May 2, 2013 - The Essex Reporter

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May 2, 2013 - The Essex Reporter
Reporter
THE
www.essexreporter.com
ESSEX
MAY 2, 2013
Vol. 33, No. 18
Don't forget Mom!
Gift ideas
on page
9a-10a
ECRWSS Car Rt. Sort
U.S. Postage Paid Permit No. 266
Burlington, VT 05401 Postal Patron-Residential
New Americans, new hope
EHS hosts naturalization ceremony
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
With students away for April break, Essex High School was the venue last week
for a naturalization ceremony that transitioned 31 immigrants to United States
citizens.
Essex High School graduate, U.S. District Judge Christina Reiss, presided over
the ceremony attended by Gov. Peter Shumlin and employees of the Essex office
of the U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services. Family members also filled the
auditorium to watch and photograph the oath-taking and a renunciation of allegiance
to former countries like Burundi, Canada, Nepal, Poland and Thailand, among
others. In all, 19 countries were represented.
President Obama even made a cameo, offering a videoed welcome to the
immigrants, who will now call Vermont home.
“I ask that you use your freedom and your talents to contribute to the good of
– See IMMIGRANT on page 3a
Gov. Peter Shumlin stands with 31 new Americans moments after their naturalization ceremony last
Wednesday in the Essex High School auditorium.
Photo by Jason Starr
Puting out Recreation transition
the smoke
Trustees pursue
zoning change
to cap tobacco
retailers
Officials prepare
for unified
manager era
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
The Essex Junction Board of
Trustees furthered their push to limit
the number of tobacco retailers in the
village last week in an issue brought
on by a community member’s plan to
open a new smoke shop on Railroad
Avenue.
While a new regulation won’t
be in place before owners hope to
open their “Up in Smoke” shop this
spring — it will take at least a year
to install, village president George
Tyler estimates — the regulation will
prevent similar stores from opening
in an area that proactive community
members have worked diligently over
the past four years to revitalize and
rid of loitering and drug dealing.
“We’re not saying if you’re in
business you need to stop,” trustee
Lori Houghton said. “We’re just
saying we don’t want any more
(tobacco retailers).”
Meanwhile, Up in Smoke’s
tobacco license application is before
the Vermont Department of Liquor
Control in a public hearing set for
9:30 a.m. May 9. The hearing was
originally scheduled to take place at
the department’s headquarters in
Montpelier, but community members
wishing to weigh in on the application
have convinced liquor control officials
to hold it in Essex Junction ­
— at
Park Street School, 21 Park Street.
The trustees determined at their
meeting last week that a change
to village zoning regulations is a
better route than creating a new
ordinance to cap tobacco retailers.
Village attorney Dave Barra has
recommended going the zoning route.
“Zoning is a little more bulletproof
because it’s less reactionary to one
situation,” Tyler said, adding that
an ordinance is easier for a business
owner to find loopholes in.
Chittenden Central Supervisory
Union Prevention and Wellness
Coordinator Gabrielle Ratte Smith
presented the trustees with research
to help justify the new regulation.
Smith and Essex CHIPS Community
Wellness Coordinator Matt Whalen
said there is evidence of a connection
between the number of children who
smoke and the number of tobacco
outlets within a half-mile of a school.
Whalen said the connection correlates
to the way cigarettes are marketed at
the “point of sale” in stores.
Village vice president Dan Kerin
is the lone trustee concerned about a
new tobacco regulation in the village,
noting an opposite trend in Vermont
and the nation to loosen laws around
marijuana use.
“Trying to legislate morality is
a slippery slope,” he said. “We are
focusing on tobacco here, and there
are a lot of things out there that are
unhealthy.”
Nonetheless, the trustees decided
to formally task the Essex Junction
Planning Commission with writing
a tobacco retailer cap into the village
zoning regulations. Public hearings
on the change will be held in front of
the commission.
Scheidel
takes seat
with trustees
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
Ally Vile started in March as the new director of Essex Parks and Recreation. By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
A transition into the leadership role of
the Essex Parks and Recreation Department
would be enough to tackle at any time, but to
do so during the spring ramp-up of summer
programming makes for lively times for new
director Ally Vile.
“Things are buzzing around here,” she said
Monday.
Vile stepped up from program coordinator
in March, a position she had held for nearly
seven years under former director Mark Berry.
