilson Acupuncture & Healing Arts Center in the Aspens.
Drop-ins welcome. $30-50. 734-0808 or
www.WilsonAcupuncture.com.
■ Wake-up Water Aerobics, 6:05 to 7:05 a.m., at the
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
■ Aqualogix Fitness Class, 9 to 10 a.m., at the Recreation
Center. 739-9025.
■ Yoga, 9 to 10:15 a.m., at the Recreation Center. 7399025.
■ Spinning Bike Fitness Class, 12:10 to 1 p.m., at the
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
■ Water Aerobics Class, 5:30 to 6:30 p.m., at the
Recreation Center. 739-9025.
November 7 & 8:
BASTARD SONS OF
JOHNNY CASH
8:30pm • No Cover
Saturday, November 15:
WMMA
Wyoming Mixed Martial Arts
brings cage fighting to Alpine, WY
Compiled by Aaron Davis & Henry Sweets
GALAXY ENTRIES must be submitted to
[email protected]
before noon on Sunday
in order to appear in the print edition.
Upload your own events at
www.planetjh.com.
GALAXY CALENDAR IS
AVAILABLE ONLINE AT
WWW.PLANETJH.COM
Mon-Fri 8am-6pm • Sat 10am-5pm • Sun 12-5pm
Located in the K-Mart Plaza • 307-733-7704
8:00pm • Call for tickets $20
Come down & watch your favorite
football team on the Big Screens.
Lots of drink specials!
Beer & Liquor King of Star Valley
Great selections & prices!
1-877-498-7993
ALPINE, WYOMING
SCROOGE
AUDITIONS
Friday, November 7
from 6:30 - 8:30p
Call for your
audition time
733-3021
SCROOGE
CHRISTMAS PARTY
Planning underway
Reserve your group seats today!
Call Emy @ 733-3021
[email protected]
2009 Winter Class Offerings
CHILDREN'S CLASSES
THE CREATIVE ADVENTURE
(An Acting Class for ages 5-7)
Jan 10 - Feb 28
Journey to the Center of Imagination
(Acting Class for ages 8-10)
Jan 12 - March 2
The Joy of Performance
(Acting for ages 7-10)
Jan 7 - Jan 31
ADULT CLASSES
How to AUDITION and get the Part
Jan 12 - Feb 16
Basic Acting for Adults:
An Introductory Course
Jan 5 - Feb 9
INTERMEDIATE IMPROV:
(on-going) Every other
Sunday/month.
Jan - May
Beginning Improv:
Jan 11 - Feb 8
Second City -Improv Master Class
January 18th
All performances
and classes at the
Center for the Arts
307-733-3021
240 S. Glenwood
Just off Town Square
www.offsquare.org
24
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
HOLLOW – WHEEE! - N
Planet JH photographer Andrew Wyatt waded through a hot mess of humanity on Halloween Night, capturing images of two well-attended dance parties at
Q Roadhouse and Pi Club. It was no enviable task, believe me; I was at both
parties too.
At Q, the fervor of haphazard glances and bumper-car flesh almost sent me
over the edge. The sound of the base was vibrating and coated everything like
warm gelatin. It spread onto the walls and dripped over the crowd of Sarah
Palins, Mexican cake decorations and demented clowns whose collective
gyrations demanded constant lubrication. On the deck outside, hand-rolled
cigarettes and relative quiet brought solace. Every once in a while, I would
step back into the humidity for 10-minute doses of absolute glee.
After hours we caught a cab to the Pi Club, which had peaked at about the
same time as Q, and so was winding down by the time we arrived. Reportedly,
the Pi Club was abuzz and people were dancing in front of a movie screen.
But I missed all of that. Instead, at five in the morning, I was running down
Broadway in my cowboy boots and union suit.
But not before I had fled a dark room where a zombie and a belly dancer
were kissing one another and making sexy looks into the cameras of middleaged men. Earlier, I was on top of the world, and next thing I knew I was fleeing the vacuum of the evening I had envisioned before it had even begun. In
retrospect, I spent most of the night on the deck at Q, and thumped myself the
following day for not having grasped the hand of opportunity, danced more or
at least made it to the Pi Club in time to check out the scene.
But in retrospect I had a great time. And considering the amount of hype and
preparation that goes into a holiday that celebrates over indulgence for all
ages, running from nothing to nothing was a fitting end. – Henry Sweets
PHOTOS BY ANDREW WYATT
Donatello made a grand entrance, but after finding no pizza he hitchhiked
home in the rain.
Diva of the undead.
Unfortunately for this man, no women were dressed as
runny noses.
Ahh, there is no nectar like the
sweat of cold steel.
MIrror image? No. It is blogger Jim Stanford living
the dream of being Andrew Wyatt for a night.
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 25
MUSICBOX
Aaron Davis
A traveling musician’s on-the-road picks; Cabassi at Center Theater
The election is now over, and its time for fresh beginnings. The same goes for your music collection. On the
road for the last five weeks, I’ve been in search of new
artists, some of whom have narrowly eluded my good listening ear for too long. Others I had never heard of until
someone mentioned that they were a “must hear.”
I guess angelic reverb, a la Jim James of My Morning
Jacket, is the new cool. The Fleet Foxes sure think so. In
the spirit of The Byrds and Crosby, Stills and Nash,
these Foxes are on the prowl of something rather
refreshing. Unlikely instruments, strong harmonies, and
the best of folk-meets-rock make this quintet a band I’d
like to know more intimately.
You don’t have to be a fan of 1920s hot jazz and jug
band blues to like Austin, Texas’s White Ghost Shivers.
Self-dubbed “the Motley Crue of hot string bands,”
they’re theatrical stage show lit up the Continental Club
during a recent visit to their hometown.
Everywhere I went, the band Bon Iver (BON-E-VARE)
kept popping up. I finally scoped the Wisconsin trio, led
by singer-songwriter Justin Vernon, and quickly realized
their newfound appeal. Vernon recorded Bon Iver’s
debut album, For Emma, Forever Ago, in his father’s
remote cabin in Wisconsin. The heavily overdubbed,
atmospheric album evolved during a cathartic time of
isolation, post-band and woman breakups, and sickness.
Kentucky folk artist Mitch Barrett has won Merle Fest’s
Chris Austin Songwriting Contest twice. Check out his
solo stuff and also his acoustic duo, Zoe Speaks. He
blends Appalachian roots with old country, Motown and
reggae. He’s also a respected storyteller who sets his
live shows apart from other folkies.
Shifting towards the avant-garde, Indie rockers
Vampire Weekend from New York City describe their
sound as “Upper West Side Soweto.” They’re definitely
classically influenced, but there’s also a strong Afro-pop
influence. Another tag that I found to be laughable is
“trust fund frat rock.” Regardless, it’s artsy and experimental. They’re currently on tour across Europe.
Named one of Rolling Stone’s “Ten Artists to Watch,”
folk rocker Brett Dennen still appears to be off the radar.
I’m a big fan of his self-titled release, with an upbeat
acoustic guitar feel and a high-pitched voice that sounds
like no other. I’ve only heard a single from his new
release, Hope for the Helpless, which features Nigerian
Afro-Beat vocalist Femi Kuti. More production, more pop
was my initial reaction to the new sound. Hopefully others will take notice to this fine songwriter.
Ambient folk is on the rise. Toronto, Canada’s Great
Lake Swimmers are a quintessential example. I really dig
their sound—acoustic string music in the background
and airy vocals in the foreground make for a nice audio
landscape. Bet they can’t swim ‘cross them lakes.
Originally formed by David Berman along with
Pavement’s Stephen Malkmus and Bob Nastanovich,
Silver Jews have apparently been around since 1989.
Where have I been? Berman is the remaining member of
the three, and released the Jews’ sixth album, Lookout
Davide Cabassi
Justin Vernon of Bon Iver
Mountain, Lookout Sea, this past June. The new disc is
odd to my ears, but there’s something I like about it.
Berman’s mellow drone of a voice can be a little creepy,
backed by pretty female “oh’s and ah’s.” Their discography is worth researching, especially American Water and
The Natural Bridge.
All of these artists have a strong Web presence, so get
your google on and open your mind.
■
Critically acclaimed Italian pianist Davide Cabassi will
be touching down in the States this week, making a stop
in Jackson for a concert at the Center for Arts. The
classical player was a finalist in the 2005 Van Cliburn
International Piano Competition, a highly prestigious for
the 32-year-old.
Cabassi’s performance will be the last concert at the
Center until December, and rounds out the eclectic
goals of the venue.
“One of our priorities here at the Center is to present the full spectrum of performers at a range of price
points,” said Center for the Arts marketing director
Richard Anderson. “We’ve managed to cover quite a
few genres over the past 20 months since the Center
Theater has been open — blues, bluegrass, rock,
world, Broadway, singer-songwriter, a little jazz — but
we have not played host to a classical musician.”
Vampire Weekend
Cabassi is no stranger to the stage. He made his
orchestral debut at age 13 with the RAI Radio Symphony
Orchestra in Milan. His resume continued to grow, collaborating with the Munich Philharmonic, the Neue
Philharmonie Westfalen, and Russian Chamber
Philharmonic. Performance opportunities have taken him
across Austria, China, France, Germany, Japan, Portugal
and beyond. Last year, Cabassi traveled to the University
of Wyoming for a recital and educational program.
“Dancing with the Orchestra,” his debut CD for SonyBMG Records in 2006, won the Italian Critics Award for
“Best Debut Recording of the Season.” The disc features
works by Bartok, De Falla, Ravel and Stravinsky.
His upcoming performance at the Center will include
two impromptus by Franz Shubert, Piano Sonata D845 in
A and Modest Mussorgsky’s single-piano version of
“Pictures at an Exhibition.”
The Center for the Arts presents Davide Cabassi at
7 p.m. on Sunday in the Center Theater. Tickets are
$25 for adults, $10 for students, and are available at
the Center Box Office at 265. S. Cache St, by calling
733-4900, or online at jhcenterforthearts.org. PJH
In addition to keeping his finger on the local music pulse, Aaron Davis is a singer-songwriter, multi-instrumentalist, trout hunter and snow rider
originally from the rolling hills of Kentucky. www.aarondavismusic.com.
