120 HELP - Extras for The Ukiah Daily Journal

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120 HELP - Extras for The Ukiah Daily Journal
SUNDAY
Wildcats finish
season winning
..........Page A-8
INSIDE
World briefly
.......Page A-2
$1 tax included
Remembering Jonestown
................................Page A-3
Nov. 16, 2008
The Ukiah
30 YEARS
Mendocino County’s
local newspaper
DAILY JOURNAL
ukiahdailyjournal.com
44 pages, Volume 150 Number 221
Monday: Mostly
sunny H 73º L 37º
Tuesday: Mostly
sunny H 72º L 40º
email: [email protected]
Can we land this trick?
Proposed Skate Park shifts from Perkins to Low Gap Park
What
goes around ...
UKIAH
By DANIEL LAZARUS
For the Daily Journal
Willits has one. Windsor has one.
Healdsburg has had one for over
five years. In fact, throughout
Northern California, there are now
143 public skate parks open, and
four more under construction. But
for more than 12 years, a professionally designed and constructed
skate park in Ukiah, to accommodate the estimated 500 local skateboarders, has been the elusive
dream of interested parties though
out the community. But for many
reasons, it has remained just that - a
dream. And now the dream is
changing sites, again.
To trace the history of the proposed skate park in Ukiah, from its
inception through all its stages
would take more time than and
space than can easily be devoted
here. Recent milestones, though,
include the adoption, in 2004, by
the Ukiah City Council, of the
Depot Park site on Perkins Street as
the site for the project. Then, in
December, 2005, the State of
California promised the city
$500,000 toward the park, as long
as local residents and businesses
came up with $214,000 in matching
funds or “in kind” services, and the
facility was completed by 2011.
Since then the Ukiah Skate Park
Committee has been raising funds
and consciousness about the project, and generally keeping the
momentum going. They now expect
the 20,000 square foot skate park to
cost around $1,000,000, and they
estimate that between the promised
state money, and local contributions, they have around $750,000
“in the bank.” That still leaves a big
gap in the budget, but committee
member George Phelan, doesn’t
think that will be a problem.
Several different businesses have
committed to contributions once the
park is underway.
“Once, we get rolling, once you
have a site, once you’re building,
everyone wants to be involved. But
until you get there, it’s sort of like
everyone wants to be on the bus,
By Candace Horsley
The Brothers
MacNab
Sarah Baldik/The Daily Journal
Brett Van Patten, a Ukiah high School junior who is sponsored by Freedom Skate shop, kick flips
his board with his feet as he does a jump down a set of steps Saturday afternoon.
but nobody wants to drive it,” he
said.
For three years, though, “the
bus” has been stalled on Perkins
Street. The site there has problems.
For starters, the North Coast
Railroad Authority, with whom the
city signed a $300 a month lease
for the one-acre property, actually
only owns the surface rights to the
land. What lays two or three feet
beneath the surface, belongs to
another company entirely, perhaps
The Southern Pacific Railway,
committee members say, and that
soil is contaminated. With environmental remediation costs for the
site estimated at $400,000, two separate corporate entities, the city of
Ukiah, plus the North Coast
Elke Vineyards
A place for pinot noir
M
ary Elke is one of
those people who
immediately makes
you feel comfortable. Tan
from working outdoors, her
graying hair pulled back,
dressed in casual shirt and
pants, she’s sitting at a picnic
table outside her small winery
building at one of her vineyards in Anderson Valley.
“Growing grapes and making wine are a tangible, heartfelt way to spend time,” she
sighs. Besides, she continues,
“I meet the most interesting
people who are attracted to
this work. It’s not like growing head lettuce in the central
valley.”
Elke is primarily a grape
grower with acreage in two
Anderson Valley locations and
another in Napa Valley.
photo by Heidi Cusick Dickerson
Mary Elke of Elke
Vineyards adjusting a
cane on a grapevine at
Elke Vineyards in
Anderson Valley.
Known for years for her Mary
Elke Apple Juice, she also
makes pinot noir and
Chardonnay and she is president of the Anderson Valley
Winegrowers Association.
As the waning sun reflects
against the muted colors of
Elke’s pinot noir vineyard she
delves into her story with the
confidence and clarity of
someone who is proud of what
she does. In 1979, when Mary
See WINE, Page A-10
Regional Water Quality Control
Board now all involved, and the
window for obtaining the state
money rapidly closing, Phelan and
the Skate Park Committee finally
decided that the Perkins Street site
just had “too many moving parts.”
Three weeks ago, The Skate Park
See SKATEPARK, Page A-10
ACCIDENT ON OBSERVATORY
Wine Notes
Editor’s note: Retired
Ukiah City Manager Candace
Horsley writes this weekly
column to highlight local
businesses that you may not
know even exist, primarily
small businesses that are
sometimes overlooked or
have a special something that
makes them unique.
So, it’s official - Mervyns
is closing. For many of us in
Ukiah, this is a major concern
and raises the question of
where else is there to shop
locally for clothes? Penneys
and Ross are right next door
to Mervyns and still offer a
wide variety of items for all
ages. In the downtown area,
there are several interesting
options that you should investigate. The next several weekly articles will describe some
of the local stores that offer
clothing choices for you.
For the man who is looking
to shop locally, MacNab’s is
as traditional as Thanksgiving
dinner. A family-run business
that started 68 years ago in
Ukiah, the brothers Bill and
Sandy MacNab still serve
their customers on a daily
basis at the shop located at
111 N. State Street, across
from the Courthouse.
What can you find at
MacNab’s? They serve the
adult customer with a spectrum that runs from casual
dress pants to Carhartt jackets. What may surprise some
is that they have quite a selection of wool and cotton
sweaters, suede and leather
coats, racks of dress and
Pendleton shirts, many brands
of jeans, action slacks and
Dockers.
For the outdoors, you can
be outfitted with a wide variety of attire including heavy
duty boots, foul-weather gear,
and all kinds of work pants
and shirts for a range of occupations. The brothers specialize in Levis, Wranglers,
Pendleton, Woolrich, Carhartt
and Enro. They also carry Big
and Tall sizes and rent out
tuxedos for those special
occasions.
Stop by and see for yourself what MacNab’s Mens
Wear has to offer.
TOP 5 ONLINE
By Heidi Cusick Dickerson
Sarah Baldik/The Daily Journal
A GMC Sierra plowed into a set of stairs at an
Observatory Avenue apartment complex Saturday
evening. According to UPD officers, the woman in
the vehicle was pulling over to let another driver
pull out and apparently hit the gas instead of the
break, driving her vehicle through the steps and
stopping just on the other side. One woman was
injured and taken by paramedics to UVMC. UPD
and UVFD responded to the incident.
Friday
1. CNN Jonestown film airs
2. Survivor recalls the horror of Jonestown; Ukiahan
travels back to Guyana
3. The Daily Digest
4. Farms as tourist attractions
5. The local vinyl revival:
Don't throw those records
away just yet!
A-2 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
DAILY DIGEST
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
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The Ukiah Daily Journal
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Leggett felon arrested in marijuana bust
The Daily Journal
An marijuana eradication
operation
in
northern
Mendocino County 30 days
ago has yielded the arrest of a
50-year-old Leggett man last
week.
Matthew Graves, 50, was
found to have marijuana
growing on his property during October eradication
efforts,
the
Mendocino
County Sheriff’s Office report
stated Friday.
In the northern county location of Foster Creek, County
of Mendocino Marijuana
Eradication
Team
and
Campaign Against Marijuana
Planting found about 12 marijuana growing sites with a
total of 2,131 plants on
October 7. All 12 of the gardens looked to have the same
design. Law enforcement then
found most of the gardens to
be on property owned by
Graves.
COMMET, with assistance
from the Drug Enforcement
Administration, Bureau of
Land
Management,
Department of Fish and
Game, Bureau of Narcotic
Enforcement and Mendocino
Major Crimes Task Force
returned to Grave’s property
on Nov. 6 with a search warrant.
On that day Graves, under
arrest, attempted to run from
law enforcement, stated the
Sheriff’s Office. Law enforcement would succeed in catching Graves a second time and
he was taken to county jail.
Marijuana, guns, and cash
was found on Grave’s property, the Sheriff’s Office stated.
A previously convicted felon,
Graves could not possess a
firearm.
Authorities found 52
pounds of processed marijua-
na, 65 growing plants, about
$15,000 cash, 22 firearms and
11 assault weapons. Guns
found on Graves property
included Uzi’s and street
sweeper shotguns. Authorities
state that one of guns could
have been fully automatic.
Authorities also found marijuana packaging materials
and scales.
Graves was booked into jail
on suspicion of possession of
marijuana for sale, cultivation
of marijuana, possession of a
fire arm, possession of assault
weapons, possession of a
machine gun, being armed
when he committed a felony
and escape from custody.
The Sheriff’s Office stated
that Graves was booked on a
$500,000 bail that was then
reduced to $360,000. Graves
paid his bail and was released
from custody.
WASHINGTON (AP) — World leaders battling a historic economic crisis agreed Saturday
to flag risky investing and regulatory weak
spots in hopes of avoiding future financial
meltdowns.
President George W. Bush and leaders from
nearly two dozen countries endorsed broad
goals to fend off any future calamities and to
revive the global economy amid rising unemployment and shrinking savings.
“We must lay the foundation for reform to
help ensure that a global crisis, such as this
one, does not happen again,” the leaders said in
lengthy statement after the emergency summit.
The plan endorses an early warning system
for problems such as the speculation frenzy
that fed the U.S. housing bubble. It also calls
for the creation of “supervisory colleges” of
financial regulators from many nations to better detect risky investing and other potential
problems.
It will be up to finance ministers to flesh out
the details to put such changes in place by the
end of March. Leaders plan to hold the next
summit by April 30, when Barack Obama is
president.
From vandalism to beating
threat, Obama election spurs
‘hundreds’ of racial incidents
(AP) — Cross burnings. Schoolchildren
chanting “Assassinate Obama.” Black figures
hung from nooses. Racial epithets scrawled on
homes and cars.
Incidents around the country referring to
President-elect Barack Obama are dampening
the postelection glow of racial progress and
harmony, highlighting the stubborn racism that
remains in America.
From California to Maine, police have documented a range of alleged crimes, from vandalism and vague threats to at least one physical attack. Insults and taunts have been delivered by adults, college students and secondgraders.
There have been “hundreds” of incidents
since the election, many more than usual, said
Mark Potok, director of the Intelligence Project
at the Southern Poverty Law Center, which
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The following were
compiled from reports
prepared by the Ukiah
Police Department. To
anonymously
report
crime information, call
463-6205.
ARREST -- Calvin Joseph
Ray, 19, of Willits, was arrested on suspicion of driving
under the influence in the
1300 block of South State
Street at 10:37 p.m. Friday.
Those arrested by law enforcement
officers are innocent until proven guilty.
People reported as having been arrested may contact the Daily Journal once
their case has been concluded so the
results can be reported. Those who feel
the information is in error should contact the appropriate agency. In the case
of those arrested on suspicion of driving under the influence of an intoxicant: all DUI cases reported by law
enforcement agencies are reported by
the newspaper. The Daily Journal makes
no exceptions.
Diamonds, Diamonds,
Diamonds!
SHOP EARLY FOR THE HOLIDAYS!
D. WILLIAM JEWELERS
Pear Tree Center • 462-4636
CORRECTIONS
The Ukiah Daily Journal reserves this
space to correct errors or make clarifications
to news articles. Significant errors in obituary notices or birth announcements will
result in reprinting the entire article. Errors
may be reported to the editor, 468-3526.
LOTTERY NUMBERS
DAILY 3: Afternoon: 0, 5,
2. Evening: 6, 6, 8.
monitors hate crimes.
One was in Snellville, Ga., where Denene
Millner said a boy on the school bus told her 9year-old daughter the day after the election: “I
hope Obama gets assassinated.” That night,
someone trashed her sister-in-law’s front lawn,
mangled the Obama lawn signs, and left two
pizza boxes filled with human feces outside the
front door, Millner said.
“Civil marriages are a civil right, and we’re
going to keep fighting until we get the rights
we deserve as American citizens,” Karen
Amico said in Philadelphia, holding up a sign
reading “Don’t Spread H8”.
“We are the American family, we live next
door to you, we teach your children, we take
care of your elderly,” said Heather Baker a special education teacher from Boston who
addressed the crowd at Boston’s City Hall
Plaza. “We need equal rights across the country.”
Massachusetts and Connecticut, which
began same sex weddings this past week, are
the only two states that allow gay marriage. All
30 states that have voted on gay marriage have
enacted bans.
UAW president insists
workers will make
no more concessions
Advice and dissent: Obama
seems interested in a
Lincolnesque ‘team of rivals’
The world briefly
Leaders agree on series of
steps they hope will prevent
global economic crises
POLICE REPORTS
COLUMBUS, Ohio (AP) — Even as
Detroit’s Big Three teeter on collapse, United
Auto Workers President Ron Gettelfinger said
Saturday that workers will not make any more
concessions and that getting the automakers
back on their feet means figuring out a way to
turn around the slumping economy.
“The focus has to be on the economy as a
whole as opposed to a UAW contract,”
Gettelfinger told reporters on a conference call,
noting the labor costs now make up 8 percent
to 10 percent of the cost of a vehicle.
“We have made dramatic, dramatic changes
and the UAW was applauded for that,” he said.
Instead, Gettelfinger blamed the problems
the auto industry is suffering from on things
beyond its control — the housing slump, the
credit crunch that has made financing a vehicle
tough and the 1.2 million jobs that have been
lost in the past year.
“We’re here not because of what the auto
industry has done,” he said. “We’re here
because of what has happened to the economy.”
Gay rights rallies held to
protest Calif. ban,
renew fight for right to wed
BOSTON (AP) — Gay rights supporters in
the first state to allow same-sex couples to
exchange wedding vows gathered Saturday to
protest the California vote that banned gay
marriage there and to urge supporters not to
quit the fight for the right to wed.
Crowds gathered near public buildings in
small communities and major cities including
New York, San Francisco and Chicago to vent
their frustrations, celebrate gay relationships
and renew calls for change.
WASHINGTON (AP) — Presidents typically say they want to be surrounded by strongwilled people who have the courage to disagree
with them. President-elect Barack Obama,
reaching out to Hillary Rodham Clinton and
Republicans, actually might mean it.
Abraham Lincoln meant it. He appointed his
bitter adversaries to crucial posts, choosing as
war secretary a man who had called him a
“long-armed ape” who “does not know anything and can do you no good.”
You could say his Cabinet meetings were
frank and open.
Richard Nixon didn’t mean it.
“I don’t want a government of yes-men,” he
declared. But among all the president’s men,
those who said no did so at their peril. He went
down a path of destruction in the company of
sycophants.
Iraq’s Cabinet to vote on
final draft of security pact
with US; bombings kill 15
BAGHDAD (AP) — Iraq’s Cabinet will
vote Sunday on a security pact with
Washington that would keep U.S. forces in the
country for another three years, a major step in
efforts to balance Iraqi demands for national
sovereignty with the security concerns of the
two allies.
In a bid to secure support for the agreement
from the country’s top Shiite cleric, Prime
Minister Nouri al-Maliki on Saturday dispatched two senior lawmakers to see Grand
Ayatollah Ali al-Sistani in the holy city of
Najaf, south of Baghdad.
Al-Sistani commands enormous influence
with Iraq’s majority Shiites and has the power
to sink the agreement or help it through the
vote in the Cabinet, and if approved, in a sub-
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LOCALLY OPERATED MEMBER
DAILY 4: 0, 5, 2, 1.
FANTASY 5: 7, 8, 22,
30, 33.
DAILY DERBY: 1st
Place: 10, Solid Gold. 2nd
Place: 07, Eureka. 3rd
Place: 02, Lucky Star. Race
time: 1:42.47.
LOTTO: 8, 18, 27, 29,
39. Mega number: 23
sequent vote in parliament. There was no word
on where he stands, but the two politicians
were upbeat after their 90-minute meeting with
him.
The U.N. mandate covering the presence of
U.S. and other foreign forces in Iraq expires
Dec. 31, and failure to pass the agreement
would leave Iraq with little choice but to seek
a renewal of the mandate.
A series of bombings Saturday pointed to
the fragility of security gains in the past year.
The violence also was likely to strengthen the
argument of the pact’s proponents, including
the interior and defense ministers, that there is
still a need for U.S. forces.
Astronauts inspect spaceship
for any launch damage
CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — Space
shuttle Endeavour’s astronauts unfurled a 100foot, laser-tipped pole and surveyed their ship
for any launch damage Saturday while drawing
ever closer to their destination, the international space station.
At least two pieces of debris were spotted
Friday night in launch photos, Mission Control
reported, and engineers were poring over the
images to determine whether anything hit
Endeavour.
The spacecraft and its crew of seven were
on track to hook up Sunday afternoon with the
space station, currently home to three astronauts. The shuttle was delivering tons of equipment for remodeling, including a new bathroom, kitchenette, two sleeping compartments
and an unprecedented recycling system for
turning urine into drinking water.
“It’s always a great day to be in space,”
shuttle commander Christopher Ferguson
observed.
The day centered around the shuttle inspections, standard procedure ever since Columbia
shattered during re-entry in 2003.
Animal rights activists in
Paris throw flour on actress
Lindsay Lohan for fur stole
PARIS (AP) — U.S. actress Lindsay Lohan
has been pelted with a flour bomb on arrival at
a Paris nightclub wearing a fur stole.
Animal rights activists showered the 22year-old actress with flour when she went to
the VIP Room Theater in the early hours of
Saturday with her friend, disc jockey Samantha
Ronson.
The owner of the nightclub helped Lohan
dust off her blue sequined dress and black stole
before she posed on the red carpet. Ronson
went on to spin tracks for a crowd that included reggae rapper Shaggy and “I Kissed a Girl”
singer Katy Perry.
©2008, MediaNews Group.
Published Daily by The Ukiah Daily Journal at 590 S. School St., Ukiah, Mendocino County, CA.
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THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
NATION
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – A-3
JONESTOWN REMEMBERED - THE 30-YEAR ANNIVERSARY
30 years after, the legacy of Jonestown
By TIM REITERMAN
Associated Press
Dark clouds tumbled overhead on
that afternoon 30 years ago, in the
last hours of the congressman’s mission deep in the jungle of Guyana.
With a small entourage, Rep. Leo
Ryan had come to investigate the
remote agricultural settlement built
by a California-based church. But
while he was there, more than a
dozen people had stepped forward:
We want to return to the United
States, they said fearfully.
Suddenly a powerful wind tore
through the central pavilion, riffling
pages of my notebook, and the skies
dumped torrents that bowed plantain
fronds. People scrambled for cover
as I interviewed the founder of
Peoples Temple.
“I feel sorry that we are being
destroyed from within,” intoned the
Rev. Jim Jones, stunned that members of his flock wanted to abandon
the place he called the Promised
Land.
That freakish storm and the mood
seemed ominous — and not just to
me. “I felt evil itself blow into
Jonestown when that storm hit,”
recalls Tim Carter, one of the few
settlers to survive that day.
Within hours, Carter would see
his wife and son die of cyanide poisoning, two of the more than 900
people Jones led in a murder and
suicide ritual of epic proportions.
And I would be wounded when a
team of temple assassins unleashed
a fusillade that killed Ryan — the
first congressman slain in the line of
duty — and four others, including
three newsmen.
By their wiles or happenstance,
scores of temple members escaped
the events of Nov. 18, 1978. Among
the survivors: Members of the
group’s basketball team who were
playing in Georgetown, 150 miles
away. A woman who escaped
Jonestown with her young son,
hours before the carnage. A family
that had left Peoples Temple months
before.
Some of the survivors would
commit suicide, die at the hands of
others or fall victim to drugs. But
many more moved on to new
careers, spouses and even churches.
With the passage of time, differences between temple outsiders and
insiders, temple defectors and loyalists have faded. They share painful
memories, guilt-filled feelings, loss
of loved ones and psychological
scars from an event that has come to
symbolize the ultimate power of a
charismatic leader over his followers.
Tim Carter was spared to carry
out one last mission for the temple.
Almost 30 years after that horrible
day, we spoke for the first time
about one of the worst American
tragedies of the last century.
“We are inextricably linked,”
Carter said. “What you experienced
at the airstrip is what I experienced
at Jonestown. Somebody was trying
to kill us. And my family was killed
as well. I cannot describe the agony,
terror and horror of what that was.”
———
Yulanda Williams was about 12
when she began attending temple
services in San Francisco with her
parents. Her father, lured by Jones’
reputation as a Christian prophet
with healing powers, believed that
the minister helped him recover
from a heart attack.
Peoples Temple sprang from the
heartland in the 1950s. Jones built
an interracial congregation in
Indianapolis through passionate
Pentecostal preaching and courageous calls for racial equality.
Moving his flock to California, the
minister transformed his church into
a leftist social movement with programs for the poor.
Political work by his followers
elevated Jones to prominence in liberal Democratic circles by the late
1970s. He was head of San
Francisco’s public housing commission when media scrutiny and legal
problems spurred his retreat to
Jonestown for what would be his
last stand.
In 1977, as news media were
beginning to investigate disciplinary
thrashings and other abuse in the
temple, Jones summoned Williams
and her husband to Guyana.
Upon arrival in Jonestown, the
couple felt deceived. It was far from
the paradise Jones described. People
were packed into metal-roofed cabins, sleeping on bunks without mattresses and using outhouses with
newsprint for toilet paper. There
were armed guards, and Jones
warned that deserters would
Daily Journal files, San Francisco Examiner
The scene on Nov. 18, 1978 after hundreds of People’s Temple church members drank cyanide
laced grape drink - or were injected as in the case of many children. More than 900 people (300 of
them children) died at Jonestown in Guyana, South America that day.
encounter venomous snakes and
hostile natives.
The preacher, who once charmed
U.S. politicians and met with future
first lady Rosalynn Carter, had
turned into a pill-popping dictator
who sadistically presided over harsh
discipline. “I felt like I was in a
concentration camp and he was
Hitler,” Williams said.