She is now hiring to fill her former position, as
well as interviewing candidates for summer
seasonal positions and preparing park facilities
for the summer season. The department is
also building a new restroom at Sand Hill Pool
and preparing for a new season of capacity
Photo by Oliver Parini
monitoring and milfoil control at Indian Brook
Reservoir.
An Essex resident, Vile comes into the
position with a comprehensive understanding
of the department, but she is starting to grasp
a new level of knowledge.
“I am definitely getting my head wrapped
around all of the projects (Berry) was thinking
about or had gotten started,” she said.
Berry, whom Vile called “a great mentor,”
moved last year to Groton, Conn., to take over
the Parks and Recreation Department there.
Among the underway projects is construction
of a new bathroom at Sand Hill Park that will,
unlike the current facility, allow for restroom
access when the pool is not open. It will replace
a portable restroom placed on the grounds in
the offseason.
– See RECREATION on page 2a
ETSD school board elects
seats and talks security
By ELSIE LYNN
The Essex Reporter
The Essex Town School District school board
met Monday evening at Founders Memorial School
to kick off their first board meeting since the Annual
Meeting and elections on April 9. Board members
Dave Clough, Brendan Kinney and Dan House, along
with Superintendent Mark Andrews welcomed Kim
Gleason back for another two-year term and Rachel
Preston for her first three-year term.
The board reelected Kinney as chair and
reelected Gleason as vice chair. House took on the
role of clerk, which Ben Gilliam — who did not seek
reelection this year — filled in the past.
“Our work is a team effort,” noted Kinney. “As
long as we continue to act as a team, I’m happy to
serve as chair.”
Gleason, House and Preston also noted their
willingness to serve the board.
The meeting progressed to discussions on
new board member orientation, evaluation of the
Celebration of Learning — a student-led interaction
with parents on April 9, an overview of next year’s
financial planning and budgeting, and a preliminary
discussion on the safety of students, staff and the
ETSD school buildings.
“We’ve all thought a lot about school security
lately,” Andrews said. “Violence is all around us …
The safety of our school, children and staff is the
most important thing… We have to improve the
security of our three schools.”
ETSD schools are currently in compliance with
basic safety measures like locks on all the classroom
doors, shades on the windows, and having guests
wear a name tag, sign in and leave their keys at
the front office. However, the superintendent made
a recommendation Monday evening to improve
upon those basic precautions. Suggested changes
included: locking the front internal doors, installing
a buzzer system required for entrance, fortifying
doorframes and glass, adding and improving
surveillance cameras, and offering front office staff
more training to help them make security decisions.
With the help of the Essex Police, a second
student resource officer (SRO) will be circulating
between ETSD and Albert D. Lawton Intermediate
School in Essex Junction this year.
More details and discussion will follow before
any of the superintendent’s suggested security
measures are finalized. The next school board
meeting is scheduled for 7 p.m. on May 13 at
Founders Memorial School. To contribute comments
to the board, contact: [email protected]
Essex Town Manager Pat
Scheidel took a seat at the staff
table during last week’s Essex
Junction Board of Trustees meeting,
beginning, at least symbolically, his
tenure as the first unified town/
village manager in 60 years.
Scheidel was invited by the
trustees to discuss his planned
transition to managing both
municipalities simultaneously in
the new fiscal year beginning in
July, and he took the opportunity
to affirm his desire to fill the role.
The unified manager position has
been created through ongoing
discussions between the trustees
and the Essex Selectboard. Scheidel
said serving both boards is a way
to reduce the cost of running the
overlapping governments.
“How to get the delivery of
services to people without putting
both hands in their pockets all the
time is an issue we should never
lose site of,” said Scheidel. “One
person reduces the overhead … I
would certainly like to be the last of
the two manager generation.”
Scheidel and the trustees hope
that after a year of managerial
unification the stage will be set for
a new manager to step into the role,
with issues of compensation, time
split and conflicts of interest ironed
out. The trustees agreed that a
succession plan should be worked
out during Scheidel’s first year, as
Scheidel has hinted at retirement.
“We need to put something in
place that’s viable after we’ve left
the scene,” village president George
Tyler said.
The only red flag Scheidel
identified
is
maintaining
confidentiality when sitting in on
executive (closed-door) sessions
with both boards, especially when
it comes to land acquisitions and
employee union negotiations.
“Secrets could be released,” he
said, “but there’s nothing that big
that is going to be unknown.”