26
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
CDREVIEWS
JUST A SOUVENIR
NOW OFFERING GREENWAY CARPET CLEANING
100% SUSTAINABLE
GREEN SEAL APPROVED!
Call today for a FREE IN-HOME ESTIMATE
734-7678
Poor Boys & Gals Private Yoga
Off-Season Special: $35.00/hour/individual lesson (group & couples packages available)
For more information call 307.413.3992 or [email protected]
one-time only • offer expires 1/1/09
Squarepusher
3.5 out of 5
The music industry is drowning in genres. The need to define
musical phrasing and its instrumental elements birthed category
titles like ‘Wizard Rock’ and ‘Pornogrind.’ Or how about some
‘Nerofunk’ or ‘Ghettotech’ (cue the endearing, feminist vocals,
“Hoes take off your clothes, hoes get naked”) ...
English Warp Records innovator Squarepusher kidnaps every genre you want to define
him in, chops and screws it, and spits it back out into a coagulated musical mess. The
result is a frenetic concoction of - forgive the genre-dropping - IDM and drum-and-bass
laced with jazz, electro, blues, rock and pretty much every other type of music you can list
off in one sitting.
A bass guitar virtuoso, Squarepusher’s newest instrumental endeavor, Just a Souvenir, is
melodic and ethereal with emotional blitzes of guitar-plucking and choppy, layered percussion. Sometimes, however, Squarepusher’s modus operandi – sped-up, slowed-down and
sped-up beats and guitar riffs – grows stale for listeners seeking a uniform four-minute formula.
Indeed, Just a Souvenir is only for the musically adventurous, the open-minded listeners
who have decidedly abandoned the process of defining just what it is they are listening to.
– Robyn Vincent
ALPINISMS
The School of Seven Bells
2 out of 5
photo by Neal Henderson
COME CHEER
US ON!
MOOSE
HOCKEY
SCHEDULE
2008-2009
Nov 7 & 8
Nov 14 & 15
Dec 12 & 13
Dec 19 & 20
Jan 2 & 3
Jan 16 & 17
Jan 23 & 24
Feb 6 & 7
Feb 13 & 14
Feb 27 & 28
Mar. 6 or 7
Mar. 20 & 21
Missoula Cutthroats
Cache Valley Trappers
@ McCall AWAY
Sun Valley Suns
Aspen Leafs
Chicago Chargers
@ Sun Valley AWAY
Cache Valley Trappers
Philadelphia Independence
McCall Mountaineers
NHL Game
Trail Smoke Eaters
ALL HOME GAMES ARE PLAYED AT THE
SNOW KING ICE CENTER @ 7:30P.M.
ADULTS $8 @ THE DOOR • KIDS 8 & UNDER $3
FOR MORE INFO CALL 733-5200
The School of Seven Bells uses sounds from the past to make lullaby dance music for the future.
The group sews together pieces of experimental noise rock, electro, new pop and other genres into a brooding construction of mechanized sounds and
danceable beats. It is a post-apocalyptical soundscape, but above it, floats the Celtic
vocals of twins Alejandra and Claudia Deheza. Distorted drums and distant synthesizers
contrast with their voices, and despite the slight tint of darkness, the music is mostly bright.
Tracks like “Iamundernodisguise” and “Face to Face in High Places” are very successful but some other tracks lack form and originality.
I am taken by the hip boundaries of dance music and songwriterly indie-rock, and enamored with the shoe-gazing ethereality of bands like Beach House and Broadcast. School of
the Seven Bells is mostly successful at tying those ends of the contemporary musical spectrum together.
The music is right for thoughtful alone-time, heady conversations about the human condition or weird late-night dance parties with close friends.
– Henry Sweets
THE PILGRIM AND THE STARS
Enrico Rava
5 out of 5
Originally released in 1975, The Pilgrim and the Stars rerelease last
month reminded me of the relative vacancy of innovation and experiment in contemporary jazz since the 70s.
At best, jazz has been used in recent years by artists such as Roy
Hargrove as the baseplate for interesting new forms, and I’ve seen Rob Wasserman’s
Banyon experiment interestingly, even if all that talent purges more than plays. Un-fusion
jazz experimentation as a prevalent American artform is no more.
Enrico Rava on trumpet, John Abercrombie on guitar, Palle Danielsson on Double-Bass
and Jon Christensen on drums – playing at a time when (drug) music was more contemplative and subtle than heart-racing, a virtue that even the original jamband, the Grateful
Dead, understood. The tone of The Pilgrim and the Stars is not unlike Miles Davis’ Sketches
of Spain, but in delivery obviously comes much later than Davis’ 1960 release, and probably with influence from 70s Davis (Rava cited him as a major influence).
I dig this album, and on a recent drive through Grand Teton National Park – visitor centers closed, sky gray and roads free of tourists – it provided a suitable backdrop to the end
of the season.
– Matthew Irwin
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 27
D I N I N G G U I D E
Asian & Sushi
BON APPE THAI
Lunch served from 11 a.m.
- 2:30 p.m. Dinner starting
at 5 p.m. Closed for lunch
on Sundays. Take-Out and
Delivery Available. Walkins welcome. Reservations
recommended.
Across
from the old post office.
245 Pearl, 734-0245.
KOSHU WINE BAR
Koshu serves an everchanging menu of contemporary pan-Asian cuisine,
delicious cocktails and a
variety of wines by the
glass. The Jackson Hole
Wine Company is just outside our door with hundreds of great wines from
which to choose. Open
nightly at 6 p.m. 733-5283.
NIKAI
Jackson Hole’s favorite
sushi bar offers the finest
delicacies from both land
and sea. Featuring innovative sushi & sashimi as well
as a creative asian inspired
grill menu. Full service bar
specializes in tropical
cocktails & offers unique
fine sake & wine lists. 225
N. Cache. Reservations are
recommended, 734-6490.
THAI ME UP
Authentic
Thai
dishes
including coconut chicken
lemongrass soup, drunken
noodle and coconut milk
curries. Full bar and children’s menu. 75 E. Pearl,
parking behind restaurant.
Serving Lunch, Tue. - Fri.
11:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.;
Dinner, 5:30 p.m. - close,
Tue.-Sat. Closed Monday
and Sunday. Take-out available, 733-0005.
Continental
43 NORTH
Serving dinner seven nights
a week at the base of Snow
King. Happy hour specials
begin at 5 p.m. Cozy pub
atmosphere and great selection of whiskies. Live music
four nights a week. 645 S.
Cache, 733-0043.
BURKE’S
Sample
our
superior
steaks, chops, and innovative fish, game and fowl
dishes in this historic
renovated
building.
Reservations recommended;
smoke-free.
Open
nightly from 6-10 p.m. 72
S. Glenwood. 733-8575.
THE BLUE LION
A Jackson Hole favorite.
Offering the finest in creative cuisine. Join us in the
charming atmosphere of a
refurbished older home.
Ask a local about our rack
of lamb. Also serving fresh
fish, elk, poultry, steaks,
and vegetarian entreés.
Open nightly at 6:00 p.m.
Closed Tuesdays until ski
season. Join us for our offseason special: 20% off
100% Natural
# LOW fat #
Buffalo & Elk
Steaks, JERKY &
Salami, Prime Rib,
Gourmet Gift Packs
NO Hormones
NO Antibiotics
LOW Cholesterol
Made in Jackson Hole
your entire bill. Good all
night. Reservations recommended. 160 N. Millward,
733-3912.
DORNAN’S PIZZA &
PASTA CO.
Gourmet pizzas, homemade soups, pasta, sandwiches and salads. Enjoy a
relaxing lunch while sitting
along the Snake River
enjoying the fabulous view
of the Tetons. 12 miles
north of Jackson in Grand
Teton National Park at
Moose, Wyoming, 7332415.
THE GRANARY
Overlooking the magnificent Teton Range, offers a
casual yet elegant atmosphere. Specialties include
elk, Rocky Mountain trout
and fresh seafood flown in
from Hawaii. Award-winning wine list. Nightly
happy hour specials from
4-7 p.m. Jazz Night is on
Fridays from 7-10 p.m. and
733-4159
1-800-543-MEAT
Next to Smith’s Grocery
Plaza & the Conoco Station
Lunch ~ Daily at 11:30am
Dinner ~ Nightly at 5:30pm
Billy’s open daily at 11:30am
Happy Hour 5-7pm nightly: 2 for 1 Drinks
385 W. Broadway, Jackson
Authentic Mexican Cuisine
(307) 733-1207
OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK 11am to 10pm
LUNCHEON COMBINATION
Monday-Friday 11am-3pm
(In the bar)
FULL BAR
On the
Town Square
733-3279
HOME OF THE ORIGINAL
JUMBO MARGARITA
“There are people who strictly deprive themselves of each and
every eatable, drinkable, and smokable which has in any way
acquired a shady reputation. They pay this price for health.
And health is all they get for it. How strange it is.
It is like paying out your whole fortune for a cow
that has gone dry.”
– Mark Twain
LARGE SELECTION OF
MEXICAN BEERS
DINNER SPECIALS
Abuelito’s Special
Jumbo prawns cooked with mushrooms,
sautéed in a tasty sour cream sauce
Sopa Sieta Mares
Delicious soup made with fresh fish, shrimp,
octopus, crab legs, clams and scallops
Try our Thai Lunch Express
from 11:00am - 2:30pm
Authentic THAI Dinner Daily
Doors Open at 5:00pm
Take-Out Available
Reservations Recommended
Walk-ins Welcome
245 W. Pearl Ave.
(across from the old Post Office)
734-0245
28
November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
DINING GUIDE continues from page 27
OFF SEASON SPECIAL:
Get 1 FREE soda
with the purchase of a sandwich
Serving up the finest
imported and domestic meats and cheeses
this side of the Continental Divide!
50 WEST DELONEY • TOWN SQUARE • JACKSON
307-734-9420 • (F) 307-734-9430 • BackcountryProvisions.com
December
, Reopen
4.
November
Closed in
Pam Drews Phillips plays
on Saturdays from 6:309:30 p.m. An unforgettable
dining experience equaled
only by the view. Serving
Breakfast, lunch & dinner 7
days a week. Reservations
suggested. Spring Creek
Ranch, 733-9112.
Q ROADHOUSE
BARBEQUE
From the people that
brought you Rendezvous
Bistro, “Q,” on Teton
Village Road, serves up a
variety of Roadhouse fare.