Because her husband was an
attorney whose skills could be better
used elsewhere, they were permitted
to leave after a few weeks. And
months before the horrific end,
Williams and her family cut ties
with the temple.
Eventually, Williams joined the
San Francisco Police Department.
But she told no one about her temple involvement for a decade
because she feared the loss of her
job. When she finally confided to a
deputy chief, “He said, ’No way,’
because everybody had this stereotype” about the kinds of people who
were members of Peoples Temple,
she recalled.
In fact, these were mostly ordinary people who joined the temple
because they wanted to help their
fellow man and be part of something larger than themselves.
Williams thrived as a policewoman. The department needed
officers to connect with gang members and other juveniles in trouble
with the law. “I told my story to
young people,” said Williams.
“They were amazed because they
never imagined anyone could beat
these types of odds.”
———
On the morning of Nov. 18,
Ryan’s party was about to tour the
settlement, and investigate whether
its inhabitants truly were free to go.
Leslie Wilson, wife of security
chief Joe Wilson, took her 3-yearold son Jakari to the kitchen building where they met seven others
who had endured enough of
Jonestown’s Spartan life and Jones’
faked sieges and suicide rehearsals.
The group told fellow settlers they
were going on a picnic — but they
just kept on moving through the
jungle, with Jakari slung in a sheet
on Wilson’s back.
“I was so scared I was shaking in
my tennis shoes,” she recalled. “I
was waiting for a gunshot and a bullet and me dropping.”
Concealed by thick undergrowth,
the escapees passed so close to the
Jonestown guard shack that they
could hear voices. Trudging 35
miles along railroad tracks, they
arrived sweaty and dirty that night
in the town of Matthews Ridge.
Wilson, who lost her mother,
brother, sister and husband that
Saturday, would be consumed with
survivor’s guilt.
On Mother’s Day, two years after
Jonestown, she thought about what
it must have been like for her mother to see two of her children die.
She put a pistol to her head.
She did not shoot. She had to
live, she decided, for the sake of her
son.
After a bout with drug abuse, she
twice married and bore two more
children.
Now divorced, she goes by her
married name Leslie Cathey and
works in the health care industry.
She finally has found forgiveness,
even for Jones, but she cannot for-
get. “I pray my family did not think
I left them,” she said. “Not a day
goes by that I don’t think about it.”
———
While a temple dump truck ferried the Ryan party and 15 grimfaced defectors toward the Port
Kaituma airstrip six miles away, we
were unaware that anyone had
escaped. But at Jonestown’s front
gate, Joe Wilson inspected the
crowded truck bed, looking for his
wife and toddler.
We made it safely to the dirt
strip. But then, a tractor with a trailer full of temple gunmen — Wilson
among them — soon bore down on
us. Gunfire exploded as we boarded
two small planes.
Ryan died. So did defector
Patricia Parks, NBC newsmen Don
Harris and Bob Brown, and photographer Greg Robinson, my colleague at the San Francisco
Examiner.
I was shot in the left forearm and
wrist. That night those of us who
were ambulatory took turns tending
to the most severely wounded in a
tent by the airstrip: The NBC soundman. A temple defector who someday would become a policeman. A
concerned relative whose sister was
a Jones mistress. And Ryan aide
Jackie Speier, who would go on to a
long career as a California lawmaker before being elected to his seat in
Congress this year.
Some survivors had fled into the
jungle but most took refuge in a
cramped rum shop, fearful the
assassins would return. “You’re
gonna see the worst carnage of your
life at Jonestown,” predicted one of
the defectors the next morning. “It’s
called ’revolutionary suicide.”’
———
By the time the airstrip gunmen
— among them, Joe Wilson —
returned to Jonestown, Jones had
gathered his people in the pavilion
and, weaving words of desperation,
had begun preparing them for the
end. Then he used news of Ryan’s
shooting to convince the throng that
they had no hope, no future, no
place to go. “The congressman has
been murdered!” he announced.
“Please get the medication before
it’s too late. ... Don’t be afraid to
die.”
When potassium cyanide-laced
Grape Flavor Aid was brought forward, Jones wanted the children to
go first, sealing everyone’s fate
because the parents and elders
would have no reason to live. With
armed guards encircling everyone
and with youngsters bawling and
screaming, medical staff members
with syringes squirted poison down
the throats of babies.
The killing already was underway
when Carter was sent to the pavilion. Frozen in horror, he saw his
own 15-month-old son Malcolm
poisoned. Then his wife Gloria died
in his arms. “I wanted to kill
myself,” he said. “But I had a voice
saying, ’You cannot die. You must
live.”’
He did live. Jones had one last
mission for the Vietnam veteran.
A top Jones aide gave Carter, his
brother and another temple member
pistols and luggage containing hundreds of thousands of dollars. They
were instructed to take the money to
the Soviet embassy in Georgetown
along with letters authorizing trans-
fer of millions from temple bank
accounts to that government. It was
to be Jones’ last gesture for socialism.
But the trio ditched most of the
cash during the arduous hike to Port
Kaituma, and they were detained by
police there.
Two days later, Carter was
brought back to Jonestown to help
identify the bodies. “People still
think everyone lined up in orderly
fashion and drank the potion without protest,” Carter said. “It’s not
reality. I saw people who had been
injected with poison.”
In the aftermath, he went to live
with his father in Boise, Idaho.
Walking on the street, he felt that
others looked at him with loathing
and fear. Friends from his youth on
the San Francisco Peninsula, where
he had introduced some people to
the temple, called him a murderer or
refused to speak with him.
Though he listed Peoples Temple
on his resume, Carter landed a job
at a travel agency and worked in the
industry for many years. He has had
two long-term relationships and is
the father of three children. He collects disability payments for posttraumatic stress from Vietnam, but
he reflects on the nightmare of
Jonestown each day.
“The more time that goes on, the
better it is,” he said. “I can think
about Gloria and Malcolm without
feeling that knife in my chest.”
———
Late on the afternoon of Nov. 18,
a coded radio message from Jones
was transmitted to the temple’s
house in Georgetown: Some
Jonestown residents had betrayed
them, and he wanted the faithful to
kill temple enemies. Then members
in the Guyanese capital and San
Francisco — a couple of hundred
people — should commit suicide.
Bay Area businessman Sherwin
Harris had sat down for supper at
the house with his teenage daughter
Liane and his ex-wife Sharon
Amos’ two other children.
Oblivious to Jones’ dire orders,
Harris felt hopeful and upbeat. He
had traveled to Guyana with the
Ryan party to check on his daughter’s welfare and, after several days
of trying, was finally able to see her
in person.
Harris and his daughter discussed
plans to spend the next day together,
touring Georgetown.
Later, Harris took a cab back to
his hotel, his spirits lifted by the
visit. But that night police informed
him that his daughter, Amos and her
two other children were dead.
“It felt like the swing of a sledge
hammer full on to my chest,” he
said. “How could this be? I just left
her.”
Amos killed her two youngest
children with a butcher knife; then
she and Liane died the same way.
Harris clings to the belief that his
daughter was killed, and did not
commit suicide.
Since that night, Harris’ two surviving children have made him a
grandfather four times over. He has
become friends with his daughter’s
closest temple confidante.
“As I’ve met members over the
years, I would hate to bet a cup of
coffee on the differences between
them and us,” he said. “They were
normal folks, mostly wanting to
make a contribution to society.
Other people think it never would
happen to them. It could happen to
anyone caught up in those circumstances.”
———
One enduring mystery is who put
a bullet in Jones’ head. Evidence
suggests that he shot himself at the
pavilion or was killed by a close
aide, as he had planned.
Two of those aides, sisters Annie
Moore and Carolyn Layton, were
among 13 people whose bodies
were found in Jones’ cottage. But
Moore was the only one who was
shot and may well have been the
last person to die in the settlement.
Her suicide note praised
Jonestown and Jones. “His love for
humans was insurmountable,” she
wrote, “and it was many whom he
put his love and trust in, and they
left him and spit in his face.”
Her epitaph read: “We died
because you would not let us live.”
Rebecca Moore, who lost her two
sisters and nephew that day, is
chairwoman of the religious studies
department at San Diego State
University, and when she teaches
about new religions and death and
dying, she talks about her personal
connection to the tragedy.
She and her husband launched a
Web site dedicated to conveying the
humanity of temple members she
feels were dehumanized by photos
of their bodies and dismissed as
robotic cultists.
Moore thinks her sisters, socially
conscious daughters of a minister,
were true temple believers to the
end. Still, she cannot fathom how
they could have joined in planning
murders and suicides.
“Jones did not buy the poison and
mix it,” she said. “Others tested it
on pigs. Others, including my sisters, wrote letters about how to kill
people. ... What is baffling is why
people would participate in something so inhumane.”
———
Thirty years later, dozens of surviving members come together for
private reunions because they still
value their friendship, the temple’s
sense of community and their utopian dream of a world free of racism
and injustice.
“I go because I feel so strongly
about the need for and power of forgiveness and understanding,” said
Stephan Jones, the minister’s son.
He was 19, and in Georgetown with
other basketball team members on
the temple’s last day. “I’ve come to
believe a group of people can see
the same thing and each come away
with a completely different perspective and all be right in the moment.”
Today, he is the father of three
daughters and is the vice president
of a small Bay Area office installation and services company.
In Jonestown’s aftermath,
Stephan hated his father. But he has
come to recognize that the capacity
for good and evil, and mental sickness, coexisted in Jones.
“We don’t want to face our own
responsibility or part in what happened and feel ashamed for being
duped or manipulated,” he said.
“We look for someone else to
blame. I realized over time that
there was a great need to forgive
him, then I could forgive myself.”
The unidentifiable or unclaimed
bodies of more than 400 of
Jonestown’s dead, most of them
children, are interred in a mass
grave at an Oakland Cemetery overlooking San Francisco Bay. Each
year a memorial service is conducted on Nov. 18.
Eugene Smith, who lost his wife,
their infant son and his mother,
went to the grave site years ago but
has not returned. Fate had put him
in Georgetown the day they perished, but he likes to think he would
have resisted the madness in
Jonestown, as he believes his wife
did.
Now working as a research analyst for California’s transportation
department, Smith has neither
remarried nor fathered more children.
“None of us are survivors; we
just got away,” he said. “For all of
us who were not in Jonestown, part
of us died there.”
———
EDITOR’S NOTE — Tim
Reiterman, San Francisco news editor for The Associated Press, is the
author with the late John Jacobs of
“Raven: The Untold Story of the
Rev. Jim Jones and His People,”
published by Tarcher/Penguin.
A-4 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
COMMUNITY
Editor: Richard Rosier, 468-3520
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THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
C OMMUNITY
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – A-5
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Food Items and Tole Painting, Art.
The American Cancer Society recommends colonoscopy screenings
if you’re 50 or over, or younger, depending on your family history.
Call us at 462-3190
Artists:
Debbie Coate, Sharon Fenton, Peggy
Ross, Shirley Estrem, Mary Lou Duncan,
Ann Stolpe, Sherry Breeden, Sharon
Costello, Elicia Andrus, Jan Stegila,
Linda Yaple, Marilyn Crayton.
COMMUNITY BRIEFS
Miss Mendocino County Scholarship
Program deadline set at Dec. 1
The Miss Mendocino County Scholarship Program has been
scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 7 at the Ukiah High School
Cafetorium and the committee is now taking applications from
prospective contestants.
To qualify for the program applicants must be 17 years of age
and high school seniors or in college.
There are numerous other requirements that must meet the
Miss America criteria. An information package can be made
available to contestants by calling Verna Jacobs, Executive
Director at 462-2025.
Rehearsals will take place every Monday evening and the
deadline for qualification is Dec. 1. Scholarships in varying
amounts will be given to each contestant who completes the
training and participates the night of the pageant, with the winner earning the opportunity to compete in the Miss California
Scholarship Program next June in Fresno.
Ukiah Senior Center to provide Fourth
annual Thanksgiving Dinner on Nov. 27
The Ukiah Senior Center will provide their Fourth annual
Thanksgiving Dinner at the Ukiah Senior Center. This year, the
Center is anticipating 250 diners. They are offering two seatings -- one to be served at 11 a.m. and the other at 1 p.m. on
Thanksgiving Day. All the traditional portions will be prepared,
including turkey, stuffing, mashed potatoes, sweet potatoes,
green beans, salad and, of course, pumpkin and pecan pie. The
community is invited, and the cost will be $6 per person or $3
for children under the age of 10.
This year the Center has received sponsorships from several
local businesses, including the Savings Bank of Mendocino
County. Sherrie Dogali, the bank’s Community Reinvestment
Officer says, ”It is our privilege to sponsor the Thanksgiving
Day feast. The Savings Bank is committed to helping the Ukiah
Senior Center help seniors in our community, especially those
who don’t have enough money or energy to make such a big
meal.”
Denny’s restaurant is also helping, with donations of pumpkin and pecan pies. For every customer who buys a pie to
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donate to the Center for the Thanksgiving dinner, Denny’s will
match the purchase with a second pie to also be given for the
dinner.
Last but not least, Friedman’ s Home Improvement store is
donating turkeys. This is the fourth year that they have done so
for the Center.
Lavonna Silveria, Executive Director of the Ukiah Senior
Center, states: “We would like to thank our local businesses for
their generous contributions. With their help and the help of the
volunteers who put in many hours to prepare this meal, we are
able to serve our local seniors and the community. Give us a call
at 462-4343 to reserve a spot for dinner, bring your family or
come and enjoy the company of others! We will even pick you
up and bring you to the Center. If you need a ride just let us
know.”
Tapestry Family services
is seeking foster families
Tapestry Family Services is looking for families to make a
difference in the life of a foster child. They specialize in training and supporting foster families as they nurture and model
successful relationships to children with emotional and behavioral challenges.
Tapestry Family Services is a local program committed to
helping local children stay within their home communities.
Tapestry will stay involved in the each child’s placement and
progress.
Tapestry employs a team treatment approach where foster
parents play an active role in the treatment of their foster child.
Although Tapestry specializes in “Intensive Treatment Foster
Care,” they also offer regular treatment and respite foster care
treatment. For more information, or if interested in applying,
call Connie Hewett, Tapestry’s Recruiter/Trainer, at 463-3300,
ext. 115.
Truckers’ Light Parade set for Dec. 6
On Dec. 6, from 5:30 p.m. until approximately 6:30 p.m. the
following streets will be traffic controlled for the Truckers Light
Parade.
On the West side of State Street: Bricarelli, Garrett at Elm,
Magnolia, Oak at Low Gap and Gibson, School at Scott, Henry,
Smith, Standley, Perkins, Church, Clay, Seminary, Mill, Oak at
Gobbi and Freitas, South State at Luce and Observatory, Crest
at Washington and Wabash on the West Side of State Street.
On the East side of State Street: Ford at Orr and Joseph,
Clara at Joseph and Mason, Main at Norton, Smith, Standley,
Perkins, Church, Stephenson, Clay, Mill and Gobbi, Hastings at
Commerce and State Street from the Airport entrance to
Commerce and Garrett to Kuki Rd. The two North bound lanes
will be closed.
Traffic will be routed up Empire Drive from the North. Those
organizing the parade anticipate that it will not take more than
an hour. As the parade progresses, the roads will reopen. For
more information, call Jimmy Rickel at 485-7915.
Anton Stadium stakeholders’
meeting set for Wednesday
The City of Ukiah Community Service Department has
announced a meeting for the stakeholders of Anton Stadium.
The meeting will be open to any members of the community
interested in helping with Anton Stadium.
Items to be discussed will include grandstand construction,
dugout renovation, field improvements, fundraising, and more.
The meeting will be held on Wednesday, Nov. 19, at 5:30
p.m. at the Ukiah Civic Center Annex at 411 W. Clay St., Ukiah,
in conference room 5. For more information, call 467-5719.
Humane Society for Inland
Mendocino County is taking
orders for holiday wreaths
The Humane Society for Inland Mendocino County is now
taking orders for their annual fresh Christmas wreaths, swags,
greenery baskets and table decorations.
This year, arrangements with candles will also be offered.
Items will begin to be available on the day after Thanksgiving.
All materials used in the project are donated, so all proceeds
benefit the society.
All wreaths are priced at $35; baskets will range from $15 to
$30; Swags from $15 to $25 and centerpieces with candles will
be $25 each.
Orders will be accepted until Dec. 10. All items must be
picked up by Dec. 15. Orders will be accepted at the shelter at
9700 Uva Drive, Redwood Valley, or by calling 485-0123.
A-6 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
FORUM
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Letters from our readers In our opinion
TWK vs. Lake County
To the Editor:
Being a long time resident and advocate
of Lake County, I was not sure what to
make of Tommy Wayne Kramer’s recent
“Visit Lake County, Land of
Enchantment.” I had never heard nor read
of Mr. Kramer until a copy of his article
satirizing my home turf circulated around
my office to a chorus of indignant snarls.
“Who is this nut job?” summed up most
comments, and some were downright
angry. If Mr. Kramer’s goal was to become
the most hated man in Lake County for a
day, he achieved his purpose; the satire
was razor sharp. But for satire to be good,
it needs elements of truth. Did Mr. Kramer
make a good case for his dislike of Lake
County, or is this simply a product of a
dazed and confused writer after a bad
batch of medicinal marijuana? (Note: In
addition to his welfare check, Mr. Kramer
should also get his pot in Lake County; 65
percent of dopers surveyed prefer their
weed grown in Lake County over that
grown in Mendocino County.)
Mr. Kramer starts off his diatribe by
saying that Lake County “has the highest
percentage of parolees in the state and that
it has the lowest per capita income in all of
California.” That may have been true while
Mr. Kramer and his friends were visiting
Lake County. But that distinction returned
to Mendocino County once Mr. Kramer
and Company arrived back in Ukiah.
He refers to our lake as being “polluted,” but at least we have water in our lake.
To get here, Mr. Kramer had to drive by
Lake Mendocino where Jesus wanna-bees
can practice walking across that mud hole
without drowning.
Mr. Kramer suggests that the best dining
in Lake County is out in our fruit and nut
orchards. But this is more of a comment on
his own peculiar personal dining preferences and not the quality of our dining
establishments, which are excellent and
numerous. At least our fruits and nuts can
be found in our orchards. Apparently in
Mendocino County, the fruits and nuts can
be found writing for the local paper.
When the Lake County real estate agent
suggested that the local jail was right for
Mr. Kramer because it “was a gated community,” that was not something that is
commonly marketed to the general public
as he implied in his article. That suggestion
was made specifically and uniquely to Mr.
Kramer and his group. But after reading
his article, it is apparent that the agent was
wrong. The best location for Mr. Kramer is
not jail, but another “guarded gate” facility
that caters to butterfly catchers.
Lake County is not fun of crack heads
as Mr. Kramer implies, and the few that we
have were hurt by his insinuation that they
were selfish. No, Mr. Kramer; unlike the
crack heads in your Ukiah neighborhood,
our crack heads will share their pipe with
total strangers! All you had to do was ask
nicely.
Mr. Kramer should take note that the
girlfriend he refers to in the Lucerne
Trailer Park is not a female. If the mustache was not enough of a clue, her name
should have been the clincher: Lola.
Lastly, to paraphrase (bastardize?) from
one of many world famous rock groups
that frequent Lake County’s own Konocti
Harbor Inn:
Well I heard Mister Kramer wrote about
her
Well, I heard ole Tommy put her down
Well, I hope Tommy Kramer will
remember
A Lake County man don’t need him
around anyhow
Sweet home Lake County
Where the skies are so blue
Sweet Home Lake County
Lord, I’m coming home to you
Phil Smoley
Lakeport
Ukiah is the best town
To the Editor:
My husband and I moved here about 15
years ago to raise our two sons Michael
and Brian. I remember being at the
Crossroads shopping center in mid-August,
114 degrees out, sweating to death, staring
out across the then junk yard and the lovely vacant Fjords parking lot, missing
friends from the Bay area and thinking,
“Okay God I know there’s some reason
we’re here but I’m not sure why.” I didn’t
at least up until now. Besides the fact we
have all met great friends and that it has
been a great place to raise our kids, little
did I know that the generosity and love of
this community would literally help save
my life. Friends old and new have come
out of everywhere when they found out
about my illness. People have made dinners for my family, prayed for and with
me, colleagues in and out of work have
gifted their healing services, herbs... to me,
prayer circles have come to my house, a
plumber worked for free on our home,
fund-raisers are being planned to help
defray our medical costs. I feel so much
gratitude that in a time of crisis I live
where I do and that this town is filled with
so much love and compassion. You touch
ON EDITORIALS
Daily Journal editorials are written by
Editor K.C. Meadows with the concurrence
of Publisher Kevin McConnell.
We’ll never know why
Tuesday marks the 30th anniversary of
the Jonestown tragedy in Guyana, South
America.
More than 900 people, many of them onetime residents of this Valley, were dead after
cyanide-laced grape drink was either consumed voluntarily or injected into them.
Of the 900, more than 300 were children
and babies, who were murdered by their parents or Jonestown loyalists who knew that
once the children were dead, the parents
would have no reason to resist their own
deaths.
The events at Jonestown that day, including the assassinations of Congressman Leo
Ryan, news reporters who had traveled to
Guyana to check on the well-being of
American citizens and church members trying to escape, will live on as one of the most
horrifying tragedies in American history.
For people in the Ukiah Valley, many who
remember that awful day when the news
came that the hundreds of people who used
to be members of this very community were
dead, and for others who survived and came
home to the U.S., Nov. 18 brings back terrible memories and a sense of confusion and
bafflement.
How could this happen and what do we
do to make sure it doesn’t happen again?
The “Why?” of it still haunts.
Jim Jones was clearly charismatic and by
most accounts had started this popular
church by forging a Christian vision of racial
equality and social justice that attracted so
many to him. How did he mutate from savior to dictator? How do hundreds of people
follow a man to the jungle and then allow
themselves to be beaten, tortured, starved
and frightened literally to death while they
watch heir own children murdered?
