GREEN SEA TURTLE - West Hawaii Today

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GREEN SEA TURTLE - West Hawaii Today
–ulu
ku‘ikahi
kaia
A VILLAGE UNITES
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Senate panel
considers
medical
marijuana
dispensaries
GREEN SEA TURTLE
Kansas man:
Hapuna
shark attack
‘surreal’
BY BRET YAGER
WEST HAWAII TODAY
[email protected]
BY CATHY BUSSEWITZ
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
HONOLULU
—
Hawaii state senators are
taking up a proposal to
develop a system of medical marijuana dispensaries, which would give
patients legal access to
the drug nearly 15 years
after it became legal in
Hawaii.
A Senate panel heard
the proposal on Friday.
Maria Eloisa Reyes
attended the hearing with
her son, who because of
a medical condition has
about of 14 seizures per
month despite taking
several medications, she
said. The seizures last as
long as a half hour. Reyes
wants her son to try
medical marijuana, and
she has a degree in agriculture, but she doesn’t
believe she can grow the
plant herself because she
doesn’t have legal access
to the correct strain to
help her son, she said.
“We tried a lot of things
already and we’re out
of options,” Reyes said.
“He is not a candidate
for brain surgery … we
would like to try medical
marijuana.”
“You guys are very
much the reason we are
here today to pass this
legislation,” said Sen.
Josh Green, chairman
of the Senate Health
Committee.
The Honolulu Police
Department
opposed
the bill, but said if the
Legislature is going to
pass it, it should consider
changing the bill so that
it allows just one permit
for each county that covers everything from cultivation to manufacturing.
“I cannot even begin
to imagine what the cost
would be to oversee all
SEE MARIJUANA PAGE 6A
The threatened green sea turtles around the Hawaiian Islands would be managed separately
from other populations under a plan floated Friday by federal agencies. A honu, or sea turtle,
takes a breather at Kukio in North Kona. CHELSEA JENSEN/WEST HAWAII TODAY
A keiki watches a honu
come up on shore.
A honu swims to shore at Kaloko-Honokohau
National Historical Park on Friday. PHOTOS BY
LAURA SHIMABUKU/WEST HAWAII TODAY
Keiki watch a honu
come up on shore.
FEDERAL PLAN WOULD CREATE MANAGEMENT AREAS
BY BRET YAGER
WEST HAWAII TODAY
[email protected]
The threatened green
sea turtles around the
Hawaiian Islands will be
managed separately from
other populations under
a plan floated Friday by
federal agencies. But the
status of Hawaii’s turtles
as threatened under the
Endangered Species Act
won’t change under the
plan, despite a petition
for delisting by an organization of Hawaii civic
clubs.
The proposal, which
will open to public comment for 90 days starting on Monday, would
establish 11 distinct population segments worldwide, allowing regulators
to tailor conservation
policy to local conditions.
“Hawaii would be its
own population segment,” said Pat Opay,
head of the endangered
species branch of NOAA’s
Pacific Islands Regional
Office, in an interview.
The segment and associated management practices would cover 4,000
nesting females, 96 percent of which are in the
French Frigate Shoals.
While researchers have
found an encouraging 4.8 percent annual
increase in the numbers
of nesting females there,
climate change, disease
and interaction with fishing gear still pose dangers to the turtles, Opay
said.
The Association of
Hawaiian Civic Clubs
petitioned
NOAA
Fisheries in 2012 to distinguish Hawaii’s turtles
as a distinct population
segment, and to remove
it from listing under the
ESA to allow for state
and local stewardship of
the species. The agency did find the population to be a distinct one,
according to NOAA. But
regulators kept the turtle
under ESA protections,
citing a small, highly
localized nesting population and threats from
climate change and sea
level rise.
Rebounding sea turtle numbers along the
Pacific Coast of Mexico
and Florida are prompting the U.S. Fish and
Wildlife Service and
NOAA Fisheries to
propose easing the turtle’s standing in those two
regions from endangered
to threatened under the
ESA. But threats from
development, harvesting,
pollution and climate
change are also causing
regulators to call for an
endangered designation
that will heighten protections for populations
through the Central
West Pacific, which has
fewer than 6,500 nesting
females, and the Central
South Pacific, which has
fewer than 3,000 nests.
“Identifying distinct
population
segments
across the green sea turtle’s range would provide the flexibility necessary to help individual
When a 10- to
12-foot tiger shark
cruised up on Kansas
physician Ken Grasing
and slashed his arm
at Hapuna Beach, it
all happened so fast it
seemed like a blur.
“I didn’t realize it was
going to attack me until
I looked down and my
arm was just mangled,”
said Grasing, 58, from
The Queen’s Medical
Center
on
Oahu
Friday afternoon. “I
couldn’t believe it. I
couldn’t really feel it.
The first indication
was the feeling of
light-headedness.”
Grasing is expected
to make a full recovery following the
Wednesday afternoon
attack that shut down
the Kohala beach for
two days. Surgeons at
Queen’s repaired nine
tendons, a nerve and a
muscle in Grasing’s left
forearm.
Grasing, of Overland
Park, Kan., was snorkeling with his two
sons around noon, and
was standing in about
four feet of water looking out to sea when
he saw the dark shape
move up on him.
“I had this feeling
like, is it really happening to me?” Grasing
recounted. “Then when
it bit me I was like, yes,
this is real.”
Grasing struck the
shark once with his free
hand. The animal was
immovable, like a massive wall, he said. His
two sons, Mike, 18, and
Dan, 16, began to yell
for help. Grasing worried the shark would
go after his sons next.
SEE SHARK PAGE 6A
SEE TURTLES PAGE 5A
More than $200M for Big Island projects in House budget
BY NANCY COOK LAUER
WEST HAWAII TODAY
[email protected]
A new courthouse and
hospital for Kona are
among more than $200
million in Big Island projects in the $2.2 billion
two-year capital improvement budget passed
Wednesday by the state
House.
The Senate is finalizing its own budget, and
representatives from both
houses will meet in conference committees next
month to work out the differences. The full spending package, once voted
on by both houses, then
goes to the governor, who
INDEX
has line item veto power.
The biggest project on
the state capital improvement project list, not
just for the Big Island
but for the entire state, is
$55 million to complete
the $90 million Kona
Judiciary Complex, a
project that has already
received $35 million, but
needs the entire amount
for the state judiciary to
be able to sign a construction contract.
“We have been very fortunate this year that the
House has committed
full funding, and now it’s
been sent to the Senate,
and it’s important that all
of our senators unify to
Annie’s Mailbox . . . . . . 4B
HI
84 LO 72
See page 5A for list of
projects in the House bill
make this project a priority for the Big Island,” said
Kona attorney Bob Kim,
a major proponent of the
courthouse.
While a courthouse
is badly needed in West
Hawaii, the project is also
viewed as a major economic engine, Kim said
Friday.
“This is really going to
stimulate the local economy, not just on the west
side,” Kim said. “It’s not
just a Kona thing; it’s
Classified . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6B
WEATHER, PAGE 6A
going to benefit the whole
island.”
Rep. Nicole Lowen,
D-Kailua-Kona, Holualoa,
Kalaoa,
Honokohau,
who sits on the House
Finance Committee, said
the courthouse is her top
priority.
“If we can get the full
funding, we can move this
project forward,” she said.
“We’ve had some funding
over the past two years
that (otherwise) could
lapse.”
Comics . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5B
Of the almost $1.5
billion for the 2016 fiscal year that begins July
1, and $755.3 million
for the 2017 fiscal year,
$689.9 million goes to
CIP projects on Oahu,
$201.7 million goes to
Hawaii Island, $165.1 million goes to Maui County
and $60.57 million goes
to Kauai, according to a
news release from House
leadership.
The budget, HB 500,
appropriates funds for
both operating and capital improvements costs
of the Executive Branch.
For FY2015-2016, the bill
provides $6.5 billion in
general funds and $12.7
Nation & World . . . . . . . . .3A
billion in all means of
financing. For FY20162017, it appropriates $6.8
billion in general funds
and $13.1 billion in all
financing means.
“While the state’s economy seems to be trending
upward, we will continue our cautious approach
to budgeting, even as we
take care of our long-term
unfunded liabilities and
important CIP projects,”
House Speaker Joe Souki,
a Maui Democrat, said in
a statement.
In addition to the courthouse funding, the proposed budget includes
Opinion . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4A
VOL. 47, NO. 80 16 PAGES
SEE PROJECTS PAGE 5A
Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1B
COMMUNITY
2A
Island Life
Volcanoes National
Park partnership
recognized
The nonprofit group
Friends
of
Hawaii
Volcanoes National Park
and Hawaii Volcanoes
National Park received
the
Association
of
Partners for Public Lands
2015 Partnership Award
for public lands partners for their shared
achievements.
Because of the partnership, nearly 140 high
school students in Ka‘u
and Puna have landed
paid internships in the
park since 2010, and thousands of island residents,
visitors and students will
be able to participate with
scientists in discovering
the unique biodiversity of
the park.
The organization’s mission is to support the
park in the protection,
preservation and interpretation of the natural
and cultural resources for
the enjoyment of current
and future generations.
It has raised more than
$700,000 for the national
park since 2009.
Kamehameha
Scholars program
applications
now available
Students
entering
grades nine through 12 in
the fall who are not currently enrolled full-time
at one of Kamehameha
Schools’ three campuses,
and who reside on the
islands of Oahu, Kauai,
Maui or Hawaii are
now eligible to apply for
Kamehameha Scholars.
Kamehameha Scholars
is a year-round supplementary
educational
enrichment program with
a focus on college and
career guidance. The mission of the Kamehameha
Scholars program is to
support Native Hawaiian
students in achieving a
higher education degree,
entering the career of
their choosing and cultivating their ability to be
servant leaders.
Students who complete
the program will receive a
college scholarship.
Applications
must
be submitted and postmarked by March 30.
Applications may be
downloaded at .ksbe.edu/
admissions. Families may
also call the Admissions
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
About
Town
Office at 842-8800 or toll
free at 800-842-4682, ext.
8800, to have an application mailed to them.
Kamehameha Schools’
policy on admissions is
to give preference to children of Hawaiian ancestry
to the extent permitted by
law.
Additional program
information is available at
apps.ksbe.edu/kscholars.
Kailua-Kona Seniors
to attend movie
The
Kailua-Kona
Seniors will attend a
free movie at 10 a.m.
Wednesday at West
Hawaii Civic Center in
Building A. The club will
not meet at Hale Halawai.
For more information,
call Dave at 345-1388 or
Pat at 329-2424.
Applicants sought
for Judicial Council,
Hawaii State Ethics
Commission
The Judicial Council
has extended the deadline in its search to find
qualified applicants to fill
an upcoming vacancy on
the Hawaii State Ethics
Commission created by
a term expiring on June
30. The council is also
extending its deadline
in its search to fill two
upcoming vacancies on
the Campaign Spending
Commission. The new
application deadline is
March 31.
Applicants must be U.S.
citizens, Hawaii residents
and may not hold any
other public office.
Those interested should
submit an application
along with a resume and
three letters of recommendation attesting to
the applicant’s character
and integrity postmarked
by March 31 to: Judicial
Signs posted on a fence at Waikii Ranch along Saddle Road ask passersby not to feed the horses. The
English sign reads, “PLEASE Do Not feed the horses. Overweight.” The Hawaiian pidgin sign reads,
“EHH! No give Kau-Kau to da lio. Stay fat already.” ROB PACHECO/COMMUNITY CONTRIBUTOR
Council, Hawaii Supreme
Court, 417 S. King St.,
Second Floor, Honolulu,
Hawaii 96813-2902.
Applications are available on the Hawaii State
Judiciary website or
by calling the Judicial
Council at 539-4702.
Funds available for
ag conservation
projects
Farmers or ranchers who want to address
water management and
erosion control on their
farming operation can
access federal funds.
The Natural Resources
Conservation
Service
reminds potential applicants to contact their local
NRCS office to find out if
they are eligible for one
of the agency’s Farm Bill
programs, Agricultural
Management Assistance.
Applications for this
ranking period are due at
NRCS offices by close of
business on April 17.
“This federal money is
only available to farmers and ranchers here
in the islands and a few
other states,” said Craig
Derickson, NRCS acting
director for the Pacific
Islands Area.
The
Agricultural
Management Assistance
program provides financial and technical assistance to agricultural
producers to voluntarily address issues such
as water management,
water quality and erosion
control by incorporating
conservation into their
farming operations. At
this time, AMA is only
available in Hawaii and
15 other states. The NRCS
office locator is available
at pia.nrcs.usda.gov.
different states – had in
caring for their own parents in Hawaii.
The session will also
include an update on the
latest efforts by AARP
Hawaii to gain legislative
support for caregivers and
their families.
Caregivers program
planned Thursday
Co-dependent
women meet
Thursday
AARP will present an
event for Hawaii Island
caregivers and residents
preparing to care for
their aging loved ones.
The event will be from 9
a.m. to noon Thursday
at the West Hawaii Civic
Center and is intended to
familiarize residents with
community resources and
supports needed to care
for older friends and family members — as well as
plan for their own future
needs. The event is free
and open to the public.
Register online at aarp.
cvent.com/konacare3-26
or call 877-926-8300.
The event will feature
a keynote presentation by
retired U.S. Army Maj.
Gen. Antonio “Tony”
Taguba, who serves as a
caregiving ambassador for
AARP. His message for
Hawaii residents: Don’t
wait for a crisis to start
planning to care for your
aging parents.
Taguba borrows from
the experience that he and
his siblings – who lived in
Co-Dependents Anonymous women’s meeting
will be from 3 to 5 p.m.
every Thursday at the
Unity Church sanctuary,
75-5722 Hanama Place,
Kailua-Kona.
For more information,
contact [email protected]
or
990-2649
Libraries observing
Prince Kuhio Day
All public libraries will
be closed Thursday in
observance of the Prince
Kuhio Day holiday.
Kealakekua
Public
Library, normally closed
on Thursdays, will also be
closed on Friday in observance of the holiday.
Visit librarieshawaii.org
or call a local library for
public service hours.
Aloha readers!
West Hawaii Today is seeking community
contributors to share photos of not only the Big
Island’s beauty, but also the events and people that make our island special. Your photos
may be featured in the daily print edition.
Be sure to check the Island Life/Community
page each day to see if your photo made the cut.
Send photos to [email protected] and be sure to
include “Island Life” in the subject line, as well as
your name and a brief description of the photo.
We encourage you to submit high-resolution
photos for sharp reproduction in our publication.
Photos can also be submitted via West Hawaii Today’s website at westhawaiitoday.com/island-life.
It’s your community – show it off
WEST HAWAII TODAY | SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
IN BRIEF
White House leaving
open possibility of
troop presence in
Afghanistan after 2016
WASHINGTON — The
Obama administration is
suggesting it could recon sider its plan to remove
nearly all U.S. troops from
Afghanistan by the end of
2016 as part of an effort
to ensure that the Afghans
can maintain security in
their country.