Menu
items
include;
Blackened Catfish, Shrimp
Jambalaya, a variety of
fresh
salads,
Turkey
Meatloaf,
Organic
“Chicken Fried”, Steaks,
BBQ Ribs, Pulled Pork &
Beef Brisket. Extensive
wine list and full bar available.
Open
Nightly
5:00pm. Happy Hours at
the bar only are 5:00 6:00 p.m. and 8:00 - 9:00
p.m. Call for reservations.
739-0700.
RENDEZVOUS BISTRO
The Bistro offers something for everyone including salads, sandwiches &
daily plate specials. Our
Raw Bar features oysters
on the half shell, tuna
tartare and oyster shooters. Appetizers include
mussels, gnocchi, grilled
octopus, steak tartare and
more. The entree selection
ranges from traditional
bistro Fish & Chips,
Meatloaf, Veal Marsala &
Coq au Vin to many other
selections including fresh
seasonal seafood, pasta &
steaks. Open nightly at
5:30 p.m. Reservations are
recommended. Located at
380 S. Hwy 89/Broadway
right next to Albertson’s,
739-1100.
SNAKE RIVER BREWERY
& RESTAURANT
America’s most award-winning microbrewery is serving lunch and dinner. Enjoy
the atmosphere while dining on delicious wood-fired
Home of the
“BIG PIG MARG”
pizzas, pastas, sandwiches, soups, salads and
desserts. $7.00 lunch
menu from 11:30am - 3pm.
Happy Hour from 4-6 with
$1 giant soft pretzels, $1
off pints and $3 nachos.
So stop by the Brew Pub to
get the freshest beer in the
valley, right from the
source! Free WIFI. Open
11:30am-midnight. 265 S.
Millward. 739-2337.
SNAKE RIVER GRILL
Celebrating
our
15th
anniversary
with
our
$20.08 SPECIAL. A Choice
of two courses. Whether
you stop by for a pizza and
beer, or enjoy our celebrated menu of American and
International fare and our
huge wine list, you will be
pleased by Jackson’s most
beautiful restaurant and as
stated
in
The
Wine
Spectator, the “best!” in
town! Open nightly at 6:00
p.m. On the Town Square,
733-0557.
SWEETWATER RESTAURANT
Satisfying locals for lunch
OFF
SEASON
SPECIAL
32oz of pleasure
and dinner for nearly 30
years
with
deliciously
affordable comfort food.
Award winning wine list.
Lunch 11:30 a.m. - 2:30
p.m. Dinner 5:30-9:30 p.m.
Corner of King & Pearl,
733-3553.
TRIO
Voted one of “Jackson
Hole’s hottest restaurants” Food and Wine
Feb. 2008. Trio is owned
and operated by local
chefs with a passion for
good food. Our menu features
contemporar y
American dishes inspired
by classic bistro cuisine.
Daily specials feature
wild game, fish and
meats. Enjoy a glass of
wine at the bar in front of
the wood-burning oven
and watch the chefs perform in the open kitchen.
One block off the town
square. Open for dinner
nightly at 5:30 p.m. 45 S.
Glenwood. For reser vations call 734-8038. For
a complete menu visit us
at www.bistrotrio.com.
JACKSON HOLE ROASTERS
COFFEEHOUSE
20% OFF ENTIRE BILL
733-3912
Since 1969
• Authentic Mexican dishes made from scratch
• Hot chips made fresh all day long
• Choose from 10 homemade salsas & sauces
• Voted “BEST SALSA” Splash Magazine
(307) 733-2966
North of the Town Square
in Downtown Jackson
160 N. Millward
GOOD ALL NIGHT
Dinner starts at 6:00pm NIGHTLY
Closed Tuesdays until Ski Season
Please present coupon to server when ordering.
Coupon expires December 11.
• Reservations Recommended •
18% gratuity may be added to your bill prior to discount.
“'Tis not her coldness,
father, that chills my
labouring breast;
Introducing Mr. Q
FULL CATERING MENU
It’s that confounded
FRESH ROASTED
ORGANIC COFFEE
cucumber I’ve ate
by the cup or by the pound
pastries
and can’t digest.”
featuring hot & cold specialties
wireless access
Call & ask for Frank
for FREE delivery to your door.
733-0201
Open for breakfast at 7:30am
sandwiches
Author: Richard Harris Barham
307-699-3984
145 East Broadway
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 29
Coffee House/Internet Cafe
HARD DRIVE CAFE
Internet Access: our computers or yours. Organic
espressos. Soup, salad,
panini,
wraps,
philly
cheese-steak. Open Mon Sat 5:45 am - 10 pm, Sun
5:45 am - 2 pm. 1110
Maple Way, across from
the new post office, 7335282.
JACKSON HOLE
ROASTERS
prides itself on procuring,
roasting and serving the
finest coffee in the world,
including organic, fair
trade, bird-friendly, and so
on! Located just off the historic town square in
Jackson, Wyoming, we
roast on the premises and
ship worldwide. When you
come to our shop be sure
to try a cup made from The
Clover, our new one-cup
brewing system designed
to give you the freshest,
best tasting coffee possible. Open M-F 7:00a.m. to
6:00p.m.
Saturdays
9:00a.m. to whenever we
feel like closing. 165 E.
Broadway, 690-8065.
JOE'S GOURMET COFFEE
"You can sleep when
you're dead." The coziest
coffee shop in town located across from Staples.
Come in and enjoy your
favorite
beverage.
We
serve organic coffees,
lattes,
cappuccinos,
frappes, smoothies and
iced drinks. As well as your
favorite eats like muffins,
breakfast and lunch sandwiches, gluten-free products, pastries and bialeys
(bagels.) Our customers
enjoy free WiFi and a
diverse library. Open daily
at 7 a.m. 545 W. Broadway,
Jackson.
PEARL STREET BAGELS
Open daily 6:30 a.m. - 6
p.m. Two locations to serve
you. In Jackson 145 W.
Pearl, 739-1218. In Wilson
on Ida Lane, 739-1261.
Italian
CAFÉ PONZA
Simple-fresh-Italian. The
new locals favorite Italian
Restaurant with homemade
pastas, fresh seafood and
our signature 22oz. bone
in rib-eye steak; there is
something for everyone.
Caprese, antipasti, stuffed
peppers and daily specials. Illy espresso beans,
home-made tiramisu and
an eclectic selection of
Italian wines. Join us for
lunch
and
dinner
Wednesday
through
Saturday.
Pink
Garter
Plaza, 50 W Broadwaystreet level- 734 2720 Call
for take-out and reservations.
OSTERIA
From the folks who brought
us the Bistro, Q, and Bistro
Catering.
Highlights
include Osteria’s 12-seat
wine bar, eight seat salumi
bar, house made pastas,
wood-oven fired pizzas,
and paninis. In addition,
the sausage stuffed olives,
fresh fish and veal chop
won’t disappoint. Located
in the new Hotel Terra,
come experience Osteria’s
outdoor seating and extensive wine list. Walk ins
welcome, reservations recommended 307-739-4100.
Dinner nightly 5:30-10.
Lunch daily starting 6/16
12-2:30.
Mexican
EL ABUELITO
Authentic
Mexican
Cuisine. Home of the original Jumbo Margarita.
Featuring a full bar with a
large selection of Mexican
beers. Open 7 days a
week from 11 a.m. to 10
p.m. 385 W. Broadway,
733-1207.
THE MERRY PIGLETS
Vo t e d B e s t S a l s a i n
Jackson! Jackson’s olde s t a n d m o s t ro c k i n ’
M ex i c a n
re s t a u r a n t .
Choose from over 10 salsas and sauces, Tex-Mex
plates, including enchiladas,
re l l e n o s ,
mesquite-grilled fajit as,
salads, wraps and firero a s t e d c h i c ke n . H u g e
m a r g s i n 1 0 f l a vo r s .
Complimentary
chips
and salsa. One block
nor th of the square. 160
N. Cache, 733-2966.
McDonald’s ® November “LOCALS SPECIAL”
Get a Double Cheeseburger, Medium Fries and Medium Soft
Drink for only $3.75 + tax during the month of November.
ONLY
$
75
3
+ tax
ENTIRE
MENU
50% OFF
(yes - you read
correctly)
“We understand how hard you work
for your money.”
– THE PEOPLE FOR CAFE PONZA –
Serving lunch and dinner Wed. - Sat.
Lunch 11:30am - 2:30pm, Dinner 6-10pm
Sunday All-U-Can-Eat Pasta $23
10:45am til close.
50 W. Broadway
Pink Garter Plaza (street level)
734-2720 for take-out or reservation
“...Voted one of Jackson Hole’s hottest restaurants”
Food and Wine February 2008.
Trio is located right off the town square in
downtown Jackson, and is owned and operated by
local chefs with a passion for good food. Our menu
features contemporary American dishes inspired by
classic bistro cuisine. Daily specials feature wild
game, fish and meats. Enjoy a glass of wine at the
bar in front of the wood-burning oven and watch
the chefs perform in the open kitchen.
Located off the town square at 45 S. Glenwood
307-733-0005
75 E. Pearl at the Ranch Inn Hotel
Available for private events & catering
For reservations 734-8038
$10.00
(Dine-in only through October)
FULL BAR
PRIVATE DINING ROOM
Come TASTE
December.
eopen in
the
NEW
ber, RITEMS
m
ve
o
N
Closed in
on the MENU
Open daily
5:00am to midnight.
Recession
Recovery
Special:
Open for Dinner nightly at 5:30pm
Dinner Entrèes
1110 W. Broadway
Simple - Fresh - Italian
Come in today for a Hot, Tasty Deal
at your Jackson Hole McDonald’s®
OPEN FOR DINNER AT 5:30PM
OPEN for LUNCH until winter
CLOSED Sunday & Monday
FREE WI-FI WITH PURCHASE
ALWAYS AFFORDABLE
CALL ahead for CARRY OUT
30 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
CRUMBS IN MY ’STACHE
Food news by Ben Cannon
A higher place
Stacey Cash and Zack Loyd are a
young married couple whose business, a
new West Bank coffee shop, is as much
a tale of opportunity-seised as it is a kind
of confluence point in the lives of friends
who have overlapped in Jackson Hole.