Scheidel envisions a 50-50 split
of his time, although that will
fluctuate based on the day-to-day
needs of each municipality. Using
phone and e-mail, he can work
for the village while at the town
offices, and vice-versa. He plans to
computerize his daily schedule for
access by certain local officials.
The selectboard is unanimously
supportive of the unified manager
concept and has given Scheidel
the go-ahead to amend his town
employment contract to take
on village hours. Details of the
unified agreement will be hashed
out in closed-door meetings with
selectboard members, trustees and
Scheidel this spring.
A sub-committee of local
officials will be formed to evaluate
Scheidel and the concept, and plan
for Scheidel’s successor.
2a
Q&A
With ...
Tracey Medeiros
The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook
Our very own food
columnist, Tracey Medeiros
of Essex, has recently
completed
her
second
Vermont cookbook. “The
Vermont
Farm
Table,”
a 255-page recipe book
published by Countryman
Press in Woodstock, is set to
come out in May. Freelance
Photographer Oliver Parini
— who also shoots for the
Essex and Colchester papers
— took all but one of the
photographs in the book.
“The book itself is
beautiful,” said Medeiros.
“Everyone did a fabulous
job.”
“I started working on the
book when I started writing
for The Essex Reporter and
The Colchester Sun,” said
Medeiros, who began writing
a weekly food column in
July of 2011. She said the
enthusiasm she received
from
contacting
local
farmers, food merchants and
producers for the column was
so overwhelming she just
had to do another Vermont
cookbook.
Medeiros’ first Vermont
cookbook,
“Dishing
up
Vermont,” was published by
Storey Publishing in 2008.
She began working on that
nearly nine years ago when
she and her husband moved
to Essex.
The Massachusetts native
holds her BS in Political
Science from Northeastern
University; she earned her
paralegal diploma from NYU
in 1994, but decided law
wasn’t the right field for her.
Medeiros switched gears and
went to Johnson and Wales,
in Providence, R.I., where she
graduated with a culinary
arts diploma in 1997.
“I love food,” she said.
“When we moved here (to
Essex in 2005), I was so
amazed at all the wonderful
food in this state… I was like
a kid in a candy shop.”
Medeiros knows that she
has been very fortunate for
both books to be published
so
quickly.
Her
new
Vermont cookbook offers 150
recipes from 107 different
contributors.
Different
from Dishing Up Vermont,
Medeiros points to the
farmers’ market features,
distillery features and more
seafood dishes.
Also unique to “The
Vermont Farm Table” is
the method Medeiros used
to select the organization
to receive a portion of the
proceeds. For her first
Vermont
cookbook,
she
donated to the Vermont
Fresh Network; this time
around, Medeiros asked her
contributors to help her select
the benefiting organization.
“It is really important
that this is a community
cookbook,”
Medeiros
reiterated. So, based on
nominations
from
the
contributors, a portion of the
proceeds from “The Vermont
Farm Table” will benefit the
Vermont Food Bank.
Medeiros
recently
reflected on “The Vermont
Farm Table” and her second
experience publishing a
Vermont cookbook.
Q: What inspired you
to make this cookbook?
A: The enthusiasm folks
had for wanting to be in the
column I write every week
for The Essex Reporter and
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
The Colchester Sun was a
big driver. People would
make the time for me to be
in this column. After a few
interviews for the column,
I felt the need for a new
Vermont cookbook.
Q: How did you come
up with the recipes in the
cookbook?
A: When I contacted
these hardworking folks
(farmers, food producers
and merchants) I asked
them to submit a recipe that
showcases what they do. I
wanted them to submit a
recipe that showcases their
products.
It’s about the Vermont
food producers first; then,
like a puzzle, I selected
what recipes I was going
to use in the book. All
of the recipes have been
tested and are in the same
format. There are recipes for
amateur and expert cooks
alike. There’s something
for everyone: vegetarian
recipes, meat-lovers’ recipes,
desserts, soups, salads and
more. There’s a nice range
of recipes. I wanted this
cookbook to reflect the face of
Vermont — it’s a community
cookbook.
Q: How long did it
take you to complete this
cookbook?
A: It took me about a
year. I spent many hours at
my computer.
Q: After interviewing
so many farmers and food
producers/merchants in
Vermont, did you draw
any conclusions?