Jeff Eggers of the White
House’s National Security
Council said Friday the U.S.
still intends to pursue its
withdrawal strategy, which
calls for a U.S. security
cooperation office in Kabul
beyond 2016 of about
1,000 U.S. troops, but no
major troop presence.
But Eggers left open
the possibility that could
change, saying the post2016 plan will be consid ered on an ongoing basis.
President Barack Obama
is meeting next week with
Afghan President Ashraf
Ghani and Chief Executive
Abdullah Abdullah and is
expected to announce
plans to slow down the
pace of troop withdrawals
between now and the end
of 2016.
“The question of the
post-2016 plan will, of
course, flow from that, and
it’s fair to say that will need
to be considered in the
same way given the intent
to maintain this ongoing
dialogue with President
Ghani and his team,”
Eggers said.
Investigators probe
cause of black man’s
hanging in Miss.
PORT GIBSON, Miss.
— An FBI agent appealed
for patience Friday after
a black man was found
hanging from a tree in
Mississippi, saying 30 fed eral, state and local agents
were working intensively
to determine whether he
was killed or committed
suicide.
“Everybody wants
answers and wants them
quickly. We understand
that,” FBI Special Agent
Don Alway told a crowd
outside the Claiborne
County Courthouse. “We
are going to hold off on
coming to any conclusions
until the facts take us to a
definitive answer.”
The county coroner confirmed that the man found
hanging from a white sheet
Thursday was Otis Byrd, an
ex-convict reported miss ing by his family more than
two weeks ago. Byrd lived
just 200 yards from the
spot where his body was
found, in a wooded area off
a dirt road that ran behind
his house.
Alway said investigators
are interviewing Byrd’s
family and friends and
searching his rental home
and a storage unit for clues,
and will not reveal any evi dence along the way.
3A
SOLAR ECLIPSE
MILLIONS IN EUROPE VIEW ECLIPSE WITH ODD DEVICES
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
SVALBARD, Norway — A
solar eclipse briefly darkened
the sky over northern Europe
on Friday, and millions used
sun viewers ranging from
a welder’s mask to a dental
X-ray to watch the cosmic
phenomenon.
While the best spot to view
the rare total eclipse was in
the remote Norwegian archipelago of Svalbard, possibly
the worst was in murky and
damp London. But that didn’t
stop schoolchildren wearing
protective glasses from looking up at the thick cloud cover
over the Royal Observatory in
Greenwich Park.
And a dog owner even put
shielding eyewear on his
pooch in London’s Regent’s
Park.
Spectators were creative in
trying to get a glimpse of the
The total solar eclipse is seen from Svalbard, Norway Friday.
HAAKON MOSVOLD LARSEN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
eclipse. The welder’s mask was
held up to the sky by a woman
in Ukraine, while a man in
Kosovo used a dental X-ray
to better observe the wonder. Others used makeshift
pinhole projectors, while one
viewer used a dark glass plate
in Bosnia’s capital.
The Dutch royals got in
the mood, with King WillemAlexander and Queen Maxima
A woman use a welder’s mask
to watch the solar eclipse in
Kiev, Ukraine, Friday.EFREM
LUKATSKY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
watching the eclipse at the
Fish Market in Hamburg,
Germany. The queen, dressed
from head to toe in red, smiled
as her husband pointed up to
the sky in delight.
Netanyahu’s ties to Obama hit new low
BY DEB RIECHMANN
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
WASHINGTON — House
Speaker John Boehner is heading to Israel as already strained
relations between the White
House and newly re-elected
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin
Netanyahu hit a new low this
week.
On the surface, the Republican
leader’s announcement Friday
that he’ll visit Israel looks like a
jab at the White House.
But a congressional aide
insisted that Boehner’s trip —
during the two-week congressional recess that begins March
30 — was planned before new
rifts developed over Netanyahu’s
address to Congress and the
prime minister’s remarks this
week about the peace process.
The aide spoke on condition
of anonymity because he wasn’t
authorized to publicly disclose
details of the trip.
President Barack Obama
bristled when Boehner invited Netanyahu to address U.S.
lawmakers earlier this month
about his fears that an emerging
nuclear agreement would pave
Iran’s path to nuclear weapons.
Relations took another hit
Monday when Netanyahu made
hard-line statements against the
establishment of a Palestinian
state.
Speaking on the eve of his
re-election, Netanyahu said
there could be no Palestinian
state while regional violence and
chaos persist — conditions that
could rule out progress on the
issue for many years. That ruffled the Obama administration,
House Speaker John Boehner
of Ohio, speaks during a
press briefing in the U.S.
Capitol in Washington. MOLLY
RILEY/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
which views a two-state solution
as a top foreign policy priority
and had dispatched Secretary
of State John Kerry for months
of shuttle diplomacy in an effort
to reach an Israeli-Palestinian
peace agreement that never
materialized.
On Thursday, Netanyahu
seemed to backtrack, saying in
a TV interview that he remains
committed to Palestinian statehood — if conditions in the
region improve. Netanyahu told
MSNBC that he hadn’t changed
his policy and that he remained
committed to the two-state
vision he spelled out in a landmark 2009 speech.
Obama called Netanyahu
to congratulate him on his
re-election, but also told the
Israeli leader that the U.S. is
reassessing its approach to
Israeli-Palestinian peace in
light of his comments about
a Palestinian state. A White
House official said Obama also
raised Netanyahu’s critical comments about Israeli Arabs ahead
of the election, which the White
House has denounced as a “cynical” effort to mobilize voters.
Asked
whether
Obama
got a better understanding
of Netanyahu’s position on a
Palestinian state after talking
with him, White House spokesman Josh Earnest said Friday:
“That was not the result of the
call.”
Earnest said the administration has not decided what a
reassessment in policy might
mean. But he noted that in
the past, the U.S. has regularly opposed U.N. resolutions to
create a Palestinian state by
arguing that such a two-state
arrangement should be negotiated between the parties.
“What has now changed is
that our ally in those conversations, Israel, has indicated that
they are not committed to that
approach anymore,” Earnest
said.
Republicans have seized on
the strained ties.
On Capitol Hill on Thursday,
Boehner, R-Ohio, mocked the
administration’s chilly reaction
to Netanyahu’s election victory.
Asked about Obama’s lukewarm response, Boehner said,
“Lukewarm?” and laughed
heartily.
Sen. Tom Cotton, R-Ark., who
wrote a letter signed by 46 other
GOP senators that warned Iran
that any deal could be scrapped
by Obama’s successor, scolded
administration officials for their
handling of U.S.-Israel relations.
“The Obama administration
… has gone off the deep end
and let their personal bitterness
towards the Israeli prime minister drive their public foreign
policy toward our closest ally,”
Cotton said.
Sen. Marco Rubio, R-Fla.,
a potential presidential candidate, said in a floor speech
Thursday that the rift between
Obama and Netanyahu needs to
be worked out privately to avoid
empowering U.S. and Israeli
enemies.
“This president is making a
historic mistake,” Rubio said.
“Allies have differences, but
allies like Israel, when you have
a difference with them and it is
public, it emboldens their enemies to launch more rockets out
of southern Lebanon and Gaza,
to launch more terrorist attacks,
to go to international forums
and delegitimize Israel’s right
to exist. And this is what they’re
doing.”
“This is outrageous. It is irresponsible. It is dangerous, and
it betrays the commitment this
nation has made to the right of
a Jewish state to exist in peace,”
Rubio said.
But the rift remains for now.
White House chief of staff
Denis McDonough plans to give
a speech Monday to a liberal-leaning Jewish group that
often criticizes the Israeli government, especially Netanyahu,
and has expressed deep disappointment at his re-election.
–
A VILLAGE UNITES
ku‘ikahi
kaia
ulu
A TASTE OF KONA FOOD FESTIVAL
By wire sources
presents
SHERATON KONA RESORT & SPA AT KEAUHOU BAY
SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 2015
11 BIG ISLANDS GREATEST CHEFS
2:00 P.M.- 6:00 P.M.
In honor of
Live Entertainment by
Kaeden and Dexen featuring
ANUHEA, LOEKA,
BULLA KAILIWAI,
Matsuyama
– KAHUA
NA
TICKETS
$40
DONATION
SILENT AUCTION
CRAFT BOOTHS AND
KEIKI CORNER - $10 WRISTBANDS AT
THE DOOR, ALL DAY INCLUDING WATER SLIDES.
10:00 A.M. - 6:00 P.M.
For more information please call Allan Jose 960-0355 or Mehana Kihoi 747-5612
Please NO Outside Food or Drink
4A
OPINION
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
EDITORIAL
LOS ANGELES TIMES (TNS)
In Syria,
diplomacy
is failing but
humanitarian
aid must not
A
t this point, the best solution to the
staggeringly brutal but seemingly
stalemated civil war in Syria is
probably a diplomatic one. But with support
for Syrian President Bashar Assad by China
and, more reliably, Russia, diplomacy so
far has failed. As permanent members
of the U.N. Security Council, they have
exercised their vetoes four times to block
actions against Syria, including one that
would have referred war crime allegations
to the International Criminal Court at The
Hague. They did sign off on resolutions
calling on member nations to supply
humanitarian aid to Syria, demanding an
end to attacks on civilians and authorizing
aid workers to enter Syria without Assad’s
permission. But human rights groups and a
spokesman for U.N. Secretary-General Ban
Ki-moon say member nations have failed to
deliver. And Assad and various rebel forces
continue to target civilians, observers say.
Meanwhile, humanitarian need rose by
a third last year. According to the recent
“Failing Syria” report by 21 human rights
organizations, nearly 12 million people
lack reliable access to clean water, and
10 million lack access to food. Nearly
half of the nation’s prewar population
of 22 million has been displaced, 3.7
million of them to other countries. Last
year 76,000 people died in the fighting,
more than a third of the 220,000 deaths
since the war began four years ago.
Secretary of State John F. Kerry said
recently that unspecified diplomatic
efforts are underway to try to force Assad
to cede power, but he gave no indication
that there was cause for optimism. With
Russia and China protecting Assad from
significant Security Council actions, he
has little reason to negotiate so long as
he thinks he might survive the war.
As the diplomats try to end the fighting,
the international community should step up
humanitarian aid. Last year, only 57 percent
of the $6 billion needed was provided; the
year before, U.N. member nations provided
71 percent of the $4.4 billion needed. In
all, the aid groups estimate that it will
take $8.4 billion to meet humanitarian
needs in and around Syria. At the same
time, other nations have offered to
resettle only 2 percent of the refugees.
The persistence of the violence and the
inadequate response are, as the report
says, “a stain on the conscience of the
international community.” History, and
perhaps The Hague, will judge Assad.
But history also will judge how the rest
of the world behaved in a time of crisis.
KATHLEEN PARKER | THE WASHINGTON POST
Hillary & the Media: Act 2016
W
ASHINGTON
— Amid all the
verbiage about
Hillary Clinton’s email, one
irrefutable fact emerges:
Polls will drive us crazy
before the Clintons do.
The latest CNN/ORC
poll shows that a majority
of Americans (51 percent)
think the email controversy
is “serious,” yet 57 percent
would be “proud” to have
her as president. So what
are we to conclude?
Nothing.
As former Texas Gov.
Rick Perry commented
recently: “I was a
front-runner. … Three
of the most glorious
hours of my life.”
So there’s that.
Otherwise, we are left
to our own gleanings
and the question that is
nectar to reporters: What
is Hillary hiding and why
did she create this mess?
Another apt quote
springs to mind: “Follow
me around. I don’t care,”
said the 1988 Democratic
presidential front-runner
Gary Hart to then-New
York Times reporter E.J.
Dionne. “I’m serious. If
anybody wants to put a
tail on me, go ahead.”
And then there he
was soon thereafter on
front pages smiling and
resplendent with an
attractive Donna Rice
sitting sidesaddle on his lap
aboard a boat deliciously
named “Monkey Business.”
This was the beginning
of the end of privacy
for candidates and the
laissez-faire attitude that
the media historically had
toward public figures’
personal lives. For the
record, Hart’s taunt
wasn’t really what led to
his exposure. The Miami
Herald had already been
stalking Hart before
publication of Dionne’s
story, but the legendary
quotes justified the Herald’s
foray into sensation and,
perhaps, assuaged editors’
guilt over going tabloid.
Hart’s challenge and
immediate political
collapse forever changed
journalism, an observation
appreciated by none more
than Bill and Hillary
Clinton, who captured
the White House just
four years later.
The media and politicos
suddenly became symbiotic
characters in a drama that
often centers not on public
works but on scandal. Sex
adds spice, but secrecy
is the plot around which
all revolves. The media
aren’t out to get anyone
necessarily, but the best
reporters will keep digging
until they find gold. The
pursuit of truth has never
been so scintillating nor
so richly rewarded in the
currency of green rooms.
Hillary, by using her
personal email account for
business and then failing
to turn over her records
to the State Department
long after she left office
— and shortly after the
House select committee
on Benghazi asked for
more emails than had
been provided previously
— may as well have said,
“Catch me if you can.”
Is Hillary hiding gold
on her private server?
Is there scandal lurking
in those deleted emails?
Why didn’t she simply
follow the protocol?
We are forced by her
reticence, her avoidance,
her skimpy responses
— her unforced error
— to assume that there
must be something she
doesn’t want the world
to know. But what?
The immediate
assumption has been that
some emails deleted as
personal must pertain to
the attacks on Benghazi.
But a more plausible theory
advanced by National
Journal’s Ron Fournier,
with the sort of caffeinated
certitude that suggests an
excellent source, is that
she doesn’t want people
to see favors exchanged
for donations to the
Bill, Hillary & Chelsea
Clinton Foundation.
Even though the
foundation largely stopped
taking money from
foreign governments while
Hillary was secretary of
state, donations were still
accepted from individuals
and companies. One
was a $2 million pledge
from Chinese billionairephilanthropist Wang
Wenliang, a delegate
to China’s parliament
and owner of Rilin
Enterprises, a construction
LETTERS | YOUR VOICE
Owners are right on
speed hump issue
Faced with the constant
problem of speeders on
Nani Kailua Drive, 62
property owners, whose
properties touch Nani
Kailua Drive, voted on
whether to ask the county
to install speed humps.
Of the 62 property
owners, 54 voted in
favor of speed humps.
Other solutions (fourway stops, roundabouts,
flashing speed signs)
had been considered,
however speed humps
were determined to be
the most effective and
logical solution. With 87
percent of the property
owners in favor of
speed humps, a traffic
engineer was assigned to
assess the 0.8-mile long
Nani Kailua Drive and
determine the number
of necessary speed
humps and where they
should be placed. For
speed humps to be most
effective, the county tries
to space them between
300 to 500 feet apart.
The nine locations
designated for the Nani
Kailua Drive speed
humps were set as close
to 500 feet as possible.
Now, as the speed
conglomerate that has
lobbied Congress and
the State Department.
We may not see a
viral video of Wang
using Lincoln’s bed as a
trampoline should the
Clintons reclaim the White
House. But there can be
little doubt that when
individuals and institutions
give money to the
foundation, their motives
aren’t strictly altruistic.
They’re of course currying
favor with an influential
former president and quite
possibly a future one.