The idea for Elevated Grounds was
born when Starbuck’s pulled out of its
two Jackson Hole locations in early summer. Cash, who was working at the Teton
Pines Starbuck’s, and her former partner
were able to take over the lease and buy
much of the shop’s equipment at a bargain price. They did this, in part, with the
help of some displaced ‘regulars,’ some
of who not only helped them create a
business plan but also invested money in
Elevated Grounds.
“Really this whole thing came together
with the support of a lot of people,” said
the ginger-headed Cash, sitting at a high
table at Elevated Grounds. A few feet
away, her husband, whose unassuming
stature and amiable personality disguise
his bloodthirst for fast skiing, carried a
plate with slices of chocolate chip pumpkin cake to offer to the shop’s patrons.
Loyd, who co-owns a house-painting
business in the valley, re-painted much of
the interior, while Cash painted a sunnymooded mural of the sky on one wall. In
view from the front counter, a sticker
pasted above an employee sink encourages the reader to “Live the Life You
Love.” This mantra is printed beneath the
initials belonging to the late Kai Puckett,
who was killed while skiing in
Switzerland. I knew Kai around the time
of his death, while I was living and working in Garmisch, Germany. And I actually
first met Cash and Loyd in winter 2007,
during a “K.P.” memorial weekend in Big
Sky, Mont.
Most of the coffee baristas at Elevated
Grounds are close personal friends of
Cash and Loyd, including Alex “The
‘Bro’rista” Weston, who used to share a
small apartment with Kai in Germany.
Invest in your
fish future!
Now serving you
7 days a week
at the JACKSON
WHOLE GROCER
307.733.0450
HOME PACK
FINAL DEADLINE: SUN., NOV. 31
FROZEN WILD SOCKEYE SALMON HOME PACK
9 LB BOX of 6oz portions
$11.99 PER LB
FROZEN WILD ALASKA HALIBUT HOME PACK
10 LB BOX of 6oz portions
$17.99 PER LB
SIGN UP AT THE SEAFOOD COUNTER AT
JACKSON WHOLE GROCER
OR VIA EMAIL: [email protected]
DELIVERY IN NOVEMBER – DATE TBA
Wild and All Natural Seafood Sustainably Harvested in the U.S.A.
ANDREW WYATT
ELEVATED GROUNDS: A BUSINESS OF CONFLUENCE.
Zach Lloyd and Stacey Cash, owners of the new Elevated Grounds.
And though the shop opened in late
September – the beginning of the ‘shoulder season’ for many local businesses
– business has been healthy, Cash and
Loyd said. Part of this can be attributed
to a built-in customer base for the only
true coffee shop serving the West Bank.
But patrons of Elevated Grounds will also
go there to find the valley’s more trusted
purveyors, like coffee by Snake River
Roasting, for one, and also Bunnery pastries, quiches from e.leaven and immaculate desserts created by world-renowned
chocolateer
Oscar
Ortega,
of
Ciaccolato. For lunch and late afternoon
snacks, the shop offers sandwiches like
the terraggon chicken salad and a line of
panini, including rare roast beef with brie
cheese and horseradish aioli.
Snake River Roasting even concocted
a new blend for Elevated Grounds – the
Elevator, with Ethiopian, Peruvian and
Sumatra coffee beans. The shop offers a
full menu of specialty coffee drinks.
But unlike what you would find with the
rigid corporate menu at any Starbuck’s,
Cash and Loyd said they will and have
stocked special items requested by a
familiar face.
“Mostly we want this to be a place
where people come to get comfy and just
hang out. A real community place,” Cash
said. PJH
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 31
ARTBEAT
Henry Sweets
Off-season art-treats at Artlab, LMC and Muse
Off-season is here and locals are thirsty with boredom, but this Friday a fertile crescent of art events
will stretch from Nobro to Sobro. Prints of nature, hiphop and human anatomy will be at Teton Artlab, a
vintage veggie-oil Mercedes and the men who raced
it across Mexico will be at Lyndsay McCandless
Contemporary and plein-air paintings of vastness
and light from Teton Valley will be at Muse.
For the last month Ben Roth, Rachel Kunkle
Hartz, Tristan Greszko, Travis Walker and a cadre
of others spent long afternoons holed up in the Teton
Artlab while an Indian Summer raged on outside.
Jokes, experimentation and crosspollination marked
the newly minted off-season print program, in which
local artists, many of whom know each other but
rarely share studio space, gather to learn the medium
of printmaking.
The program is the first major step for a bouncingbaby nonprofit version of Artlab, a gallery that spent its
first year as a for-profit venture. The fruits of their
labors will be for sale this Friday.
Artlab emerged as a response to Jackson Hole’s
unique art environment; where creative people flock
and might not be snared into any fold that will foster
the evolution of their work. The founders hoped to capitalize on the valleys unique natural aesthetic and the
New-West lifestyles that blends Old-West heritage with
contemporary ideas – a fertile ground for germane art.
Limited edition prints will be for sale for between $6
and $50.
The prints include a “Hip-Hop Bible” by Greszko,
babylonian iterations of Walker’s trailers, a red crane
by Rachel Kunkle Hartz, a goldfish by Rich Goodwin,
gun-sighted elk and too much other stuff to list.
The party will go from 6 to 8 p.m. at Teton Artlab,
135 N. Cache #5, next to Teton Thai. Call 699-0836
for more information.
■
Have you ever wanted to race a ’59 Mercedes 190D
from south Texas to the Yucatan and fuel it with that
which fries the food that fed the native people you
whir past?
Mike DeVine, a bartender at the Cadillac, did. See
art
GALLERIES
Artspace Gallery/Art
Association
240 S. Glenwood
733-6379
A Horse of a
Different Color
60 E. Broadway
734-9603
A Touch of Class
10 W. Broadway
733-3168
Astoria Fine Art
35 E. Deloney
733-4016
Buffalo Trail Gallery
98 Center Street
734-6904
Brookover Gallery
125 N. Cache Street
732-3988
Caswell Gallery &
Sculpture Garden
145 E. Broadway
734-2660
Cayuse Western
Americana
255 N. Glenwood
739-1940
Center Street Gallery
30 Center Street
733-1115
Ciao Gallery
1921 Moose-Wilson Rd.
733-7833
Craft Gallery
50 King Street
734-2747
Davies Reid
On the Town Square
A stencil by Tristan Greszko.
prairie-like alpine hinterlands of Teton Valley
Wyoming.
The contrast of open spaces and sky, or the
way light lands on intriguingly simple slopes of
color, are essential parts of the Teton’s aesthetic, and Stoetzer captures those elements
first and foremost.
The opening for “Voices of our Land” will
run from 5 to 8 p.m. at Muse Gallery, 62 S.
Glenwood. For more information, call 7330555.
Shannon Plumb is a video artist who
explores the intricacies of everyday human
shortcomings.
She makes films about old couples, new
mothers or slews of fashionistas. She is a good
actor who commands an array of androgynous
facial expressions, so she plays men and
women who are often de-sexed to expose their
curious inner qualities. The things those people strive
for become comedy, but are still celebrated.
She will speak tonight at 7:00 p.m. at the Studio
Theater, and her video installation “Paper Collection”
opens Friday in the Artspace Gallery. Both events are
in the Center for the arts. Call 733-6379 for more
information. PJH
his beautiful car, Rudi, on display in Lyndsay
McCandless contemporary on Friday. Outfitted with a
special grease kit that recycles veggie oil, Mike DeVine
raced in the 2,000-mile PanAm race across Mexico.
Not only is the car beautiful, but for an American
culture that longs for the past and wants to be the
future, few things are as relevant as a vintage Benz
fueled by waste.
After a talk by DeVine
from 5 to 6 p.m., the “First
Friday” event will highlight
the local artists of LMC.
The boys from Anomoly
farm will also be there.
The event will run until 8
p.m. at LMC, 130 S.
Jackson Street. Call 7340649 for more information.
■
Cynthia
Guild
Stoetzer paints impressions of the moments of
“Mahogony Creek Fall,” by Cynthia Guild Stoetzer.
light that grace the
739-1009
Diehl Gallery
155 W. Broadway
307-733-0905
DiTomasso Galleries
172 Center Street
734-9677
Fay Gallery
Teton Village Road
739-1006
Fighting Bear Antiques
375 S. Cache
733-2669
Galleries West Fine Art
70 S. Glenwood
733-4412
260 N. Cache
733-4525
Gros Ventre Gallery
Heriz Rug Co.
120 W. Pearl ✌ 733-3388
Haworth Gallery
140 S. Main St., Victor
307-413-6237
Horizon Fine Art
165 N. Center
739-1540
Images of Nature
170 N. Cache
733-9752
Images West
98 E. Little Ave., Driggs
208-354-3545
Jack Dennis
Wyoming Gallery
Town Square
733-7548
Jeff Grainger Workshop
335 N. Glenwood
734-0029
JH Muse Gallery
62 S. Glenwood
733-0555
Legacy Gallery
Town Square
733-2353
Lyndsay McCandless
Contemporary
130 S. Jackson Street
734-0649
Meyer Milagros Gallery
155 Center Street
733-0905
Mountain Trails Gallery
150 Center Street
734-8150
National Museum of
Wildlife Art
3 miles north of Jackson
733-5771
Oswald Gallery
165 N. Center Street
734-8100
RARE Fine Art Gallery
485 W. Broadway
733-8726
Robert Dean Collection
180 W. Broadway
733-9290
Rivertime Designs
98 E. Little Ave., Driggs
208-351-2045
Schmidt’s Custom
Framing
890 S. Highway 89
733-2306
Shadow Mountain
Gallery
10 W. Broadway
733-3162
Trailside Galleries
Town Square
733-3186
Trio Fine Art
545 N. Cache
734-4444
West Lives On
74 Glenwood
734-2888
Wilcox Gallery
North of town on Cache
733-6450
Wild by Nature
Photography
95 W. Deloney
733-8877
Wild Exposures
Gallery
60 E. Broadway
739-1777
Wild Hands
Art for Living
70 S. Glenwood
265 W. Pearl
733-4619
32 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
LIVINGWELL
Teresa Griswold
Post-Halloween health
Oh how sweet it is! All that candy has
filled the bags of your little trick-ortreaters, now what are you do? Just eat it!