There is no easy answer. There is no ques-
tion that Jim Jones had gotten hooked on bad
drugs which had changed him into a paranoid psychotic. His followers, once dreaming of a utopian society on a farm in South
America, found themselves weak with
hunger and fatigue, surrounded by Jones’
goons, watched every minute, and far from
home in the middle of a jungle which would
swallow them up in a moment if they dashed
for freedom. Many of them had come to
believe that Jones was, in fact, God, and
would find them and hunt them down wherever they went.
Clearly some Jonestown residents did
object, did try to fight, did try to escape.
Some achieved it with great effort, others
died for their trouble from assassins’ bullets.
When we recall the Jonestown tragedy,
and when we watch documentaries like the
film CNN has produced for this anniversary,
we are moved again to blame the church
members for their stupidity and weakness.
But that is too easy. The human heart and the
human mind are too delicate and complex to
be cubby-holed as simply stupid or atrophied.
Instead perhaps we need to remember
Jonestown and Jim Jones as the result of
what happens when people lose hope in their
everyday lives and find false hope instead in
institutions like the Jones church - or cult, if
you will - where promises are sky high and
reality is blurred.
We need to remember that any institution
where asking questions is rebuffed or even
punishable is suspect.
Or perhaps it’s as simple as the advice
Ukiah Jonestown survivor Tracy Parks Diaz
gives us, “You need to follow your heart and
listen to your gut.”
my heart and heal parts of me some of you
may never have known were skeptical and
distrusting of the world. Thank you for
your love. As my husband and I prepare to
leave for treatment at the Burzynski Clinic
in Houston, Texas Nov. 12 I hope you will
keep myself and my family in your prayers
and visions of good health and happiness.
Thank you again and see you in December.
Casey Eldredge
Ukiah
I am one of the ones who likes Tommy
Wayne Kramer. I really do. I always laugh
at his comments, they seem so bad, but
they are so true; especially when he holds
forth on Ukiah -- the little city of my
dreams.
Ukiah, Ukiah, so dear to my heart... but
I digress...
One of the really neat things about
Ukiah is one that Mr. Kramer has missed
so far in his ramblings. I am not speaking
here of the illustrious PumpkinFest, I am
speaking of the Ukiah Speedway. The
Speedway, oh, oh, what a fantastic thing
for our little city to host!
Go Ukiah!
To the Editor:
You seem to print a lot of long letters to
the editor from apparent nut cases. Maybe
mine will qualify too;
See LETTERS, Page A-7
WHERE TO WRITE
President George Bush: The White
House, 1600 Pennsylvania Ave., Washington, D.C. 20500; (202) 456-1111, FAX
(202)456-2461.
Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger: State Capitol, Sacramento, 95814.
(916) 445-2841; FAX (916)445-4633
Sen. Barbara Boxer: 112 Hart Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C. 20510;
(202)224-3553; San Francisco, (415) 4030100 FAX (202) 224--0454
Sen. Dianne Feinstein: 331 Hart
Senate Office Bldg., Washington, D.C.
20510. (202)224-3841 FAX (202) 2283954; San Francisco (415) 393-0707; [email protected]
Congressman Mike Thompson:
1st District, 231 Cannon Office Bldg,
Washington, D.C. 20515. (202) 225-3311;
FAX (202)225-4335. Fort Bragg district
office, 430 N. Franklin St., PO Box 2208,
Fort Bragg 95437; 962-0933,FAX 9620934;
www.house.gov/write rep
Assemblywoman Patty Berg: State
Assembly District 1, Capitol, Rm. 4146,
Sacramento, 95814. (916) 319-2001;
Berg's Ukiah field representative is Ruth
Valenzuela. Ukiah office located at 311 N.
State St, Ukiah, 95482, 463-5770. The
office’s fax number is 463-5773. For email
go to web site: assembly.ca.gov/Berg
Senator Pat Wiggins: State Senate
District 2, Capitol Building, Room 5100,
Sacramento, 95814. (916) 445-3375
Email: [email protected] In
Ukiah: Kathy Kelley at 200 S. School St,
468-8914, email: [email protected]
Mendocino County Supervisors:
Michael Delbar, 1st District; Jim Wattenburger, 2nd District; John Pinches, 3rd
District; Kendall Smith, 4th District;
David Colfax, 5th District. All can be
reached by writing to 501 Low Gap Road,
Room 1090, Ukiah, 95482, 463-4221,
FAX 463-4245. [email protected]
Assignment:Ukiah
By Tommy Wayne Kramer
We are the World,
We are the Children
Do you feel it-- the gust of freedom? Do you hear
the answer that’s been blowin’ in the wind for all these
decades?
Congratulations. We made it.
From the land of Baldwinistas here in Ukiah to the
Obamanoids of Washington, our triumph is complete.
The hour belongs to the Democrats, to the left, the progressives—those with a vision for tomorrow who see a
brighter future today. Equality and social justice are
now foregone conclusions as we step into the world
we’ve all been imagining might some day become
reality.
With the November 4 election we have eliminated
racism and sexism and moved into the promised land
of forward thinking, to a place better than Oz, better
than Shangri La, better than Pepperland!
Who wants a hug? I’m here to give ‘em!!
Speaking of giving things away, who needs a handout or a bailout or a rebate or a stimulus check or a
dream of a better tomorrow? All this is possible, and in
fact all of it will soon be mandatory, for these elections
have swept away all ignorance and hate, all divisiveness and mistrust.
Social harmony has been achieved from the lowest
rung of our society to the very top of the ladder, not
that any hierarchies exist anymore, mind you. Gone is
the patriarchy, gone is the culture of corruption, gone is
corporate greed. Everyone is now exactly and precisely equal to everyone else. We are finally free of all
prejudices and biases and unkind thoughts.
We have at last brought the ‘60s dream to life, the
dream promised so long before by the wizards and
visionaries who traveled before us: The Maharishi,
Donovan, Baba Ram Dass, Jim Jones, Reverend
Moon, Tim Leary, Joni Mitchell, Charles Manson and
His Most Rajneesh BoogaWooga.
These voices have at long last been heard by citizens
all across this (suddenly) great land of ours. And local
citizens have responded by voting in record numbers
and in the process have cast out the last of the old
politicians. Mike Delbar - gone! Jim Wattenburger gone!
Both have been replaced by the solid squishy leftie
progressive candidates who now totally dominate our
county and city governments. Local officials are joined
at the state and national level by an entire herd of
geniuses now bringing peace and prosperity to the
cheering masses.
How can they not? How could our current elected
officials possibly fail to implement their agenda of
more stuff for everyone, now that their dastardly rightwing foes have been vanquished? No longer are the old
shackles of ignorance obstructing our progress. There
will no longer be heard a discouraging word about debt
or balanced budgets or checks and balances or personal responsibility.
Behold what we have wrought: layer after layer of
unfettered progressive idealists who can finally bring
about all those massive social upheavals we have long
yearned for. We cast aside the outdated superstitions of
our grandparents’ era. Gone at last are their tired old
traditions and rituals.
And in their place: Hope. Dreams. Change.
We stand together high on a hillside gazing at the
world’s unfolding possibilities, holding one another’s
hand as we begin to sing, slowly at first, then in a rising chorus of joy: “I’d like to teach the world to sing,
in perfect harmony . . .”
The Earth Goddess beams upon our happy world.
And we descend our glorious hillside in perfect harmonious lockstep, marching ever leftward into the vast
dizzying nowhere which we all know is everywhere,
Om Shanti, Hare Krishna, etc. Remember, we cannot
fail. With ignorance abolished and maximum freedom
made mandatory and everyone made just as darn equal
as our leaders can legislate, nothing can stop us. We
will destroy the enemy even if we are it.
Tommy Wayne Kramer is pained to point out that
back there when we were all singing and holding hands
on that mountaintop someone reached into his pocket
and stole his wallet. Also, Tom Hine says there is
breaking news coming from a college campus near
Cleveland. Apparently some students failed to adequately separate their glass and aluminum and the
National Recycle Police responded forcefully: Four
Dead in Ohio.
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Publisher: Kevin McConnell
Editor: K.C. Meadows
Office manager: Yvonne Bell
Visit our web site at ukiahdailyjournal.com
email us at [email protected]
Retail ad manager: Sue Whitman
Member
Audit Bureau
Of Circulations
Member California
Newspaper Publishers
Association
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – A-7
FORUM
Editor: K.C. Meadows, 468-3526
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
SUNDAY VOICES
ON THE STREETS
Our high paid executives at work
Sunday view
How do you feel about
the Ukiah Skate Park’s
new location at Low Gap?
On Tuesday, Oct. 28 the Board of
Supervisors got a budget status report
from their top number cruncher in the
Chief Executive’s Office, Jennifer Wyatt.
Ms. Wyatt told the Board that the
County’s expensive new computerized
centralized financial tracking system
known as “MUNIS” only produces
“canned reports which are very limited in
scope. They can’t be printed and read
easily by board.”
Translation: the reports are as useless
as the expensive program producing
them.
It might be possible to pay the
County’s Information Systems staff to
create “customized reports,” explained
Wyatt, but “some reports are only for certain departments. There are security limitations.”
Not on financial reports, there aren’t.
The public’s money is public business -no “limitations.” What Ms. Wyatt was
saying was, “We can’t just let the few
members of the public who are interested
in these things actually see any slightly
improved financial reports even if we
wanted to create them -- which we don’t
-- because then the public would see how
incompetent we are.”
Wyatt then gave the Supervisors a
“detailed worksheet with breakdown by
department” which provided no real
detail at all because it was just a list of
departments and their overall budget status. Of course it’s too early to draw any
major conclusions, said Wyatt, before
pointing out that the County is substantially exceeding its budgets for extra help
and overtime.
Supervisor Delbar asked, “What controls do we have on overtime and extra
help? Some departments have overtime
and extra help which were not budgeted
at all and others are over by more than
100 percent. Is there any oversight? Any
authority? Is this legitimate?”
Delbar doesn’t know if there’s oversight? He doesn’t know if there’s a system for authorizing overtime? How could
a sitting Supervisor NOT know the
answer to this question? (Delbar won’t
know much longer though, he’s being
replaced by Carre Brown who -- we live
in hope -- will at least want to know if
there’s a system for authorizing overtime
and extra help.)
Ms. Wyatt replied, “There are controls
within MUNIS by series on salaries and
benefits. If they go over it looks at that
series. The authority to expend is monitored by the Auditor/Controller. MUNIS
allows us to send out warnings, but we
Letters
Continued from Page A-6
The Speedway, where guys (note that
I did not say ‘idiot’ guys) race their cars
around a little track as fast as they can
burning up gasoline as they hurry by.
What a fantastic thing -- need I say
more?
Then later, I would suppose it is the
same people, drag boats behind them in
an attempt to destroy the boats as well
as the so-called cars. What a fantastic
exhibition of -- well -- what anyway?
But this is Ukiah, after all, and I do love
Ukiah so well...
The other area in which I wanted to
speak out in praise of our dear little city,
Ukiah, is the one area where Ukiah is in
competition with only a very few small
thinking cities in America. Mr. Kramer
has apparently missed this deal entirely,
but I will note it here. What I mean is
that this event puts Ukiah on the map,
the map where people can go to do their
BY MARK SCARAMELLA
have not implemented that. It’s not monitored that closely. It’s monitored quarterly more in depth. But on a routine weekly basis, there’s no monitoring of budgets
except by 1000 series (total employee
expense).”
That wasn’t even close to an answer,
so Delbar tried again: “So this big
accounting system we spent boucoup
bucks on can’t tell us if we’re exceeding
a line item?”
Wyatt: “Yes. It can. We just didn’t set
it.”
That sounds like a little like Barack
Obama: “Yes we can -- but we won’t.”
“The Board said we wanted to keep
tighter controls on overtime and extra
help, to monitor that closer. If it’s exceeded, there should be authorization or a reason or we should quit paying and department heads should be held accountable.
You’re not monitoring it closely enough
for me.”
Apparently what the Board says doesn’t mean anything to their own staff.
At which point CEO Tom - ‘I’m looking into it’ - Mitchell replied, “We’ll be
talking about this subject again in our
regular department head meeting next
Wednesday.”
Again? What seems to be the problem,
Mr. Mitchell?
Mr. Mitchell went on to reveal that he
had just discovered that high-paid
deputies spend a lot of time-and-a-half
overtime schlepping the County’s
orange-suited, shackled sad cases back
and forth from jail to the courthouse
every work day. Never mind that the
cumbersome, costly logistics of the practice has been a well known financial
drain and security problem since the jail
on the top of the Courthouse was closed
in the middle 1970s. CEO Mitchell said
the extravagant transportation process
was “interesting.”
It was interesting in the 70s. It’s long
since moved from interesting and on to
expensive and dangerous.
Mr. ‘I’m Looking Into It’s recommendation?
“We will follow up with the Public
Defender, the District Attorney, the
Sheriff and the courts to see what we can
do, to do it without unnecessary overbusiness. It is a map with very few stars
on it because most places don’t want
anything to do with this business, and
don’t want a star next to their name for
this. But not Ukiah. The city fathers in
Ukiah recognize that Americans need
guns like never before, and the city
hosts regular Gun Shows in order to see
that anybody who needs, or thinks
he/she needs a gun, can get one in
Ukiah. The Gun Shows are at the
Fairgrounds in Ukiah, supported by your
and my tax money. OH what a wonder!
More guns, that’s just what we need, a
way to settle everything for ever. Get
your guns and enjoy the gun show in
Ukiah, folks.
Oh, wonderful little city! No need for
big box stores when we have a speedway and a gun show. No need for more
retail, more sales taxes, competition...
not just now. Let’s have more sprawl up
and down State Street, along with more
empty storefronts. Let’s support all those
neat little stores, and lawyer’s offices,
on School Street. Let’s continue to have
the Ukiah of our nightmares, and let’s
time. The Sheriff has heard the message
and is trying to monitor those expenses.”
Although Mr. Mitchell has been drawing his executive salary and perks for
well over a year now, he not only didn’t
know about the obvious long-running
prisoner transport overtime problem, he
has no clue what to do about it.
The problem has very little to do with
the Sheriff’s office. It has to do with the
Courthouse and the judges. Under the
late DA Norm Vroman, Vroman’s
impressive Assistant DA Rick Martin
(now a judge in Lake County), proposed
setting up a simple arraignment court in a
corner of the Sheriff’s conference room
at the jail one day a week to handle many
of the initial pleas and routine hearings.
No transport required. Martin, a rare
interlude of intelligence and clarity in the
everyday operations of the Courthouse,
had the Sheriff, the Public Defender,
Probation and his own DA’s office all
ready to go.
But their majesties the judges wouldn’t cooperate. Martin said that the judges
insisted on the expensive appointments
they have always enjoyed at the
Courthouse -- a raised bench, paneling,
railings and gates, defense and prosecution desks, clerk’s desk, etc. -- installed in
the Sheriff’s conference room before they
would deign to convene proceedings at
the Jail. Independent of the County
because they’re state employees, the
judges are, at best, indifferent to local
budget deficits.
Martin, obviously, didn’t have the
money to create a whole new courthouse
at the jail.
Martin and Vroman are gone now, and
with them whatever managerial intelligence there was in the DA’s office and
the Courthouse itself.
Even on the off chance CEO Mitchell
gets beyond research into the realities of
the Sheriff’s overtime budget, he’ll
quickly discover that nobody in a position of authority at the Courthouse, i.e.,
the boys and girls in the black robes,
cares one whit about the County’s precarious fiscal situation. If the judges’ lavish
pay and perks were on the line you could
be sure their indignant whelps would
resound from Covelo to Gualala.
But Mr. Mitchell and his high paid
executive staff can’t even set their fancy
computerized accounting system to tell
them which departments are overrunning
their budgets. Not that the Supervisors
would care if they did.
Mark Scaramella is a Boonville resident.
“I don’t like it, they and
the city put in a good
deal of work landscaping and preparing... It’s
ridiculous that Ukiah has
taken so long to bring in
a skate board park for
the youth.”
Ruth Sander
Retired
Ukiah
“I am 100 percent in
favor of a skate park...
It’s taken way too long...
The railway square
makes more sense with
sound, and so much
work has gone into that
space.”
Mark Parker
Construction
Ukiah
“I think as soon as they
get one built the better,
skating’s a good thing
for kids... Doesn’t matter
(where the skate park is
located).”
Fred Thal
Electronics Engineer
Ukiah
“When I heard it was at
the railway I was upset
because I think we
should preserve the railway. It makes a lot of
sense to have it by the
high school.”
Steve Plocher
CFO for Yokayo bio
fuels
Ukiah
continue to dream of a better day. On
Ukiah, More trucks, more guns -- on
Ukiah! Go! Go!
Tom McFadden
Boonville
“Off hand I would say it’s
a better location.”
When will we learn?
To the Editor:
The passage of Proposition 8 is not
just a blow to gay/lesbian couples, as it
has been continually termed by the
press, but a blow to all citizens who
abhor discrimination in any form. It was
not that long ago, 41 years to be exact,
when inter-racial couples were still prohibited from marrying in 16 states.
Many of the same arguments and fears
expressed then in opposition to interracial marriages, have been repeated by
those who oppose equal rights for samesex couples. Why must we continue to
deny freedom and equal rights to all
members of our nation? When will we
learn that bigotry cannot and must not
be tolerated?
Jan Cole Wilson
Ukiah
The dangers of tobacco
Judicial follies
Izelle Burgess was the owner of a Ford pickup truck. On the morning of November 12,
1987, Burgess drove his truck to a local Ford
dealership for service. (Unfortunately, the
accounts of exactly where this incident took
place are a little vague, except that it happened
in Monroe County in upstate New York, about
halfway between Syracuse and Utica.)
It also happened that Burgess was a tobacco
chewer, and in the spirit of American ingenuity
had attached a homemade spittoon to the emergency brake release handle under the dashboard of his truck. That morning the spittoon
contained about six ounces of spit. (How anyone calculated this is not something I like to
think about.)
Burgess’ car needed repairs to its alignment.
Robert Shaff, the mechanic assigned to work
on Burgess’ car, completed his work on the
alignment, opened the driver’s door to get a
better view as he backed the truck off of a service ramp. Shaff shifted the truck into reverse
and bent to find the emergency brake release.
From what’s already been related, you can
probably guess what happened next. When
Shaff pulled on the handle and released the
brake, the brake pedal popped up and struck
Leeya Thompson
Retired
Ukiah
BY FRANK ZOTTER
the spittoon, spraying its contents-that’s the six
ounces of tobacco spit - into Shaff’ face.
As he court that got to review this explained,
“As a result, Shaff’s eyes burned and he
became disoriented, lost control of the truck
and fell out.” Burgess’ truck continued down
the ramp and struck a vehicle being repaired by
Johnnie W. Peevey, who happened to be an
employee of the dealership, causing serious
injury. The court didn’t explain whether the
“serious injury” was just to the car, but the use
of that phrase suggests that it was more likely
an “injury” to the mechanic working on the
vehicle at the time -- probably Johnnie Peevey
himself.
It may seem a little odd to some folks that
Burgess had designed his spittoon in such a
way that the brake pedal would pop up and
smack the spittoon strong enough to eject its
Ben Baumgardner
Student
Ukiah
“Sounds good, it’s about
time we had one... It
sounds like a really
good location (by the
high school).”
Photos and interviews by Sarah Baldik
contents. But that’s exactly what he had done.
Burgess testified during the inevitable lawsuit that resulted from this (well, it involved
two cars ... there had to be insurance out there
somewhere) that he knew about the spittoon’s
“eject button,” and so he always “paid attention” when he released the emergency brake.
Well, sure -- wouldn’t you?
The trial court dismissed the case against
Burgess. This judge reasoned that Peevey was
not in the “zone of danger” (maybe that should
be the “splash zone”) of someone who had the
unfortunate luck to pull Burgess’ brake release
without knowing there was a surprise waiting
on the other end. He concluded that it was
“unforseeable” that the brake release would
cause injure to someone like Peevey, who wasn’t even in the car.
An appeals court, however, unanimously
reversed. The appeals court judges ruled that a
jury could reasonably conclude that placing a
spittoon above an emergency brake pedal,
knowing that its contents could easily be ejected on the driver when the brake was released,
might cause a driver to lose control of the vehicle.
That would certainly be a potential cause of
injury to a third party -- and in this case, to
Peevey, or at least to his car. (Why, it might
have even been Burgess himself if he were distracted and not “paying attention” the way he
normally did.) Since the case had been dismissed by the judge, the appellate judges sent
it back for a trial.
Of course, there’s no shortage of news these
days about the dangers of tobacco. The tobacco industry is paying out billions in settlements
to state governments to help pay the cost of
public health expenses for smokers; a few
years ago, California has its second proposition
adding a 50¢ per pack tax on cigarettes; and for
the first time tobacco companies have lost a
few lawsuits brought by smokers (or their relatives) who claim that they were misled by
years of cigarette advertising.
But Izelle Burgess broke new ground. He
managed to find a new way for someone to be
injured by tobacco that until 1987 was -- to use
a legal phrase that’s gotten some currency -unprecedented in our legal annals.
Peevey v. Burgess, 192 A.D.2d 1115, 596
N.Y.S.2d 250 (1987)
Frank Zotter is a Ukiah attorney.
A-8 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
SPORTS
Editor: Joe Langstaff, 468-3518
COMMUNITY
DIGEST
Anton Stadium
stakeholders
meeting set for
Wednesday
The City of Ukiah
Community
Service
Department
has
announced a meeting for
the stakeholders of Anton
Stadium. The meeting will
be open to any members of
the community interested
in helping with Anton
Stadium. Items to be discussed will include grandstand construction, dugout
renovation, field improvements, fund raising, and
more.
The meeting will be
held on Wednesday, Nov.
19, at 5:30 p.m. at the
Ukiah Civic Center Annex
at 411 W. Clay St., Ukiah,
in conference room 5. For
more information, call
467-5719.