The rub for anyone
who had hoped for
more from Hillary-theInevitable is that none of
this would have happened
had she simply used
the government-issued
phone (or server) for
state business and used
her personal account for
everything else. No scandal,
no media scramble, no
congressional probes.
The foundation and her
personal life would have
been off-limits. Case closed.
Instead, the media and
Hillary are locked once
again into a folie a deux
(shared madness). It’s a
familiar template, which,
though we pretend to
loathe the reiteration,
lends its own strange
comfort. You almost
wonder whether Hillary,
ever the victim, couldn’t
resist placing herself in
troubled waters yet again.
Hating the media —
perhaps Hillary’s fatal
flaw — is the love affair
she just can’t quit.
Kathleen Parker’s email address is
[email protected]
[email protected]
humps are about to be
installed, people not
living on Nani Kailua
Drive are protesting the
installation of the speed
humps. Understandably,
people on Hoene Street
and Aloha Kona Drive
are worried the speeders
and construction trucks
will divert to their streets
to avoid Nani Kailua
Drive’s speed humps.
Despite their complaints,
the only alternative they
can suggest is more
police enforcement.
Unfortunately, the officers
are “too busy” to provide
effective enforcement.
Property owners on
Nani Kailua Drive are
fed up with the speeding
and have followed the
county’s procedures
and rules for properly
requesting speed humps.
The decision on installing
speed humps on Nani
Kailua Drive is now in
the hands of the county
director. He can opt to
comply with the wishes
of the 54 property owners
or he can succumb to
the complaints of people
not owning property
on Nani Kailua Drive.
The decision is a tough
one as it could have legal
ramifications and/or
set a precedence. If the
director sides with the
anti-speed hump group,
will the property owners
be able to sue the county
for lack of action? What
if a speeder causes injury
or damage after the speed
humps request is denied?
Would the county be
liable? Would a precedent
be established where
we as Kona residents
could protest and stop
streets in Hilo from
getting speed humps?
Could someone in Ka‘u
block property owners
in Hawi from taking
steps to deter speeding
in Hawi? You may laugh
at these examples, but
then again, should
someone not living on
Nani Kailua Drive get
to overrule 87 percent of
the property owners?
The property owners
on Nani Kailua Drive are
just trying to make their
street safer. People on
Hoene Street and Aloha
Kona Drive are welcome
to do the same. Speed
hump petition forms and
the requirements are
on the county website.
The Kona Traffic
Safety Committee also
meets every second
Thursday at 5 p.m.
Bradley K. Main
Kailua-Kona
WEST HAWAII TODAY | SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
FROM PAGE ONE
5A
PROJECTS: New courthouse and hospital for Kona are among more than $200 million in Big Island projects
One of those is
$2.4 million for the
design and construction of a Waimea
post-harvest facility
and vacuum cooling
plant.
“Once
farmers
grow their crops,
they need a facility where they can
take their produce
and prepare it for
sale,” Rep. Richard
Onishi,
D-Hilo,
Keaau, Kurtistown,
Volcano, who sits on
the House Finance
Committee, said in a
statement.
“The
Kamuela
Vacuum
Cooling
Plant is that type of
post-harvest facility,”
he said. “It enables
farmers to quickly bring down the
temperature of their
produce which then
ensures a longer shelf
life, increase product
quality and lessens
the potential of product degradation.”
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
$3.5 million for renovations at Kona
Community Hospital
and $1.2 million for
the planning and
design of a new hospital in Kona.
The East Hawaii
Hawaii
Health
Systems Corp. would
benefit from $4.99
million for photovoltaic projects.
Airports would
benefit as well, with
$61 million for the
design and construction of a new
airport rescue firefighters
regional
training facility at
Kona International
Airport and $3.5
million for airfield
improvements
at
Hilo International
Airport.
And, there’s money
for schools, roads
and harbors, as well
as improvements to
boost agriculture.
Big Island capital improvement projects in the House appropriations bill:
• $55 million in continued funding for the design and construction of a Judiciary Complex in Kona
• $1.2 million for the plans and design of a new hospital in Kona
• $2.35 million for the design and construction of a Kamuela post-harvest facility and vacuum cooling plant
• $330,000 for improvements to the research campus in the Hawaii Ocean Science and Technology Park
• $30.212 million for the construction of a new combined support maintenance shop complex for Hawaii Army National Guard
at the Keaukaha military reservation
• $1.675 million for Youth Challenge Academy renovations and improvements at Keaukaha military reservation
• $2 million for the design of Building A phase 1 renovations at Hilo Intermediate School
• $1 million for the construction of bleachers at Honokaa High School
• $230,000 for the construction of drainage improvements and a raised covered walkway at Mountain View Elementary School
• $450,000 for a new baseball batting cage at Waiakea High School
• $1.58 million for the design of a new classroom building at Waikoloa Elementary and Middle School
• $300,000 for parking improvements at Kealakehe Elementary School
• $8.5 million for the land acquisition, design, construction and equipment for a multi-purpose workforce development processing facility
• $1 million for the design and construction for Pu’u Wa’awa’a structure improvements and dam compliance
• $400,000 for the plans and design for improvements at the North Kawaihae small boat harbor
• $600,000 for the land acquisition and design for a community center in Waiakea Uka
• $200,000 for building renovations and improvements at the Paauilo slaughterhouse plant
• $3.5 million for airfield improvements at Hilo International Airport
• $61 million for the design and construction of a new airport rescue firefighters regional training facility at the Kona International
Airport at Keahole
• $1.425 million for physical modifications to improve navigational safety and operational efficiencies at Hilo Harbor
• $3.6 million for Kohala Mountain Road drainage improvements by mile post 10.60
• $8 million for the rehabilitation of Ninole Bridge along Mamalahoa Highway (route 11)
• $15 million for repair and maintenance of feeder roads and alternate routes for Highway 130
• $660,000 for land acquisition to extend the Daniel K. Inouye Highway from the Hilo terminus to the Queen Kaahumanu Highway
• $1.5 million for the construction of portable trailers at Hawaii Community College
• $350,000 to renovate the tennis court at Honokaa High and Intermediate School
• $2.46 million lump sum for renovations at Hilo High School
• $1.23 million lump sum for renovations at Konawaena Middle School
• $780,000 lump sum for renovations at Kohala High
• $4.99 million for photovoltaic projects for East Hawaii HHSC region
• $3.492 million total for renovations at Kona Community Hospital
• $750,000 for an 80 bed intake unit at Hawaii Community Correctional Center to address overcrowding
TURTLES: Threatened species will be managed separately
CORRECTION
A story appearing in Friday’s
Entertainment
section concerning
sunglass collector
Betty Webster contained an incorrect
telephone
number. The Firehouse
Gallery
number
should have read
887-1052. Those
with questions may
call that number or
937-9231 for more
information.
It is the policy of
West Hawaii Today
to correct promptly any incorrect or
misleading information when it
is brought to the
attention of the
newspaper.
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
A honu rests in the sand at Kaloko Honokohau
National Historical Park while park visitors keep
their distance on Friday. LAURA SHIMABUKU/WEST HAWAII TODAY
populations based on
localized threats,” said
Eileen Sobeck, NOAA
assistant administrator
for fisheries, in a statement. “NOAA and our
partners continue to
study green sea turtles to
ensure that our conservation and management
decisions are driven by
the best available science.”
If approved, the rule
changes won’t go into
effect for up to a year,
Opay said.
The proposal is set to be
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published in the National
Register on Monday. A
public hearing is set for
April 8 at 5:30 p.m. at the
Japanese Cultural Center
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ΎŶŶƵĂůWĞƌĐĞŶƚĂŐĞZĂƚĞ͘zŽƵƌWZǁŝůůďĞďĂƐĞĚŽŶLJŽƵƌĐƌĞĚŝƚǁŽƌƚŚŝŶĞƐƐ͘ĞƌƚĂŝŶƚĞƌŵƐĂŶĚƌĞƐƚƌŝĐƟŽŶƐĂƉƉůLJ͘
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WEATHER
6A
TODAY’S WEATHER
Hanalei
Kekaha
79/71
KONA TIDES TODAY
First
High
Low
Second
High
Low
78/71
Kapaa
79/71
Kalaheo
78/70
Time
Height
4:22 a.m. 1.8’
10:36 a.m. -0.3’
Time
Height
5:00 p.m. 2.0’
11:07 p.m. -0.3’
Waialua
80/68
Shown is today’s weather.
Temperatures are today’s
highs and tonight’s lows.
SATELLITE VIEW
Laie
80/71
Mokapu
82/67
Ewa Beach Honolulu
82/69
81/70
Kaunakakai
79/66
Lanai
79/64
SUN AND MOON
Sun
Rise
Today 6:28 a.m. 6:36 p.m.
Sunday 6:27 a.m. 6:36 p.m.
Moon
Rise
Today 7:34 a.m. 8:25 p.m.
Sunday 8:23 a.m. 9:26 p.m.
Last
New
Mar 26
Apr 4
Apr 11
Apr 18
Wailuku
80/67
Hana
80/69
Kihei
83/66
Honokaa
80/66
Hi/Lo/W City
Mountain View NATIONAL SUMMARY: A surge of mild air will bring melting snow to much of the
77/64
Northeast today, while new snow pushes across northern New England. Cold air will
expand over the Upper Midwest. While the Southeast states will be dry, rain will expand
from Texas to the lower Mississippi Valley. Rain is in the offing for the Northwest, with
some sun for the Southwest.
Naalehu
80/70
Hi/Lo/W City
Hi/Lo/W City
Shown are noon positions of weather systems and
precipitation. Temperature bands are highs for the day.
Hilo
80/66
Captain Cook
79/65
NATIONAL CITIES TODAY
NATIONAL WEATHER TODAY
Set
Full
Kailua-Kona
84/72
City
Set
First
Kapaau
81/69
As of 3 p.m. yesterday.
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
Hi/Lo/W City
Hi/Lo/W City
Albany, NY 47/19/sh
Bismarck
47/24/c Cincinnati
65/37/pc Fairbanks
35/11/s Juneau
45/33/sn
Albuquerque
68/41/s Boise
65/40/pc Cleveland
52/24/pc Fargo
36/24/pc Kansas City 72/44/s
Amarillo
69/43/pc Boston
40/23/sn Columbia, SC 75/54/pc
Grand Rapids 46/25/pc
Key West 82/75/s
Anchorage
44/29/s Buffalo
43/20/sn Dallas
62/53/r Green Bay 44/24/pc
Lansing
46/24/pc
Atlanta
73/54/c Charleston, SC 72/55/pc
Denver
73/40/s Honolulu
81/70/pc Las Vegas 85/57/s
Austin
68/56/r Charleston, WV 67/40/pc
Des Moines 60/39/s
Houston
71/63/r Little Rock 66/51/r
Baltimore
57/34/pc Charlotte, NC 74/50/pc
Detroit
53/27/pc Indianapolis
62/34/s Los Angeles 73/57/s
Billings
70/38/pc Cheyenne
68/40/s Duluth
35/15/s Jackson, MS 68/59/r
Louisville
69/43/pc
Birmingham
72/53/c Chicago
51/31/s El Paso
63/46/r Jacksonville
82/62/pc Madison
50/27/s
Weather(W): s-sunny, pc-partly cloudy, c-cloudy, sh-showers, t-thunderstorms, r-rain, sf-snow flurries, sn-snow, i-ice.
Hi/Lo/W City
Memphis
67/53/r
Miami
89/70/pc
Milwaukee
47/30/s
Minneapolis
45/28/s
Nashville
69/48/pc
New Orleans 79/67/t
New York City 52/31/pc
Norfolk
59/43/pc
Oklahoma City 70/53/c
Hi/Lo/W City
Hi/Lo/W City
Hi/Lo/W
Omaha
68/41/s Reno
68/41/pc Seattle
57/41/sh
Orlando
88/68/pc Sacramento
75/54/pc Spokane
56/33/sh
Philadelphia
52/33/pc St. Louis 69/45/s
Syracuse
44/14/sn
Phoenix
85/61/s Salt Lake City 70/44/pc
Tampa
85/69/s
Pittsburgh
55/26/pc San Antonio 68/58/r
Tucson
79/52/s
Portland, ME 38/20/sn
San Diego 71/59/pc
Tulsa
72/49/pc
Portland, OR 62/42/sh
San Francisco 67/56/pc
Washington, DC 64/41/pc
Providence
45/25/sn San Juan, PR 84/72/pc
Wichita
75/43/s
Raleigh
69/47/pc Santa Fe 65/34/pc
Wichita Falls 66/53/c
Forecasts and graphics provided by AccuWeather, Inc. ©2015
John Radcliffe,
president
of Capital
Consultants of
Hawaii, talks to
Hawaii lawmakers
about the need for
medical marijuana
dispensaries
Friday in Honolulu.
Radcliffe told the
panel that he has
been a stage four
liver and colon
cancer patient.
CATHY BUSSEWITZ/
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
MARIJUANA: Island-hopping with
medical marijuana could present serious problems
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
of it,” if there were 26 dispensaries,
said Jason Kawabata, acting major
of the narcotics/vice division of the
Honolulu Police Department. “If it’s
just one site, it would be much easier to inspect.” He also suggested
allowing unannounced inspections of
dispensaries.
Sen. Will Espero, chairman of
the Committee on Public Safety,
Intergovernmental and Military
Affairs, questioned why law enforcement would be against the proposal,
considering that many medical marijuana patients are left to buy the drug
on the black market.
“There could be fights or turf
battles, all because of this,” Espero
said. “There is a criminal element
now that’s likely involved in medical
marijuana.”
Island-hopping with medical marijuana could present serious problems, according to representatives
from the state attorney general. The
bill would allow dispensary employees to deliver medical marijuana
on inter-island flights, essentially
mandating that a state agency permit
a violation of federal law.
“We cannot support inter-island travel with marijuana. … We
strenuously want this committee
to understand that if that provision
remains in the bill it might necessitate a veto recommendation,” said
Jill Nakamine, deputy attorney
general.
The bill also seeks to prevent
counties from enacting zoning regulations that discriminate against
dispensaries.
There are thousands of cancer
patients in Hawaii who could benefit from medical marijuana, said
John Radcliffe, president of Capital
Consultants of Hawaii, adding that
he’s a stage four liver and colon cancer patient.
“You ought to at last end the cruel
hopes now being perpetrated on all
Hawaii patients that we have a medical marijuana program when we
really don’t,” Radcliffe said.
Lawmakers planned to continue
working out the details and postponed making a decision until
Wednesday afternoon, Green said.
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Kansas physician Ken Grasing, who was attacked by a tiger shark at Hapuna
Beach on Wednesday, recounts the experience. SPECIAL TO WEST HAWAII TODAY
SHARK: Victim is expected to make a full recovery
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1A
Standing closer to shore
than his father, Mike
Grasing stood stunned,
not knowing how to react.
A bystander helped
Grasing away from the
scene, and onshore, towels
were used to help staunch
the bleeding. Responding
lifeguards used a tourniquet on the wound,
and Grasing was transported to North Hawaii
Community
Hospital
before being flown to
Queen’s.