A: It is a remarkable
community. They are very
passionate and hardworking
people. They really are
concerned about producing
the best products possible
in a responsible way. It’s a
lot of work and not a lot of
money. What drives them is
the passion, love and belief
in what they are doing. It’s a
really special community.
Q:
Why
are
you
donating proceeds to
Vermont Food Bank?
UPCOMING EVENTS
Tuesday, May 7
What: The Vermont Foodbank Hunger Action Conference and book signing
Where: Sheraton Hotel & Conference Center, Burlington
When: 7:30 a.m.
Wednesday, May 8
What: Book signing
Where: Phoenix Book Store, Essex Junction
When: 7 p.m.
Thursday, May 9
What: Book signing
Where: Phoenix Book Store, Burlington
When: 7 p.m.
Tuesday, May 21
What: The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook Dinner and Book Launch
Where: Carpenter & Main, Norwich, Vt.
When: 6 p.m.
Details: It will be a four-course dinner consisting of soup, salad, entree and
dessert, as well as a complimentary copy of The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook
signed by the author. This event is open to the public. Make reservations by
contacting The Norwich Bookstore at (802) 649-1114.
For the latest news and updates follow: www.facebook.com/
vermontfarmtablecookbook
A: I felt that I needed
to give back more than just
with the book. The people
I’ve met really care about
feeding their community
high quality food, taking care
of the soil and really thinking
about the next generation.
It’s awe-inspiring and I
really wanted to give these
hard working people a voice.
My hope and goal
through this book is to get
the word out there on a local
and national level. I want to
keep these farmers employed
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In the April 11, 2013
edition of The Essex
Reporter Daniel Ryan
was mislabeled as the
principal of Summit
Street School in Essex
Junction in a photostory of the CCSU
staff-wide
basketball
tournament. Ryan is
in fact the principal of
Thomas Fleming School
in Essex Junction.
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and help them succeed. I also
want to excite the younger
generations; to plant that
seed [in our youth] that
says, ‘maybe I will try to be a
farmer one day.’
EXPERIENCE LEARNING.
RECREATION
from page 1a
At
Indian
Brook
Reservoir,
a
carrying
capacity study is ongoing
to manage the wear and
tear caused by the 4,300
park pass holders that
amount to roughly 10,000
people using the park each
season. Also, mitigation of
the invasive aquatic plant,
milfoil, began last summer,
and its effectiveness will
be assessed this spring.
The
department
has
grant funding to remove
remaining milfoil plants
this season. Berry also
oversaw a needs assessment
for the department in 2011
that Vile said she will refer
to in determining where
else to focus department
resources.
“We’re trying to pick
up where (Berry) left
off, staying steady and
improving where we need
to,” said Vile. “We are
always adding programs
and increasing the quality
of what we offer.”
For Vile, the transition
from program coordinator
to department director
means a shift in focus
from programs to the
buildings and grounds the
department controls.
“I’ve been a part of
the department for a long
time and it was a great
opportunity,” she said.
3a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Transition PT comes to Essex Junction
By PHYL NEWBECK
For The Essex Reporter
Sean Fitzgerald has
come home.
In 2007,
Fitzgerald and his thenpartner began a physical
therapy practice in South
Burlington.
Two years
later, he opened a branch
of that practice, then
called Momentum Physical
Therapy, in Jericho, the
town in which he grew
up. In 2012 he changed
the name of the practice
to Transition Physical
Therapy and this month he
will open another office at
17 Main Street in his home
town, Essex Junction.
Fitzgerald started his
professional
career
as
a personal trainer after
obtaining a degree in health
science/allied health from
Johnson State College.
He later earned a BS in
biology and was working
on a Masters in Education
from St. Michael’s College
when he began to think
his work wasn’t reaching
the
population
that
really needed help. After
obtaining his Masters in
Physical Therapy from
UVM, Fitzgerald spent
a year at Fletcher Allen
before branching out on
his own.
Fitzgerald changed the
name of his practice when
he split from his former
partner. “The logo and the
name reflect our approach
to physical therapy,” he
said.
“Physically and
cognitively,
everything
has a duality and we help
you transition to those
dualities.”
The
practice’s
philosophy is referred to
as “the art of going grey,”
suggesting
transitions
from black to white and
Sean Fitzgerald
back again.
“People
become patterned,” said
Fitzgerald.
“They lose
the ability to transition
and
they
end
up
compensating.”