That’s not what I’m recommending, but
rather that you use those treats to teach
your children to eat healthfully. The key is
to focus on balance, variety and moderation.
You can formulate a plan with your kids
and agree on how much candy they can
eat at a time, and when they can eat it,
says the American Dietetic Association
(ADA).
One thing that helps is having your children sort their candy into piles of
“favorites” and “not so favorites,” making
sure their favorites contain miniatures,
teaching them how to help control portions. Then let them enjoy the favorite
treats over time.
Remember, there’s a reason most of
our parents kept the cookie jar out of our
easy reach. Children need help learning
how to plan their food choices.
As your kids forage for snacks, make it
easier for them to choose healthfully by
making them convenient, visible and
effortless. It’s better to keep fresh fruit
on the counter, store cut up vegetables in
see-through containers in the fridge, and
put those healthy snacks where they can
be easily reached. That means no pies on
the windowsill, nor candy dishes on the
coffee table.
Candy can be a part of a child’s healthful eating plan — in moderation.
And as you teach your young ones
about healthy eating habits, keep in mind
that physical activity and lifestyle practices are important lessons too. There is
no better time than the early years to
make an impact on the lifelong eating and
exercise habits that contribute to health
maintenance and disease prevention.
Time to bring back the light
The colors of the leaves have changed
from green to gold, temperatures have
dropped, and now the season of shorter
days is upon us, signaling a time to
readjust our bodies for the change.
The shorter days can bring on feelings
of sadness, especially for those who suffer from seasonal affective disorder
(SAD). Many of us feel a natural urge to
slow our pace, but our bodies still need
daily activity. One important thing to
counteract the negative impacts of
falling into winter is to keep exercising!
Exercise elevates your feel good
chemicals, helping you maintain the
brightness you felt in summer.
Serotonin, dopamine and endorphins
are released during physical activity and
provide you with improved mood, stress
reduction, better quality of sleep, and a
sense of peace and higher self-esteem.
Lunch and learn
On Nov. 11, Samuel L. Abbate, M.D.,
will present St. John’s Lite Lunch program on “Living with Diabetes.” Abbate
has been practicing clinical endocrinology and diabetes for more than 15
years. He attended medical school at
the University of Illinois at Chicago and
completed his residency training at the
Cleveland Clinic Foundation as well as
an Endocrinology Fellowship at the
University of Washington in Seattle.
Abbate has served on the National
Board of the American Diabetes
Association,
American
Diabetes
Association Research Foundation and
the National Diabetes Education
Program of the National Institutes of
Health. He is passionate about the prevention of diabetes and the proper
management of this disease in the hospital and the outpatient setting.
The discussion will take place from
noon to 1 p.m. in the Moose-Wapiti
classrooms at St. John’s Medical
Center. PJH
Teresa Griswold is a healthy-living activist who is passionate about making
a positive difference in the lives of others.
Elizabeth Kingwill,
MA/LPC
• Licensed Professional Counselor
• Medical Hypnotherapist
“If you know the art of breathing
you have the strength, wisdom and
courage of ten tigers.”
Now Accepting
Blue Cross Blue Shield
Practicing in Jackson
since 1980
LIVING WELL
v iInN
g GweWl lE L L
LlIi V
quote
733-5680
– Chinese Adage
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 33
HOMEGROWN SATIRE
Travels with my knee
Not long ago, I swallowed a couple of
happy pills, got on a plane and flew to
Texas; at least, I think I did. I was on the
plane when it landed so I must have
been on it when it took off. I hate to fly
and only do so when in a state of rigor
mortis. Scary as flying is, once the
plane takes off, you are going somewhere, perhaps not where you wanted
to go, but you are going. Scarier still, is
the airport. It’s not going anywhere and
you might not be either.
I bring this up because of our tribulations in the airport. Coming home we
arrived with plenty of time, we thought,
but silly us we should have known better.
There was a major snafu at the ticket
counter which could have been solved in
a minute, but wasn’t. My husband was a
rock, keeping his cool, while I threw a
number of fits. He tried to ignore me, but
it is hard to ignore an old lady turning
purple and stamping around.
Our problems solved, we hit the security line now stretching across the airport. Those people weren’t there five
minutes before, but they were there
now. Meanwhile our plane is departing.
My husband breezed through security
but I set off every bell in the airport. I
explained that I had a titanium knee, but
they were not impressed. They went
over me again and again; my knee set
off alarms, my bra set off alarms, and
we were about to miss our plane. They
finally decided I was not a danger to
national security, we made the plane at
the last second, and we actually got
home in time. I just wanted everyone to
Galloping
Grandma
Local grandma
speaks out!
know that they are safe from attack by
my knee and my bra, and that should
make them feel kind of cozy.
I was reminded of Ludeen Larsen,
from Corn Cob County and her trip to
Omaha from the Des Moines airport. She
was a vegetarian and was subjecting her
husband to endless meals of fried tofu
and weird looking grains. She refused to
give up her cigarettes and liquid refreshment because she figured that tobacco
was a plant and therefore OK and that
booze was made out of fruit and grain so
it was like a large, wet loaf of bread. The
trouble started when security took away
her lighter and got worse when he tried
to take away her matches.
“How in the hell am I going to light my
cigarettes,” she hollered and hit the TSA
man with her purse. At this point, two
cans of beer fell out and rolled across
the floor. Now Ludeen had been in the
Navy and had a vocabulary to match,
and she didn’t get to go to Omaha that
day. Worse, when she got home, she
found her husband hiding in the kitchen
surrounded by Big Mac remains.
When I got home, I read a report that
said old people spend too much time
watching T.V. I was reminded of Fay
Fungo, who lives in Lutheran Acres in
Corn Cob. She saw a program about
pythons invading Florida. Apparently,
people toss their pet pythons into the
swamps and they make little pythons
that become big pythons and crawl
through people’s lawns and down their
streets. I don’t know of any pythons in
Corn Cob County, but who knows. Fay
became convinced that she saw a huge
python in her neighbor’s yard, or maybe
it was the giant earthworm she had seen
in another program. She grabbed her
garden hoe and rushed to the rescue.
After she chopped that sucker to pieces
it turned out to be a garden hose.
“Well it looked like a giant earthworm,“ she said.
She has promised to get new glasses
and stop watching Animal Planet. PJH
FLIPSIDE
Elderly Jackson pundit jailed for espionage
Capt. Mob Boris, elder statesman
and political haberdasher, was
arrested on his bicycle last Monday
for suspected terrorism and the
charges against him have escalated
to first class espionage.
Boris was pulled over for riding his
bicycle too slowly and deliberately
with pants that are too short. Several
cyclists a year are pulled over and
warned for such violations, according to County Clerk records.
But once Boris was pulled over,
the officer realized that Boris was
probably a terrorist.
“That thing he was carrying looked
like a HED (Handmade Explosive
Device) and Boris is the name of a
famous spy,” said Saul Squiggs, a
police officer who was recruited to
Jackson after two tours of duty in Iraq.
Once Boris was brought in to police
station, police discovered campaign
paraphernalia that favors the legaliza-
tion of marijuana and some pieces of
ancient Sanskrit text. The parchment
and paraphernalia was seized by
Captain Pivmerkitsch as evidence that
Boris is a terrorist who sates the minds
of young Jacksonites to exploit their
brain power and get information out of
the uber-classified mainframe computer buried in a secret vault, 100-feet
below the home of VP Dick Mamey.
“America is the greatest nation on
earth,” Pivmerkitsch said, “with the
greatest workers on earth. The topsecret information in Vice President
Mamey’s vault will keep these
Americans from thinking, so they can
keep working to make America the
greatest place in the world.”
In the lining of Boris’ suitcase, the
police found blueprints to Mamey’s
secret vault, as well as an electronic
pocket translator set to “Sanskrit to
English.” The police then deduced
that the Sanskrit text describes meth-
ods used by ancient vibrational
Buddhists to extract information from
other people’s brains. Pivmerkitsch
reckons that Capt. Boris was attempting to teach local service workers
how to meditate deeply enough to
actually extract information from
Mamey’s secret computer, which
some speculate is actually a giant
brain that has been fabricated from
the remains of victims of capitalism.
Pivmerkitsch has speculated that
Mob Boris was trying “fix” the election between Barak Orama and John
McPalin in Orama’s favor. The chief
also suspects that Boris recently
received funding from Russian
Leader Vladamir Poontin, who has
been frightened ever since John
McPalin announced on Saturday
Night Live that he is rolling wheelbarrows full of firewood through the
snow so he can win a fistfight with
Poontin. PJH
34 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
The valley’s finest selection of wine, spirits, gourmet cheeses and microbrews.
Enhancing
Los Angeles Times
Sunday Crossword Puzzle
“PLASTERED CAST” By PANCHO HARRISON Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis • November 9
ANSWERS ON PAGE 36
all of life’s
pleasures
with quality.
739-WINE • Home of Koshu Wine Bar
Open 10am - 10pm • Seven days a week • 200 W. Broadway • Jackson, WY
SUDOKU
JANRIC CLASSIC
© 2008 Janric Enterprises Dist. by Creators Syndicate Inc.
R
11/10/08
Rating:
Fill in the blank cells using numbers
1 to 9. Each number can appear
only once in each row, column, and
3x3 block. Use logic and process of
elimination to solve the puzzle. The
difficulty level ranges from Bronze
(easiest) to Silver to Gold (hardest).
Answers on page 36.
ACROSS
1 “Super-duper!”
6 It probably won’t keep you up
11 Treasured
15 2008 World Series of Poker
bracelet winner Kenny
19 Tango composer Piazzolla
20 African antelope
21 Lee Meredith’s role in “The
Producers” (1968)
22 Hollywood’s Skye
23 Drunk bricklayer?
25 Drunk section of operagoers?
27 Rock on the Rhine
28 “And this man is now become
__”: Cassius
30 Attorney’s employer
31 Savvy
34 Shudder-inducing
36 Drunk chug-a-lugger?
41 Encouraging words
45 Energy company founder
Halliburton
46 Evening gala
47 Its st. song is “Home on the
Range”
48 Sales figure
49 Mountain nymph
51 Roofing material
52 Exhibit
54 Sutherland contemporary
56 Oft-framed document
59 Drunk business bigwig?
62 D.C. summer hrs.
63 “The Beauty Myth” author Wolf
66 Taylor of “Mystic Pizza”
67 Willing words
68 Drunk officer?
71 16th-century explorer of Florida
74 “Shucks!”