BAM Wrestling
Sign-ups
Sign-ups will be held
for BAM Wrestling, Nov.
17, 18 and 19. The location is the Ukiah High
School Gymnasium lobby.
Sign up times are 6:30
p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
Ukiah Elks
“Hoop Shoot”
Do you like to shoot
hoops? All children ages 8
to 13 years old are invited
to practice their skills at
basketball free throwing
with the assistance of the
Ukiah Elks Lodge. The
Elks sponsor a competition with contestants
shooting 25 free throws
for scoring with the
chance of advancing to the
District shoot off in
December. The program
will be held at Pomolita
Middle School, 9 a.m. noon, Nov. 22, for boys
and girls from Ukiah, and
Dec. 13, for boys and girls
from Northern California.
There is no fee for participants who must preregister with the City of Ukiah.
Please call Robert Cannon
at 462-7897 for more
information.
Little Bounce
Hoop Clinic
This camp is designed
for the younger players
who are not old enough for
our other basketball
camps. This camp would
be ideal for a child who
has not had experience in
an organized sports setting, but is enthusiastic
about basketball. It is for
boys and girls, ages 3
through 8. It will be held
at Yokayo Elementary
School Gym, Monday,
Nov. 24 - Wednesday,
Nov. 26, 8:30 a.m. - 4
p.m. The cost is $80 full
day or $40 half day. Lowincome discounts are
available. For more information or to register for
any of these camps, please
call (707) 463-6714 or
come to 411 West Clay St.
in Ukiah.
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
UKIAH HIGH SCHOOL | VARSITY FOOTBALL
Wildcats end regular season with 27-8 win
By RUSS TOW
For the Daily Journal
Friday night, the Ukiah
Wildcats improved their
chances for a postseason
playoff berth with a 27-8
win over Elsie Allen. After
the ‘Cats jumped out to a
21-0 lead, the game turned
sloppy. Mistakes, both
offensively and defensively,
limited scoring opportunities. Credit should be give to
Elsie Allen, who, with just
twenty-one suited players,
and much maligned during
the year, hung in there with
the ‘Cats.
Ugly win or not, Ukiah
Principal Dennis Willeford
put it in perspective saying,
“This is why you play, to get
into the playoffs. If you win
your last game, you know
you’re pretty good.”
The ‘Cats kicked off to
the Lobos to start the game.
Successive running first
downs brought the ball out
to the their own 44-yard
line. Subsequent stops by
Wildcats Scott Cokely,
Garrett
Edwards,
and
Colton Thompson pushed
the Lobos back to their own
41, forcing a fourth-and-16,
and a punt.
Ukiah quarterback Kyle
Morris immediately got the
offense moving , completing a first-down toss to Brett
Furman to the 43. RB
Marcos Hernandez ran to
the Allen 46. Following a
completion to Furman, the
drive sputtered. Facing a
third-and-one, Hernandez
slipped. A running play on
fourth down failed, giving
the Lobos a first down on
their own 37.
The ‘Cat defense stiffened. A first down run was
stopped for no gain by Chad
Pittman and Thompson.
That was followed by John
Escamilla tackling the Elsie
Allen running back for a
loss. Facing third-and-long,
the Allen QB attempted a
pass which was tipped by
Escamilla into Pittman’s
hands for an interception at
the Lobo 43-yard line.
On the ‘Cats first play
from the line of scrimmage,
Morris hit Mayfield with a
perfectly-thrown ball for a
43-yard touchdown. The
point-after conversion by
Gabe Ott was good. With
3:45 left in the first quarter,
the ‘Cats led 7-0.
Starting from their own
25-yard line, the Lobos
quickly went three-and-out.
James Maki tackled the ball
carrier for a loss. Hernandez
made a nice deflection on a
well-thrown long pass on
the third-down .
After a Lobo punt, Ukiah
took over on their own 47.
Hernandez ran to the Lobo
35. However, on the next
play, Morris suffered a rare
sack back to the 47. Two
incomplete passes followed,
leaving a long fourth down.
Chris Fraser boomed a punt
Sarah Baldik/The Daily Journal
Wildcat quarterback Kyle Morris rolls out looking to pass or run in Friday night’s final regular season
game against Elsie Allen. Ukiah won the game 27-8 to up its season record to 8-2.
into the end zone.
Three successive running
plays gained little for the
Lobos,
with
Pittman,
Cokely and Thompson
stuffing the run. Heavy
pressure from Maki on the
punt resulted in a net of 7
yards. The ‘Cats began firstand-10 from the Allen 27yard line.
On first down, Morris hit
Mayfield to the 2-yard line.
On the next play Hernandez
bulled his way in for touchdown. With 10:38 left in the
half, the ‘Cats led 13-0. The
extra-point attempt glanced
off the goal post.
Escamilla made a pivotal
third-down stop on Elsie
Allen’s next drive. After the
punt, the ‘Cats took over on
their own 35. A well-timed
screen to Hernandez, with
excellent downfield blocking by Furman, took the ball
to the Allen 39. Ott ran to
the 30. After two incomplete
passes, Hernandez ran to the
25. On fourth down Morris
rolled left to complete a
first-down pass to Furman.
After a completion to Ott,
Hernandez added to the lead
with a 5-yard touchdown
run. Morris ran for the 2point conversion to increase
the lead to 21-0.
The teams traded possessions the rest of the second
quarter. Zach Jackson had a
big interception for the
Wildcats to stop one Lobo
drive. The Wildcats ran out
the clock on a log completion to speedy Furman, who
was pushed out of bounds
on the Allen 18, ending the
half, with Ukiah still leading
21-0.
Defensively, for the first
half, Escamilla had five
tackles, one assist and a batted ball. Cokely had five
A Wildcat ball carrier looks to gain yardage
against the Elsie Allen Lobos Friday night.
tackles and one assist.
Pittman had three tackles ,
two assists and an interception. Thompson added two
tackles, three assists and a
sack.
Offensively, Hernandez
rushed eight times for 40
yards. Morris completed 9
of 14 passes for 175 yards.
Mayfield caught two passes
for 69 yards, and Furman,
four passes for 59 yards.
The two teams battled
through a scoreless third
quarter. Both defenses came
up with big plays to thwart
the offenses. The ‘Cats were
hindered by a fumble and
two sacks.
As the temperature started dropping, Pittman and
Geoff Belford stopped the
Lobos on a fourth down.
Ukiah took over with 11:45
left in the game. A Morristo-Fraser pass moved the
ball to the 34. On fourth
down, Morris hit Chris Tow
for a first down to the 22yard line. Morris was hit for
a loss, but then came back
with
completions
to
Mayfield, Tow and Furman,
the last for a 5-yard touchdown. The extra point was
no good, making the score
27-0 , Ukiah.
The ensuing kickoff was
returned by the Lobos from
their 20. The returner,
bursting through a pack of
defenders, ran the ball back
80-yards for a touchdown.
the 2-point conversion was
good, making the score 278, Ukiah.
With 6:08 left in the
game, the ‘Cats took over
on their on 17. Primarily
running the ball to use up
the clock, Morris ran for 35
yards and Tow added 15.
With little time left on the
clock, a fourth-down pass
by Morris for an attempted
touchdown was intercepted.
Shortly thereafter, time
expired with the final score
reading, Ukiah 27, Elsie
Allen 8.
For the game, offensively, Hernandez carried 10
times for 87 yards. Logan
Morris had 36 yards on
three carries. Kyle Morris
completed 16 of 28 passes
for 235 yards. Mayfield
caught five balls for 98
yards. Furman had five
catches for 64 yards.
Defensively, Pittman had
five tackles, five assists, and
an interception. Cokely had
a sack, six tackles and two
assists. Escamilla had six
tackles and a deflection.
Head Coach Chris Burris
reflected on the week leading up to the game saying, “
We didn’t practice well. Our
focus was poor and it
showed. But, hey, we’re 8-2.
We’ll see what happens
Sunday at the pairings.”
No. 23 Oregon State tops California 34 -21
Thanksgiving
Hoop Clinic
By ANNE M. PETERSON
AP Sports Writer
Each camper will
receive intense individual
instruction in every phase
of the game of basketball
from experienced local
basketball coaches. Team
responsibility and self-discipline will be emphasized. This camp is for
boys and girls, ages 7
through 15. It will be held
at Pomolita Middle School
Gym, Monday, Nov. 24 Wednesday, Nov. 26., 8:30
a.m. - 1:30 p.m. The cost
is $100. Low-income discounts are available. For
more information or to
register for any of these
camps, please call (707)
463-6714 or come to 411
West Clay St. in Ukiah.
CORVALLIS, Ore. (AP) — While the Oregon
State Beavers wouldn’t dare mention it, their fans
weren’t at all afraid.
“We Smell Roses!” read a trio of signs lofted by
fans at Reser Stadium following No. 23 Oregon’s
34-21 victory over California.
With the win, the Beavers edged closer to their
first appearance in the Rose Bowl since New Year’s
Day, 1965.
Because Oregon State defeated then-No. 1 USC
27-21 on Sept 21, the Beavers hold the tiebreaker for
a Rose Bowl berth should both teams win out.
Oregon State visits Arizona next weekend before
hosting Oregon in the Civil War rivalry game.
“It’s just one step closer to our goals,” Jacquizz
Rodgers said of the Beavers’ fifth straight win.
Lyle Moevao completed 14 of 28 passes for 145
yards for Oregon State (7-3, 6-1 Pacific-10
Conference. Jacquizz Rodgers, the Pac-10’s leading
rusher, ran for 144 yards and a score while older
brother James Rodgers caught six passes for 50
yards and ran 18 yards for a touchdown.
Moevao referred to the Rose Bowl as “It.”
“The thing about having it in the back of our
minds is that we get hungry for it. We want it so
bad,” he said. “But we know what we are going to
have to do and how we’re going to get there.”
Kevin Riley, who grew up to the north in
Portland, started for Cal (6-4, 4-3) and completed 11
of 25 passes for 117 yards and a score. Jahvid Best
ran for 116 yards and a touchdown.
“The strength of this team is defense and we
played pretty well,” Golden Bears coach Jeff
Tedford said. “But this is a team game and we have
to play well in all three phases. So we need to
regroup.”
Cal jumped in front on its first series, scoring on
Riley’s 5-yard pass to Verran Tucker. Oregon State
quickly answered, when James Rodgers returned the
kickoff 86 yards for a touchdown. It was the first
kickoff return for a score this season in the Pac-10.
The Beavers made it 14-7 when Sammie
Stroughter returned a punt 56 yards to the California
2-yard line and Jacquizz Rodgers ran it in for the
touchdown.
Justin Kahut added a 28-yard field goal for the
Beavers in the second quarter. But the Golden Bears
narrowed it when Riley lateraled to Jeremy Ross,
who threw a 30-yard scoring pass to Nyan Boateng
to make it 17-14 going into the half.
Kahut kicked a 24-yard field goal early in the second half before James Rodgers ran 18 yards for a
score to make it 27-14.
Best’s 65-yard touchdown run narrowed it for Cal
before the end of the third quarter.
The Beavers missed a chance at the start of the
fourth when Kahut’s 29-yard field goal attempt went
wide right. But Keenan Lewis sealed it for Oregon
State when he intercepted Riley and ran 25 yards for
a touchdown with 31 seconds to play.
Oregon State coach Mike Riley doesn’t think
he’ll need to find ways to keep players loose down
the stretch given what’s on the line.
“I don’t think we’ll have to. I think these guys are
having fun playing these games,” he said. “I don’t
want them to get uptight about it. I just want this
team to go out and have fun on Saturdays.”
Mike Riley even admitted, sheepishly, that he
does think about the possibility of going to the Rose
Bowl.
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
SPORTS
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – A-9
Sign-Ups will be held
November 17th, 18th, and 19th
6:30 – 7:30 p.m.
Ukiah High School Gymnasium Lobby
First day of practice will be
December 2nd at 6:00 p.m.
Medical Marijuana Evaluations
Be Safe - Get Legal
$100 End of Summer Special For
New & Renewing Patients
Dr. Donald Solomon
463-3420
compassionatehealthoptions.com
Wildcat JVs defeat
Lobos, end season 9-1
By RUSS TOW
For the Daily Journal
The Ukiah JV football team
concluded a remarkable season with a dominating win
over Elsie Allen. From the
opening kickoff, it was clear
the ‘Cats players and coaches
were not suffering any residual effects from last week’s 30 loss to Cardinal Newman.
Early in the first quarter, a
hard hit on an Elsie Allen ball
carrier created a fumble,
recovered by Wildcat Carson
Schram. A 15-yard pass from
QB Vinnie Hyler to Aaron
Dhuyvetter was followed by a
9-yard run by RB Ben Brooks.
Moments later, Hyler ran the
ball in from 6 yards out for the
touchdown. The extra point
failed, leaving the score ‘Cats
6, Lobos 0.
The ‘Cats second drive of
the evening started at their
own 20. Two plays highlighted the drive and the ‘Cats’
intensity. From the ‘Cats 23yard line, Hyler hit Oscar
Delgado on a swing pass.
Evading tacklers, following
his down-field blockers,
Delgado reached the Allen 38yard line. Ben Brooks followed with a 25-yard run, running over attempted tacklers
to the 13. Delgado ran to the
1-yard line, where, with 2:03
left in the first quarter, Brooks
ran the final yard to make the
score 13-0. A well-designed
run-and-reverse pass from
Cody Goss to Dhuyvetter was
good for the 2-point conversion, making the score 14-0.
On their third possession,
despite a fumble and a holding penalty, the ‘Cats marched
crisply down the field. Hard
running by Brooks, a Hyler to
Aric Cordell pass completion,
and an 11-yard touchdown
pass from Hyler to Marques
Maciel, highlighted by a
crushing block from Goss,
increased the lead to 20-0.
Anthony Butler added the
extra point. With 6:22 left in
the second quarter, the score
increased to 21-0.
Elsie Allen cam back with
their best sustained drive of
the first half. The ‘Cats physical defense stiffened inside
their own 20. A Maciel interception in the end zone was
waved off because of a roughing-the-passer penalty. A subsequent fourth-down stop by
Hyler and support thwarted
the Lobos, ending the half
with Ukiah still leading 21-0.
Brooks was the leading
ground gainer in the first half
with 61 yards on five carries.
Hyler added 23 yards on 3
Carries. Hyler also completed
for of six passes for 67 yards.
Defensively, Hyler had five
tackles with two assists.
Cordell added two tackles and
three assists. Will Laster contributed thee tackles and two
assists.
The ‘Cats opening drive of
the third quarter gave clear
indication that Elsie Allen
would not be making a spirited
comeback.
Delgado
brought the kickoff back to
the 37. A Hyler-to-Brooks
pass had him rumbling down
the sideline to the Allen 30.
After an incomplete, Hyler,
facing a third-and-10, managed to pickup a fumbled
snap, roll right, and hit Goss,
diving to make the catch at the
13-yard line. Brooks took the
ball into the end zone on the
next play, with Goss again
providing a lead block. Butler
kicked the extra point. With
7:41 left in the quarter, the
‘Cats lead was 28-0.
Anthony Butler stopped the
Lobo’s next drive by returning
and interception to the 50yard line. With 4:02 left in the
third quarter, a subsequent
Allen drive was stymied by
Brooks timing the snap count
to perfection, hurling himself
like a projectile to tackle the
Allen QB for a loss. Maciel
returned the Lobo punt 28yards to the 50, where the ‘Cat
drive stopped on downs
beginning the fourth quarter.
With scant time left, the
Lobos went on their final
drive of the game. Mixing the
pass and run, with seconds
left, they scored a moral-lifting touchdown. The extra
point was no good, ending the
scoring at 28-6, ‘Cats.
Ben Brooks led all rushers
with 90 yards on eight carries.
Maciel added 49 yards on two
carries. Hyler completed six
of ten passes for 150 yards.
Defensively, Hyler had
seven tackles and two assists.
Brandon Delapo added five
tackles and one assist. Maciel
had five tackles, one assist, a
deflection and an interception.
Putting an exclamation
point on the wonderful season, the players even found
time to give the coaches a
Gatorade bath as the final seconds ticked off.
Coach
Mike
Hyler
acknowledged the teams
readiness saying that, “During
our pregame warmups, we
were the sharpest I’ve seen us
all season. We came out determined to end the season on a
positive note.”
A scant 3 points was all that
separated the ‘Cats from a
perfect
season.
Congratulations to the players, coaches, support personnel, and the parents.
Community Sports Digest
Attention all softball players
The City of Ukiah would like to announce the beginning of
registration for a softball class for girls in grades 8 to 12. The
class will be held from Dec. 2 to Dec. 18, every Tuesday and
REDISCOVER HISTORIC
DOWNTOWN UKIAH
Over 25 shops now open on Sundays
Walk · Shop · Dine · Enjoy
www.downtownukiah.com
More than just a pretty place!
Find us online at www.ukiahdailyjournal.com
Thursday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m. The Theory of Softball class
will be held in the PE classroom at Ukiah High School. This
course will cover situations, rules, hitting philosophies and
many other aspects of fast pitch strategy.
There is NO charge for this clinic. However, preregistration
is required and can be done at the City of Ukiah, 411 W. Clay
St.
Please call the City of Ukiah Community Services at 4636714 Department for more information.
Attention all baseball players
The City of Ukiah would like to announce the beginning of
registration for a high school baseball clinic. Come join the fun
and learn about every aspect of the game: hitting, sliding; fielding, and much more.
This clinic will be held every Tuesday, Wednesday, and
Thursday from 3 p.m. to 5 p.m., beginning Dec. 2 and running
through the end of January.
The clinic is open to boys ages 14 to 17. It will be held at the
Ukiah High School baseball field. There is NO charge for this
clinic. However, preregistration is required. It can be done at
the City of Ukiah, 411 W. Clay St.
Please call the City of Ukiah Community Services
Department at 463-6714 for more information .
LOCAL
A-10 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
NOVEMBER 2008
6 TURKEY DINNERS
FOR FOUR
will be given away on a drawing
on the 25th of November
Drawing Tickets available now
at the Cashier’s Cage
Christmas Cash
Three drawings each Wednesday (7 to 9 p.m.)
in November and December. Each drawing worth $200
Home of the $10 Match Play
Every Day!!
10:00 a.m. - Midnight • Sun - Thurs
10:00 a.m. - 2:00 a.m. • Fri - Sat
Fox Den Café
Open from 10am to 10pm Daily
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Continued from Page A-1
“The last couple of
councils have been
pretty supportive.
Walls have been
coming down over
time. But the other
night was, I think, the
first time we brought
something to them
and they didn’t need
to talk about it in
closed session. It
was unanimous.”
- Freedom Skate Shop
owner, Justin Capri.
Committee went to the Ukiah
City Council and told them
they were shifting their focus
back to a site they had previously considered - Low Gap
Park. Committee members
hesitated to even call Low
Gap their second choice. It
was more like “a tie for first,”
they say. For one thing Low
Gap is already a park. It has a
natural, wooded setting, with
parking, picnic tables, tennis
courts, and a disc golf course
already in place. The proposed skating facility would
lie mostly between the tennis
courts and the Ukiah Players
Theater, on city-owned land,
which is currently leased
from the county. There had
been some preliminary studies already done about situating a skate park there. But,
partly out of concerns from
the high school, across the
street, and the Ukiah Players
Theater, and the availability
Wine
Continued from Page A-1
Elke and her husband, Tom,
bought this 20 acres, they
already owned a vineyard in
Napa Valley.
“We purchased the Napa
Valley parcel and planted
grapes, including pinot noir,
long before it was the chichi
place it is today,” she says.
The vineyard was supposed to
pay off by the time their two
boys went to college and be
the source of college tuition.
“Instead,” she says, “phylloxera hit the Napa vineyards and
we ended up taking out loans
to replant AND to pay for college.”
Elke is not daunted by setbacks. “The value of our
investment comes not from
growing grapes but from
appreciation of the land,” she
explains, with the caveat that
she couldn’t start from scratch
today.
Before becoming a fulltime winemaker and grape
grower, Elke taught elementary school and worked as a
paralegal over the years. Her
husband was a lawyer who
went to Stanford Law School.
468-0640
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WE’RE ALSO YOUR SOURCE FOR
303 ‘A’ Talmage Rd., Ukiah
of the Depot Park property in
2005, the Committee had
shifted their focus to Perkins
Street. But now that has
changed.
After hearing the particulars of the project’s current
plight, the City Council gave
immediate approval to investigate the new site, with
monthly updates to be given
by city staff.
“The last couple of councils have been pretty supportive,” says Committee member and Freedom Skate Shop
owner, Justin Capri. “Walls
have been coming down over
time. But the other night was,
I think, the first time we
brought something to them
and they didn’t need to talk
about it in closed session. It
was unanimous.”
In a perfect world, the
Committee would like to
break ground at the new site
next spring. But first, more
studies on the impact including noise - of building
a skate park at the Low Gap
site are required. Ongoing
individual meetings to allay
the concerns of both the high
school and the Ukiah Players
Theater have already begun.
Phelan says that the high
school is concerned that if
skaters have their boards so
close by, the school grounds
will become a de facto “skate
park north.” The theater is
concerned about the noise
from the park, as well as possible vandalism.
“There really is no other
spot,” says Capri. “We looked
at a topographical map with
city-owned land highlighted
in blue, and it’s either in a
flight pattern or in a major
neighborhood where we’ve
already been, and the neighborhood was against it. This
One of their two sons, Matt, is
joining his mom working the
vineyard. He went to UC
Davis to study viticulture and
enology, and now is an assistant winemaker at Breggo
Cellars, where one of her
pinots is made just down the
road. Their other son, Tom, is
a deputy district attorney in
Napa.
During the 1980s Mary
only grew organic apples in
Anderson Valley. She was
making Mary Elke’s apple
juice, which was sold at places
like the famed vegetarian
restaurant Greens in San
Francisco. In the late 1990s
Anderson Valley got discovered. By then, Elke had converted 10 acres of apple
orchard to grapes and purchased the 80-acre Donnelly
Creek
Ranch
outside
Boonville and planted 50
acres to pinot noir, chardonnay and pinot gris. She found
local customers such as
Edmeades, Handley, Breggo,
Goldeneye and Londer for her
Anderson Valley grapes.