Rather
than treat the result of this
situation, Fitzgerald and
his team try to figure out
what caused the problem
in the first case. “We want
to know why the injury
occurred,” he said “rather
than react to the injury.”
Although
Fitzgerald
works with a wide variety
of patients, he has recently
begun to specialize in
musicians. After watching
his violinist daughter and
pianist son at rehearsals
and concerts he realized
that just like athletes,
musicians spend many
hours in certain postures.
In addition to being a
member of the sports
physical
therapy
and
private practice sections
of the American Physical
Therapy
Association
he has joined the the
Performing Arts Special
Interest Group.
He is
also a member of the
Performing Arts Medical
Association.
Fitzgerald
continues to work with
Transition Physical Therapy recently opened its second location on 17 Main Street in Essex Junction. athletes of all kinds
and serves as a physical
therapy consultant for the
USA Olympic Luge Team
in Lake Placid. Fitzgerald is one of
only 100 people in the
U.S. who is certified to
do postural restoration
work — one of his
specialties. He works with
a patient’s neurological
system
as
much
as
with their musculature.
Additionally,
Fitzgerald
focuses on body symmetry.
He explained that most
humans have developed a
right stance posture over
time which throws off their
symmetry and causes them
to rotate parts of their
body in order to maintain
their center of gravity.
That’s why Fitzgerald
begins every consultation
by determining whether
the patient is neutral,
believing that is the basis
for everything.
“We’re looking systemwide,” he said. “Even if
someone comes to me with
a shoulder problem, I’ll
look at their pelvis to see if
they are neutral.”
There are two fulltime and two-part time
physical therapists at both
the Jericho and Essex
Junction locations, as well
as an exercise physiologist.
Every patient gets a onehour block of time to
make sure they receive a
thorough evaluation.
Fitzgerald also believes
in giving back to the
community. His practice
has been involved with
three
local
charitable
efforts: the Slam Diabetes
Wiffle Ball tournament at
Little Fenway Park, the
Camp Exclamation Point
program in Richmond, and
the Fallen Heroes Race
to Remember at Camp
Johnson.
Fitzgerald is taking
new patients but wants
to
continue
keeping
his practice small and
community-based.
“It’s
more than rewarding,” he
said of his work. “It’s so
much fun, particularly in a
small community. Nothing
is more fulfilling than
helping people restore
some aspect of their
function and performance.”
IMMIGRANT
from page 1a
our nation and the world,”
Obama said. “You can
help write the next great
chapter in our American
story.”
Shumlin declared that
the immigrants “have
picked the best of the 50
states to live in.”
“You follow in a long
tradition of the melting
pot that makes this the
greatest democracy where
freedom reigns that’s ever
been invented,” added the
governor. “We are glad
you’re here, we are glad
you’re Vermonters, and
we look forward to a very
prosperous journey for
you and your family.”
The ceremony capped
unique
and
varied
journeys to America, but
those stories remained
private
through
the
ceremony. One of the
immigrants who resides
in Essex declined an
interview request.
The new American
perspective
was
articulated emotionally
by
Noel
Mukiza,
a
Burundian and Rwandan
refugee who came to
Vermont in 2007 and now
works as a case manager
for the Vermont Refugee
Resettlement Program in
Fort Ethan Allen. Mukiza
shared his thoughts and
experiences as a refugee
in Africa and as a new
American over the past
six years. He became a
citizen a year ago.
“People come here
because they lack freedom,
lack a future,” he said.
“They are without hope.
Thanks to the Refugee
Resettlement Program, I
was settled and given the
tools to restart my life.”
Mukiza spent 12 years
as a refugee of Rwandan
war in the Democratic
Republic of Congo and
the United Republic of
Tanzania. He earned a
high school degree and
became a teacher and
leader in the refugee
community,
but
he
“was never a citizen of a
country.”
“Today, I am really
proud that I have a
country I belong to,” he
said. “I have a country
that when I think about
my past, I think my
destiny was to be here.
And I feel like I have a
future.”
Since
arriving
in
Vermont, Mukiza has had
two children who “are
really blessed to be in a
country where human
rights
are
respected,
where freedom is really
visible.”
For employees of the
U.S.
Citizenship
and
Immigration
Services
Vermont Service Center
— with offices in St.
Albans and Essex —
attending the ceremony
was a way to make real the
day-to-day work they do
processing immigration
applications.