75 Scandinavian toast
76 Pitcher Maglie
79 Drunk leader?
82 Neither here nor there
84 Taurus preceder
85 Look healthy
86 Picks out of a lineup, briefly
89 Progeny
90 It might be a raise
91 Nearly failing, to a prof
92 Commotions
95 Earth, to Mahler
96 Dreams up
99
102
haps
104
105
108
109
114
116
120
121
122
123
124
125
126
127
Drunk pitchman?
Cook for three minutes, perTons
Dojo VIP
California wine city
Unlike a wild horse
Drunk diner employee?
Drunk cheerleading team?
Whiskey purchase
Ceases to be
Madison’s roomie
Strange
Genetic info carriers
List heading
Bags with handles
Birth-related
DOWN
1 The Chicago Sting was its last
champion in 1984: Abbr.
2 This, in Toledo
3 Comment end?
4 Signal to begin speaking,
perhaps
5 Threat phrase
6 One of The Three Tenors
7 Victorian __
8 USSR successor
9 Diagnostic lab system
10 Get using guile
11 Soup follower?
12 Get away from
13 Louisville’s __ Center, cultural
attraction
14 Rocky of song
15 Less messy
16 Tied garment
17 Erelong
18 Call in a deli
24 Exploits
26 Pesky “Blondie” kid
29 2004 Olympics host, to the IOC
32 Spades, but not shovels
33 Pound of verse
35 Oboe’s predecessor
36 Glittery stone
37 Secret rival
38 Nodded
39 Big top barker
40 Reset, as an odometer
42 Chilean pianist Claudio
43 She lived most of her life as a
44
47
50
52
53
54
55
57
58
60
61
64
65
68
69
70
71
72
73
76
77
78
80
81
83
87
88
91
92
93
94
97
98
99
100
101
103
105
106
107
110
111
112
113
115
117
118
119
male named Anshel
Zoom
10-foot Alaskan, at times
Gives away
Hardly abundant
Steersmen’s posts
“The Time Machine” author
__ about
House of the lord
Just dandy
Massey of old films
Actor Quinn
Be officious
Hells Canyon is on its border
Unabridged dictionary, e.g.
Work detail
“There’s __ in team”
Abu __
Like the fur seal
Bible belt?
Gloating look
Dwelling
Not a company man?
Discharge
Andalusia Almighty
Place to find fjord explorers:
Abbr.
Capital of Qatar
Silverstein who wrote “A Boy
Named Sue”
Shortage
Flounder relative
Huge fans
Hardly capricious
They can be frozen
Nailed obliquely
Developed a fondness for
Divest (of)
Appends
Truman Capote, e.g.
Dirty Harry’s org.
Yeats’s homeland
Singer Simone
Blue hue
Keister
Actress __ Flynn Boyle
Henry James biographer Leon
Bear, in Bolivia
“Double Fantasy” artist
Co. chiefs
Pollen spreader
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole lNovember 5 - 11, 2008 35
DIVEYENA’S DELIGHT
Breathe & Believe; Live in the Light of Love...Namaste
DIANA HORT Body/Energy Worker of the Divine
Teacher of Yoga and DNA Theta Healing
Licensed Massage Therapist, Esthetician
(561) 214-5304 • [email protected]
House calls available
Inquire about off-season specials
Wilson Hardware
307.732.AUTO(2886)
920 West Broadway
HEAD
HEART
Attend the
4-H OPEN HOUSE &
ICE CREAM SOCIAL
Thursday, Nov. 13
5:30-7:30pm
HANDS
Join us at the 4-H Office
located at 255 W. Deloney.
Talk with 4-H Leaders and
members about clubs you
may be interested in or
call 733-3087
HEALTH
Join the 4-H community!
Start your own club, become a
member or a volunteer leader today.
36 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
CLASSIFIEDS
Classified Ad Rates:
Classified Line Ads:
$16 per week for 25 words or less.
$.25 for each additional word after 25 words.
Classified Box Ads:
$16 column inch per week (logos/photos $5 each).
To place a classified ad, call (307) 732-0299 or go to www.planetjh.com and click on “CLASSIFIEDS” to place an ad online. Credit cards accepted.
CLASSIFIED PRINT DEADLINES: Monday by noon for the following Wednesday’s publication.
PJH IS NOT RESPONSIBLE OR LIABLE FOR ANY CLAIM MADE BY A CLASSIFIED AD IN THIS PAPER. PJH IS NOT RESPONSIBLE FOR ERRORS MADE BY A CLASSIFIED ADVERTISER.
HELP WANTED
START Bus Drivers: START is accepting
applications for seasonal bus drivers.
Visit www.townofjackson.com for an
application and job description or call
733-3932. Requires participation in drug
and alcohol testing program. The Town of
Jackson is an Equal Opportunity
Employer.
Backcountry Provisions is now hiring for
all postiions, full-time and part-time available. Must have ability to multi-task and
have a positive attitude. Apply within.
THE BULL MOOSE SALOON IS HIRING
FOR ALL POSITIONS: Bartenders,
Waitstaff, Cooks, etc. Alpine, WY. Please
apply in person or call 877-498-7993.
Love theatre and want to help it be successful, volunteer one night this season or
once a month, we’re very flexible. For
more information call the Off Square
Theatre Company at (307) 733-3021.
Inside Sales & Counter Help Wanted. Full
time, year round, people person. Need
clean DL. Apply in person @ Wilson
Hardware. 1275 N. West St. in Wilson.
REAL ESTATE
FOR SALE BY OWNER: 3BDR, 2BATH
HOUSE. HOBACK JUNCTION. 1235 sq ft
on .22 acres. Quiet & private lot at end of
cul de sac on paved road. Recently
remodeled & upgraded. Open plan dining
& living room, kitchen with breakfast bar.
Stunning mountain views and wildlife
abound. Lots of light with south facing
windows, mature landscaping and large
yard. Walk from the doorstep to the
Hoback River and National Forest for
great fishing, hunting, hiking, and biking.
Ample parking with both front and rear
entrance to house, wraparound deck with
new hot tub (included - under warranty).
Includes “bully barn” for storage of the
tools & toys and all appliances washer,
dryer, dishwasher, etc. LOW HOA’S.
$629,000. Call (888) 566-1404 ext. 2.
FOR RENT
House for rent in Victor beginning Nov
1st. 2B/1B, huge yard, one dog
OK, $775/mo. 307.732.2170.
Storage Units for rent in Victor. Perfect for
cars, boats, motorcycles. 12’ x 17’, $60
per month. 307.732.2170.
Florida Condo For Rent: Sarasota,
Florida; newly decorated 2 bd, 2 bth unit,
year round lanai, overlooking golf
course; 15 minutes to ocean; monthly
rentals only; $2900/month prime season, less for multi-month rentals; [email protected]
AUTOS
FREE TRUCK with the purchase of
Alaskan Camper, 1969 Dodge one-ton
truck with 10-foot utility bed. $1,500 OBO,
will consider all trades. Call 690-8065.
1999 Toyota Land Cruiser: silver & gold,
full loaded, leather interior, power everything, 3rd row seating, sunroof, DVD player, 157,000 miles, $12,900 OBO. Call
208-520-9984.
FOR SALE
Beautiful Steel Buildings: Utility,
Industrial, Commercial. Discounted, Can
Erect. Local Consultant. www.scggrp.com Source# 12U. 307-231-6643
Everlast heavy bag - 100 lbs. - punching
bag - great workout - $50 - call 690-4935.
SERVICES
Prugh Real Estate LLC specializes in commercial and residential sales and service.
Visit prughrealestate.com to search listings, rentals and MLS. For more information, please call 307.733.9888.
Rally’s Pet Garage – The service center
for your pet! Self-service pet wash, fullservice grooming, toys and accessories,
Natural Life pet food, Doggie Day Care,
and pet obedience classes. Located in the
Kmart Plaza. (307) 733-7704.
MUSIC & BANDS
Judd Grossman Music is a full service
music agency providing all styles of music
for all occasions - solos, duos, trios, dance
bands, country, rock, folk, jazz, and classical. Live musicians and DJs available.
(307) 690-4935.
ALL OCCASIONS MUSIC: Live Music,
The Way You Want It. Seven bands
and artists represented. All Genres.
Professional. Experienced. Inquire at
413-2513 or 699-0102.
PERSONALS
PARENTS & FRIENDS OF
EX-GAYS & GAYS. www.pfox.org
Fact: Teton Motors is jackson’s ONLY
Full Service Dealership!
“FAMILY OWNED & OPERATED SINCE 1972”
MILLIONS OF DOLLARS
IN INVENTORY
AVAILABLE EVERY DAY
SPECIAL INTERNET PRICING
OUR ENTIRE INVENTORY
AVAILABLE ONLINE
w w w. t e t o n m o t o r s . c o m
1020 W. Broadway and 405 Powderhorn Lane
(307) 733-6600 • (800) 537-6609
SALES • SERVICE • PARTS • COLLISION CENTER
WINTER STREET OPERATOR
The Town of Jackson, Public Works Department is now accepting
applications for a winter seasonal Street Operator. This position
is 40 hours/week running through April 15, 2009. The wage for
this position is $14.84 - $17.13/hour, DOQ. This is an excellent
opportunity for a value centered, team-oriented person. Jackson
is seeking a qualified, motivated individual to work in a position
focusing mainly on snow removal operations. Duties also include
street maintenance, sidewalk repair, street sweeping, street sign
management and other duties as assigned in the Public Works
Department. Any combination of education and experience
providing the required skill and knowledge for successful
performance would be qualifying. Typical qualifications include:
High School graduation or equivalent and a Wyoming Class B
Commercial Drivers License. Position involves random drug and
alcohol testing. There are no benefits associated with this
position. Application and job description may be picked up at
the Town Hall at 150 East Pearl in the Administration Office, or
contact the Personnel Department, Town of Jackson, P.O. Box
1687, Jackson, WY 83001, (307) 733-3932 x133,
[email protected] Applications are
also available at www.townofjackson.com.
Applications will be accepted until 5:00 P.M.