Elke has a distinct philosophy about growing grapes and
was excited when she had the
chance to grow from scratch.
“I believe in growing pinot
noir in a place where it wants
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Meanwhile skaters skate
Meanwhile, the skaters,
with essentially no place
within city limits to where it’s
legal to pursue their sport,
play a daily cat-and-mouse
game with the police. Every
afternoon, a group of young
skaters gather at the Peartree
Plaza on Perkins Street, in the
parking lot between Lucky’s
and Wendy’s to hone their
skills. While the asphalt area
there doesn’t look like much
to the uninformed, the kids
say that subtleties in the terrain make it the most versatile spot around for them to
practice their “K flips, manual pads, nose slides and 5050’s.” But, of course, they
have to give way to the occasional car, as well as contend
with the intermittent complaints from store managers,
and, of course, the police.
Many have received citations,
had their boards confiscated
at one time or another, or
both. Jarod Bridges, 17, a
junior at Ukiah High, is one
who regularly skates the
Lucky’s lot.
“We come to spots and we
only have a certain amount of
minutes until the cops show
up and then we have to either
sit down and hope he doesn’t
bust us, or just get out of here
and go to Wendy’s and eat
some food, or something.
Really, the whole dynamic of
skateboarding has changed. It
would be so nice to have
some place where it’s legal to
skate. Unless I was just skat-
ing by, I’d probably never
skate this place again if we
had a skate park.”
Other skaters at the
Lucky’s lot echoed the sentiment. All had heard about the
problems with the proposed
Perkins Street site, were
aware of the concerns of
businesses including property
damage and liability, and said
they would happily go to
Low Gap Park, or wherever
they had to, if it meant they
could skate freely.
The police, meanwhile,
have to enforce a city ordinance against skating in the
downtown area, the area
defined as bounded by Main
Street, School Street, Smith
Street, and Clay Street. They
do respond to complaints
from merchants, and a skateboarding infraction is punishable by fine. But says UPD
Capt. Justin Wyatt, they try to
target “repeat offenders” with
the harsher penalties.
“Basically, we support the
concept of a skate park,”
offers Capt. Wyatt.
The lack of such a facility
locally has been a matter of
frustration for a broad swath
of people across the community for many years. Perhaps
now, with options running
out, and the clock ticking on
possible state help, like many
other communities across the
region, Ukiah will finally
manage to “land” this trick.
Blair DeAguero, 18, also sponsored by Freedom
Skate shop, grabs his board during a jump Saturday.
to be,” she explains. If you
orient the vines the right way,
practice good viticulture, and
have appropriate trellising,
you will produce “wine of a
place.”
“I wanted to prove that we
can grow good pinot noir at
higher yields than two tons
per acre,” she says. Her goal is
to produce four tons per acre
and still have good fruit. She
developed a pruning system
that allows the fruit to grow
across the canopy in a way
that equally ripens more clusters. “I’m bucking the common learning,” she says, noting that the smaller yield philosophy “is not yet scientifically proven.”
Anyone can make good
wine out of lower yields, says
Elke. She wants to show you
can make good wine out of
higher yields. “The grapevine
wants to grow and produce as
much fruit as it can ripen,” she
says. “It wants to make more
grapes than two tons per acre
and if the conditions are right
and the vine is in balance it
easily can.” Given the prestige
of her customers it sounds like
she’s on to something.
In the early 1990s Elke
decided she would start making her own wine. She always
liked pinot noir and Anderson
Valley pinots were getting
good reviews but “‘Sideways’
hadn’t come out yet,” she
laughs and adds that it was
hard in those days.
By 1997 Elke launched the
winery brand and made her
first commercial production of
700 cases of pinot noir. Now
the winery is up to 1,800 cases
and includes some chardonnay and a limited quantity of
rosé, which is only available
on the website.
She describes her pinot noir
as “more feminine, layered
and nuanced” compared with
pinots from the Russian River
or the Central Coast. “Less
fruit driven with better acidity,
I think it’s what pinot noir
should taste like,” she says.
The nicest compliment she
receives for her wine is that “it
is well-balanced,” she adds.
Our conversation halts
when her cell phone rings. It’s
her vineyard foreman Jesus
Perez. He is turning 50 today
and reminds her to be at his
house for the party at 5 p.m.
She has known him since he
was 22 and is godmother to
one of his daughters. “He
planted every grapevine on
the 60 acres,” she tells me
when she gets off the phone.
The two make a special blend
of the pinot noir they grow on
this vineyard. They call it
Boonville Barter and it is only
available on the website or
through the wine club.
Turning to the future, Elke,
who is president of the
Anderson
Valley
Winegrowers Association,
talks about the wine industry
in Mendocino County. She’s
been here since Anderson
Valley changed from sheep
ranches and apple orchards to
being known for its pinot noir
and Alsatian style wines such
as riesling and gewurztraminer. Two festivals in Anderson
Valley celebrate those varietals. The Alsatian festival is
February 21 and 22 and the
Pinot Noir Festival is in May.
Elke knows that farming is
based on supply and demand.
“If farmers can’t make enough
to live on from growing
grapes [or another crop] they
will sell the property,” she
says. “As Disneyland-like as
Napa Valley has become, that
beautiful valley is not tract
houses and suburbs today
because of grapes and wine.
Ukiah doesn’t want to be a
bedroom community either,
but its agriculture has to be
profitable.”
She points out that
Anderson Valley was discovered by wine lovers before the
whole of Mendocino County
because it’s the conduit to
Mendocino and the coast.
Elke puts both appellations,
Mendocino and Anderson
Valley, on her simple straightforward label she says, “out of
solidarity.”
TASTING NOTES: A
memorable
combination
paired Elke 2006 (unfined and
unfiltered) Donnelly Creek
Pinot Noir with pork loin
braised in milk. I loved the
bright flavor and the balanced
acidity of Elke’s pinot noir
which complemented the tender milky pork morsels.
For more information about
Elke Vineyards, contact the
Mendocino Winegrape and
Wine Commission www.mendowine.com, gomendo.com,
or www.elkevineyards.com
Heidi Cusick Dickerson
writes Wine Notes for the
Ukiah Daily Journal on behalf
of the Mendocino County
Winegrape
and
Wine
Commission.
Next week:
Esterlina
Vineyards
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 -A-11
Huge
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2002 Ford
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2003 Dodge
Caravan
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WAS $11,995
05 Nissan
Altima S
WAS $13,995
WAS $15,995
2004 Buick
Rendezvous AWD
07 Chevy
Cobalt
#5595P
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WAS $14,995
WAS $17,995
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2007 Chevy
Aveo
#5527P
00 Toyota
Avalon
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2007 Chevy
Malibu Maxx
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2006 Toyota
Camry
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06 Hyundai
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2008 Pontiac
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07 Toyota
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07 Jeep
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2006 Chevrolet
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2004 Toyota
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2004 Toyota
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05 Chevy
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07 Mazda 3
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2007 Dodge
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06 Honda
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2007 Toyota
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2005 Toyota
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06 Nissan
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2006 Toyota
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2005 Toyota
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2006 Hummer
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07 Mercedes
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05 Ford F250
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* $25 per month given back to customer. Customer must send in $100 in fuel purchase receipts every
month. Redemtion of $500 will take 20 months. Limit one per household. Price plus government fees
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2800 North State St. • Ukiah www.thurstonautoplaza.com
1-866-2-THURSTON
(707) 462-8817
WEATHER
A-12 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
.
3-DAY FORECAST
SUN AND MOON
REGIONAL WEATHER
CALIFORNIA CITIES
Shown is today s weather. Temperatures are today s highs
and tonight s lows.
TODAY
78
Sunrise today ............. 6:57 a.m.
Sunset tonight ............ 4:57 p.m.
Moonrise today .......... 8:30 p.m.
Moonset today ......... 10:59 a.m.
Sunshine and patchy clouds
MOON PHASES
TONIGHT
Last
New
First
Full
Rockport
62/47
Laytonville
72/37
Covelo
74/38
Westport
65/47
42
Nov. 19 Nov. 27 Dec. 5 Dec. 12
Mainly clear
ALMANAC
Ukiah through 2 p.m. Saturday
Temperature
High .............................................. 79
Low .............................................. 42
Normal high .................................. 61
Normal low .................................... 40
Record high .................... 81 in 1949
Record low ...................... 23 in 1916
Precipitation
24 hrs to 2 p.m. Sat. .................. 0.01"
Month to date ............................ 2.79"
Normal month to date ................ 2.46"
Season to date .......................... 4.43"
Last season to date .................. 2.89"
Normal season to date .............. 5.39"
MONDAY
73
37
Mostly sunny and remaining
warm
TUESDAY
72
40
Fort Bragg
61/47
Willows
78/42
Willits
71/42
Elk
66/44
UKIAH
78/42
Philo
67/44
Redwood Valley
71/41
Lakeport
78/42
Lucerne
78/42
Boonville
74/42
Gualala
62/42
Clearlake
76/42
Cloverdale
80/46
Forecasts and graphics provided by
AccuWeather, Inc. 2008
Sunshine and patchy clouds
City
Today
Hi/Lo/W
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
City
Today
Hi/Lo/W
Mon.
Hi/Lo/W
Anaheim
Antioch
Arroyo Grande
Atascadero
Auburn
Barstow
Big Sur
Bishop
Blythe
Burbank
California City
Carpinteria
Catalina
Chico
Crescent City
Death Valley
Downey
Encinitas
Escondido
Eureka
Fort Bragg
Fresno
Gilroy
Indio
Irvine
Hollywood
Lake Arrowhead
Lodi
Lompoc
Long Beach
Los Angeles
Mammoth
Marysville
Modesto
Monrovia
Monterey
Morro Bay
92/54/s
75/47/s
81/43/s
88/45/s
76/52/s
76/49/s
70/52/s
74/28/s
82/51/s
92/54/s
75/50/s
84/50/s
74/58/s
76/42/s
61/46/pc
90/53/s
91/56/s
81/54/s
91/51/s
64/44/s
61/47/s
74/50/s
80/46/s
88/53/s
90/55/s
91/57/s
76/33/s
76/43/s
77/48/s
90/56/s
90/56/s
66/37/s
77/39/s
73/48/s
91/54/s
73/51/s
73/52/s
88/53/s
72/46/s
81/38/s
80/42/s
76/49/s
77/46/s
78/49/s
75/30/s
86/51/s
88/54/s
81/46/s
71/47/s
73/64/s
74/43/s
59/44/pc
93/48/s
86/54/s
73/52/s
87/49/s
63/42/pc
61/46/pc
74/50/s
75/49/s
88/48/s
84/53/s
85/56/s
79/32/s
73/43/s
72/47/s
84/52/s
84/56/s
65/21/s
74/39/s
70/44/s
90/52/s
77/47/s
72/50/s
Napa
Needles
Oakland
Ontario
Orange
Oxnard
Palm Springs
Pasadena
Pomona
Potter Valley
Redding
Riverside
Sacramento
Salinas
San Bernardino
San Diego
San Fernando
San Francisco
San Jose
San Luis Obispo
San Rafael
Santa Ana
Santa Barbara
Santa Cruz
Santa Monica
Santa Rosa
S. Lake Tahoe
Stockton
Tahoe Valley
Torrance
Vacaville
Vallejo
Van Nuys
Visalia
Willits
Yosemite Valley
Yreka
75/45/s
82/54/s
75/49/s
93/52/s
93/48/s
86/53/s
85/57/s
95/57/s
92/46/s
73/43/s
77/41/s
94/49/s
74/42/s
80/50/s
92/50/s
88/57/s
92/53/s
73/51/s
77/51/s
86/48/s
71/48/s
87/55/s
84/47/s
73/48/s
86/58/s
80/43/s
63/23/s
73/44/s
63/23/s
86/56/s
77/47/s
73/46/s
92/53/s
76/45/s
71/42/s
72/29/s
59/27/s
71/43/s
86/52/s
72/45/s
91/51/s
85/47/s
76/50/s
85/57/s
87/55/s
90/43/s
75/37/s
74/40/s
90/48/s
69/42/s
81/48/s
91/49/s
77/55/s
87/53/s
73/50/s
75/50/s
82/44/s
72/42/s
79/53/s
71/45/s
73/47/s
78/56/s
75/41/s
66/24/s
70/44/s
66/24/s
77/54/s
71/42/s
69/43/s
88/54/s
69/45/s
73/37/pc
75/31/s
58/26/pc
Weather (W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, rrain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Lake Mendocino – Lake level: 717.18 feet; Storage: 37,606 acre-feet (Maximum storage 122,500 acre-feet) Air quality – Not available.
NOYO THEATRE
• Willits •
459-NOYO (6696)
Visit us at our website www.cinemawest.com
INDEPENDENT FILM SERIES
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Times For 11/16
© 2008
Hungry LA fires reduce
hundreds of homes to ash
By SHAYA TAYEFE
MOHAJER
Associated Press
LOS
ANGELES
—
Southern
Californians
endured a third day of destruction Saturday as wind-blasted
wildfires torched hundreds of
mobile homes and mansions,
forced tens of thousands of
people to flee and shut down
major freeways.
No deaths were reported,
but the Los Angeles police
chief said he feared authorities
might find bodies among the
500 burned dwellings in a
devastated mobile home park
that housed many senior citizens.
“We have almost total devastation here in the mobile
park,” Fire Capt. Steve Ruda
said. “I can’t even read the
street names because the street
signs are melting.”
The series of fires has
injured at least 20 people and
destroyed hundreds of homes
from coastal Santa Barbara to
inland Riverside County, on
the other side of the Los
Angeles area. Smoke blanketed the nation’s second-largest
city Saturday, reducing the
afternoon sun to a pale orange
disk.
As night fell, a fire fed by a
sleet of blowing embers hopscotched through the winding
lanes of modern subdivisions
in Orange and Riverside counties, destroying more than 50
homes, some of them apparently mansions.
A blaze in the Sylmar community in the hillsides above
Los Angeles’ San Fernando
Valley destroyed the mobile
homes, nine single-family
homes and several other
buildings before growing to
more than 8,000 acres —
more than 12 square miles. It
was only 20 percent contained
Saturday.
It sent residents fleeing in
the dark Saturday morning as
notorious Santa Ana winds
topping 75 mph torched cars,
bone-dry brush and much of
Oakridge Mobile Home Park.
The blaze, whose cause was
under investigation, threatened at least 1,000 structures,
city Fire Department spokeswoman Melissa Kelley said.
Gov.
Arnold
Schwarzenegger declared a
state of emergency in Los
Angeles. Fire officials estimated 10,000 people were
under orders to evacuate,
including residents of the
mobile home park.
At an evacuation center,
Lucretia Romero, 65, wore a
string of pearls and clutched
the purse and jacket she
snatched as firefighters shouted at them to flee hours earlier.
Her daughter, Lisa, 42,
wore a bloodstained shirt and
pants. A helicopter dropping
water on their home caused
the entryway ceiling to collapse. Debris scratched her
forehead and gave her a black
eye.
Lucretia Romero said she
saw smoke above the hills
beyond the front door and
then, within an hour, saw that
a canyon across from her
home was red with flame.
“They would drop water,
the water would squash the
flames and then two minutes
later the flames would come
back,” she said. Firefighters
soon banged on the door and
gave them 10 minutes to evacuate.
Flames swept across the
park and scorched cypress
trees, Ruda said. Firefighters
had to flee, grabbing some
residents and leaving hoses
melted into the concrete.
Ruda produced a burned
U.S. flag on a broken stick as
a sign of hope and bravery for
firefighters. “The home that
this flag was flying from is
gone,” he said.
Police Chief William
Bratton said cars were found
in the debris at the park, raising concerns that bodies might
be found. Crews were waiting
for the ground to cool before
bringing in search dogs, he
said.
The Santa Anas — dry
winds that typically blow
through Southern California
between
October
and
February — tossed embers
ahead of flames, jumping two
interstate highways and sparking new flare-ups. Walls of
flame raced up ridge lines
covered in sun-baked brush
and surrounded high-power
transmission line towers.
Mayor
Antonio
Villaraigosa said the fire
caused problems that shut
down power lines in places,
and he asked residents to conserve power to help avoid possible blackouts.
Shortly after midnight, the
Sylmar fire burned to the edge
of the Olive View-UCLA
Medical Center campus,
knocking out power and forcing officials to evacuate two
dozen critical patients.
The shifting winds caused
the fire to move uphill toward
the San Gabriel Mountains,
downhill toward homes and
sometimes
skip
across
canyons. It also jumped across
Interstates 5 and 210, forcing
the California Highway Patrol
to shut down portions of both
freeways and some connecting roads.
More than 60 homes were
damaged or destroyed in a fire
that erupted in the Riverside
County city of Corona and
spread west to the Orange
County communities of Yorba
Linda and Anaheim Hills.
In addition, 50 apartment
units burned in a complex in
Anaheim
Hills.
Devin
Nathanson, 27, had put down
a deposit on an apartment
there and planned to move in
Saturday. Instead, he watched
from the road as it burned to
the ground.
“At least none of my stuff
was inside yet,” he said.
Palm trees lining the
entrance to the complex were
ablaze, and two firefighters
manned hoses at the swimming pool and sprayed water
on the leasing center. The roof
caved in with a loud bang.
About 2,000 acres — more
than 3 square miles — were
charred by that fire, with more
than 12,000 people in 4,500
dwellings ordered to evacuate
in Anaheim alone. Four
Corona firefighters were
slightly injured when flames
swept over their engine.
Winds began to decrease in
the afternoon and were
expected to drop further
overnight, but humidity was
expected to remain low.
The night before, northwest
of Los Angeles, more than 180
homes burned to the ground
Thursday in Santa Barbara
and the wealthy, star-studded
community of Montecito, said
William Boyer, spokesman for
the city of Santa Barbara. The
total could reach 200, he said.
At least half of the area’s
5,400 evacuees had been
allowed to return home by
Saturday night, he said. The
fire was 40 percent contained,
city spokesman Browning
Allen said.
Several multimillion-dollar
homes and a small Christian
college were damaged in
Montecito, a town of 14,000
that has attracted celebrities
such as Rob Lowe, Jeff
Bridges, Michael Douglas and
Oprah Winfrey.
The cause of the fire is
under investigation. At least
13 people were injured.
Contributing to this report
were Associated Press writers
Gillian Flaccus in Orange
County; Denise Petski, Alicia
Chang, Bob Jablon and Daisy
Nguyen in Los Angeles; and
Thomas Watkins and Amy
Taxin in Montecito.
Visit our web site at ukiahdailyjournal.com/email us at [email protected]
COMMUNITY
Editor: Richard Rosier, 468-3520
The Ukiah Daily Journal
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – B-1
[email protected]
Students o f the Month for October 2008
Yokayo Elementary School
Oak Manor Elementary School
Yokayo Elementary School’s Students of the Month of October were, from the left:
Back row: Blake Kelser, Sebastian Rico, Sally Rohan and Andrea Trejo Muniz.
Front Row: Kami Swinney, Jordan Berg, Sara Ramos and Kailee Orsi.
Oak Manor Elementary School’s Students of the Month for October were, from the
left: Back row: Emily Ullrich, Ma Kayla Hunter and Andrew Skroggins. Front row:
Pedro Martinez, Ashley Norvell and Milo Hooper.
Nokomis Elementary School
Frank Zeek Elementary School
Nokomis Elementary School’s Students of the Month for October were, from the
left: Back row: Bryan Smith, Yvett Magallon and Nicholas Ayala. Front Row:
Joaquin Lugo, Raymond Palacios and Summer Kerrigan.
Frank Zeek Elementary School’s Students of the Month for October were, from the
left: Back row: Karina Ruiz, Steven Gonzalez and Taylor Scott. Front row: Nina
Scott, Trenton Burford and Raquel Hidalgo.
B-2 – SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
TIME OUT
Editor: Chris McCartney, 468-3524
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
ASTROGRAPH
By Bernice Bede Osol
Puzzle
answers
on the next
page
Monday, Nov. 17, 2008
Some people may label
you as too set in your ways,
so you’ll need to make
changes in the year ahead. In
order to move forward, new
instincts may be aroused and
turn you into a trailblazer.
SCORPIO (Oct. 24-Nov.
22) -- Help family members
pull together, rather than
taking sides or finding fault
with their aims and aspirations. Even if you believe
something is beyond their
reach, encourage them to try.
SAGITTARIUS (Nov.
23-Dec. 21) -- Your hopes to
fulfill your aims are actually
quite good, but unless you
believe in yourself, your
chances for achieving everything of which you are capable will not be realized.
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22Jan. 19) -- Instead of being
intimidated by the competition’s bravado, draw upon
those reserves that your
adversaries don’t possess.
You have far more talent and
luck going for you.
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20Feb. 19) -- When negotiating an important agreement,
your opponent will try to get
you to believe that he or she
has the upper hand; in reality, though, you’re in the driver’s seat.
PISCES (Feb. 20-March
20) -- Dare to be bold and
different when circumstances warrant it, especially
if it could benefit your
career. It’ll be your loss if
you don’t take advantage of
favorable openings.
ARIES (March 21-April
19) -- You have the ability to
bring together unrelated factions for a common purpose,
but unless you take the time
to communicate your points
in understandable ways, they
won’t comply.
(1873-1958), composer; George Kaufman
(1889-1961),
playwright;
Marg
Helgenberger (1958-), actress, is 50; Lisa
In 1973, President Richard Nixon signed Bonet (1967-), actress, is 41; Oksana Baiul
legislation authorizing the construction of (1977-), figure skater, is 31; Maggie
Gyllenhaal (1977-), actress, is 31.
the trans-Alaska oil pipeline.
TODAY’S SPORTS: In 1957, the
In 2004, President George W. Bush
longest
winning streak in college football
nominated National Security Advisor
ended
at
48 games, when the Notre Dame
Condoleezza Rice to be secretary of state.