The
employees work through
paper
correspondence
only, never meeting the
applicants for whom they
make benefits decisions.
About 100 employees
watched the ceremony,
and the service center’s
acting director, Karen
FitzGerald, spoke about
the experience on their
behalf.
“We are thrilled to
be able to meet you in
person,” she said. “It
makes us very proud of
the work we do to play a
part in your journey.”
The 31 candidates for
citizenship stood to take
the oath of allegiance
to the United States
and to pledge allegiance
to the flag. Each was
called individually to
receive their citizenship
documents and shake
hands with Shumlin.
GREEN UP DAY
SATURDAY, MAY 4, 2013
Green-Up Day Group Hours are 9 am - 2 pm
Thank you for helping make Green-Up Day in Essex a success!
Please remember that:
All Green-Up litter must be put in specially marked bags.
The purpose of the day is cleaning roadsides, drainage swales and park/common areas - not personal
yard or business site clean-up. Over the past few years, a large number of tires have been deposited
at some pick-up sites which appear to have originated from commercial businesses and not from
roadway pick-up. Residents are encouraged to contact the Police Department if this type of drop-off
is observed.
No hazardous waste will be accepted; please bring your hazardous waste to the Chittenden County
Solid Waste District Facilities (872-8100 for information)
The Town will not pick up tree and branch debris from private property - do not put this material
at the curb. The CCSWD drop-off facility at the old Town landfill (VT2A and the Circumferential
Highway) will accept this material.
The Town of Essex will pick up rubbish from the following identified drop-off sites, those sites
specifically assigned by the Recreation Department, and wherever the specially marked Green-Up
Day bags are placed along the road edge:
1. Town Common - across from the Essex Free Library
2. Indian Brook Reservoir
3. Highway Garage / Fire Station - Sand Hill Road
4. Corner of Allen Martin Drive and Thompson Drive
5. Northeast corner of the Susie Wilson Road/Blair Road Intersection
•
A sign will mark these areas. Please place all articles near the sign.
•
All rubbish will be picked up from the above areas between 2 - 4 pm on that day or on the
following Monday. All residents are requested to bring filled Green-Up bags to the pick-up points.
•
The Town will make arrangements with groups registered with the Recreation Department
to pick up debris at additional locations.
As a thank-you to volunteers, hot dogs, chips, and even some healthy snacks will be available
at the Town of Essex Public Works yard on Sand Hill Road from 11 am – 1 pm
while they last!
Thank you for your help in keeping Essex green!
Photo contributed
4a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Opinion
From the Statehouse
Essex Memorial Day Parade Committee gathers
The Essex Memorial Parade
Committee held its 4th Annual
Dinner
Dance
Fundraiser
featuring Sturcrazie on April
20 at the Catamount Country
Club in Williston. The event
raises funds and awareness
for the Essex Memorial Day
Parade on May 25. Event
Chair Lorraine St. Cyr Berry,
pictured second from right,
thanked local florists —
Centerpiece, Chantilly Rose,
Maplehurst and Village Green
— as well Sturcrazie and
parade committee members
for their time and dedication
to make the event a success.
Parade committee members
pictured, from left to right, are:
Ed Von Sitas, Heidi Clark,
Mary Tewarson, Ed Daudelin,
Caroline Ashley, Lorraine St.
Cyr Berry and Scott Morris.
Spreading the wealth
through the Capital
Construction Bill
A
s you read this
column, only one
Linda
or
two
weeks
remain in this
Myers
legislative session. The
Speaker of the House
anticipates a May 11
adjournment, while the
Senate says it may take until May 18 to complete our
work. Legislative salaries for the 2013 session that were
approved last year run through May 18. So if we get out
on May 11 or May 18, we will still be within the approved
budget.
These last few weeks have seen many bills coming
before the House. The transportation bill has passed the
House and Senate and will go into effect on May 1. We have
passed a bill, H.522, which is a response to opioid addiction
and methamphetamine abuse. The House passed H.528,
the tax bill, but as of this writing the Senate Finance
Committee has not weighed in on its changes to the bill.