The shark left the
area but returned and
could be seen an hour
later swimming just outside the break line at the
empty beach. The state
Department of Land
and Natural Resources
kept the area closed until
Friday because of concerns about poor visibility
and the shark’s aggressive
behavior.
“I’m expected to make
a full recovery,” said
Grasing, who sounded
to be in good spirits in a
room full of media. “It’s
just a bump in the road
for me.”
It was Grasing’s third
trip to Hawaii but his first
to the Big Island. The family was having an early celebration of the eldest son’s
graduation from high
school. Despite the attack,
Grasing talked enthusiastically about what he had
seen snorkeling the reef
for about an hour before
he was bitten.
“We had a great day
snorkeling,” he said. “We
saw all different kinds of
fish. We saw an octopus.”
But Grasing doesn’t
know if he’ll go snorkeling again, and said it concerned him that the tiger
returned to the beach
after the attack.
“I was out there for over
an hour, but it attacked
me right in the public area
where all the people were,”
he said.
Last October, a 12to 15-foot tiger shark
attacked Kailua-Kona
surfer McKenzie Clark
off Halaula Lighthouse
in North Kohala. The
shark missed on the first
lunge, causing McKenzie
and her board to ramp
up on the animal’s back.
The tiger then made a
second pass, latched onto
McKenzie’s board and
began to pull her seaward
by the board’s leash. The
shark had dropped the
board and was returning
for McKenzie when her
companion Brian Wargo
grabbed the dorsal fin and
beat it repeatedly in the
gills with his fist, causing
the shark to leave the area.
McKenzie, 34, received
20 stitches to her left
hand, a skin graft to one
finger, and a 15-inch bite
in the board.
Bill “Papa Pea” Pagett
June 6, 1935 – March 14, 2015
45-year Kona resident, former owner
Kona’s original boutique The Butterfly,
and multiple Ironman Kona finisher,
Bill “Papa Pea” Pagett has left us in
body but will always be with us in
spirit. Papa Pea is survived by sons
Darwin and Sean “Peaman”,
and 6 grandchildren.
Please join the Peaman
Ohana in a Celebration
of Papa Pea’s Life on
Saturday, March 21st,
4:00 - 7:00 PM, at the
Courtyard by Marriott’s
King Kamehameha’s
Kona Beach Hotel
luau grounds.
Aloha attire or Pea
attire. A hui hou.
WEST HAWAII TODAY | SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
7A
IN BRIEF | BIG ISLAND & STATE
Police seek
wanted man
Hawaii Island police are
searching for a 23-yearold Puna man wanted on
a no-bail bench warrant for
violating probation.
Collins
Hopeau is
described
as 5-foot9,
190
pounds
with
brown hair
and black
Hopeau
eyes,
according to the Hawaii Police
Department. His last
known address was in
Pahoa. He is also wanted
for questioning in connection with a burglary investigation.
Anyone with information on his whereabouts
should call the department’s nonemergency line
at 935-3311 or contact
Detective Norbert Serrao
at 961-2383 or [email protected]
co.hawaii.hi.us.
Those who prefer to
remain anonymous may
call the islandwide Crime
Stoppers number at 9618300 and may be eligible for a reward of up to
$1,000. All Crime Stoppers
information is kept confidential.
Protection Plan and is
seeking feedback on the
resource issues that are
important to the public.
The meeting will be
held at 6:30 p.m. March
24 at the West Hawaii
Civic Center Community
Meeting Hale. A workshop
in Hilo will follow at the
same hour on March 30
at the Aupuni Center. The
meetings are two of seven
being held around the
state this month.
Water Commission
seeks public input
Wanted man
arrested on drug and
weapons offenses
The state Commission
on
Water
Resource
Management will hold a
workshop in Kailua-Kona
next Tuesday to gather input on how to best
manage water resources
around the state.
CWRM is updating the
statewide Water Resource
A Kona man who was
wanted for questioning for
an unrelated firearm and
drug investigation was
located Wednesday in possession of a weapon and
drugs.
Kona patrol officers
Church
Directory
observed
38-yearold
Michael
Ventrella
of KailuaKona at a
gas station
on Kuakini
Ventrella
Highway
in Kailua-Kona. They recognized him as a man
wanted for questioning
and identified a 2012 Jeep
next to him as his vehicle. They also identified a
woman with him, 36-yearold Waiola Corcoran of
Kealakekua, as his passenger.
Officers observed a firearm inside the Jeep. They
arrested the two and took
them to the Kona police
cellblock for further investigation. During a custodial
search of Ventrella, police
found 0.5 grams of a white
powdery substance sus-
pected to
be cocaine
and $127 in
cash. The
Jeep was
towed to
the police
station
and
the
Corcoran
Area II Vice
Section took over the
investigation.
After executing a search
warrant on the Jeep,
detectives
recovered
a loaded, unregistered
9-mm handgun with eight
unspent rounds of ammunition, 1 gram of a crystalline substance suspected
to be methamphetamine,
1.1 grams of a dried green
plant material suspected to be marijuana, three
unprescribed pharmaceutical pills and paraphernalia associated with meth
use and intravenous narcotics ingestion.
At 3 p.m. Thursday,
Vice detectives charged
Ventrella with place to
keep pistol, registration
mandatory, permit to
acquire, carrying or possessing a loaded firearm
on a highway, promoting a
detrimental drug and two
counts each of promoting a dangerous drug and
possessing drug paraphernalia. His bail was set at
$93,000.
Corcoran was charged
with promoting a harmful
drug. Her bail was set at
$500.
Both were released from
custody Thursday night
after posting bail.
The Jeep and cash were
seized for forfeiture proceedings.
The unrelated case
Ventrella was wanted for
is still under investigation.
CALVARY
CALVARY
CALVARY
CHAPEL
NORTH KONA
❧
(Formally Kona Christian Fellowship)
74-5599 Luhia st. F-3
430-1313
Great contemporary
worship & line by line
Bible study
Pastor Scott Gills
Sunday Service 9am
Wed. Bible study 7pm
Located in the Old
Industrial area
For information regarding placing
an advertisement in the Church Directory,
please call 930-8654 or fax 329-3659
Konachristianfellowship.com
CHRISTIAN
CHURCH OF
SCIENCE CHRIST
❧
CHURCH
❧
Sunday Services
& Sunday School
10:30am
Wednesday
Service 5pm
Kaiwi Square 74-5565
Luhia st, A-2
For more
information Call:
329-1935
Kamuela / Waimea
We will meet at
The Pukalani Stables
this Sunday.
BL classes are at 9:00 am
Worship is at 10:00 am
Sermon Topic:
“JESUS KNOWS ME!”
Call 889-5499 for
info or directions.
ALOHA E KOMO MAI
and watch
CableTV, Channel 54
Sunday, 10:30 pm &
Wednesday, 12:01 am
KONA BAPTIST
UNITED CHURCH CHURCH (S.B.C.)
❧
HOKULOA
OF CHRIST
❧
OUR FAITH IS
OVER 2000 YEARS OLD,
OUR THINKING IS NOT!
GOD IS STILL SPEAKING…!
Located at
69-1600 Puako Beach Drive
Between Hapuna Beach and
the Mauna Lani Resort.
MARCH 14, 2015
Sunday Worship at 9am
ALL WELCOME!
Rev. John Hoover
883-8295
LIVING STONES
CHURCH
at ALI‘I DRIVE
On the ocean at 76-6224 Ali‘i Drive
❧
SUNDAY SERVICE TIMES
7:30, 9:00, 10:30am & 6pm
Children’s Ministry:
9:00am & 10:30am
Nursery Care @ all services
Prayer Ministry after every service
Outside seating available
MEN’S PRAYER
Join the men’s ministry on Friday,
March 27 @ 7pm for a night of
prayer-standing in faith for our
families and our community.
EASTER
Join us on Easter Sunday to
celebrate Jesus! We will have four
service times: 7:30am, 9:00am,
10:30am and 6:00pm. Children’s
ministry available at the 9:00am &
10:30am services.
www.livingstones.us
ST. AUGUSTINE’S
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
North Kohala, Kapaau, HI
❧
Sunday Worship
7am – Holy Eucharist
9am – Holy Eucharist
(Sunday School provided, followed
with fellowship brunch)
Visiting Priest:
Rev. Bruce DeGooyer
from Bloomington, Illinois
Thrift Shop hours:
Wed: 12pm-3:30pm
Thur: 4-6pm and 4th Sat.
of each month: 10am-Noon
Community Meal offered 4th Sat.
of each month: 11am-12:30pm,
Church Office – 889-5390
All visitors welcome.
Take Hwy 270 North to Kapaau,
1 mile past 33 mile marker, left side
www.staugustineskohala.com
Located 2 miles south of Keahou Bay
on Hwy 11, across from fire station
78-7156 Puuloa Road
SUNDAY:
Bible study all ages 9:00am
Worship service 10:15am
Join us for blended worship
Morning message by
Pastor Dean Stanley
“Jesus the Lamb:
The Provided Lamb”
Sunday Evening Service at 6PM
Message by Pastor Dean Stanley
“Lifestyle Evangelism: Lesson 2”
WEDNESDAY:
Children in Action, Youth Group,
and Adult Prayer 6:00pm
For more info, call 322-3355 or
visit our website:
www.konabaptist.org
THE ECUMENICAL
CHURCH OF LIGHT
❧
Meets on Sundays at 10:00am
just off Mamalahoa Hwy.
Sunday’s speaker will be Rev. Gisela
R. Hetherington who is a spiritual
teacher, lecturer, counselor, and
a licensed massage therapist
working intuitively. Her theme is:
“NO MATTER WHAT, HOPE
AND FAITH WILL GET YOU
THROUGH”
Sunday services consist of a guided
meditation, an inspiring sermon,
psychic messages, inspirational
music, and togetherness in social
hour after service. We offer “Request
a prayer” for all those in physical,
emotional and mental needs.
OUR PURPOSE: To provide a place
for people meeting people sharing
one common goal: Inner Peace
Call
325-5268
KONA CHURCH
OF GOD
❧
A CHRIST
CENTERED LOVING
FELLOWSHIP
Breakfast of Believers
9:15 Sunday
Worship Service 9:45 Sunday
Women’s & Men’s
Ministry 6pm Monday;
Bible Study & Potluck
6pm Thursday
Makai side of Mamalahoa
Hwy., 1 mile north Hina Lani
Pastor Keith Elliott
325-7588
www.konachurchofGOD.com
LUTHERAN CHURCH
OF THE HOLY
TRINITY, ELCA
MOKUAIKAUA CHURCH
CONGREGATIONAL
❧
❧
The Reverend Leslie Ann Mahraun
All are welcome Sundays at 8:00
and 10:15am. Weekly Holy
Communion at both services,
with fellowship and Adult Forum:
The History of Lent,
taught by Dr. Daniel Mahraun.
between services.
Wednesday Lenten Services 7pm
Bible Study Thursdays at 5:30pm
And Choir Rehearsal at 6:30pm
77-165 Lako Street
#808-329-5733, or visit
www.konalutheranchurch.com
www.elca.org
ST JUDE
EPISCOPAL
❧
Sunday Mass 9:30 AM
1st Sunday
Hawaiian Hula Mass
U.S. Most Southern Episcopal
Church
REV. P. DOUGLAS COIL
Serving thru Easter April 5
Where All are Welcome
Paradise Circle @ Keaka Parkway,
Ocean View, Hawaii 96737
808-939-7000
stjudeshawaii.org
Hawaii’s first
Christian Church
Kailua-Kona • Open Daily
Sunday Schedule:
9am Contemporary Service
10:30am Aloha Hour
11am Traditional Service
Pastor David S. de Carvalho
Series: Jesus the Savior of the World
Part: 4 “Jesus Loves the Little Children”
March 7:33-37 & 42-48
Norwegian Choir Performance
Sunday 3/22/15 @ 5-7pm
Koffee with Kahu & Staff 3/24/15 @
9:30-10:30am on the Office Lanai
Youth Group Tuesdays 6:00-8:00pm
Rev. David S. de Carvalho
www.mokuaikaua.org
808-329-0655
CHRIST
CHURCH
EPISCOPAL
❧
Hwy 11 & Konawaena
School Rd. Kealakekua
Dr. Dick Tardiff, Rector
[email protected]
OPEN & AFFIRMING
Sunday Holy Eucharist
7:30 & 10:00am
Keiki School 10:00
KONA COAST
BAPTIST
CHURCH
❧
Sunday School:
10:00am
Sunday Worship:
11:00am & 12:30pm
Kona Outdoor Circle
Pastor William Dierking
(808)-322-3355
KonaCoastBaptist.org
“Study to Show Thyself
Approved unto God,…
Rightly Dividing The
Word of Truth.”
II Tim 2:15
Nursery provided
❧
or “Church on the Beach”
Service Sunday mornings.
Free breakfast 8:30am,
North end of Old Airport Park.
Worship @ 9am
This week Pastor Isy will
continue studying through
the Mark 8
Nursery & Elementary Sunday
School available.
Tues eves. Bible Study
6:30pm Rev. 20,
1st floor (Plaza area) of
Regency at Hualalai.
Call 808-329-1965
GRACE COMMUNITY
CHURCH
“Equipping Followers of Jesus”
❧
74-4889 Palani Rd
Sunday Service @ 10am
Expository teaching desiring to
accurately communicate the
Bible in a practical way.
Nursery & Children’s Church
AWANA for children - Monday
Uprising (Jr High) - Tuesday
Celebrate Recovery - Friday
Resistance (Sr High) - Sunday
Life Groups - Weekly
Men & Women’s Ministries
Rev. Bruce Campbell, Pastor
Gary Summers, Men’s Pastor
Tracey Hamilton,
Children’s Director
Joe Valentino, Youth Director
Call 326-9580 or go to
Gracekona.org
Affiliated with the Evangelical
Free Church
KONA UNITED
METHODIST
❧
74-4960 Palani Rd. Kailua Kona,
English Congregation:
Sunday Worship March 15, at 8:00am
Scriptures: Ephesians 2:1-10;
john 3:14-21
Sermon Title:
“For God so Loved the World”
By Rev Dr. Krista Givens
English choir practice:
Fridays at 4pm: all are welcome
Tongan Congregation:
Sunday Worship 3pm
The Tongan Choir
Men’s group meets every Sunday
after worship
The women’s Unit Program meets
2nd Sunday after worship
The last Sunday of each month is
for youth activities.
Choir rehearsals are
Tues. and Sat at 7:00pm
❧
Saturday Worship 5pm
Kawaihae Harbor Beach
Bring a beach chair!
Sunday Worship
65-1237 Kawaihae Road
7:30 am, 9:00 am (with music)
Nursery/Toddler Room9am service,
Godly Play (ages 3-12)
8:45 am,
Youth Group (teenagers)
Sun. afternoons
Everyone is welcome!
885-4923 or visit our website
www.stjameshawaii.org
“Weaving a lei of love”
Kealakekua, Pualani Terrace
81-6587 Mamalahoa Hwy
Sunday Service 10am
Free childcare.