Fighting
Irish upset the Oklahoma
TODAY’S BIRTHDAYS: W.C. Handy
Datebook: Sunday, Nov. 16, 2008
Today is the 321st day of 2008 and the
56th day of autumn.
TODAY’S HISTORY: In 1841, the first
underwater tunnel was completed beneath
the Thames River in London, England.
In 1914, the Federal Reserve System of
the United States officially opened.
TAURUS (April 20-May
20) -- Getting distasteful
assignments out of the way
once and for all will provide
a solid sense of achievement, but if you succumb to
excuses, you might put
things off once again.
GEMINI (May 21-June
20) -- This is an excellent
day to take care of an obligation, but don’t assume you
can do so without contacting
the other person involved.
He or she might have other
plans and be unavailable.
CANCER (June 21-July
22) -- Financial currents are
presently running in your
favor, and you should be
able to make some serious
money. However, wait until
you have cash in the bank
before going on a plastic
spree.
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) - Your greatest asset is the
ability to assess situations
properly; yet when it comes
time to execute your conclusions, you might let another
convince you not to do what
you know is best.
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept.
22) -- This could be one of
those days when co-workers
or associates are willing to
help you without asking for
anything in return. However,
don’t take them for granted;
make it a point to repay their
favors.
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct.
23) -- You’re in a fortunate
cycle where you’ll be having
lots of fun with friends. Just
don’t appoint yourself judge,
jury or entertainment director every time a decision has
to be made.
Know where to look for
romance and you’ll find it.
The
Astro-Graph
Matchmaker
instantly
reveals which signs are
romantically perfect for you.
Mail $3 to Astro-Graph, P.O.
Box 167, Wickliffe, OH
44092-0167.
Copyright
2008, Newspaper Enterprise
Assn.
Sooners.
TODAY’S QUOTE: “People may
oppose you, but when they realize you can
hurt them, they’ll join your side.” -Condoleezza Rice
TODAY’S FACT: At an average of 16
months, the $5 bill is the Federal Reserve
note with the shortest life span.
TODAY’S MOON: Between full moon
(Nov. 13) and last quarter (Nov. 19).
Buying into a world with no more cam’pain’ ads!
One of the great things about the
recent election is that we won’t have
to see another political commercial
for two or three months, when, after
a short break, the campaign for 2012
election will begin. Some reports
say the two major campaigns spent
$750 million this year, most of it on
television advertising. That doesn’t
count money spent in local races.
Now, how many ordinary, nonpolitical TV commercials have you
seen in your life? Thousands?
Hundreds of thousands? Yet you
rarely see a car commercial that
makes you angry or an ad for a dishwashing liquid that makes you want
to change the channel. Most of us
will even suffer through adult diaper
commercials without feeling strongly about them. Cat people will watch
dog food commercials and vice
versa without complaining.
So why can’t they can’t make a
campaign commercial that doesn’t
Village
Idiot
By Jim Mullen
have half the country screaming at
the television?
Why don’t we scream at airline
commercials? Their ads are all pretty much the same, you see a plane
flying, it lands in some beautiful
Shangri-La, a place you would love
to visit if you had the money and
when the plane lands a bunch of
happy, smiling passengers get off the
plane looking as if they had just
stepped out of a relaxation booth.
You watch it, but you don’t stand up
and yell at the television, “That’s a
lie! Those people just spent ten
hours on the tarmac and the toilets
overflowed and not one of them is
going to get their luggage! How can
they get away with putting that kind
of stuff on television. There oughta
be a law, I want equal time! I will
never fly that airline again!”
Since the biggest difference
between most airlines is the color of
the flight attendant’s uniform, you
have to wonder why they advertise
at all. I buy the cheapest seat I can
get. Who cares what airline it is?
How many fast-food commercials
have you seen where the restaurant
is spotless, the staff is clean, friendly and smart enough to make
change. In the background all the
customers are attractive and skinnier
than supermodels? And the reality is
...? And yet few of us yell “Lies!
Fraud! Distortion! Untruth! How do
they get away with that?” at the television when we see a fast-food commercial.
I’ve never been in a country
band, but I’m pretty sure if the guitar player started singing “Viva
Viagra” at a rehearsal, the other guys
wouldn’t join in, they would club
him to death with their instruments
knowing full well that no jury would
convict them. Yet we watch the commercial unemotionally, coolly
detached as if we could care less.
But political commercials aren’t
just annoying -- they are offensive ...
to their supporters! Every time the
guy I liked ran an ad I would think,
“Is that the best he can do?
Nobody’s going to fall for that crap.
Why don’t you say this? Why don’t
you say that? Doesn’t anyone in
your campaign watch television?
Have they ever seen a commercial
before?” I figure if your commercial
offends your supporters, you’re
doing it wrong.
Why don’t politicians do what the
airlines do? You show the candi-
Searching for something big?
IT'S IN THE CLASSIFIEDS–468-3500
date’s plane flying through the air, it
lands in a beautiful place -- the
future -- where Arabs and Israelis
walk down the street holding hands;
where everyone has a high-paying
job; where no one pays any taxes;
where there are no potholes and cars
run on used coffee grounds; where
all teens are so well-adjusted and
happy; where stocks never go down,
where all children behave; where
school teachers get paid like basketball players and basketball players
get paid like teachers; where all marriages last forever; where lawyers
don’t file frivolous law suits; where
CEOs give their employees a raise
before they give one to themselves.
Wouldn’t you buy some of that?
Jim Mullen is the author of “It
Takes a Village Idiot: Complicating
the Simple Life” and “Baby’s First
Tattoo.” You can reach him at
[email protected] Copyright
2008, Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
YOUR MONEY
Editor: Chris McCartney, 468-3524
By the Editors of Consumer
Reports
ier, including customer service, satisfying checkouts and
general shopping ease.
10 Ways to Save Money
When Buying Electronics
Whether buying online or
in a brick-and-mortar store,
CR recommends the following 10 money-savings secrets
that can help consumers stick
to their budget this holiday
season:
1. Buying online can be
better. The higher-rated electronics retailers in CR’s annual reader survey are Web sites.
Readers who bought online
rated their overall satisfaction
at 90 out of 100 -- higher than
those who bought in a store.
2. Be wary of pricey addons. Retailers may push highpriced accessories such as premium video cables for a television. As a rule, CR suggests
choosing regular alternatives,
since the fancy versions can
cost twice as much and aren’t
likely to give much performance benefit.
3. Skip the extended warranty. CR’s reliability data
continues to indicate that
repair rates on most electronics are low overall. But even in
the unlikely event that a repair
is required after the manufacturer’s warranty expires; the
bill for the repair itself is often
comparable with the typical
cost of an extended warranty.
4. The best prices come
early in the season. CR has
found that the lowest prices of
the holiday season on flatpanel televisions and more
have been offered on Black
Friday and the other frantic
shopping
days
after
Thanksgiving.
5. Consider refurbished and
open-box items. Buying refurbished or open-box items can
save consumers 30 percent or
more over buying new. To
minimize risks, CR recommends buying from a trustworthy manufacturer or retailer.
6. Asking for a lower price
often works. A recent CR survey found that about a third of
shoppers tried to negotiate the
price of an electronics item
within the past three years and
most succeeded at least once
in their efforts.
7. Recognize what each
retailer offers. No single merchant has it all -- low prices,
broad selection and conve-
nience. CR recommends that
consumers select their top
shopping priorities -- low price
or best selection, for example - and head to the nearest retailer that offers them, rather than
worry about modest differences among similar retailers.
8. High specs might not
ensure high quality. Ads and
in-store sales pitches often
imply a direct relationship
between high resolution and
high image quality. However,
CR’s lab tests reveal that’s not
always the case: Some highdef televisions and highmegapixel cameras fell short
in other respects, such as contrast or color.
9. Performance often runs
in the family. Consumers
won’t go wrong if they buy a
model that scored well in
CR’s full tests, but if the
model being considered isn’t
included in the Ratings, they
can still offer some guidance.
10. Top performance might
not be needed. CR’s rigorous
tests sometimes turn up fairly
subtle performance distinctions -- say between very good
and excellent performance on
an attribute. While these differences are evident in sideby-side comparisons, they can
be less obvious in normal isolated use.
Be wary of cheap long-term insurance
Q: This is in reference to your recent
column on long-term insurance. At one
time I was in agreement with you. Allow
me to explain what happened.
I am 80; my wife is 84. We took out
LTCI when I was 63. We took a policy
that paid $100 per day with an inflation
rider. Because my wife was over 65, her
premium was higher than mine. This
seemed a very straightforward policy and
cost about $1,500 a year total. After nine
years, the premium increased 10 percent.
That seemed reasonable. A year later the
premium doubled. This was beyond our
planned budget and would impact our
discretional spending. And then what will
future increases be?
When we purchased the policy, the statistics were very clearly outlined: The
percentage of elders who required nursing home care and for how long. So the
insurance company knew what was in
store. Nothing had really changed in the
10 years except overall-care costs had
increased substantially. Our benefits had
not.
We realized from the beginning that
we would have to pay the nursing home
beyond the $100/day from insurance and
were prepared to do that. We did not
renew our policy. I wrote to the insurance
commission but was advised they had
approved the increase. So we learned a
$15,000 lesson.
A: From the description of your experience, I can certainly understand why
you are very unhappy. However, I fear
you might have learned the wrong lesson.
Truth about
money
By Ric Edelman
The problem is not simply with the
risk that an insurance company might
radically raise its rates. The real problem
lies in choosing an insurance company
that is not likely to do that. You purchased a policy from a company that
offered a very low price, and it was
unable to sustain that low price. Massive
price increases were inevitable.
Had you selected a policy offered by a
more well-established company, rather
than one that was lowballing its price
merely to capture market share, you
would have paid a lot more initially -perhaps double your initial rate. But you
would not have experienced the kind of
price increases you described. Of course,
you might not have purchased any policy
if you were forced to pay double your initial rate, and that would have left you
without coverage. But you’re without
coverage now, and having never had it
would have saved you all the money you
spent in premiums.
So what should you do now? Instead
of canceling the policy, consider keeping
it but with reduced benefits to avoid an
unaffordable price increase. After all,
some coverage is better than nothing.
And the real message for consumers,
as I’ve warned many times, is this: Never
buy an LTC policy based on price; cheap
policies always become the most expensive, in more ways than one. I deeply
regret your experience, and thank you for
sharing your story.
Q: I’m fully vested at the company I
work at. Can I take money from my
401(k) for a down payment on a house
without having to pay taxes or penalties?
A: Some retirement plans permit withdrawals for first-time home purchase. But
don’t do this. It’s a retirement plan, not an
I-wanna-buy-a-house plan.
Find the money elsewhere. If you
can’t, this means you can’t afford to buy
a house at this time. Rent and keep saving
to accumulate the cash you need to move
in. And never touch your retirement
assets for anything but retirement.
Q: I have a question about investment
losses carried forward. Let’s assume I
have a $10,000 loss to carry forward. The
second year, I don’t have any investment
gains or losses, so I can use $3,000 of that
loss carry forward to reduce my ordinary
income, leaving me with $7,000 to carry
forward. The next year I come up with
investment gains that total $12,000. Is it
true that the whole $7,000 can be used to
reduce my investment gain to $5,000?
A: Yes.
You can e-mail Financial Adviser Ric
Edelman at [email protected]
Copyright 2008, Newspaper Enterprise
Assn.
Tips for living in tough economic times
DEAR BRUCE: I’ve been renting a
modest apartment for the last three years.
I pay my rent on time. I have not made a
lot of money, but I always kept up with
my bills. Two months ago, I was laid off.
I immediately went out and got a job
working at a little over minimum wage,
which will never support this apartment’s rent. No matter how I look at it I
have to get out of here. I went to talk to
the management and they said that I had
signed a lease for a year. They were sorry
that I had employment problems but I
have to pay them. I am thinking about
moving back in with my parents. Is there
anything else I can do? I have no assets
other than my ability to work. I don’t
want to ruin my credit, but I’m not going
to beg for money from my parents to pay
for an apartment that I simply can no
longer afford. -- Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER.: Unfortunately, in
these tough economic times, your landlords are probably going to run into this
more than they’d like to. The key to this
is how rentable is the apartment? If you
are in a complex with many vacancies,
management may rent their own units
rather than yours first. You very likely do
have the option of trying to sublet it, and
you may wish to try to do this. Even if
you have to sublet it for a little less than
you are currently receiving, it would take
you off the hook. I know that there are
lots of reasons why tenants try to break
leases, but I’m of the opinion, as a for-
[email protected]
The Ukiah Daily Journal
Plug into these electronics’ savings
Consumer reports ✔
When it comes to buying
electronics, online retailers
continue to outscore walk-in
stores, according to a
Consumer Reports’ survey.
The survey, based on more
than 38,000 purchases of electronics including flat-screen
televisions, found that online
retailers offered better prices.
Although no single retailer
has it all, perennial standouts
Amazon.com
and
Crutchfield.com came close.
Both were among the highestscoring retailers for electronics -- each offering aboveaverage selection. Newcomer
B&H (bhphotovideo.com)
also scored well in CR’s survey and, like Amazon.com,
was noted for its prices.
Despite CR’s findings, consumers shouldn’t rule out
brick-and-mortar stores. If
price is a top priority, warehouse stores such as Costco
and BJ’s Wholesale stood out
in the survey, but consumers
shouldn’t expect the best service or the widest selection.
Independent retailers Apple,
Sony, Tweeter, Ultimate
Electronics, Ritz Camera, P.C.
Richard & Son and HH Gregg
were noted for attributes that
made the store experience eas-
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 – B-3
SMART MONEY
BY BRUCE WILLIAMS
mer landlord, that there is a need for
more flexibility particularly in today’s
economy. People are going to remember
those landlords and management companies that acted decently and those that
were intractable. If they are unwilling to
negotiate with you, down to perhaps forfeiting your security deposit, all you can
do is let them know in writing that you
are moving or have moved because of
inability to pay because your job has disappeared. They then will have to decide
whether they will proceed against you.
The likelihood is they will sell this "bad
debt" to some bottom-feeding company
who will try to squeeze some money out
of you.
DEAR BRUCE: I owe some money
on my credit card. I would like to get it
paid off as soon as possible. Should I pay
extra on the principle? -- Reader, via email
DEAR READER: If you are only
making the minimum payments it will
take you forever to get your debt paid
off. I assume when you say you would
like to "pay extra" this is what you are
referring to. Pay as much each month as
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
you are able and soon you will only be
paying the entire balance owed each
month. When you do achieve this, your
credit card will be a useful tool. If you
continue to build up balances beyond
your ability to pay them off each month
this tool can come back and bite you.
DEAR BRUCE: I am considering
writing an advice column about computers for a small local newspaper. If it takes
off, I was thinking of trying to syndicate
it within the state. I’m wondering if you
could give me advice on this? It would
be nice to be able to make a living off of
giving advice on something that I know
a lot about. -- Reader, via e-mail
DEAR READER: There are any
number of companies that syndicate
columns. You are far better advised to try
and get the attention of one of these. The
professional syndicates are in a far better
position to make things happen than you
would be. If you cannot get their attention however, then it will be a question
of you going out and soliciting each individual newspaper. If you get big enough,
once again the big guys will get interested in you. Good Luck!
Send your questions to: Smart Money,
P.O. Box 2095, Elfers, FL 34680. E-mail
to:
[email protected]
Questions of general interest will be
answered in future columns. Owing to
the volume of mail, personal replies cannot be provided. Copyright 2008,
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
The most reach in this
community!
Frugal Living
By Sara Noel
Keep butter
spreadable
DEAR SARA: How do you keep your butter soft and
spreadable? We’ve switched from margarine to butter. -Carol, e-mail
DEAR CAROL: I simply take it out of the refrigerator
before I need it so it has a chance to soften. I’m not very
picky. I’ll scrape thin layers for bread in a pinch if I have
to. You can also buy a butter bell crock. Or whip your butter by adding a bit of milk (about 1/4 cup milk to 1/2
pound butter) and beat it with an electric mixer until it’s
fluffy. You can also add 1 cup vegetable oil, 1 teaspoon
liquid lecithin and 5 ounces of water with 1 pound of softened butter to a blender and mix until well combined.
Spoon it into a container until you’re ready to use.
DEAR SARA: Do you make your own ranch dressing?
I want to make my own ranch dressing, since we seem to
go through so much of it. -- Kim, Oklahoma
DEAR KIM: I have made my own, but I often buy it
premade in the bottle. Gasp! You can buy the seasoning
packets and mix your own, or you can use your own seasonings.
Ranch Seasoning
2 teaspoons salt
2 teaspoons dried minced garlic
8 teaspoons dried minced onion
2 teaspoons freshly ground pepper
2 teaspoons granulated sugar
2 teaspoons paprika
2 teaspoons parsley flakes
Combine all ingredients, and store until ready to use.
When ready to make dressing, combine 1 tablespoon seasoning with 1 cup mayonnaise and 1 cup buttermilk. If
you don’t have buttermilk on hand, you can mix 1 cup
milk with 1 tablespoon vinegar or lemon juice. Let sit for
a few minutes before using. Your homemade ranch dressing will not be as thick as store-bought. If you prefer a
thicker dressing, add sour cream. This recipe is wonderful
for chicken-salad sandwiches and pasta salads.
DEAR SARA: I’m spending a lot of money on gas to
get back and forth to work. I have a 45-minute commute
on a good day. Prices keep going up on everything. I never
thought I would have to look at ways to cut back. Regular
bills like gas are costing me a fortune. I’ve downsized my
car. Any other suggestions for me? -- Bill, Pennsylvania
DEAR BILL: Look into whether you can work a compressed workweek. You could save a bit on transportation
costs and possibly get stuck in less traffic by arriving to
work earlier than usual or leaving later than usual and
avoiding rush hour. Not only could you have an extra day
to relax; it could help with taking time off for appointments and errands, too.
DEAR SARA: You seem to calculate the cost of household choices. Are there any you haven’t compared? -Cheryl, Indiana
DEAR CHERYL: There are tons of choices I haven’t
calculated. For example, I have an oil lamp, and I haven’t
calculated the cost to use it compared it to a single light,
nightlight or candle. I’m also undecided on the cost benefit of using ceiling fans during the winter. I’ve heard that
during the winter, a fan should rotate upward and push
warm air throughout the room more evenly versus settling
up near the ceiling. I understand the concept, but I’m
undecided on whether using it is truly beneficial. I haven’t
tested it yet.
Sara Noel is the owner of Frugal Village (www.frugalvillage.com), a Web site that offers practical, moneysaving strategies for everyday living. To send tips, comments or questions, write to Sara Noel, c/o United Media,
200 Madison Ave., 4th Floor, New York, NY 10016, or email [email protected] Copyright 2008,
Newspaper Enterprise Assn.
PUZZLE ANSWERS
Mendocino County’s
Local Newspaper
ukiahdailyjournal.com
B-4- SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
707-468-3500
Copy Acceptance
The Daily Journal reserves the right to edit or withhold publication & may exercise its
discretion in acceptance or classification of any & all advertising.
Deadlines
New classified ads, corrections & cancellations is 2:00 p.m. the day before publication.Sunday and Monday edition deadline is Friday at 2:30.
Payment
All advertising must be paid in advance unless credit account has been established.
Master-Card & Visa are accepted.
Errors
When placing your ad, always ask for the ad to be repeated back to you. Check your ad
for any errors the FIRST DAY. The Ukiah Daily Journal will be responsible for only one
incorrect insertion & no greater extent than the cost of the space occupied.
Local • Statewide • Countywide • One Call – One Bill – We make it EASY for you!
Announcements
010...Notices
020...Personals
030...Lost & Found
040...Cards of Thanks
050...In Memoriam
060...Meetings & Events
070...Travel Opportunities
310...Apartments Furnished
320...Duplexes
330...Homes for Rent
340...Vacation Rentals
350...Rooms for Rent
360...Rest Homes
370...Wanted to Rent
380...Wanted to Share Rent
390...Mobiles & Space
510...Livestock
520...Farm Equipment
530...Feed/Pasture Supplies
540...Equipment Rentals
550...Produce
Transportation
600...Aviation
610...Recreational Vehicles
Employment
620...Motorcycles
100...Instruction
630...Auto Parts & Acc.
General Merchandise
110....Employment Wanted
640...Auto Services
400...New & Used Equipment 650...4X4s for Sale
120...Help Wanted
410...Musical Instruments
130...Sales Help Wanted
660...Vans for Sale
420...Boats
140...Child Care
670...Trucks for Sale
430...Building Supplies
680...Cars for Sale
Services
440...Furniture
690...Utility Trailers
200...Services Offered
450...Wanted to Buy
205...Financial Services
460...Appliances
Real Estate
210...Business Opportunities 470...Antiques
710...Real Estate Wanted
215...Businesses for Sale
475...Computers
720...Mobile Homes for Sale
220...Money to Loan
480...Miscellaneous for Sale
730...Mobile Homes with Land
230...Money Wanted
490...Auctions
740...Income Property
240...Investments
590...Garage Sales
750...Ranches
250...Business Rentals
760...Lots/Acerage
Farm-Garden-Pets
770...Real Estate
Rentals
500...Pets & Supplies
800 JUST LISTED!
300...Apartments Unfurnished
810-08
809-08
11-16/08
SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCES
The Mendocino County Board of Supervisors
adopted the following ordinances to comply
with recent changes in federal and state regulations primarily dealing with the establishment of lowest floor, defining alternative
methodologies for determining base flood elevation in areas not specifically studied, development criteria for areas designated “coastal
high hazard areas,” and clarifying and adding
definitions within the County’s Flood Plain Ordinance (last updated in 1992).
11-16/08
SUMMARY OF ADOPTED ORDINANCES
The Mendocino County Board of Supervisors
adopted the following ordinances to update
the zoning ordinance to be consistent with
state law regarding provisions for small and
large day care facilities.