The House approved H.530, the Appropriations Budget Bill
as well as H.533, the Capital Construction Bill (more about
that below). H. 200, the bill to decriminalize marijuana was
passed, as was H.538, Amendments to Education Funding
Laws. Last week the House approved S.14, the “fair share”
bill that will require non-union members to pay an agency
fee to unions at their place of employment. Of major
concern to many people is S.77, the assisted suicide bill,
which will have been discussed by the House members by
the time you read this column. The bills noted here can be
seen in their entirety by going to www.leg.state.vt.us and
looking for the bills as passed. You can also go to the same
web site to look at roll call votes for various bills to see
how your legislators voted on specific bills.
The main focus of my committee, House Corrections
and Institutions, on which I serve as vice-chair, is the
Capital Construction Bill. This is a two-year bill that
appropriates bonded money for capital construction
projects throughout the state. The FY2014-2015 bill sets
up spending of $173,231,370 for projects ranging from the
renovation and replacement of state facilities destroyed
by Tropical Storm Irene such as the Waterbury State
Office Complex, $56.2 million; the Vermont State Hospital
system, $8.7 million; and the moving of the Agency of
Transportation employees who had been housed in
Waterbury to the National Life building in Montpelier,
$4.1 million.
Other large appropriations in the bill include
$15.1 million for statewide major maintenance of state
buildings and $2.5 million to complete funding of a district
heating plant in Montpelier that will serve state buildings
and businesses in the Capital City. $11 million has been
appropriated to complete the funding of a new Vermont
State Health Lab in Colchester to finish the funding of
the $39 million building. The ground-breaking for this
building took place Monday. H.533 also provides $3.5
million toward a $7.9 million renovation of the Lamoille
County Courthouse in Hyde Park and $6.1 million to
consolidate the Brattleboro and Rockingham state police
barracks in Winchester. The bill also appropriates $17.1
million to pay off all school construction funds that have
been owed to school districts throughout the state. The
Center for Technology in Essex will receive $347,793 from
this appropriation to pay off the state’s obligation for the
addition and renovations made in FY 2008.
While these appropriations fund major construction
projects, the Capital Bill also provides money for repairs
at other state buildings and correctional facilities, major
maintenance at state historical sites, and the funding of
grants for communities for historic preservation, barns,
cultural facilities, recreational facilities, human services,
and agricultural fairs. There are appropriations to the
University of Vermont and the Vermont State Colleges for
construction and renovation, for clean water and drinking
water projects in towns throughout the state, for small
scale rehabilitation for state parks and recreation, for land
acquisitions for military armories, for agriculture best
management practices, for Vermont Public Television
and Vermont Interactive Technologies, for rural fire
protection, and for the Vermont Veterans Home. The
bill even provides funds for underwater preserves in
Lake Champlain, roadside historic markers, and digital
orthophotographic mapping.
The Capital Bill funds a huge number of projects
throughout Vermont and you can see why my committee
spends most of the legislative session crafting this bill.
H.533 was approved by a 135-0 vote in the House and has
also been passed by the Senate Institutions Committee and
the full Senate. The two committees will now try to resolve
differences between the House and Senate versions.
For those of you who have expressed concerns about
H.526, the shoreline protection bill, it appears the bill has
been tabled for this session and more study will follow. The
same has happened with S.30, the wind power moratorium
bill. A committee will study the issue this summer.
There is one more thing coming up in the Legislature
in the next two weeks that will be of special interest
to Essex residents. A resolution, sponsored by the
five Essex representatives, will be read in the House
of Representatives congratulating the Town on its
sestercentennial, the 250th anniversary of the founding of
Essex on June 7, 1763.
FYI: Remember all those bills to name state “entities”
that I mentioned in my last column. Not a single one has
passed through the House or Senate. Perhaps my fellow
legislators realized there were more important issues to
consider during this legislative session.
I appreciate the faith you have in me to represent you
in Montpelier and I will work diligently to keep the trust
you have given me. If any of you have questions about
what is going on in Montpelier I will be happy to answer
any of them as time permits. I look forward to hearing
from you with your questions and concerns. You can call
me at 878-3514 or call the Statehouse at 802-828-2228 to leave
a message for me. You can also e-mail me at: [email protected]
attglobal.net, [email protected], or [email protected]
comcast.net. I will get back to you as soon as I can.
Linda Myers represents Essex Town in the
House of Representatives.
Photo contributed
Perspective
My brother, Moby Dick and PETA
By EMERSON LYNN
My younger brother spent a good
share of his youth on the muddy shores
of the Neosho River in Kansas, armed
with a fishing pole, angling for anything
with gills. He caught the occasional bass,
perch, sucker and carp. And then, there
was the 60-pound channel cat, which was
about as long as he was tall, and almost
his equal in weight. It was his Moby Dick,
the whale of a fish that fed his dreams.