Monday, November 17, 2008. The Town of
Jackson is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
CROSSWORD & SUDUKO
PUZZLE ANSWERS
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 37
IN THE DISTRICT COURT OF TETON COUNTY, WYOMING
NINTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT
HUGE TOY HAULER SUPER SALE!
5TH WHEELS
• CYCLONE, 2007, 37’, $39,900.
• RAPTOR, 2005, 36’, $34,500.
• KARRY_ALLl, 2005, 38’, roof porch, $32,900.
• RAGE’N, 2006, 36’, $32,900.
• RAMPAGE, 2006, 28’, $24,900.
• RAGE’N, 2009, 40’, $49,900.
All new Limited Edition 2009 Fuzion Touring 5th Wheels ON SALE! “MUST SEE!”
TRAVEL TRAILERS
• TAHOE TRANSPORT, 2006, $19,900.
• THOR FURY, 2005, 29’, $24,900.
• WEEKEND WARRIOR, 2007, 28’, $29,900.
• ROCKCLIMBER, 2009, 22’, glide, $28,900.
• KADDY KRUISER, 2009, 20’, $14,900.
• VR1, 2009, 32’, $28,900.
• OUTBACK KARGAROO, 2009, 28’, $24,900.
• RAGE’N FX, $19,900.
NEW CYCLONE 5TH WHEELS ON SALE!
MOTORHOME SALE!
• DUTCHSTAR, 2002, 38’, class A, diesel pusher, 330HP cat, low miles, 2 glides, new
condition $88,000
• TIOGA, 2004, 31W, class C, ultra glide, loaded, low miles, $54,500.
• DUTCHMEN, 2002, 28’, class C, low low miles, loaded, $32,500.
• JAYCO SENECA ZX, toy hauler, diesel, 5500 Chevy chassis, glide, loaded, N $87,500.
• CHALLENGER, 2006, 37’, class A, 3 glides, low miles, loaded, $75,000.
• HURRICANE, 2006, 34’, class A, 3 glides, low miles, loaded, $79,000.
• AMERICAN CLIPPER, 2007, 28’, class C, full length glide room, loaded, NOW $69,500.
STALKUP’S RV SUPERSTORE
501 W. Yellowstone Hwy., Casper, WY
1-800-577-9350 • www.stalkupsrv.com
album review
It is common knowledge that James Taylor lived part of his life, and wrote most of his iconic
folk hits in a drug induced haze. Luckily, being the super star he is, Taylor was still able to produce offspring. James' son, Benjamin James, is now indulging his own disires in the world of
music. The Legend Of Kung Folk Part 1 (The Killing Bite) is the latest from Taylor The Younger
(to use the parlance of this past political season) and he follows close in his father's footsteps
with a classic folk sound and intimate lyrics. You can hear the sexy first single "Wicked Way"
and more on your channel for new music in the valley, KMTN. - Jack Murray
Your Mountain of Music!
(307) 733-KMTN
w w w. K M T N T H E M O U N TA I N . c o m
In the Matter of
the Estate of
William Alvin Paddleford
2623
Probate No._______________
NOTICE OF FILING A PETITION
COMES NOW Petitioner, Lisa Marie Paddleford, and by and through
her attorney, Jessica Rutzick, gives notice of filing a Petition
28
Jessica Rutzick
to establish death of a cotenant and her right of survivorship.
FILED
ING
WYOM
UNTY
03
N CO
PM 4
TETO
T 28
OC
2008
_____
_____
_____
OURT
_____
ICT C
DISTR
K OF
CLER
DATED this __________ day of October, 2004.
Jessica Rutzick, Attorney at Law
PO Box 4114, Jackson, WY 83001 • 733-8140 • Bar No. 6-3126
38 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
ROB BREZSNEY’S
[email protected]
© 2008 Rob Brezney
ARIES (March 21-April 19): Uranus is on the opposite side of
the sun from Saturn right now. To traditional astrologers,
that’s a stressful aspect. It bespeaks a titanic clash between
the forces of progress and the inertia of the past. But there
are mitigating factors. The expansive planet Jupiter is trine
to Saturn and sextile to Uranus, suggesting that unexpected
grace may provide beauty and healing during these strenuous moments of truth. I predict that’s what will occur in your
personal life, Aries. You’re well-situated to navigate smartly
through the brouhaha. For best results, respect the old
ways, but not so much that it slows down your exuberant
quest for the most interesting possible future.
TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Every year my friend Jim travels
to Cabos San Lucas in Baja California to participate in a
deep-sea fishing competition. He says the best way to catch
the big fish is with actual bait in the form of smaller fish. But
marlins can be fooled into getting snagged with merely pretty lures — colorful fabrications that look like food but are
actually made of metal, wood, plastic, and rubber. Jim says
that hammerhead sharks, on the other hand, will never bite
the fake bait. They’re too smart, insisting on the real thing. I
suggest you use this information as an allegory in the coming weeks, Taurus. You may find it to your advantage to get
yourself “caught” by a metaphorical fisherperson, but only if
he or she is offering you the authentic bait, not a simulation.
GEMINI (May 21-June 20): When the air is pure and clean, a
bee can smell a flower from 3,281 feet. The presence of pollution severely cripples the bee’s awareness of floral scents,
however, reducing its range to 650 feet. Consider the possibility that this is a metaphor for what has been happening to
you recently. Have you suffered a reduction in your sensitivity to sources of nourishment? Are you oblivious to gifts and
blessings that could be available to you if you only knew
about them? According to my analysis, this is quite possible.
freewill astrology
Luckily, you’re reading this horoscope, which will surely
motivate you to overcome the problem.
CANCER (June 21-July 22): Dolphins love erotic play, according to the book Dolphin Chronicles. For almost a third of their
waking life, they caress and touch each other. They’re ingenious about using their Frisbees, plastic boats, and rubber
balls as sex toys. Gender isn’t much of an issue. There’s as
much same-sex as opposite-sex cavorting. If you‘d like to
place yourself in alignment with cosmic rhythms, Cancerian,
you will consider taking a page from the dolphin Kama Sutra
in the coming days. Remember, the key for them is simply to
play freely without any specific goal. Bliss comes as much
from experimenting with creative intimacy as from driving
toward orgasm.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): One of my friends on Facebook
describes her vocation as “Hammer of the Gods.” Her task
in life, she says, is to be a tool that the divine powers wield
as they nail together raw materials to make useful structures. While I don’t know if that’s also one of your long-range
goals, Leo, I do know that it describes a role you’d thrive in
during the coming weeks. So how about it? Are you ready to
upgrade your game in order to be the best hammer of the
gods you can possibly be?
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I’m not necessarily suggesting
that you read Al Franken’s book The Truth (with Jokes). But
I do recommend that you make that title your motto in the
coming week. According to my analysis of the astrological
omens, there will be no such thing as truth without jokes, at
least for you. Every situation you need to know more about
will, if you investigate it, reveal some amusing riddle. All the
information that’ll be important for you to gather will lead
you in the direction of laughter.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Some years back, I maxed out my
credit cards to pay for recording my band’s CD. Soon after-
wards, following a few financial setbacks, I was close to
declaring bankruptcy. Luckily, my parents stepped in and
bailed me out. (Thanks, Mom and Dad!) Since then, I‘ve rigorously kept my debts to a minimum. That policy has, on
occasion, cramped my style, but it looks pretty wise in light
of the current financial crunch. Please draw inspiration from
my experience, Libra. Take inventory of any patterns in your
own life that may be distorting your ability to get the money
and resources you need. This is an excellent time to flush
your old conditioning and imprint yourself with good, new
habits.
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Many times in my life,” says
philosopher Eckhardt Tolle, “it has been my experience that
the most powerful starting point for any endeavor is not the
question ‘What do I want?’, but what does Life (God,
Consciousness) want from me? How do I serve the whole?”
I offer that meditation to you, Scorpio, as you slip into the
heart of the reinvent yourself phase of your cycle. It’s time to
stage a grand reopening, launch a new (relation)ship, or
instigate a fresh batch of good trouble. As you whip up the
initiatory energy, ask the Big Cosmic Thou where it would
like you to go and what it would love you to do.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Whenever I find myself
growing grim about the mouth,” says Ishmael in Herman
Melville’s novel Moby Dick, “whenever it is damp, drizzly
November in my soul; whenever I find myself involuntarily
pausing before coffin warehouses . . . it [is] high time to get
to the sea as soon as I can.” Use this passage as an inspirational kick-in-the-ass, Sagittarius. There’s no need for you to
sink into the emotional abyss Ishmael describes. Fix yourself before you’re broken! Get to the sea immediately, and
prevent the grey glumness from taking over. If there’s no
ocean nearby, then try the next best things: Walk along a
river or lake. Immerse yourself for long stretches in baths
WEEK OF NOV. 5
and saunas and heated pools. Cry and sweat and come
abundantly. Listen to music that makes you feel like you’re
floating.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): This is the Week of the UpsideDown Rainbow. It’s a time when signs of good fortune are
everywhere, but always with some odd twist or anomalous
feature. Should you worry that the tweaks mean there’s
some mischief at work? Does it suggest you will have to pay
a price for the breakthroughs that are coming? I don’t think
so. My interpretation of the upside-down rainbow (or the
five-leaf clover or the torn $10 bill you find on the street) is
that you will be asked to expand your capacities in order to
take full advantage of the unusual blessings.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Should you go with the flow or
should you try to wheedle, manipulate, and entice the flow to
go with you? This is one of those rare times when I advocate
the latter approach. The flow is currently in an indecisive
state, when it could go one of several different ways. You
have cosmic authorization to nudge it in the direction that
looks to you like it will be the best for the most people.