ORDINANCE NO. 4206
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTIONS
WITHIN DIVISION I OF TITLE 20 OF THE
MENDOCINO COUNTY CODE
ORDINANCE NO. 4209
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER
20.120 OF DIVISION I OR TITLE 20 IS
AMENDED
AS
FOLLOWS: CHAPTER
20.120 FLOODPLAIN COMBINING DISTRICT
ORDINANCE NO. 4207
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTIONS
WITHIN DIVISION II OF TITLE 20 OF THE
MENDOCINO COUNTY CODE
ORDINANCE NO. 4210
ORDINANCE NO. 4208
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER
20.420 OF DIVISION II OR TITLE 20 IS
AMENDED AS FOLLOWS:
CHAPTER
20.420 - FLOODPLAIN COMBINING DISTRICT
AN ORDINANCE AMENDING SECTIONS
WITHIN DIVISION III OF TITLE 20 OF THE
MENDOCINO COUNTY CODE
The aforementioned ordinances were passed
and adopted by the Board of Supervisors of
the County of Mendocino, State of California,
on this 28th day of October, 2008, by the following roll call vote:
AYES: Super visors Delbar, Wattenburger,
Pinches, Smith, and Colfax
NOES: None
ABSENT: None
10
Let us feature your
ad in this space on
the first day of insertion
$
Only
AYES: Supervisors Delbar, Wattenburger,
Pinches, Smith, and Colfax
NOES: None
ABSENT: None
A complete copy of each ordinance is on file
with the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors
and is available for inspection and copying as
a public record.
A complete copy of each ordinance is on file
with the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors
and is available for inspection and copying as
a public record.
KRISTI FURMAN
Clerk of the Board
KRISTI FURMAN
Clerk of the Board
NOTICES
30
LOST &
FOUND
590 S. School St.
468-3500
30
LOST &
FOUND
SUPPORT
OUR
TROOPS
DVD DRIVE!!!
The troops need
to be entertained.
Please
donate
your used or new
DVD’s. We will
ship them to the
troops in Iraq. Any
type of DVD. G,
PG, R, but nothing
too
bad.
Thank you for
your support! The
troops really appreciate
the
DVDs. Drop off
boxes are at
FOUND KITTEN
Approx. 3-4 mos. old.
General vicinity of
Pomolita School
Neighborhood. Calico
female, very social,
affectionate & mellow. May have been
lost for several weeks
as she’s very thin.
Please call Erica if
this your missing cat
or if you would like to
adopt this special
beauty 463-8993
I am a ver y, ver y
friendly male LARGE
black American Staffordshire Terrier. I
was found full of ticks
and very skinny on
11/12 in Dos Rios.
Do you know me? I
am now being cared
for at the Ukiah Shelter at 298 Plant Rd.
If you know me
please call Sage at
467-6453
●Potter Vly Com
munity Health Ctr.
●Potter Vly Hi. Scl.
In Redwood Valley
In Ukiah:
●GI Joe’s,
●Christmas
Dreams & Gifts.
Or call Jasmine or
Chris Snider at
743-2215 or
489-4592
SUPPORT
OUR
TROOPS
'Til they all
come home
Check out the Classified section for more details.
10
*Does not include price of ad
●3 Pepper Pizza.
The aforementioned ordinances were passed
and adopted by the Board of Supervisors of
the County of Mendocino, State of California,
on this 28th day of October, 2008, by the following roll call vote:
00*
GI Mom's and VFW
post 1900 are requesting monetary
donations for our
deployed
troops
serving in Iraq and
Afghanistan to make
their holidays a little
brighter.
Checks should be
made out to and
mailed to:
VFW Post 1900
P.O. Box 1477
Ukiah, CA 95482
In the memo part,
please write GI
Mom's.
If you have
someone serving
from our local
area, please contact Tamara @
459-4044, as they
have priority.
Hello I am a male
Mini Schnauzer.
I
was found in Willits
on 11/8 and now am
a guest at the Ukiah
Shelter located at
298 Plant Rd. I was
wearing a blue collar.
Am I yours? Now I
am at the Ukiah Shelter at 298 Plant Rd.
If not found m by my
human I will be available for adoption on
11/15.
Hello I am a tri-colored handsome male
dog who was out
walking on McNab
Ranch Rd on Sunday
10/9. Just letting the
breeze ruffle my fur.
Now I am at the
Ukiah Shelter. If you
know me please help
me get home. Otherwise I will be available for adoption
10/17.
Call Sage at
467-6453 or come by
the shelter at 298
Plant Rd.
I am one of two rust
colored male Pitbulls
found on E. Valley
Rd in Willits on 11/9.
We are very anxious
for our people to
come to the Ukiah
Shelter and identify
us. We are guests at
the shelter located at
298 Plant Rd. You
can also call Sage at
467-6453.
I was out for a stroll
on E. Calpella Rd on
11/9 when a nice
man picked me up. I
am now a guest at
the Ukiah Shelter.
I
am red and white
with long hair. I am
very handsome, If I
do say so. Know
me? Come and take
me home or call
Sage at 467-6453.
120
BUY
SELL
TRADE
RENT
HELP
WANTED
Dentist
-Practice
general dentistry in
clinic offices in Ukiah,
Lakepor t, & Willits,
CA. for nonprofit
community
health
clinic. Calif. Dental License & DEA. Mail
resume to: Mendocino Community Health
Clinic, Inc., Attn: D.
Akka, 333 Laws Ave.,
Ukiah, CA 95482.
JOURNAL
CLASSIFEDS
WORK!
DIESEL MECHANIC
5yrs exp. good
pay/benefits. Clean
DMV 462-7393
120
HELP
WANTED
Direct Care Work
No Exp.Needed!!
Morning,
eves,
graveyard. Drug test
req., no test for cannabis, gd DMV. Personal care, cooking,
cleaning, driving &
providing living skills
training to adults with
developmental disabilities. 3,6 bed group
homes, estb. in 1988.
485-0165, 485-5168
468-0602
Dispatcher/Cust
Service- PT, Weekends, Eves & Grave
shifts available. Typing, spelling, phone
skills a must. Apply
@ 960 N. State St,
or fax resume to
462-1478
ELECTRICAL
DISTRIBUTION
ENGINEER:
Total annual comp
package
up
to
$110,006; Bachelor’s Degree in Electrical Engineering, 5
yrs. exp & ability to
obtain CA P.E. license w/in 2 yrs.
req’d. Complete job
descript & app available at www.cityof
ukiah.com Apply
by: 12/2/08. EOE
Family Nurse Practitioner / Physician
Assistant - Mendocino Community Health
Clinic seeks exp.
FNP or PA to support
our new pediatric
practice at our Lakeport, CA, site. Excellent salary & benefits.
Complete job desc.
at www.mchcinc.org.
(EOE) Apply:
[email protected]
Insurance F/T CSR Bilingual a plus. Sal.
neg. Apply in person
with resume, 376 E.
Gobbi St. Suite A
Ukiah residential
childrens facility
is looking for caring,
responsible individuals to join our team.
At least 1 yr exp.pref.
Will provide on the
job training. Also 2
graveyard shifts
avail. Starting sal.
$12.12 hr. 403B,
great benefits, & vac.
pkg. Fax resume
707-463-6957
120
HELP
WANTED
Information
Systems
Technician I
Mendocino County
General
Ser vices
Agency/Information
Ser vices.
$3351$4075/Mo. Performs
technology work pertaining to the technical maintenance &
suppor t of County
mainframe, network,
desktop,
telecom
&/or other technology
systems. Apply by
11/19/08 to: HR
Dept, 579 Low Gap
Road, Ukiah, CA
95482, (707) 4634261, w/TDD: (800)
735-2929. www.co.
mendocino.ca.us/hr
EOE
AGRICULTURAL/
MEASUREMENT
STANDARDS
SPECIALIST I/II/III
Mendocino County Ukiah,
I/$3519$4280/Mo; II/$3696$4493/Mo; III/$4280 $5202/Mo; Conducts
inspections and enforces applicable codes. Req BA. Apply
by 11/19/08 to: HR,
579 Low Gap Rd,
Ukiah, CA 95482,
(707)
463-4261,
w/TDD (800) 7352909. For more information and to view
the flyers go to:
www.co.mendocino.
ca.us/hr EOE
Job Coach
UVAH/Mayacama is
seeking applicants
for part to full time job
coach- to provide one
on one training support & follow along
services to people in
community
jobs.
Wages
DOE
requires-use of own vehicle (mileage reimb.), a CDL, clean
DMV, bckgrnd clearance, HS dip or
equiv. Job description/application at
990 S. Dora St.
Ukiah 468-8824
Registered Nurse –
Case Manager
Mendocino Community Health Clinic
seeks exp. RN Case
Manager for Ukiah
site. Excellent salary
& benefits.
Complete job desc.
at www.mchcinc.org.
(EOE)Apply:
[email protected]
120
HELP
WANTED
LINKUS
ENTERPRISES
The Largest regional
service provider for
Dish net work is
seeking to hire motivated experienced
satellite installation
technicians, we offer
good pay and benefits after 180 days of
employment. Must
have own work truck
to begin (mileage
paid). We offer advancement oppor tunities within the company. Drug testing
and
background
checks will be performed, fax all resumes to (559)2566778 attn: Ismael
Carenas or email
[email protected]
iness.com
LVN, P/T. Tired of
high case loads?
Provide support to 6
adults with Devel.
Disabilities in their
home. Office 4855168 Cell 489-0022
MAKE A
DIFFERENCE IN
THE LIFE OF A
CHILD! JOIN THE
TRINITY TEAM!
Trinity Youth
Services-Ukiah
A social service
agency
serving
abused & neglected
youth in a Residential Treatment Campus is looking for
CHILD CARE
WORKERS.
CCW is responsible
for the daily care &
supervision of clients & living conditions. Swing &
Night shifts available. Star ting at
$9.40/hr. On-call
$9/hr. Must be 21
yrs old. Excellent
benefits, including
medical, dental, vision, tuition reimbursement & FREE
co-op child care.
Must pass pre-employment physical,
drug test & background check.
APPLY AT
915 W. Church St.
Ukiah or fax
resume
877-382-7617
www.trinityys.org
EOE
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
120
120
HELP
WANTED
MANAGEMENT
TRAINEE
COLLEGE GOING
FACILITATOR
20
hrs/wk,
12
mos/yr
Requires
Bachelor’s Degree
and desire for a career in public education.
Mendocino County
Office of
Education
707-467-5012
or
visit our website at
www.mcoe.us/d/hr/
jobs to view job
announcement.
Deadline to apply:
11/21/08
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 -B-5
HELP
WANTED
OPEN HOUSE
PHOTOGRAPHER
The Ukiah Daily
Journal
is seeking a PT
photographer. This
is a good job for
someone who is
looking to get published and hone
their photography
skills. Applicants
must have their
own gear and be
available to work
Sun/Mon and some
evenings. Knowledge of photoshop
a plus. To apply
submit a resume
and portfolio (either
hard copy or CD) to
the front desk at
590 S. School St.
Attention
Chief
Photographer.
Mystery ShoppersEarn up to $100 per
day. Undercover
shoppers needed to
judge retail & dining
est. No exp. necessary. Fee Required.
Call 877-306-3968
OPEN HOUSE, Sunday , November 16th, 12-2PM
Main Street Garden Townhomes
Main Street Garden townhouses where
affordability meets comfort and piece of
mind. Enjoy all the amenities this wonderful
complex has to offer-swimming pool,
convenient location, picnic area, playground,
landscaped yards and more. Not to mention
the brand new Interior features including
kitchen cabinets, dishwasher, range, tile
kitchen floor and paint. Now’s the time to
take advantage of this wonderful opportunity!
$199,000
POST OFFICE
NOW HIRING!
Avg Pay $20/ hr, $57
K/yr, incl. Fed ben, OT.
Placed by adSource not
affiliated with USPS who
hires. 1-866-292-1387
NOW HIRING
$13/hr. to start
Behavior Workers
EXCITING
POSITION in
Mendocino
County Work
one-on-one with
Children
and Adults
with
Developmental
Disabilities.
Work is FT/PT
Bens.+Mileage
Call Families
United—Respite
(707)263-3921 or
1-800-640-3992
PT JANITOR
NEEDED IN
WILLITS CALL PAT
AT (707) 476-8874
Youth
Advocate:
FT. Intensive Treatment Foster Care.
Aid foster parents
w/child rearing problems, assist children
& youth with difficulties in social adjustments. Must have
Associate Degree &
2 yrs exp working
w/at-risk youth in residential
setting.
Great way to balance
office & field work.
Must pass fingerprint
background through
DOJ, FBI, CAC, preemploy physical &
TB. Valid CDL, clean
DMV req’d. Fax résumé: (707)462-6994
or mail: RCS, P.O.
Box 422 Ukiah CA
95482.
Facility#
236801918. Application
deadline
11/27/08. Job#11YA. EOE.
NOW HIRING
Behavior Services
Coordinator
$3,182 p/mo
Oversee daily
operations of
behavior program
providing services
throughout Lake &
Mend. counties
Work is FT
Bens.+Mileage
Call Families
United—Respite
(707)263-3921 or
1-800-640-3992
Application closing
date 11/21/08
621-1404
275 W. Gobbi Street, Ukiah
Hostess: Rachel Maki
Educational
Skills.
Looking
For A Career?
EVERYDAY:
Classified
SUNDAY–SATURDAY:
The Ukiah Daily Journal
TLC Child &
Family Services
On site manager.
sml 20 unit complex.
Maintenance exp.
pref. 707-391-3406
PHARMACY TECH
Licensed in CA.
Salary DOE. Call
Joanne 707-468-5220
PLUMBER
TRAINEES
Repair/Drain Cleaning. No exp. nec. w/
train. Must have truck
or van. Exp. a +, benefits
avail.
Call
(800)414-0340
seeks 2 additional
homes for Shelter
Care program
Applicants need to
have at least 1 spare
bdrm to house a child
for up to 30 days.
Guaranteed monthly
allotment. Generous
increase upon placement. Income tax-exempt. Exp. with children req. Parents will
receive training, + Social Worker, in-home
support & respite.
Need 1 or 2-parent
homes, with 1 parent
home full time. Home
with no more than 1
biological child considered. Retirees invited
to apply. Contact TLC
707-463-1100
JOB
SEARCH
Are you looking for the perfect opportunity to shine?
You could find a great job in our Classified section.
590 S. School St., Ukiah
468-3500
Lic#236800809
WE LOVE
TO HEAR
FROM YOU!
The Ukiah Daily Journal is YOUR local newspaper!
That said, we at the Journal love to hear from you regarding
anything and everything that is of interest to you.
Whether you want to acknowledge a job well done or air a grievance,
the Letters to the Editor section is the place for you!
Simply drop your letter off at: 590 S. School St., Ukiah,
send your letter to: Letters to the Editor, P.O. Box 749, Ukiah, CA 95482,
Fax to: 468-3544 or e-mail to: [email protected]
It’s that easy!
Letter Policy
The Daily Journal welcomes letters to the editor. Only letters that
include a legible signature, return address and phone number will be
considered. Shorter, concise letters will be given preference and
names will not be withheld for any reason. All letters are subject to
editing.
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
B-6- SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
120
HELP
WANTED
THERAPIST
Trinity Youth Ser vices-Ukiah, a social
service agency serving abused and neglected youth in a
Residential
Treatment Campus is
seeking a Contract
Therapist to provide
individual, family and
group therapy services approx. 20/hrs
per week. Qualified
candidates will possess
an
MFCC,
LCSW, or LPC.
APPLY AT: 915 W.
Church St., Ukiah or
fax resume to
877-382-7617
www.trinityys.org
EOE
SOUS CHEF
2-3 yrs kitchen
cooking, supervising
exp. 467-4752
PUBLIC WORKS
PROJECT
ANALYST
Excellent Career Opportunity! The City of
Fort Bragg is seeking
a qualified individual
to identify, prepare
and track grant applications and proposals, monitor and report on projects and
grants to ensure
compliance with regulations and reporting
requirements, monitor capital project
budgets, timeliness
and contracts, act as
liaison with public
and contractors, and
maintain public access files. Specific
requirements include:
* Bachelor’s Degree
with major course
work in business or
public administration,
accounting
or
a
closely related field;
and
* Three years of progressively responsible related experience; and
* Possession of valid
Class C or higher
California Driver’s License.
Direct related experience may be consid-
120
HELP
WANTED
ered as a substitute
for educational requirements.
Desirable Education/
Experience: Master’s
Degree with major
course work in business or public administration, accounting
or a closely related
field and/or two additional years of related
experience.
Full
time
40
hrs/week. Monthly
salar y
$3,915
$4,759 with comprehensive
benefits
package. to apply,
obtain and submit a
City
application
(www.fortbragg.com)
to the Human Resources Office, City
Hall 416 N. Franklin
Street, For t Bragg,
CA 95437. Faxed or
emailed applications
will not be accepted.
Filing Deadline: November 24, 2008
(Postmarks not accepted),
EOE/AA/Drug Free
Workplace.
215
BUSINESSES
FOR SALE
Beauty Salon for
sale, motivated seller, seller willing to
nego. 489-5553. Uk.
250
BUSINESS
RENTALS
FREE MO. 171 B
Brush, 1850 sq.ft. lrg.
w/ac office Call for
details 468-5176
Prime Office
Space in Ukiah!!
Nice building in
excel. loc. So. State
St. 3 offices 986,
1500 & 1690 sf.
Incl. utils., janitorial
& ample off-street
parking. 707-468-5426
Office/Shop/Retail
1000 sq. ft. $550/mo.
2181 S. State, Ukiah
Warehouse w/office
1200sf lg.fenced yd.
150 Blue Bonnet, Uk
$650/mo. 462-8273
SELZER REALTY
350 E. Gobbi St. Ukiah
468-0411
APARTMENTS
210 Norton St. – Upstairs 1 bd., 1 ba. apt. w/ stove,
refrigerator, swamp cooler, w/d hookups, carport & more.
$625/mo.
524 N. School St. #A – 1 bd., 1 ba. upstairs apt. w/
carport; located within walking distance to downtown
Ukiah. $625/mo.
8501 Uva Dr. – Roomy 1 bd., 1 ba. downstairs apt.
nestled in a park-like setting in Redwood Valley.
$625/mo.
6620 Elledge Ranch Rd. – Lovely 1 bd., 1 ba. upstairs
flat in a country setting off Hwy. 20, featuring hardwood &
tile floors, stove, refrigerator & balcony w/ views of the
mountains. $650/mo.
2551 N. State St. - 1 bd., 1 ba. apt. situated close to
Mendocino College; includes all utilities plus basic cable!
$675/mo.
150 Evans St. – Recently renovated 2 bd., 1 ba. apt.
equipped w/ stove, refrigerator, newer carpet, linoleum &
paint. $750/mo.
CONDOS/DUPLEXES
CONDOS/DUPLEXES
1420 Sanford Ranch Rd. #B - 2 bd., 1 ba. duplex w/
stove, refrigerator, a/c, carport, yard & vineyard views.
$775/mo.
3186 N. State St. #A – Newly renovated 2 bd., 1 ba.
duplex, w/ vaulted ceilings, new carpet, linoleum &
interior paint; located close to Lake Mendocino. $825/mo.
1598 Padula Dr. #A – Roomy 2+ bd., 2 ba. duplex
located in a wooded setting in Brooktrails; equipped w/
cook top, oven, refrigerator, dishwasher, w/d & yard.
$850/mo.
785 Yosemite Dr. #B – 3 bd., 2 ba. duplex w/ stove,
refrigerator, dishwasher, a/c, yard & garage; located
close to school, park & shopping. $1050/mo.
905 Waugh Ln. – Luxury 3 bd., 3 ba. condo fully
equipped w/ stove, refrigerator, dishwasher, microwave,
w/d, central heat & air, plus garage & small yard.
$1100/mo.
HOUSES
HOUSES
586 N. State St. - Cozy 1 bd., 1 ba. home in a downtown
location, w/ stove, refrigerator, w/d hook-ups, off-street
parking & small yard. $700/mo.
976 Mazzoni St. #A – 2 bd., 1 ba. home w/ stove,
refrigerator, swamp cooler & fenced yard; located close
to schools, shopping & restaurants. $950/mo.
291 E. Clay St. – 2 bd., 1.5 ba. home on a private
driveway; equipped w/ stove, refrigerator & new carpet.
$950/mo.
1370 S. State St. – Unique 2+ bd., 2 ba. home featuring
hardwood floors, high ceilings, new interior paint, yard &
garage. $1150/mo.
1878 Tulip Pl. – Charming 3 bd., 2 ba. home in a
wooded setting in Brooktrails; featuring tile countertops,
stove, dishwasher, new carpet & tile floors, 2-car garage
& large backyard. $1250/mo.
13741 Old River Rd. – 3+ bd., 2 ba. Old Hopland home
w/ loft, vaulted ceilings, color-stamped concrete floors &
more! $1350/mo.
617 W. Jones St. – Beautiful 2 bd., 1 ba. home in a
desirable Westside location; highlights include hardwood
& tile floors, granite kitchen counters, stainless steel
appliances, central heat, garage & yard. A must see!
$1500/mo.
COMMERCIAL
COMMERCIAL
304 E. Gobbi St. #D – Large 3000 sq. ft. warehouse
space. $1500/mo.
304 E. Gobbi St. #A – Large 6180 sq. ft. warehouse
space w/ small office & roll-up doors. $2500/mo.
307 N. Main St. – Spacious 7000 +/- sq. ft. retail/office
space, close to downtown Ukiah. $2500/mo.
WE HAVE MANY RENTALS AVAILABLE,
INCLUDING COMMERCIAL,
BOAT & MINI STORAGE UNITS!
FOR MORE INFO. CALL 468-0411
Find us on the web:
www.realtyworldselzer.com
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
250
BUSINESS
RENTALS
LEE KRAEMER
Real Estate Broker
FEATURED PROPERTIES
GOBBI STREET
OFFICE SPACE
600+/- sq. ft. w/pkg.