3/15: Jean-Pierre Thoma, “Take
Flight with Musical Guided Imagery”
Music: J.-P., flutes of diverse cultures
Healing meditation: 9-9:30am
Workshop, 1:30-3:00pm: In-depth
Chakra Balancing with Music
Sufi Dances 5-7pm
Real Love mtgs, Wed & Fri: 4 pm
www.newthoughtcenterofhawaii.com
Call 323-2232
Member, I.N.T.A.
❧
SUNDAYS - 10AM
322-0885
(at Kona Center near Big Island Grill)
75-7522 Hanama Pl.
Rev. Deborah Knowles LUT, LUM
Fellowship follows service
ALL ARE WELCOME
www.uuwesthawaii.org
808-640-4483
- MINISTRIES INT’L
ST. JAMES’
EPISCOPAL CHURCH
❧
UNITY OF KONA
3/22 – “When Beliefs Conflict:
Do we separate or stay together”
Dr. Frank Young
AMAZING GRACE
NEW THOUGHT
CENTER
UNITARIAN
UNIVERSALISTS
OF WEST HAWAII
2nd & 4th Sundays at 4 pm
Kona Outdoor Circle
76-6280 Kuakini Hwy., KK
CHAPEL KONA
A POSITIVE PATH FOR
SPIRITUAL LIVING
❧
Lesson
EVERYONE HAS A MINISTRY –
WHAT’S YOURS?
Childcare & Sunday School
also provided.
www.unityofkona.org
Member-Unity Worldwide Ministries
FREE PARKING
THRIFT STORE OPEN
10-2/Tues-Sat
FREE ITEMS/CLOTHING DAILY!
SEE BRIEFS PAGE 8A
COMMUNITY
CHURCH
❧
Bringing ‘OHANA Together!
76-4295 Leilani Street
For directions visit us at
www.ccckona.org
SUNDAY, MARCH 22
9am Intercession
9:30am ‘Ohana Worship
10am Kid’s Church
“Pacific GLORY Arise”
Metul Veisauyadra
Small Group ‘Ohana and
Special Monthly Gatherings
For more info call, 329-1440
Kahu (Pastor) Kealoha Kaopua
Email: [email protected]
HO‘OLOKAHI
CONGREGATIONAL
❧
March 22, 2015
Pastor Robert Fitts Sr. will
be preaching tomorrow at
Ho‘olokahi
Congregational Church.
His message will be
on healing.
The Church is located at
the Kealakekua Ranch Center
in Captain Cook,
below Ace Hardware
(the old Pearl’s Garden Shop)
Worship service starts at 10:30;
lunch to follow.
For more information, call
936-8320
LIVING STONES
CHURCH
at PINE TREE CENTER
❧
Next to Pine Trees Cafe at
73-4040 Hulikoa Dr.
SUNDAY SERVICE at 9:00am
Children’s Ministry (4-11 yrs)
Nursery Care (0-3 yrs)
Prayer Ministry after service
LOVE, SEX & DATING
Join us Friday, March 27 @ 7pm for
the start of a 4 week series based on
Andy Stanley’s “Love, Sex & Dating.”
EASTER
Join us on Easter Sunday to celebrate
Jesus! We will have two service times:
9:00am & 10:30am
Children’s ministry and nursery care
available at both service times.
www.livingstones.us
SNI KONA
TRUTH OF LIFE
CENTER
❧
79-7517 Mamalahoa Hwy
Kealakekua, HI 96750
Ph: 322-3792 Fax 323-3786
The Seicho-No-Le
Truth of the movement is
nondenominational
Humanity Enlightenment
& Peace by Faith movement
based on the truth that all
religions emanate from the
ONE UNIVERSAL GOD
WAIKOLOA
BAPTIST
CHURCH
WAIKOLOA
COMMUNITY
CHURCH
68-3670 Paniolo Avenue
Waikoloa, HI
www.wbchawaii.org, 883-8080
Denver Copeland, Pastor
SUNDAY SERVICES
WikiWiki Praise Service 8:30 am
Traditional Worship @ 10:00 am
with Children’s Church
BIBLICAL TEACHING
Sunday Services:
9am & 10:30am
Bible Study, Celebration
Service, Children’s Church
Pastor Denver Copeland
“Church/Hospital, Which is it?”
Matthew 8:18-22, 9:9-13
68-3625 Paniolo Ave- 883-8944
(across from Waikoloa School)
Lead Pastor Greg Scott
Youth Pastor Keoni Sugimoto
❧
❧
An Interdenominational
Christian Church
Serving the community 31 years
BECAUSE HE CARES!
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
8A
IN BRIEF | BIG ISLAND & STATE
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 7A
Gas prices
down slightly
Gas prices in West
Hawaii for the most part
remained unchanged this
week, an analysis of AAA
and GasBuddy.com data
shows.
The price per gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline
in West Hawaii — excluding
the Waikoloa resort area —
averaged $3.44 between
Monday and Friday, according to a week’s worth of
GasBuddy.com data from
the Kailua-Kona, Waimea,
Kealakekua and Waikoloa
areas. That’s down just one
penny from last week.
Including the Waikoloa
resort area, where prices
are higher, motorists this
THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT
[CC,DV] (PG-13) ★
(130 PM) 1030 PM
THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT
3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★
(1030 1130 230 430 530) 730 830 930
THE GUNMAN [CC,DV] (R)
(1035 115 405) 650 935
CINDERELLA [CC,DV] (PG) ★
(1045
1145 130 230 415 515) 700 800 945 1045
RUN ALL NIGHT [CC,DV] (R)
(1050 135 440) 710 1010
CHAPPIE [CC,DV] (R)
(1100 150 440) 745 1035
MCFARLAND, USA [CC,DV] (PG)
(100 400) 705 1005
THE DUFF [CC,DV] (PG-13)
(1035 110 345) 620 1115
KINGSMAN: THE SECRET SERVICE
(1240 340) 645 950
[CC,DV] (R)
THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT
[CC,DV] (PG-13) ★
(200 PM) 900 PM
THE DIVERGENT SERIES: INSURGENT
3D [CC,DV] (PG-13) ★
(1100 AM 500 PM) 800 PM
THE GUNMAN [CC,DV] (R)
(1120 205 450) 735 1020
CINDERELLA [CC,DV] (PG) ★
(1115 200 445) 730 1015
RUN ALL NIGHT [CC,DV] (R)
(1105 155 440) 725 1010
CHAPPIE [CC,DV] (R) (1215 305) 605 910
THE SECOND BEST EXOTIC MARIGOLD
HOTEL [CC,DV] (PG)
(1210 PM 310 PM) 610 PM
MCFARLAND, USA [CC,DV] (PG)
(1200 300) 600 905
week spent on average
$3.49, also unchanged
from the week prior,
according to GasBuddy.
com data.
Filling up at Kailua-Kona
gas stations, motorists
spent slightly less than
last week at $3.37 per gallon. That’s up just a dime
from when gas prices in
Kailua-Kona reached a low
of $3.27 in mid-February.
At the Kailua-Kona
Costco, where filling up
requires a membership, a
gallon of gas averaged at
$2.98 this week. Between
Thursday and Friday, the
price dropped four cents to
$2.95 per gallon.
Drivers filling up in
Waimea paid an average of
$3.51 per gallon while the
same gallon of gas aver aged $3.52 in Waikoloa
Village. Filling up in the
resort area of Waikoloa
resort cost drivers an average of $3.69 per gallon this
week. All prices in South
Kohala were unchanged
from the week prior.
In Kealakekua, motorists
doled out $3.36 per gallon
this week, down two cents
from last week.
Hilo drivers spent $3.10
per gallon for the same
gallon of gas, according to
GasBuddy.com data. AAA’s
Daily Fuel Gauge Report
put the average price of gas
at $3.11 per gallon during
the week, unchanged from
the week prior. AAA does
not track gas prices for
any other area on the Big
Island.
The statewide aver
age for a gallon of regular
unleaded fuel held steady
at $3.14, according to AAA.
One year ago, Hawaii residents were paying $4.18
per gallon.
Nationwide, the aver age price for a gallon of
regular unleaded gasoline
this week was $2.42, down
three pennies from last
week. The national average
is up from a low of $2.03 on
Jan. 26.
Lava flow
remains active
Upslope breakouts
along the June 27 lava flow
remained active Friday
morning, Hawaii County
Civil Defense reported.
The breakouts are located from about 8 miles upslope of the flow’s stalled
leading edges to Kilauea
Volcano’s Puu Oo vent,
Civil Defense said.
A breakout on the north-
ern flank of Puu Oo, which
started on Feb. 21, remains
active on the northeastern
base of the cone while the
northern arm of another
breakout near Kahaualea
continues to burn trees
north of Puu Kahaualea,
the U.S. Geological
Survey Hawaiian Volcano
Observatory said.
Breakouts observed previously about 3 to 4 miles
northeast of Puu Oo have
become inactive, while a
small set of new ones were
observed in roughly the
same area.
Officials said there was
“very little activity” in the
lower portions of the flow
where inactive leading
edges remained stalled
less than a mile above
Pahoa. The USGS said that
area of the flow field was
inactive.
None of the activity
posed an immediate threat
to area communities, however, Civil Defense said.
Health insurance
enrollment opens
The Hawaii Health
Connector is opening a
special enrollment period
for individuals and families
who do not have health
insurance, and owe a fee
on their 2014 federal taxes
for not having health insurance. The enrollment period begins now and ends
April 30. During this time,
individuals and families
who meet the above criteria will be able to enroll in
health coverage for 2015.
There are three ways to
apply: Make an appoint ment with a certified
Kokua or licensed health
insurance agent, call the
Customer Support Center
between 8 a.m. and 8 p.m.
Monday through Friday
toll-free at 877-628-5076,
or apply online by creating
an account and completing
an application.
The fee for people
who don’t have coverage
increases in 2015. In 2015,
the fee is $325 per person
or 2 percent of household
income, whichever is higher.
New report says
Hawaii hotel
occupancy fell in
January
HONOLULU — A new
report says Hawaii’s hotel
occupancy in January fell
statewide except for on
Maui.
The Honolulu StarAdvertiser newspaper
reported statewide hotel
occupancy fell 2 percentage points from the previous year, according
to the latest hotel flash
report released Friday by
Hospitality Advisors LLC.
The report said Maui
and Kauai, however, had
new records in revenue
per available rooms. Also,
Maui’s occupancy rose
0.4 percentage points in
January.
Overall, Hawaii hotels
had a 77.5 percent occupancy in January.
The statewide average
daily room rate for January
climbed nearly 2.4 percent
to $254.62, a record for the
month.
But the report said that
record was offset by the
occupancy drop.
The Hawaii Tourism
Authority reported a 0.7
percent jump in visitor
arrivals in January, but
the Hospitality Advisors
report said the number of
people staying in hotels
fell against other choices
including timeshares.
By West Hawaii Today staff and
wire sources
No action on request for cousel for officer
HONOKAA — The Hawaii
County Police Commission
took no action during its meeting Friday on attorney Brian
DeLima’s request for private
counsel to represent Jody
Buddemeyer, the Hawaii Police
Department officer authorities
say struck and killed a bicyclist
March 1 in South Kohala.
Josie Pelayo, secretary for
the commission, said the panel
made its decision based on the
fact that the officer currently is
not being sued and has not been
charged.
DeLima said he was hoping
the commission would proactively make a finding that
Buddemeyer was performing
his duty as a police officer and
agree he is entitled to an attorney should he be charged criminally, or be sued civilly.
Jeffrey Surnow, a 63-year-old
visitor from Michigan, was riding
a bicycle east on Waikoloa Road
near the 11-mile marker when he
was hit by Buddemeyer, who was
driving in the same direction.
The 30-year-old officer was
on duty at the time of the
early morning incident. He
was arrested on suspicion of
negligent homicide and later
released pending further
investigation.
The officer was placed on
administrative leave, according
to officials.
Times For 03/21 © 2015
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SPORTS
INSIDE | PAGE 3B
Rainbow Wahine
fall to St. Mary’s
at WNIT
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
NBA
BIIF BASEBALL
Injured
Durant
shut down
by Thunder
SLIDING BY
BY CLIFF BRUNT
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
OKLAHOMA
CITY
— Reigning NBA MVP
Kevin Durant likely won’t
return this season.
General manager Sam
Presti said Friday that
Durant still has pain in
his right foot, well after he
was expected to be ready
to return. When asked if
the best thing would be
best to shut him down for
the season, Presti said:
“Essentially, that’s the
direction that we’re taking right now, in terms
of removing him from
all
basketball-related
activities.”
Oklahoma City now
faces the prospect of trying to make the playoffs
without the four-time
scoring champion. The
Thunder led the New
Orleans Pelicans by a
game for the No. 8 spot in
the Western Conference
playoffs heading into
Friday night’s games.
Durant is averaging
25.4 points, 6.6 rebounds
and 4.1 assists, but he’s
played in just 27 of the
team’s 68 games this season. He last played Feb. 19
against Memphis and had
surgery three days later
to replace a screw that
was causing discomfort
in the right foot that he
broke during the preseason. At the time, Brooks
said Durant could return
to the lineup in 1-2 weeks.
The Thunder had
hoped to get a boost
from Durant’s return, but
Presti said Durant’s longterm health is his primary
concern. Presti said he’s
unsure of the source of the
current pain, so Durant
will see specialists in the
coming days.
“He’s not making the
progress that we had
hoped and anticipated
him making,” Presti said.
“He still has some soreness in his foot, and the
protocol that’s in place
calls for him to be able
to compete on the floor
without that at this stage.”
This is just the latest in
a barrage of bad news the
Thunder have dealt with
this season. Serge Ibaka,
a versatile forward who is
the team’s best defensive
player, could miss the rest
of the season after having
an arthroscopic procedure
on his right knee earlier
this week.
INSIDE
▶ More BIIF baseball:
Hilo puts a stop to Keaau’s
unbeaten start, PAGE 2B
Kealakehe’s Hunter Cuaresma slides safely by Konawaena catcher Tyler Kitaoka in the second inning of Friday’s BIIIF
baseball game. RICK WINTERS/WEST HAWAII TODAY
BY RICKS WINTERS
WEST HAWAII TODAY
[email protected]
Kealakehe blew an 8-1 lead in
the bottom of the seventh inning
of a BIIF contest to Konawaena,
only to rebound and slam the
door on the ‘Cats in extra innings,
escaping Gabby Inaba Field with
a narrow 10-9 win.
“We are having a tough time
late in the game shutting it
down,” said Kealakehe coach
Josh Hansen. “But the fight in
this team this season is something we have not had in the
WAVERIDERS BLOW BIG LEAD,
REBOUND TO BEAT
WILDCATS IN EXTRAS
past. We keep battling and getting good at-bats. They are driving the ball and driving runs
in and we are competitive right
now.”
Kealakehe (2-2) struck early in
the game, pushing five runs across
the plate in the top of the second
inning thanks to control issues
by Konawaena starting pitcher
Tristan DeAguiar. DeAguiar
walked Louie Garcia and Pulama
Lewis to start the inning. Garcia
stole second and the throw from
the catcher sailed into left, allowing a run.
DeAguiar walked Hunter
Cuaresma and Bryton Lewi
singled down the left field line
to load the bases with no outs.