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): In the sci-fi film The Matrix, a
small band of people have managed to escape from the collective hallucination that most of their fellow humans are
stuck inside. Though life is hard staying free, there are some
perks. They can, for instance, get downloads of data directly into their brains that allow them to quickly master complex tasks. In this way, the heroine, Trinity, learns to fly a helicopter in a few minutes. I call your attention to these fictional events, Pisces, because I think you’re close to pulling off
real-life accomplishments that resemble them. First, you’re
in an excellent position to slip away from certain illusions
that enslave some of the people around you. Second, you
have an enormous power to rapidly understand new information and acquire new skills.˚
Homework: Tell me how this year’s election process and its results are changing your life. Go to FreeWillAstrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”
920 West Broadway
307.732.AUTO(2886)
INFORMATION
FOR ALL MEETING AGENDAS AND MINUTES
WEEKLY CALENDARS # JOB OPENINGS
SOLICITATIONS FOR BIDS
PUBLIC NOTICES, AND OTHER VALUABLE INFORMATION
V I S I T O U R W E B S I T E
WWW.TETONWYO.ORG
The public meeting agendas and minutes for the Board of County Commissioners and Planning
Commission can also be found in the Public Notices section of the JH News and Guide.
www.PlanetJH.com updated daily l Planet Jackson Hole l November 5 - 11, 2008 39
Art Hazen
Real Estate LLC
e
e
e
s
s
y
k
e
s
o
We are Wyoming
Locally Owned
SCOREBOARD
REALTOR OF
THE WEEK
r
o
e
e
u
t
TETON VALLEY, ID
Will Garson
a
e
e
- I have been living in Jackson Hole full-time since the Spring of 1993. Having grown
- up in Wyoming, I truly appreciate the lifestyle that Jackson Hole offers to all of us.
- I retired as an airline captain in 2005 and have thoroughly enjoyed the real estate
f business since that time!
e
s
u
-
WEEK OF 10.26.08 TO 11.01.08
LL282
Located next to the new school, this five
acres is in a prime area for investment.
No CC&R’s and within 40 miles of
Jackson Hole.
$120,000 Contact: Dena Luth
LL223
With access just steps away to National
Forest, you feel very secluded in Star
Valley Ranches. Seasonal stream,
aspens, pines, and views are yours.
$82,000 Contact: Penny Gaitan
Total # of Sales:
Week’s top sale:
Residential
Building Site
Multi-Family
Farm & Ranch
Commercial
2
$312,500
Total #
of Sales
Average
Sold Price
2
0
0
0
0
$266,250
$0
$0
$0
$0
Last 12 Months (11.01.07-10.31.08)
Number of Sales
Days on Market
List Price Volume Sold
Median List Price Sold
Average List Price Sold
248
235
$92,826,558
$299,500
$374,300
12 Months - A Year Ago (11.01.06-10.31.07)
SF459
Immaculate home overlooking the
Snake River, with panoramic valley and
mountain views! The home has large
decks, a new gourmet kitchen, stainlesssteel appliances, granite counters,
steam shower, cedar closet, a heated
garage and mature landscaping with
auto-sprinklers.
$995,000 Contact: Sarah Kerr
LL287
Convenient and easy to build on, .40
acre site in the desirable Karns Hillside
Addition in the Town of Jackson. Gently
sloping lot, views to Glory Bowl and the
Karns Meadow with nearby access to
forest trails.
$660,000 Contact: Cindy Zabriskie
SF470
This home sits on the most beautiful 20
acres in Hoback Ranches. Fenced for
horses with a stream through the middle
and rock cliffs out the backyard
$569,000 Contact: Chuck Sandberg
LL246
Nothing but views! Located near the edge
of Grand Teton National Park this 3.09 acre
lot has beauty in all directions featuring the
Grand Teton, Teton Mountain Range,
Sleeping Indian, Death Canyon, Valley
views, and more. Covenants for this
property are very simple allowing for
horses, critters, and fencing.
$925,000 Contact: Timothy C. Mayo
Number of Sales
Days on Market
Lis Price Volume Sold
Median List Price Sold
Average List Price Sold
840
204
$225,617,123
$209,895
$268,591
Current Inventory
Active Listings
Listing Inventory Dollars
Average List Price
Average Days on Market
1,324
$589,350,842
$445,129
287
See outside back cover
for Jackson Hole Scoreboard
LL267
Awesome western views from this .5
acre lot in the highly sought after “new
section” of Melody Ranch. Locate on a
quiet street with little traffic, this lot
boasts a flat building site with endless
design opportunities.
$575,000 Contact: Kristin Vito
LL283
Beautifully adorned with many quaking
aspen trees and bordering the National
Forest, this property offers views of the
Tetons, the Gros Ventre Range and the
Buffalo River. A wonderful building site
in a rare part of the Valley.
$598,000 Contact: Chuck Sandberg
LL251
Nature Lovers do not miss this
opportunity. Build a house on this 1 acre
parcel and walk, ski or ride into the
National Forest. You have to see this to
truly appreciate the great location.
$139,000 Contact: Zach Smith
733.4339 or 800.227.3334 Fax 307.739.0766
TC179
This 4 bedroom with loft town house
recently renovated with high end finishes
has all new furniture package, great
room, rock fireplace, granite kitchen
counters, mountain views from deck,
slate tile floors, ski-in, ski-out location,
and Sundance Tennis and Swim Club
membership included.
$1,775,000 Contact: Penny Gaitan
www.jhrealestate.com
*In the event the week’s Top Sale is
erroneously reported it’s listed price is used.
** Some information above is derived from the
Teton County MLS system and represents
information as submitted by all Teton County
MLS Members for Teton County, Wyoming and
is deemed to be accurate but not guaranteed.
Art Hazen Real Estate LLC advertising and
promotional ads, products, and information
are the sole property of Art Hazen Real Estate
LLC and may NOT be reproduced, copied,
and/or used in whole or part without the
prior expressed written consent of Art Hazen
Real Estate LLC.
[email protected]
40 November 5 - 11, 2008 l Planet Jackson Hole l www.PlanetJH.com updated daily
Art Hazen
Real Estate LLC
We are Wyoming
Locally Owned
SCOREBOARD
JACKSON HOLE
WEEK OF 10.26.08 TO 11.01.08
SF461
Wilderness, wildlife and outdoor activities
abound from this three bedroom cabin
near the Buffalo River. A lease permits
this on the Bridger-Teton National
Forest, north of Jackson Hole, at the
Gateway to Yellowstone and Grand
Teton National Parks.
$295,000 Contact: Jennifer Reichert
SF453
This quaint log cabin is great for
vacationers or year round owner.
Plenty of rooms for guests. Very sturdily
built. House sits on one acre.
$225,000 Contact: Dena Luthi
LL244
PRICE REDUCTION! Great lot in a great
neighborhood! Located on a quiet street
in Brookside Hollow, this building is
close to a neighborhood park and within
Victor city limits. Protective CC&R’s
insure Brookside Hollow’s continued
desirability.
$69,000 Contact: Kristin Vito
CC102
A dream come true rare business
opportunity for the outdoor experience
of a lifetime. A rare, year round outfitting
business with unique permits for
snowmobiling, summer day trips
and pack trips plus hunting permits.
$750,000 Contact: Chuck Sandberg
Total # of Sales:
Week’s top sale:
Residential
Building Site
Multi-Family
Farm & Ranch
Commercial
4
$5,500,000
Total #
of Sales
Average
Sold Price
4
0
0
0
0
$2,566,250
$0
$0
$0
$0
Last 12 Months (11.01.07-10.31.08)
Number of Sales
Days on Market
List Price Volume Sold
Median List Price Sold
Average List Price Sold
FEATURED LISTING
SF486
This 4 bedroom home on 3 secluded
acres has it all, remodeled interior,
fabulous decks, wonderful views, guest
house, barn for horses & a 3 car garage.
$2,350,000 Contact: Penny Gaitan
LL286
Views galore! Located close to the 2nd
tee box of Jackson Hole Golf & Tennis,
this oversized lot boasts magnificent and
unobstructed views of the Grand Teton,
JH Ski Resort, and Sleeping Indian. A
seasonal creek offers the sounds of
tranquility and mature cottonwood trees
create privacy without obstructing views.
$949,000 Contact: Kristin Vito
349
153
$628,976,485
$1,097,000
$1,802,224
12 Months - Year Ago (11.01.06-10.31.07)
Number of Sales
Days on Market
List Price Volume Sold
Median List Price Sold
Average List Price Sold
639
141
$882,129,195
$825,000
$1,380,483
Current Inventory
Active Listings
753
Listing Inventory Dollars $2,022,583,629
Average List Price
$2,686,034
Average Days on Market
189
See inside back cover
for Teton Valley Scoreboard
SF465
Stunning Teton Views from this slopeside
contemporary log home nestled in a
pine grove in East Jackson. Fully
remodeled & updated, bordering
both Snow King Ski Resort & the
national forest, this four bedroom
home has it all.
$1,195,000 Contact: Jennifer Reichert
Contact: Timothy C. Mayo
LL273 – LL281
OWL CREEK-lots from 3.4 to 8.3 acres-offering dynamic views of the Grand Teton,
Sleeping Indian, and Death Canyon or framed and filtered views of the same mountains
with the privacy of tree cover. Snake River Access! Terms for qualified buyers!
Lot 1
8.36 Acres Listing
Price $ 2,900,000
Listing Number: LL273
Lot 10
4.01 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,420,000
Listing Number: LL274
Lot 11
3.46 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,375,000
Listing Number: LL275
Lot 12
3.39 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,375,000
Listing Number: LL276
Lot 15
3.51 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,250,000
Listing Number: LL277
Lot 41
4.01 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,400,000
Listing Number: LL278
Lot 43
4.14 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,400,000
Listing Number: LL279
Lot 49
5.11 Acres Listing
Price $ 1,900,000
Listing Number: LL280
Lot 50
4.59 Acres Listing
Price $ 2,400,000
Listing Number: LL281
733.4339 or 800.227.3334 Fax 307.739.0766
LL237
Over 200 feet of Fox Creek flows through
this 3 acre secluded lot. Add to this
mature aspens and conifers, an open site
for your new home, as well as views of
the Big Hole mountains. Just 5 miles from
Victor, this parcel is not in a subdivision,
and there are no restrictive CC&Rs.
$235,000 Contact: Sarah Kerr
www.jhrealestate.com
*In the event the week’s Top Sale is
erroneously reported it’s listed price is used.
** Some information above is derived from the
Teton County MLS system and represents
information as submitted by all Teton County
MLS Members for Teton County, Wyoming and
is deemed to be accurate but not guaranteed.
Art Hazen Real Estate LLC advertising and
promotional ads, products, and information
are the sole property of Art Hazen Real Estate
LLC and may NOT be reproduced, copied,
and/or used in whole or part without the
prior expressed written consent of Art Hazen
Real Estate LLC.
[email protected]

Similar documents