BRAND NEW!
BUILD TO SUIT
Office or Medical
Will divide
1974+- sq. ft. w/pkg.
DOWNTOWN
OFFICE RETAIL
Hi-traffic Location
2500+- sq. ft. w/pkg.
OFFICE SPACES
2nd Floor, State St.
Elevator/pkg.
MED. OFFICE or
RETAIL
South Orchard
3400+/- sq. ft. w/pkng
468-8951
300
APARTMENTS
UNFURNISHED
$200 OFF 1st mo rent.
Lkpt lg 2/1 carport
$725/mo $745/mo;
3/2 $995mo 722-3141
$825-$895 NEWER
2 bdrm w/pool, A/C,
garage, yard &
laundry. 463-2325
2 bd 1.5 ba.townhouse, pool, lndry,
AC, $920+ dep. N/P
No sec. 8 No smoking complex. 468-5426
2BD 1BA washer/
dryer water/garbage,
AC & heating
462-8600
Home for the Holidays!
Brand New Construction
2BD APT in 4plex,
private bk yd, garage,
newly renovated, w/d
$850 743-2673
CHINOOK GARDEN
2bd/2ba all appliances + garage.
TH $1025/mo. sec.
dep. $700, pet dep
$500 sorry no dogs
468-5468
Lg 1bd upstrs. private deck, pool,lndry,
carport. No Sec. 8.
$750. 463-2134
MARLENE VILLAGE
2bd/2ba all appliances + garage.
Flat $1100/mo., sec.
dep $700 468-5468
Only $500 Deposit!
Modern 2BR w/yard
Central Heat/AC N/S
Dial up a sale when you
call us and put the
classifieds to work for you.
Brand New Homes in Ukiah
• 2 BEDS/2+1/2 BATHS.........................$249,000
• 3 BEDS/2 BATHS................................$289,000 - $299,000
• Slab Granite Kitchens; upgrades included
• Craftsman-style single family homes
• Air conditioning, no HOA
• Front and back landscaping, attached, finished garages
468-3500
Directions: North State Street to Low Gap Road,
past Bush Street, look for subdivision signs.
www.1000CottageLane.com
KATHARINE BREITHAUPT (Bright-hop)
707/888-9185
www.brighthop.com
Carport $900 433-4040
PARK PLACE
1 bd. $800. 2 bd.
$910. T.H. $1050.
Pool, Garg. 462-5009
Open Homes
Spacious 2bd. Pool.
H20, trash pd. $850.
N/P. 462-6075
Se habla espanol.
310
APARTMENTS
FURNISHED
Lakeside Resort Living Blue Lakes with
or w/o kitc. $200-$300
wk.Inc. util. 275-2181
320
DUPLEXES
2/1, W.side. remodel.
gar. w/d hkup.
No pet /smoke. Yd.
$880/$800 dep.,
206-999-4949
2BD, 1BA part of
personal home $700
+ util. 462-7449 or
489-4070
3bd/1.5bth
Ukiah
tnhse w/ fireplace,
w/d hkup, garage,
$1200/mo $1600dep
707/433-6688
330
HOMES
FOR RENT
1 bd 1 ba 18+ ac.
Horse proper ty nr
Hwy 20 P.V. $850/
mo. (707) 489-1916
1BD, 1BA
garage & yard. N/S/P
$825/mo.
707-265-4318
1bd/1ba,cot.PV,clean
+quiet, No sec. 8. ref.
req. N/S/P/D. $800 +
dep. 489 -1343
3BD, 2BA $1300/mo.
Central heat & air,
garage & yard N/S/P
265-4318
3BD, 2BA nr High
School, quit St. Immaculate. $1900/mo.
N/S/P/D 498-2328
3BD/2BA Country
setting. No sec. 8,
N/S/D. $1100 +dep
485-7704
3bd2ba Brooktrails
area. $1400/mo.
Dep. req. Lg. fen. yd.
Pets neg. W/D HU.
707-725-7087
3bd2ba N/P, N/S,
Walk to shop. $1500/
mo. $1600 dep. 6212927, 707-537-1316
3bd2ba. Rwd. Vly. ,
useable flat ac, shop,
pets neg. N/S.
$1500/mo.Avl 12/1.
489-0963
3bdr 2bth W/sde loc.
$1400 mo. + dep.
near schs, N/S/D
322-2705, 463-2747
OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, Nov. 16th, 12pm - 2pm
680 E. School Way, Redwood Valley
OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, November 16th, 1-4pm
2501 Old River Rd. #31
oom
edr
5B
Offered By: The Blakes
Spacious home in the heart of Redwood Valley. 2 operating wells,
fenced corner lot w/access from 2 streets. Room to roam or
develop. Poss. Lease Option!
www.680SchoolWay.com
COME AND EXPLORE THE
POSSIBILITIES FOR YOU!
Now $499,000!
Joe’s cell: (707) 489-8712 • Cathy’s cell: (707) 489-1676
www.TheBlakes4U.com
OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, November 16th, 11:30-1:30pm
4400 First Ave, Ukiah
1081 Cortina Place
(off Knob Hill Road)
AC1.9
RE5
S
s!
OPEN HOUSE, Sunday, November 16th, 12-2pm
Presented by: Pat Williams
Reduced below bank appraisal! Custom built three story 4 bedroom 5
bath home with gourmet kitchen, formal dining room, living room with
dramatic ceilings and fireplace. Downstairs features separate
entrance for studio and family room. Vineyard and mountain views
and over 1000 sq. ft. of decking to enjoy outside entertaining and
relaxation. Paved driveway plus room for boat and RV parking.
Located on 2.1 acres with easy access. $750,000
101 S. School Ukiah
(707) 462-6701
Affordable New Home
New double wide in quiet, desirable all age park. 2 bed 2 bath
open floor plan, lots of extras. End of road privacy with vineyard
and mountain views. $135,000
Call 462-5646
OPEN HOUSE, Saturday, November 15th, 11:00-2:00pm
1106 W. Clay Street
(off Knob Hill Road)
Selzer Realty • 467-3625
On The Market
Your Source for
Real Estate
Featured each week in
the Ukiah Daily Journal
Hosted by: Ann Campbell
This immaculate home is in a desirable neighborhood with 3 bedrooms, 2.5 bathrooms, approx. 2123 sq. ft. of living space & is on a +/.31 acre lot. You will appreciate features such as a formal dining area,
additional family room, finished garage, RV parking, attached deck for
entertaining, and a hot tub. Other items include impressive landscaping with automatic irrigation, large garden area, numerous fruit trees,
vineyard and mountain views. $449,000
101 S. School Ukiah
(707) 462-6701
972-4021
www.fullspectrumproperties.com
Offered By: Chris Hale
Unique corner lot on the Westside. 3 bedrooms, 2 bath
home with spacious living room, pool and hot tub. Oversized
driveway with RV parking and 2 car garage. Ready for your
family to move in! $499,900
101 S. School Ukiah
(707) 462-6701
Have your advertising message
reach over 16,000 potential buyers
each week!
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
Redwood Valley,
newly built 2 bdrm, 2
bath home, $1500/
mo. includes utilities.
972-4260
RUSTIC COUNTRY
cottage 2bd in quiet
beautiful setting w/
mtn views, off the
grid, grn lifestyle, 20
min to Willits, 30 to
Ukiah. Newly renovated inside & out
N/S $800/mo 2724654
Ukiah-4bd2.5ba.
Good view, Central
air cond. & heat.
$1550/mo. 2bd, 1 1/2
ba 2 car gar. $1090
508-8773
380
WANTED TO
SHARE RENT
COLLEGE student
seeks roommate,
new 3bd, 1.5 ba apt
$375-$400 671-2520
Lg. bd. Sep ent., own
cooking area. Refs.
N/P/D/S. $550 + 1/3
utils. 467-9925
390
MOBILES FOR
RENT
Mobile space.
Senior Park. Up to a
10x50. $310/mo
+ $310 last mo rent.
Incl. wtr, swr, garb.,
462-4036, 462-7630
410
MUSICAL
INSTRUMENTS
Piano upright, good
condition, $500 or
best offer. you move.
468-8458
Xmas Piano,
Beautiful Wurlitzer
Maple Spinet
$500 obo 462-8150
430
BUILDING
SUPPLIES
GREENHOUSE
Roof/wall panels.
Poly carbonate 3x16
$65 744-1721
NewSteel Building,
30 x 60, still in bindings, asking half
price. 279-1365
STEEL BUILDINGS
Factory Deals
Can Erect
www.scg-grp.com
Source#17V
Phone:
707-964-4922
440
FURNITURE
5 kitchen chairs that
are on pedstal that
swivel and roll tan
$150. 462-0411
Desk Hutch, dark
honey finish. 55“ W,
42” T, excel. cond.
$50. 707-529-0463
450
WANTED
TO BUY
N
W
590
AUTO
SERVICES
Toyota Highlander
2003,low mil.exc.
cond.new tires,
$15,500. 279-1365.
S
PAOLI
MORTGAGE
MAP NOT TO SCALE
EET
I STR
GOBB
AL DRIV
HOSPIT
E
✪
✪
GARBOCCI
VAN HOUSEN
REALTY
E. Perkins St.
495 E. PERKINS
169 MASON ST., SUITE 300
T
✪
CENTURY 21
LES RYAN
REALTY
D AVE.
ST.
S. MAIN
S
MASON
COLDWELL
BANKER
MENDO
REALTY
BEVERLY
SANDERS
REALTY
320 S. STATE ST.
.
RKINS ST
EAST PE
RY AVE.
EET
MILL STR
E
✪
CHP/DMV
FULL
SPECTRUM
601 S. STATE ST.
✪
01
HWY 1
FIRE & POLICE
DEPARTMENT
SEMINA
✪
✪
LIBRARY
R
ORCHA
OAT HAY!
640
T.
ST.
W. CLAY
$12-$14 per bale,
Orchard Grass Soon
621-3897
Multi Family
10 to 3 Sat.
11 to 3 Sun.
1388 Berkeley Way
Close to Beacon Ln.
Absolutely no
EARLY BIRDS!!
Hallmark seasonal
items, hsewres, toys,
women’s & children’s
clothing & more
N. OAK STREET
EET
NSON STR
STEPHE
CIVIC CENTER
GARAGE
SALES
FREE GARAGE
SALE SIGNS.
Realty World Selzer
Realty. 350 E. Gobbi
✪
CHAMBER
OF
COMMERCE
WEST PE
LIVESTOCK
Potter Vlly. Blk
Anges Cattle sold by
pairs,$1200/pr. Grass
Fed.707-391-6169
PINE ST.
.
RKINS ST
COURT
HOUSE
Vichy Springs Rd
PEAR TREE
CENTER
STREE
101 SO. SCHOOL ST.
POST
OFFICE
REET
114 SO. SCHOOL ST.
RIVER
WALK
HOSPITAL
LESLIE
ST
STANDLEY
DIVERSIFIED
LENDING &
REAL ESTATE
BROWN
& CO.
e
✪
Lake Mendocino Driv
N. STATE ST.
500
REALTY
WORLD
SELZER
350 E. GOBBI ST
TALMAGE RD.
275 W. GOBBI ST.
1-888-750-4USA
707-485-5759
Locally Owned
By Gerald Boesel
Termite Control
•Inspections
•Structual Repairs
•New Construction
P.O. Box 389 Calpella, CA 95418
•Remodels
•Foundations
General Contractor, Lic #752409
Structural Pest Control, Lic #OPR9000
River Walk - Ukiah
Karen
Clark-Gulyas
You’ve found River Walk, a new neighborhood in Northern Ukiah.
Consisting of 15 new homes and minutes to the nearby Russian
River and Lake Mendocino. These homes are sited on large level
lots. Choose from different plans, both single and two-story with
architectural detail smart floor plans with 3-car garage. Starting at
$499,500. Open Friday thru Monday 1pm - 5pm.
Mortgage Loan
Specialist/Agent
For more information please call 707-462-2825.
License #OPR9138
From Covelo to Gualala the Most Trusted Name
in the Termite Business!
Call for appointment
485-7829
Carol Myer, Agent
CPCU, CLU, ChFC
Lic. ODO5161
State Farm Fire and Casualty Co.
Home Office: Bloomington, Illinois
400 E. Gobbi St., Ukiah, CA 95482
Off: 707-462-4936
Fax: 707-462-7158
(707) 462-6701 Office
(707) 481-6622 Cell
(707) 462-6703 Fax
[email protected]
This space is
available
Call 468-3513
For more Info
This space is
available
Call 468-3513
For more Info
This space is
available
Call 468-3513
For more Info
650
4X4'S
FOR SALE
FORD 1 TON 4X4
‘91 crew cab, long
bed, fully loaded, gd
cond $4500 obo
707-354-4394
670
TRUCKS
FOR SALE
CHEVY SILVERADO
‘82 4x4 step side, auto, 350 block $2250
obo 621-1391
680
CARS
FOR SALE
$$CASH FOR YOUR
JUNK CARS $$$ For
your old used cars!
FREE pick up in
Ukiah area! Lost title
ok. Steel drop boxes
for scrap metal also
available upon request, call 707-5467553!!!!
CHEVY
IMPALA
2002 4 dr. exc cond.,
tint windows, wood
grain,
20” chrom
rims, low mi., fast &
reliable. $7500. obo.
357-3911
720
MOBILES
FOR SALE
By Owner 2 Bd.in
quiet pk,pool, all util.
incl. w/ space rent.
$23,000. 707-463-1294
770
REAL ESTATE
11 AC. Hillside to
river, fixer-upper 3bd,
2ba + 2nd unit & 3rd
unit. $550k
JBRE 391-7612
4 Bd 3 Bth Foreclosure!
ONLY
$42,550!!!! Must Sell
Now! For Listings
Call 800-379-5067
ext. 1789
MORTGAGE LOANS
purchasing & refin.
Rates at 6%. Also
doing short sales!!
Larry Wright
Golden Bear Mortgage
707-239-8080
Westside Charmer
2 stor y 4bd2bth.
Open House Sun.
Nov. 16, 1 pm - 3 pm.
206 Thompson St.
Uk.
Top Quality
Treadmill
for a reasonable
price. 485-0176
USED
APPLIANCES
& FURNITURE.
Guaranteed. 485-1216
HENRY STREET
ET
SMITH STRE
PETS &
SUPPLIES
Poodle pups 2
black females.
12wks. $200. call
707-463-0551
Wanted to
Buy
APPLIANCES
REFRIGERATOR
Kenmore 20. 18.2 cf,
excel cond. $200
468-9478
REET
Small Fisher
Wood Stove.
Airtight. 16” wood.
$250. 485-1187
L(●)(●)K
460
SCOTT ST
WALNUT AVE.
LANE
Large
3
bdr./2
bth.pets neg.central
heat,remodeled.located in Hopland, in
countr y, nice views
and
much
more
$1500 + dep. Call for
Details 799-4048
GROVE AVE.
Seasoned Firewood
Madrone $250/cord
Fir $150 you pick up
354-4394
510
HWY 20
H
WAUG
GREAT HOUSE
West side location
3bd/2ba + office, gar,
$1650 + last mo. rent
& dep. 463-0208
UKIAH
FAIRGROUNDS
OAK $285/cord delivered, green wood
$250, Fir $200/cord
delivered 696-2662
SOUTH STATE ST.
Great 3bd 2ba Willits
w/lake & forest view
$1300 N/S, pet negotiable 486-7193
WILLITS
FORD STREET
UKIAH MUNICIPAL
GOLF COURSE
S. SCHOOL ST.
COZY HOUSE with
Deluxe finish. 1
Bdrm. Hobby rm,
Redwood Vly. $900
lease,485-0867
POTTER VALLEY
▲
Kenmore freezer. 8.6
cu ft. $90. 5, 20:
TV’s. Qn. bed &
frame. B/O. 621-2837
S. OAK STREET
Charming 1bd hse,
Gr8 West Side loc.,
Garage, hrdwd flrs,
W/D avail, 1.5 blks
to downtwn & parks
NOS/P/D/sec8/asst
$895 916-267-7669
UKIAH AREA REAL ESTATE OFFICES
BUSH ST
836 Yosemite Dr.
$1600/mo.1st, last &
$500 dep. 4bd. 707696-3797, 272-6442
MISC.
FOR SALE
FARM FRESH
EGGS
for sale
Call Nancy 485-9146
N. DORA STREET
4BD3BA.
EAST UKIAH
$2000/mo. Pool & hot
tub. 1/4 ac. 272-1561
480
S. DORA STREET
HOMES
FOR RENT
3bdr, 2bth. 2 story,
lrg yard, 2-car garage, $1450 + dep.
NCRE 468-9101
BARNES ST.
330
SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008 -B-7
Read All
About It!
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Your Local
Daily Newspaper!
Real Estate Services
EVE FISHELL
Real Estate Services
Broker/Owner/Realtor
ASSET/PROPERTY
MANAGEMENT
707-468-4380
[email protected]
22 years of experience.
Dedicated to protect & improve
your asset/investment
Jeff Twomey
Les Ryan Realty
Property Management, Rentals
495-C East Perkins Street
Ukiah, California 95482
Business (707) 468-0463
Fax (707) 468-7968
Each office is independently owned and operated.
Mortgage Loan Officer
Home Loans
Tel.: 707.430.6970
Fax: 866.923.3137
[email protected]
Consumer Real Estate, CA3-515-0101
322 North Main Street #201, Ukiah
Equal Housing Lender.
B-8- SUNDAY, NOV. 16, 2008
THE UKIAH DAILY JOURNAL
SERVICE DIRECTORY
HEATING • COOLING
EXCAVATING
FLOORING INSTALLATION
All Terrain Excavation
& Utilities Specialist
• Gas • Power
• Water • Telephone
D FLOORING
(Se Habla Español)
• Earthwork/
Site Development
• Site Clearing & Preparation
• Demolition
• Traffic Control
• Concrete/Site Curbs & Walks
• Erosion Control
• Foundation/Excavation
Call For Appointment
Tel. (707) 621-0261
Office: 485-7536 • Cell: 477-6221
Gen. Engineering Contractor • Lic.#878612
CONSTRUCTION
MASSAGE THERAPY
TERMITE BUSINESS
Carpet
Vinyl
Laminates
Hardwood
• Preventative Maintenance
• Commercial • Residential
• State Certified HERS Rater
Since 1978
Free Estimates
707-462-8802
Redwood Valley
Massage
Oolah Boudreau-Taylor
From Covelo to
Gualala the most
trusted name in the
Termite Business!
Thorough & Sensitive
Deep Tissue & Sports Massage
My work is to reduce your pain,
improve your ability to do your
work, and allow you to play harder
and sleep better.
Foundation to finish
Homes • Additions
• Kitchens • Decks
2 Hrs/$65
707.485.8954
707.367.4040 cell
485-1881
HOME REPAIRS
HANDYMAN
All home repairs
Carpentry
Plumbing
Decks
Painting
No job too small
Free estimates
Call 707 972-6116
License #OPR9138
By appointment 8am to 6:30pm, M-F
Escobar Services
•
•
•
•
•
•
Call for
appointment
485-7829
1st Visit Special
Lic. #580504
All types of home repair
including termite damage,
bathrooms, windows, doors,
plumbing, electrical, taping,
painting, tile work, flooring,
fencing, decks and roofs.
Work Guaranteed
(707) 485-0810
Silver Bells
Terra Firma Exc.
EL FINOS
• Service & Repair
HEATING &
COOLING SERVICES
HANDYMAN
“EXPERT SERVICE
WHEN YOU NEED IT”
• Service & Repair
on all Brands
• Residential
& Commercial
Available Mon - Sat
Call the professionals
462-2468
Serving Our Community
Since 1964
Lic/Bonded 292494
**To original owner.
Non-licensed contractor
Office - 468-9598
Cell - 489-8486
Mon-Fri 8:30-5:00
Saturday 10:00-2:00
759 S. State St. Ukiah
NOTARY ON DUTY
468-0251
Fax 468-5763
CAMPING
CREEKSIDE
LANDSCAPE
Willits KOA
Family Camping
Resort
License #624806 C27
RESIDENTIAL
COMMERCIAL
Complete Landscape Installation
• Concrete & Masonry • Retaining Walls
• Irrigation & Drip Sprinklers
• Drainage Systems • Consulting & Design
• Bobcat Grading • Tractor Service
Excavating & Deer Fencing
Joe Morales
(707) 744-1912
(707) 318-4480 cell
COUNTERTOPS
Handyman Service
or (707) 367-4098
CHRISTMAS
CARDS & STATIONERY
LANDSCAPING
Rent-A-Man
Tile Work • Electrical
• Plumbing • Home Repair
• Building-Maintanence
• Woodworking
Serving the Greater Ukiah
Area & Willits
Residential • Commercial
No Job Too Big or Small
We Do’Em All!
Custom Photo Calendars
Mugs • T-Shirts
Mousepads & More!
SOLID SURFACE &
LAMINATE COUNTERTOPS
2485 N. State St. • Ukiah
Bill & Craig
707.467.3969
CL 856023
Check
Out Our
Website
Day use everyday
except Saturdays
1600 Hwy 20
Willits - 459-6179
willitskoa.com
[email protected]
NOTICE TO READERS
We do not affirm the status of advertisers. We
recommend that you check your contractors
status at www.cslb.ca.gov or call 800-321CSLB(2752) 24/7.
The Ukiah Daily Journal publishes
advertisements from companies and
individuals who have been licensed by the
State of California and we also publish
advertisements from unlicensed companies
and individuals.
All licensed contractors are required by State
Law to list their license number in
advertisements offering their services. The law
also states contractors performing work of
improvements totaling $500 or more must be
licensed by the State of California.
Advertisements appearing in these columns
without a licensed number indicate that the
contractor or individuals are not licensed.
Looking for the best coverage of the
local arts & entertainment scene?
People? Lifestyles? Sports? Business?
You’ll find it in the
The Ukiah
DAILY JOURNAL
Your ONLY Local
News Source.
Call
468-3533
to subscribe

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