Makana Kaluau hit a line drive
to left, scoring both Lewis and
Cuaresma for a 3-0 lead.
Keoki Meyers followed with
a single to left, allowing Bryton
Lewi to score. Shaden Lewi hit
a jammed shot to right-center,
loading the bases again and ending the night for DeAguiar.
Logan Canda entered and
forced the first batter he faced to
hit a grounder to third with the
out coming at the plate. Pohaku
Dela Cruz, singled to right-center, scoring Keoki Meyers for a
SEE RIVALS PAGE 2B
COLLEGE BASKETBALL | NCAA TOURNAMENT
Favorites have a much better Day 2 of tourney
THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
Louisville’s Wayne Blackshear celebrates after
Louisville beat UC Irvine 57-55 in an NCAA
tournament Round of 64 game on Friday. TED S.
WARREN/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
There were no big
upsets in the first half
of Friday’s action in the
NCAA
Tournament.
There will be, however, some good matchups in the round of 32,
including one the state of
Kansas has been anticipating for almost 20
years.
The Atlantic Coast
Conference ran its perfect start to 6-0, and the
Pac-12 is 4 for 4 so far.
Big Ten teams are 6-1,
while the Big 12 is 3-4.
SOUTH REGION
DUKE 85,
ROBERT MORRIS 56
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Quinn
Cook scored 22 points to
help No. 1 seed Duke get
off to a torrid start.
Freshman Jahlil Okafor add-
ed 21 as the Blue Devils (30-4)
wasted little time getting their
offense revving, hitting their
first seven shots and 12 of 15
to quickly build a big lead.
That’s not to say everything
went smoothly for Duke, a
team with half of its eight
scholarship players making
its tournament debut. Hall of
Fame coach Mike Krzyzewski
furiously burned a timeout
after Okafor blew a reverse
dunk, while Robert Morris —
the No. 16 seed that had to
win a First Four game to get
here — showed plenty of fight.
SAN DIEGO STATE 76,
ST. JOHN’S 64
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — JJ O’Brien
scored 18 points for San Diego
State, and Dwayne Polee II
added 15 points on five 3-pointers
against his former team.
Skylar Spencer added 10 points
and seven rebounds for the
Aztecs (27-8), who will face the
top-seeded Duke on Sunday.
The Aztecs never trailed in the
second half and improved to 6-4
in NCAA Tournament play since
2011 under coach Steve Fisher.
SEE NCAA PAGE 2B
SPORTS
2B
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
RIVALS: ‘Riders rebound in extras
GLANCE
BASEBALL
DIVISION I
Keaau
Waiakea
Hilo
Kealakehe
DIVISION II
Kamehameha
Hawaii Prep
Pahoa
Kohala
Konawaena
Honokaa
Tuesday
Hilo 4, Honokaa 3
Kamehameha 8, Kealakehe 3
Keaau 6, Konawaena 5
Waiakea 15, Hawaii Prep 0
Friday
Hilo 7, Keaau 5
Kamehameha at Waiakea,late
Kealakehe 10, Konawaena 9
Saturday
Kohala at Hawaii Prep, 11 a.m.
W-L
4-1
3-0
3-2
2-2
W-L
3-0
1-2
1-2
1-2
1-4
0-4
Konawaena
1-1
Honokaa
1-1
Kohala
1-2
Ka’u
1-2
Pahoa
0-2
Hawaii Prep
0-2
Wednesday
Hilo 11, Kohala 9
Kamehameha 12, Konawaena 1
Honkaa 26, Pahoa 2
Kealakehe 4, Waiakea 3
Saturday
Hilo at Konawaena, 1 p.m.
Keaau at Honokaa, 1 p.m.
Pahoa at Kealakehe,10:30 a.m.
Kohala at Waiakea, 1 p.m.
TENNIS
BOYS VOLLEYBALL
DIVISION I
W-L
Kamehameha
3-0
Hilo
5-1
Waiakea
4-1
Kealakehe
3-1
Keaau
1-3
DIVISION II
W-L
Hawaii Prep
2-0
Pahoa
3-1
Ka’u
3-1
Konawaena
1-2
Laupahoehoe
1-3
Honokaa
0-2
Kohala
0-3
Ke Kula O Ehunuikaimalino
0-4
Christian Liberty
0-4
Tuesday
Keaau def. Ehunui 25-14, 25-15, 25-11
Waiakea def. Pahoa 25-16, 25-22,
25-14. JV: Waiakea wins 2-0
Wednesday
Hilo def. Honokaa 25-18, 25-14,
25-17Ka‘u def. Kohala 25-20, 30-28,
25-22
Thursday
Konawaena def. Keaau 25-17, 23-25,
25-21, 25-18
Friday
Ka‘u at Kealakehe, not reported
Konawaena def. Honokaa 25-20,
25-18, 25-17
Saturday
Pahoa at Konawaena, 10 a.m.
Keaau at Kohala, 10 a.m.
Waiakea at Laupahoehoe, 10 a.m.
BOYS
W-L
Hawaii Prep
6-0
Waiakea
5-1
Konawaena
4-0
Hilo
4-1
Kealakehe
3-0
Kohala
2-1
St. Joseph
1-3
Keaau
1-2
Makua Lani
1-2
Parker
0-3
Kau
0-4
Kamehameha
0-5
Honokaa
0-5
GIRLS
W-L
Hawaii Prep
5-0
Waiakea
5-1
Konawaena
4-0
Kealakehe
3-0
Kohala
1-1
Keaau
1-2
Parker
1-2
Makua Lani
1-2
Hilo
1-3
Kamehameha
1-4
Kau
0-0
St. Joseph
0-3
Honokaa
0-5
*Standings as of March 14.
Saturday
Kohala at Hilo, 10 a.m.
Kamehameha at Konawaena, 10 a.m.
Makua Lani at Ka‘u, 10 a.m.
Parker at Keaau, 10 a.m.
St. Joseph at Honokaa, 10 a.m.
Kealakehe at Waiakea, 10 a.m.
TRACK AND FIELD
Saturday
at Keaau, field 2 p.m./running 3 p.m.
WATER POLO
GOLF
March 30
At Waikoloa Kings’ Course, 10 a.m.
JUDO
March 28
At Kealakehe High School, 10 a.m.
Kealakehe vs. Ka’u
Keaau vs. Kamehameha
Waiakea vs. Hilo
Konawaena vs. Kamehameha
Hilo vs. Ka’u
Waiakea vs. Kealakehe
Konawaena vs. Keaau
Ka’u vs. Kamehameha
Hilo vs. Kealakehe
Waiakea vs. Keaau
Kealakehe vs. Konawaena
SOFTBALL
DIVISION I
Hilo
Kealakehe
Keaau
Waiakea
DIVISION II
Kamehameha
W-L
2-0
2-0
1-0
0-1
W-L
2-0
Standings
W-L
Konawaena
2-0
Kamehameha
1-0
Waiakea
1-0
Hawaii Prep
0-0
Kealakehe
0-2
Hilo
0-2
Saturday
At Kona Community Aquatic Center
Konawaena vs. Hawaii Prep, 9 a.m.
Kealakehe vs. Hilo, 10:15 a.m.
Waiakea vs. Kamehameha, 11:30 a.m.
Hilo vs. Konawaena, 1:15 p.m.
Hawaii Prep vs. Waiakea, 2:30 p.m.
Kamehameha vs. Kealakehe,
3:45 p.m.
Reporting scores
Host schools are responsible for
reporting scores, but visitors are
welcome to report as well.
Information should include JV
score, and varsity score. Stats are
optional but welcome.
Scores may be reported by phone
to 930-8616 or emailed to [email protected]
westhawaiitoday.com.
Hilo puts a stop to
Keaau’s unbeaten start
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
a 5-0 lead. Canda finally escaped the second
inning after forcing fielder’s choice at home and
striking out a batter. All
five runs were charged to
DeAguiar.
While
Konawaena’s
starter struggled, the
Kealakehe starter looked
strong. Dela Cruz recorded eight straight outs
before walking Kaiya
Leleiwi in the third. He
would get the next batter
to fly out to center.
The Kealakehe offense
scored a run in the fifth
and two in the sixth, while
Konawaena’s
offense
picked up with one run in
the fifth and sixth innings
to make in an 8-2 game
heading into the final
inning.
After
Canda
put
Kealakehe down in the top
of the inning, Dela Cruz
was pulled after working
the first six. He allowed
only two runs on two
hits, but would get a no
decision as the Wildcats
scored six runs against
two relievers, while only
recording two hits in the
bottom of the seventh
“Pohaku pitched his
butt off today, “Hansen
said. “That kid is a competitor and he gives us a
chance to win.”
Markus
Degrate
entered in relief first but
struggled with his control.
He allowed a pair singles to Kaiya Leleiwi and
Shelton Grace, and then
hit Skye Suzuki to load
the bases with one out. He
then walked two, allowing
Phillip Grace and Canda
to score. Degrate was
pulled for Shaden Lewi.
Konawaena
continued to rally when Tyler
Kitaoka reached on a
fielder’s choice to second. The runner at the
base was called safe on a
controversial call by the
umpire, who ruled the bag
was not touched. Shelton
Grace crossed the plate to
cut the deficit to three.
A walk to Kolu Alani
brought in Phillip Grace
and a wild pitch scored
Canda to make it a one
run game. After an intentional walk to AJ Allred,
Kaiya Leleiwi laid down
BIIF BASEBALL
BY MATT GERHART
HAWAII TRIBUNE-HERALD
Kealakehe starting
pitcher Pohaku
Dela Cruz took a
no decision despite
allowing only two runs,
off two hits, in six
innings of work against
Konawaeana. RICK
WINTERS/WEST HAWAII TODAY
a perfect squeeze to score
Kitaoka for the tying run.
All six runs were charged
to Degrate.
Heading into extra
innings, the Kealakehe
offense continued to fight
and they were aided by
the Wildcat defense when
Dustin Waiau reached second on a throwing error
to lead off the inning. A
sac-bunt by Shaden Lewi
moved Waiau to third and
he scored on a infield hit
by Degrate. After Dela
Cruz walked, Garcia hit
into what should have
been a double play, but a
bad throw to first allowed
him to reach safely and
allowed Degrate to score
for a 10-8 advantage.
Konawaena’s second
comeback bid fell just
short. Suzuki and Phillip
Grace walked, ending the
night for Shaden Lewi,
but he would eventually pick up the victory.
Makana Kaluau entered
and allowed a run scoring double to Kitaoka, but
with two outs, he forced
Alani to hit a grounder to
second to end the game.
“We were dead for the
first six innings and finally had a spark back to
life in the seventh,” said
Konawaena head coach
Kevin Taberios. “I like the
fight, we just can’t seem
to put everything together
and tonight the hits came
way to late.”
Keal 051 002 02 — 10 15 3
Kona 000 011 61 — 9 7 2
Coach Tony De Sa
can rest easier now
that Hilo is starting to
produce with its bats.
The Vikings not
only hit the ball to all
fields Friday, but they
did so with two outs.
But when push
came to shove, Hilo
took advantage when
Keaau (4-1) started
booting the ball all
over Wong Stadium.
The Vikings took
advantage of four
six-inning
errors
to push across two
runs for a 7-5 victory, handing the
Cougars their first Big
Island Interscholastic
Federation
Interscholastic loss.
“We’re starting to be
patient at the plate,”
De Sa said, “not just
swinging at first pitches like we were doing
early in the year.
“We’ve got to stop
the errors, but we
worked around it.
We showed some
character.”
The teams combined for 10 errors,
including six in the
sixth as a game of
giveaway broke out.
Keaau’s Erik Arnold
reached on an error
and courtesy runner
Delvin Ongais scored
on another error as
the Cougars completed a comeback from a
5-1 deficit.
But Keaau’s best
start to a season since
2003 took a sloppy
turn.
“I can live with it,”
coach Herb Yasuhara
said. “The guys could
have easily folded,
but they believed and
came right back.”
Hilo’s Chase CostaIshii and Micah
Bello both reached
on errors to open
the bottom of the
sixth against reliever Keian Kanetani,
and courtesy runner
Ryan Ragual scored
the go-ahead run on a
throwing error.
“Everyone picked
themselves up and
we came back,” Hilo’s
Josiah Factora said.
“We didn’t come back
hitting-wise, but we
took it from them.”
Factora drove in
two runs in the first
with a two-out double and also tripled,
and the right-hander
delivered five solid
inning in his second
start of the season.
De Sa is looking for
three capable starters
come the postseason.
Joey Jarneski tossed
a scoreless seventh for
the save as he rounds
his arm back into
shape and figures to
be the ace. Jarneski
also hit a two-run single with two outs in
the third.
Riley
Macanas
gave up an unearned
run in the sixth and
got the victory after
Factora allowed six
hits and four runs –
two earned – with a
walk, two hit batters
and two strikeouts.
Hilo (3-2) has won
three in a row since
a surprising loss to
Kohala.
“We’re starting to
execute and make our
plays,” said Factora, a
rare upperclassman
starter for Hilo. “A lot
a lot of the younger
players make mistakes
and they get down on
themselves, so I have
to pick them up.”
Noah Serrao had
two hits for Hilo,
Noah Higa-Gonsalves
scored twice and
drove in a run and
Russell Ragual nearly
had a home run in the
sixth when his double
hit the wall in left.
Keaau 100 031 0 – 5 6 6
Hilo 300 202 x– 7 8 4
NCAA: With exception of Dayton, upset-lovers were losers on Day 2 of tourney
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1B
GONZAGA 86,
NORTH DAKOTA STATE 76
SEATTLE — Kyle Wiltjer
scored 23 points to lead
Gonzaga to the victory.
The second-seeded Zags (33-2)
will play Iowa on Sunday to try
to make the second weekend
of the NCAA Tournament for
the first time since 2009.
Sophomore Dexter Werner
had a career-high 22 points
— all of them entertaining —
while keeping North Dakota
State (23-10) within range
for much of the game.
IOWA 83, DAVIDSON 52
SEATTLE — Aaron White
scored 13 straight points as
part of Iowa’s 18-3 run early
in the second half, and the
seventh-seeded Hawkeyes
rolled into the round of 32.
White finished with 26
points as Iowa (22-11) used its
significant height advantage to
overwhelm the champions of the
Atlantic 10 Conference regular
season. Mike Gesell added 15
points for the Hawkeyes.
EAST REGION
MICHIGAN ST. 70,
GEORGIA 63
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Denzel
Valentine scored 16 points
and went 6 for 6 at the
free-throw line in the final 30
seconds, helping Michigan
State hold on for the win.
Travis Trice scored 15 points
for the seventh-seeded Spartans
(24-11), who answered a push
from the Bulldogs with a poised
run to take back control.
They weren’t so steady coming
down the stretch, flirting with
blowing a 10-point lead in
the final 1:16. Valentine’s free
throws were critical as Georgia (21-12) rallied to make it
a one-possession game.
Michigan State advanced to
face second-seeded Virginia
in Sunday’s round of 32.
VIRGINIA 79,
BELMONT 67
CHARLOTTE, N.C. — Malcolm Brogdon scored 22
points and Justin Anderson
re-emerged as a scoring threat
for second-seeded Virginia.
Anderson had 15 points on
4-of-6 shooting and Anthony Gill added 16 points for
the Cavaliers (30-3).
Anderson, playing with his
broken left pinky taped to
his ring finger, scored for the
first time since Feb. 7 against
Louisville. He was shut out in
two ACC Tournament games.
Like last year when Virginia
avoided a historic upset and held
on to beat 16th-seeded Coastal
Carolina, the Cavaliers needed a
late second-half push to advance.
Belmont (22-11) had clawed
within two behind 25 points from
Crag Bradshaw, but the Cavaliers
outscored the Bruins 17-7 over
the final 4:37 of the game.
NORTHERN IOWA 71,
WYOMING 54
SEATTLE — Paul Jesperson
led five Northern Iowa players
in double figures with 16 points,
and Sean Tuttle scored 14 for
the fifth-seeded Panthers.
Northern Iowa (31-3) built a
21-point lead after scoring 11
of the first 12 points to start
the second half. That lead was
whittled to seven points twice
but the Cowboys could get no
closer. Wes Washpun scored
eight of his 10 points in the final
9 minutes to help the Panthers
advance to face fourth-seeded Louisville on Sunday.
Larry Nance Jr. led Wyoming (25-10) with 16 points.
He had one point and one
shot in the first half.
Northern Iowa won for the
20th time in the past 21 games.
LOUISVILLE 57,
UC IRVINE 55
SEATTLE — Freshman Quentin
Snider hit the winning free throws
and Terry Rozier made the saving
steal for fourth-seeded Louisville.
the final of the Atlantic 10
Tournament on Sunday in New
York, then winning a First Four
game against Boise State on
its home court Wednesday.
MIDWEST REGION
WEST VIRGINIA 68,
BUFFALO 62
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Tarik
Phillip hit a big 3-pointer for
fifth-seeded West Virginia with
28 seconds left while the shot
clock was winding down.
The Mountaineers (24-9)
will take on No. 4 Maryland (27-6) on Sunday.
Devin Williams, who led the
Mountaineers with 17 points
and nine rebounds, hit two free
throws with 2:10 left to give
his team the lead for good.
Xavier Ford had 11 of his
16 points in the second half
for the Bulls (23-10).
Dayton’s Dyshawn Pierre celebrates late in a NCAA
tournament game against Providence in the Round MARYLAND 65,
VALPARAISO 62
of 64. PAUL VERNON/THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
With the game tied, Snider
snagged a rebound in the
corner off a long miss by Luke
Nelson and drew a foul when
Will Davis II crashed into him.
Snider made the free throws
with 8.9 seconds left and the
13th-seeded Anteaters (21-13)
never got a final shot, thanks to
Rozier’s pick of Alex Young as
he was moving up the court.
Wayne Blackshear had 19
points for the Cardinals (25-8),
who will play fifth-seeded
Northern Iowa on Sunday
for a trip to the Sweet 16.
OKLAHOMA 69,
ALBANY 60
COLUMBUS, Ohio — TaShawn
Thomas had 18 points and Buddy
Hield scored 15, carrying Oklahoma into the round of 32 after
early exits the last two years.
The Sooners (23-10),
who led wire to wire, advance to play Dayton.
Peter Hooley had 15 points and
Evan Singletary scored 13 for No.
14-seeded Albany (24-8), regular
season and tournament champs
of the America East Conference.
DAYTON 66,
PROVIDENCE 53
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Dyshawn
Pierre scored 20 points and
Dayton rode a loud homecrowd advantage to another
NCAA Tournament victory.
The 11th-seeded Flyers
(27-8) will face Oklahoma on
Sunday night, with a chance
to reach the round of 16 for
the second straight season.
Sixth-seeded Providence
(22-12) could not overcome
early foul trouble on Big East
player of the year Kris Dunn or a
Dayton team buoyed by a legion
of fans that made the 80-mile
trip to Columbus. Dunn finished
with 11 points before fouling
out. LaDontae Henton had 18.
Dayton was playing its fifth
game in eight days after reaching
COLUMBUS, Ohio — Dez
Wells turned an offensive
rebound into a three-point play
with 1:44 left, and Varun Ram
stripped away Valparaiso’s last
chance as Maryland held off
the determined Crusaders.
Wells finished with 14 points
for the fourth-seeded Terrapins
(28-6), including that three-point
play that made it 65-61. Melo
Trimble had 14 points and 10
rebounds for Maryland, playing in
its first NCAA Tournament under
fourth-year coach Mark Turgeon.
WEST REGION
WISCONSIN 86,
COASTAL CAROLINA 72
OMAHA, Neb. — Frank
Kaminsky had 27 points and 12
rebounds for his 12th double-double of the season, and No.
1 seed Wisconsin got the win.
Sam Dekker had 20 points
and Nigel Hayes added 15
against a Coastal Carolina team
that gave a game effort but
had no answer for the 7-foot
Kaminsky or, for that matter,
any of his hulking teammates.
Wisconsin (32-3), the Big
Ten’s regular-season and
tournament champion, will play
eighth-seeded Oregon on Sunday
in a round-of-32 rematch.
OREGON 79,
OKLAHOMA STATE 73
OMAHA, Neb. — Joseph
Young scored 27 points and
Elgin Cook added 18, leading
No. 8 seed Oregon to the win.
Dillon Brooks had 17 points
for the Ducks (26-9), and
Dana Altman got the win
in his return to Omaha and
the same building where he
once coached Creighton.
KANSAS 75,
NEW MEXICO ST. 56
OMAHA, Neb. — Frank Mason
III scored 17 points to lead
a balanced attack, and the
second-seeded Jayhawks
gave the Big 12 its first win
of the tournament after
three losses on Thursday.
Perry Ellis added nine points
for the Jayhawks (27-8), who
will face seventh-seeded Wichita
State in the round of 32.
The schools, separated by a
couple hours of highway, have
not played since 1993 because of
the Jayhawks’ stubborn refusal
to schedule the Shockers.
WICHITA STATE 81,
INDIANA 76
OMAHA, Neb. — Fred VanVleet
matched his career high with
27 points and Ron Baker
made big free throws late for
seventh-seeded Wichita State.
By winning, the seventh-seeded Shockers (29-4) set up a
much-anticipated Sunflower
State showdown with second-seeded Kansas on Sunday.
Baker scored 15 points, making
7 of 8 free throws in the last 2
minutes to allow Wichita State
to hold off the Hoosiers (20-14).
SPORTS
WEST HAWAII TODAY | SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015
3B
SCOREBOARD
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
SATURDAY’S TV SCHEDULE
NBA
AUTO RACING
4:30 a.m.
6:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
United Sportscar Championship, 12 Hours of Sebring (Fla.)
NASCAR, XFINITY Series, qualifying for Drive4Clots.com 300
NASCAR, Sprint Cup, practice for Auto Club 400
NASCAR, XFINITY Series, Drive4Clots.com 300
COLLEGE BASEBALL
6:30 p.m.
OCSPORTS
New Mexico State at Hawaii
COLLEGE WRESTLING
2 p.m.
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
ESPN
NCAA Division I Championships, finals
TGC
NBC
TGC
TGC
PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational
PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational
Champions Tour, Conquistadores Classic
LPGA, Founders Cup
HORSE RACING
9 a.m.
FSNPT
Trackside Live!
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
NIT, second round, Alabama at Miami
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, UAB vs. UCLA
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Kentucky vs. Cincinnati
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Arizona vs. Ohio State
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Georgia State vs. Xavier
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Villanova vs. N.C. State
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Georgetown vs. Utah
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, North Carolina vs. Arkansas
NCAA Tournament, Round of 32, Notre Dame vs. Butler
MEN’S COLLEGE HOCKEY
1 p.m.
Hockey East Tournament, championship
MOTORSPORTS
1 p.m.
NHL
10 a.m.
SOCCER
2:40 a.m.
4:55 a.m.
7:25 a.m.
4:30 p.m.
TENNIS
8 a.m.
AMA Supercross
Vancouver at L.A. Kings
Premier League, West Bromwich at Manchester City
Premier League, United FC vs Arsenal FC
Premier League, Sunderland at West Ham
MLS, Houston at Los Angeles
ATP World Tour/WTA, BNP Paribas Open
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 a.m.
7:30 a.m.
10 a.m.
12:30 p.m.
3 p.m.
FSNPT
SNLA
San Francisco vs. L.A. Angels
L.A. Dodgers vs. Colorado
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 a.m.
6 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
FS1
FS1
FS1
FS1
NCAA Tournament, first round
NCAA Tournament, first round
NCAA Tournament, first round
NCAA Tournament, first round
NCAA Tournament, first round
ESPN
CBS
CBS
CBS
TNT
TBS
CBS
TNT
TBS
NBCSN
FS1
FSNW
NBCSN
NBCSN
NBCSN
TWSN
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPN2
ESPN2
ESPN2
ESPN2
SUNDAY’S TV SCHEDULE
AUTO RACING
9:30 a.m.
NASCAR, Sprint Cup, Auto Club 400
COLLEGE BASEBALL
9 a.m.
GOLF
6:30 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
Oklahoma St. at TCU
PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational
PGA Tour, Arnold Palmer Invitational, final round
Champions Tour, Conquistadores Classic
LPGA, Founders Cup, final round
HORSE RACING
1 p.m.
L.A. Angels vs. San Francisco
Cleveland vs. L.A. Dodgers
MEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
5 a.m.
6 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
11 a.m.
Noon
1 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
1:30 p.m.
2:30 p.m.
3:30 p.m.
NBA
9:30 a.m.
3:30 p.m.
NHL
6 a.m.
1:30 p.m.
SOCCER
3:25 a.m.
5:55 a.m.
11 a.m.
1 p.m.
TENNIS
8 a.m.
FSNW
SNLA
ESPN
CBS
CBS
CBS
TNT
TBS
ESPNU
TRUTV
TNT
TBS
L.A. Clippers at New Orleans
Philadelphia at L.A. Lakers
FSNPT
TWSN
St. Louis at Detroit
Anaheim at N.Y. Rangers
NBC
NBCSN
Premier League, Manchester United at Liverpool
Premier League, Chelsea at Hull City
MLS, D.C. United at New York
MLS, Chicago at San Jose
NBCSN
NBCSN
ESPN2
FS1
ATP World Tour/WTA, BNP Paribas Open, men’s and women’s finals ESPN
Curling, World Women’s Championship*
WOMEN’S COLLEGE BASKETBALL
6 a.m.
8:30 a.m.
1 p.m.
1 p.m.
3 p.m.
3 p.m.
TGC
NBC
TGC
TGC
NIT, second round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NIT, second round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
NCAA Tournament, third round
WINTER SPORTS
11 a.m.
FS1
FSNPT
Trackside Live!
MAJOR LEAGUE BASEBALL
10 a.m.
10 a.m.
FOX
NCAA Tournament, second round
NCAA Tournament, second round
NCAA Tournament, second round
NCAA Tournament, second round
NCAA Tournament, second round
NCAA Tournament, second round
ESPN
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPN
ESPN2
ESPN
ESPN2
*Tape-delayed broadcast
BASKETBALL
EASTERN CONFERENCE
Atlantic
W L Pct GB
Toronto
41 28 .594
-Boston
30 38 .441 10½
Brooklyn
28 39 .418 12
Philadelphia
17 52 .246 24
New York
14 55 .203 27
Southeast
W L Pct GB
y-Atlanta
53 16 .768
-Washington
40 29 .580 13
Miami
32 36 .471 20½
Charlotte
29 38 .433 23
Orlando
22 49 .310 32
Central
W L Pct GB
x-Cleveland
45 26 .634
-Chicago
42 28 .600 2½
Milwaukee
34 35 .493 10
Indiana
30 38 .441 13½
Detroit
24 44 .353 19½
WESTERN CONFERENCE
Southwest
W L Pct GB
Memphis
48 21 .696
-Houston
46 22 .676 1½
San Antonio
43 25 .632 4½
Dallas
44 26 .629 4½
New Orleans
37 32 .536
11
Northwest
W L Pct GB
Portland
44 23 .657
-Oklahoma City
39 30 .565
6
Utah
31 37 .456 13½
Denver
26 44 .371 19½
Minnesota
15 53 .221 29½
Pacific
W L Pct GB
x-Golden State 55 13 .809
-L.A. Clippers
45 25 .643
11
Phoenix
36 33 .522 19½
Sacramento
23 45 .338 32
L.A. Lakers
17 50 .254 37½
Friday’s Games
Philadelphia 97, New York 81
Orlando 111, Portland 104
Miami 108, Denver 91
Brooklyn 129, Milwaukee 127,3OT
Cleveland 95, Indiana 92
Chicago 108, Toronto 92
Oklahoma City 123, Atlanta 115
Memphis 112, Dallas 101
San Antonio 101, Boston 89
Sacramento 101, Charlotte 91
Golden State 112, New Orleans 96
L.A. Clippers 113, Washington 99
Saturday’s Games
Brooklyn at Indiana, 1 p.m
Chicago at Detroit, 1:30 p.m.
Phoenix at Houston, 2 p.m.
Portland at Memphis, 2 p.m.
Utah at Golden State, 4:30 p.m.
COLLEGE
MEN
NCAA TOURNAMENT
EAST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday’s Games
Villanova 93, Lafayette 52
N.C. State 66, LSU 65
Friday’s Games
Michigan State 70, Georgia 63
Virginia 79, Belmont 67
Oklahoma 69, Albany 60
Dayton 66, Providence 53
Northern Iowa 71, Wyoming 54
Louisville 57, UC Irvine 55
Round of 32
Saturday’s Games
Villanova (33-2) vs. N.C. State (21-13),
1:10 p.m.
SOUTH REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday’s Games
UAB 60, Iowa State 59
UCLA 60, SMU 59
Utah 57, Stephen F. Austin 50
Georgetown 84, E.Wash 74
Friday’s Games
Duke 85, Robert Morris 56
San Diego State 76, St. John’s 64
Iowa 83, Davidson 52
Gonzaga 86, North Dakota State 76
Round of 32
Saturday’s Games
UAB (20-15) vs. UCLA (21-13), 6:10 a.m.
Georgetown (22-10) vs. Utah (25-8),
1:30 p.m.
MIDWEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday’s Games
Cincinnati 66, Purdue 65, OT
Kentucky 79, Hampton 56
Notre Dame 69, Northeastern 65
Butler 56, Texas 48
Friday’s Games
West Virginia 68, Buffalo 62
Maryland 65, Valparaiso 62
Kansas 75, New Mexico State 56
Wichita State 81, Indiana 76
Round of 32
Saturday’s Games
Kentucky (35-0) vs. Cincinnati (23-10),
8:45 a.m.
Notre Dame (30-5) vs. Butler (23-10),
3:40 p.m.
WEST REGIONAL
Second Round
Thursday’s Games
Georgia State 57, Baylor 56
Xavier 76, Mississippi 57
North Carolina 67, Harvard 65
Arkansas 56, Wofford 53
Arizona 93, Texas Southern 72
Ohio State 75, VCU 72, OT
Friday’s Games
Oregon 79, Oklahoma State 73
Wisconsin 86, Coastal Carolina 72
Round of 32
Saturday’s Games
Georgia State (25-9) vs. Xavier (22-13),
12:10 p.m.
North Carolina (25-11) vs. Arkansas
(27-8), 2:40 p.m.
Arizona (32-3) vs. Ohio State (24-10),
11:15 a.m.
WOMENS
NCAA TOURNAMENT
ALBANY REGIONAL
First Round
Friday’s Games
Texas 66, Western Kentucky 64
California 78, Wichita State 66
Dayton 78, Iowa State 66
Kentucky 97, Tennessee State 52
Saturday’s Games
Rutgers (22-9) vs. Seton Hall (28-5),
12:30 p.m.
Connecticut (32-1) vs. Francis (N.Y.)
(15-18), 3 p.m.
Louisville (25-6) vs. BYU (23-9), 10 a.m.
South Florida (26-7) vs. LSU (17-13),
12:30 p.m.
SPOKANE REGIONAL
First Round
Friday’s Games
Duke 54, Albany (NY) 52
Mississippi State 57, Tulane 47
Oregon State 74, South Dakota State 62
Gonzaga 82, George Washington 69
Saturday’s Games
Princeton (30-0) vs. Green Bay (28-4),
5 a.m.
Maryland (30-2) vs. New Mexico State
(22-7), 7:30 a.m.
Chattanooga (29-3) vs. Pittsburgh (1911), 5 a.m.
Tennessee (27-5) vs. Boise State (2210), 7:30 a.m.
OKLAHOMA CITY REGIONAL
First Round
Friday’s Games
DePaul 79, Minnesota 72
Notre Dame 77, Montana 43
Miami 86, Washington 80
Iowa 75, American 67
Arkansas 57, Northwestern 55
Baylor 77, Northwestern State 36
Saturday’s Games
Oklahoma (20-11) vs. Quinnipiac (31-3),
10 a.m.
Stanford (24-9) vs. CS Northridge (239), 12:30 p.m.
GREENSBORO REGIONAL
First Round
Friday’s Games
South Carolina 81, Savannah State 48
Syracuse 72, Nebraska 69
Saturday’s Games
North Carolina (24-8) vs. Liberty (266), 5 a.m.
Ohio State (23-10) vs. James Madison
(29-3), 7:30 a.m.
Texas A&M (23-9) vs. Arkansas-Little
Rock (28-4), 10 a.m.
Arizona State (27-5) vs. Ohio (27-4),
12;30 p.m.
Florida Gulf Coast (30-2) vs. Oklahoma
State (20-11), 5 a.m.
Florida State (29-4) vs. Alabama State
(17-14), 7:30 a.m.
NATIONAL INVITATION TOURNAMENT
St. Mary’s 92, Hawaii 88 OT
PGA
GOLF
Bay Hill
Friday
At Bay Hill Club and Lodge
Orlando, Fla.
Purse: $6.2 million
Yardage: 7,419; Par: 72
Second Round Leaderboard
Morgan Hoffmann 66-65--131
Matt Every
68-66--134
Henrik Stenson
68-66--134
Harris English
68-66--134
Ben Martin
68-67--135
Danny Lee
72-64--136
Rory McIlroy
70-66--136
David Lingmerth
69-67--136
Matt Jones
71-65--136
Louis Oosthuizen
69-68--137
Ian Poulter
67-70--137
Sean O’Hair
69-68--137
Brooks Koepka
71-66--137
Kevin Na
67-70--137
Blayne Barber
72-65--137
-13
-10
-10
-10
-9
-8
-8
-8
-8
-7
-7
-7
-7
-7
-7
TENNIS
BNP PARIBAS OPEN
Friday
At The Indian Wells Tennis Garden
Indian Wells, Calif.
Purse: Men: $7.1 million (Masters
1000); Women: $5.38 million
(Premier)
Surface: Hard-Outdoor
Singles
Men
Quarterfinals
Roger Federer (2), Switzerland, def.
Tomas Berdych (9), Czech Republic,
6-4, 6-0.
Milos Raonic (6), Canada, def. Rafael
Nadal (3), Spain, 4-6, 7-6 (10), 7-5.
Women
Semifinals
Jelena Jankovic (18), Serbia, def. Sabine
Lisicki (24), Germany, 3-6, 6-3, 6-1
Simona Halep (3), Romania, def. Serena
Williams (1), United States, walkover.
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Rainbow Wahine
rally falls just
short at WNIT
WEST HAWAII TODAY
Hawaii trailed by as
many as 18 points in
the second half, but
mounted a furious
rally to catch St. Mary’s
at the end of regulation to force overtime.
However, UH’s comeback effort fell just
short as the Gaels (2110, 13-5 WCC) held
on to advance with a
92-88 overtime victory
in a first round WNIT
Friday night at McKeon
Pavilion in Moraga,
Calif.
Senior Shawna-Lei
Kuehu scored 15 second
half points, including
two clutch free throws
with 3.6-seconds left to
tie the game at 75-75 to
take the game to OT.
Hawaii’s Briana Harris
scored a career-high
24 points while Kuehu
added 19 and Ashleigh
Karaitiana
finished
with 12 points. It was
the final collegiate
game for four Rainbow
Wahine — Shawlina
Segovia,
Morgan
Mason, Karaitiana and
Kuehu.
The ‘Bows and Gaels
both shot well in the
first half, with UH
going 11-for-24 (45.8%)
and SMC shooting
11-for-26 (42.3%). But
the difference was the
Gaels made 12-of-17
free throws after being
in the bonus for the
last 10 minutes, while
UH was just 5-of-7
from the charity stripe.
Foul trouble would be
a problem that would
come back to hurt UH
in overtime.
In the OT, things were
looking good for Hawaii
early. After SMC’s
Lauren
Nicholson
made one of two free
throws, Toeaina drove
for a layup to give UH
a 77-76 lead — its first
lead of the game —
coming with 3:44 left
on the clock. Later,
Harris raced past her
defender for a layup to
give the ‘Bows a threepoint lead at 80-77 with
2:37 left. St. Mary’s
then went on a 6-to-0
run to take a three point
lead on a layup and four
made free throws, but
Harris, who had the hot
hand in OT, nailed a
trey to tie the game for
the sixth time at 83-83.
But that would be the
closest UH would get
to the win as the Gaels
made 13 of their last 14
free throws to seal the
win, 92-88. A total of
five Rainbow Wahine
fouled out in overtime
— Karaitiana, Destiny
King, Toeaina, Kuehu
and Harris.
Kuehu had just two
points in the first half,
but erupted for 15 in
the second half, shooting 5-for-14 from the
floor and 5-of-6 from
the free throw line.
Kuehu filled the stat
line with four rebounds,
seven assists, and one
blocked shot. She finishes her stellar, six
year Rainbow Wahine
career
with
1,245
points, 645 rebounds,
125 blocked shots, 248
assists and 161 steals.
Kuehu concludes her
career ranked No. 8
all-time in points; No.
13 in scoring average (10.0 ppg); No. 8
in rebounds; No. 6 in
blocked shots (125);
and No. 9 in steals
(161) just to mention
just a few of her many
accomplishments.
Hawaii finishes the
season with a 23-9
overall record-its best
mark since the 199798 team posted a
23-8 record under
Vince Gooen en route
to a Western Athletic
Conference
Pacific
Division title. UH’s
season was highlighted by a 15-game win
streak (the most since
UH won 19-straight in
1997-98) and their first
conference title since
1997-98 with a regular
season record of 14-2.
Under the 2015 Big
West Coach of the Year,
Laura Beeman, UH has
advanced to the WNIT
all three seasons during
her tenure.
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COMMUNITY MEETING
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APRIL 2, 2015
4:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.
Kamehameha Schools
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at Keauhou Shopping Center
RSVP
to Denise at 322-5301 or [email protected]
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
4B
ANNIE’S MAILBOX | ADVICE
Readers named Dick ridiculed for their nickname
Dear Annie: I read the
letter from “Richard,” who
was named for a hero of
World War II, but whose
nickname (“Dick”) elicits snickers. My name is
Richard, and my friends
call me Dick. I’m 79 and
6-foot-4. I was football
captain in high school,
played at university, and
spent four years as a military police paratrooper,
so I have a few advantages working for me.
But I have never understood why anyone would
worry about hurting the
feelings of some nitwit
who failed to show the
respect that any person
deserves. A few times
over the years I’ve suggested to the speaker
that he stuff that comment where it belongs
and said I’d be glad to
assist if he needed any
help, although none of
them seemed to need
help. They didn’t bother
me again, nor did they
attempt to socialize with
me at all, but it was their
loss, not mine. Richard
sounds like he’s capable
of the same approach
but chooses not to use
it. Perhaps he should.
— Another Richard
Dear Richard: We
were surprised at the
number of men named
Richard who wrote to
us about their names
and nicknames. Read
on for a sampling:
From Florida: I am
75 years young and have
used Dick my entire adult
life, in both business
and personal relationships. Occasionally, I
run into someone who
makes a stupid comment. I stare at them
and respond, “What
would you have said if
my name was John?”
Boston: My idea of the
best response would be:
“I was named for a war
hero. How about you?”
New York: My father
was also a World War
II veteran whose nickname was Dick. I suggest
“Richard’s” response
simply be: “Dick may be
my name, but at least
I don’t act like one.”
Orange Park, Fla.:
I was named after my
father, Richard Sr., who
was called Dick. I was
given the nickname
“Buddy” so that I would
not be referred to as “little
Dick.” I’m now 66 and am
still called “Buddy” by my
siblings, but I’m known
to my friends as Richard.
Fort Dodge, Iowa:
An acquaintance named
“Dick” has a good line
he uses when he anticipates an unflattering
remark might be on its
way during introductions. He says, “My given
name is Richard, but
my friends call me ‘Big
Dick.’” This is especially
amusing because he is
rather short in stature.
Omaha: I have many
Richards in my life,
beginning with my father,
ASTROLOGY
Eugenia Last
Saturday, March 21, 2015
CELEBRITIES BORN ON
THIS DAY: Matthew Broderick,
53; Rosie O’Donnell, 53; Gary
Oldman, 57; Timothy Dalton, 71.
Happy Birthday: Discipline
will lead to greater prosperity.
Whether you budget better or
invest smarter, you can and will
get ahead if you are diligent about
the way you live and spend. Your
ability to ferret out a good deal
and act upon it will be testimony
to your insight and intelligence.
A partnership will reach a higher
level of commitment. Your numbers are 5, 8, 17, 24, 33, 37, 43.
ARIES (March 21-April 19):
You’ve got an edge when it comes
to financial, legal or medical matters. Focus on what you want to
see transpire and make it so. Luck
is in your corner, so don’t hesitate
to ask for what you want. 3 stars
TAURUS (April 20-May 20):
Stick close to home. Fixing up
your residence to suit your lifestyle will help put you in the right
frame of mind to start a project that can contribute to your
income. Personal improvements
will pay off. 3 stars
GEMINI (May 21-June 20):
You’ve got what it takes to get
ahead. Don’t hesitate to make
your ideas known and to offer
solutions to problems you see others having. Your input will put you
in a good position when you want
something in return. 4 stars
CANCER (June 21-July 22):
Take a moment to observe what
others do, but don’t get involved
in other people’s affairs. Focus on
your own situations and look for
creative solutions that will bring
about an environment that is conducive to your advancement. 2
stars
LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Step
into the spotlight and show everyone how capable you are. Embrace
challenges and make changes that
will attract the people who want
to join your team and help you
succeed. Don’t let jealousy hold
you back. Choose your friends and
partners wisely. 5 stars
VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):
Keep your eye on what’s important. Update documents and negotiate any deal you aren’t satisfied
with. Be prepared to walk away
if someone wants too much for
too little. Time is on your side.
Don’t believe everything you hear.
Check the facts. 3 stars
LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22):
Address partnership issues. The
changes you make will give you
the freedom to enjoy new endeavors. If you compromise, everyone
will go home happy. A group you
join will result in interesting new
friendships as well as opportunities to advance. 3 stars
SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21):
Stick close to home. Minimize
your spending and work toward
self and home improvements that
will make you feel good and add
to your comfort. Don’t let anyone
talk you into doing something you
don’t want to do. 3 stars
SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec.
21): You can and should make
moves to alter the way you live.
Negotiate and sign deals and tie
up loose ends. Bring about the
changes you want to see at home
and within your relationships. Do
what suits you best. 5 stars
CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan.
19): Aggressive communication
will bring about change, but be
prepared to give something up
at the same time. Problems while
traveling or dealing with community concerns can be expected.
Focus on making self-improvements, not on trying to change
others. 2 stars
AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18):
Check out job prospects online or
in your community. You will find
an interesting opportunity that
will make a difference to your
financial security. A change in
the way you offer your skills or
present your resume will pay off.
4 stars
PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20):
Emotional situations will escalate quickly, turning into a costly
affair. Listen carefully to what’s
being said and be as honest with
your response as possible. An
unexpected change will leave you
in an awkward position if you
have exaggerated. 3 stars
Birthday Baby: You are
sensitive, admirable and possessive. You are persuasive and
triumphant.
COPYRIGHT 2015 UNIVERSAL
UCLICK 1130 Walnut St., Kansas
City, MO 64106; 816-581-7500
who went by “Dick.” My
brother is also Richard,
and he uses his full name.
My husband is Richard,
but he goes by “Rich”
most of the time. My son,
Richard, goes by “Rick”
at family gatherings but
sticks with his full name
at work. My father-in-law
is also named Richard
and goes by “Dick.” If you
are getting dizzy, take
comfort that none of “my”
Richards has ever had
an issue with the name.
I am hoping for a grandson I can call “Richie!”
Indiana: My dad’s sister and her husband had
a son they named Dick
right after the war. A few
years later, his brother
had a son and also named
him Dick. A few times a
year we all got together
at Grandma’s house. To
avoid any confusion, we
would just call them Big
Dick and Little Dick,
and I never thought
anything about it until
I read your column.
Annie’s Mailbox
is written by Kathy
Mitchell and Marcy
Sugar, longtime editors
of the Ann Landers column. Email questions to
[email protected]
net, or write to: Annie’s
Mailbox, c/o Creators
Syndicate, 737 3rd St.,
Hermosa Beach, CA
90254. To find out more
about Annie’s Mailbox
and read features by other
Creators Syndicate writers and cartoonists, visit
the Creators Syndicate
webpage at creators.com.
COPYRIGHT 2015 CREATORS.COM
SATURDAY, MARCH 21, 2015 | WEST HAWAII TODAY
COMICS
5B
PEANUTS
GARFIELD
DILBERT
DOONESBURY
BEETLE BAILEY
FOR BETTER OR FOR WORSE
BIZARRO
BLONDIE
HAGAR THE HORRIBLE
THE WIZARD OF ID
FRANK AND ERNEST
THATABABY
B.C.
THE BORN LOSER
SHOE
FAMILY CIRCUS
ZITS
DENNIS
THE MENACE