And his hook had settled deep into the
monster’s throat.
The thing about catfish is that they
don’t die easily. And this one was no
exception, even as it was dragged the
hundred yards from the creek to the
garage, and then laid flat on an old pine
board. It continued to writhe, seemingly
convinced that its muddy, dark, slithery
haunts were within flapping distance.
My brother, buoyed by the bounty
that was struggling ’neath his hands, was
equally determined the fish’s fate would
soon be sealed.
“Hold ‘em,” he said. I did, as he raced to the shed,
returning moments later with a hammer
and a twenty-penny nail. (More like a
giant spike.)
“Watch …. this is what Mr. Scoville
taught me.” He was so proud. (Mr.
Scoville was a neighbor, ancient in years
and beliefs and with fingers the size
of sausages … and the one who taught
him how to handle the monsters of the
Neosho.)
And my brother, in one quick, fluid
motion, drove the spike down through
the head of the fish and into the knot of
pine beneath.
I watched, eyeball to eyeball with
the fish. He didn’t blink. Not once. His
barbells (the four sets of whiskers)
twitched twice. The end.
And my brother’s story — Moby Dick
of the Neosho — has continued ever since. But stories have ways of taking
unexpected turns. And yesterday,
decades later, this one took a decided
twist. The People for the Ethical Treatment
of Animals (PETA) has recently asked the
Vermont Fish and Wildlife department to
cancel its “Let’s go Fishing” program.
The purpose of the department’s event is
to teach families and their children how
to fish.
Picture a bunch of Mr. Scovilles …
The release from PETA reads: “The
only lesson that fishing teaches children
is that violence is acceptable when it is
directed against those who don’t look
like them or are smaller and weaker than
they are. Fish have particularly sensitive
mouths and lips that they use in much
the same way that we use our hands …”
That cut my brother to the quick.
He in no way looked like that channel
cat, not even after a three-day climb
without a razor. As close as it was in
height and weight, he was still the bigger
of the two. Plus, he had the hammer and
the spike. The fish didn’t.
And Mr. Scoville had neglected to
tell him about the “irrefutable scientific
evidence that fish feel pain.”
How was he to know?
The problem is, as profound as his
remorse might be … something that has yet
to be quantified … my brother still fishes. Primarily with flies. For unsuspecting
trout in clear mountain streams. The
pretty ones, with scales that shimmer
with all colors of the rainbow. The ones
with bobbing lips that practically talk to
you.
Will he stop? Will PETA’s plea make
a difference? Is there no end to his
madness? Can he wean himself from the
thrill of the catch?
Or will the Herman Melville of his
youth rise again, the Melville who wrote:
“Whenever I find myself growing grim
about the mouth; whenever it is a damp,
drizzly November in my soul; whenever
I find myself involuntarily pausing
before coffin warehouses, and bringing
up the rear of every funeral I meet; and
especially whenever my hypos get such
an upper hand of me, that it requires a
strong moral principle to prevent me
from deliberately stepping into the street,
and methodically knocking people’s hats
off — then, I account it high time to get to
sea as soon as I can. This is my substitute
for pistol and ball. With a philosophical
flourish Cato throws himself upon his
sword; I quietly take to the ship.”
Tough call. The PETA folks make such compelling
arguments.
Emerson Lynn is the co-publisher of The
Essex Reporter and the publisher of the
St. Albans Messenger.
Time out on reach up time limits
By MARGARET K. NELSON
When President Clinton promised to
“end welfare as we have come to know it”
and signed the Personal Responsibility
and Work Opportunity Reconciliation
Act into law on Aug. 22, 1996, he initiated
a policy experiment, an experiment with
the lives of low income parents (mostly
women) and their children. Almost 17
years later the part of that experiment
that had to do with time limits for
lifetime welfare receipt has proven to be
a significant failure.
To be sure, time limits made good
headlines because they appealed to both
liberals and conservatives who believed
that the right combination of incentives
and
sanctions
would
encourage
employment over welfare reliance. But
time limits have made terrible social
policy. No combination of incentives and
sanctions can create jobs where no good
or accessible ones exist; no combination
of incentives and sanctions can reduce
the real, concrete barriers to employment
many individuals experience.
Governor Shumlin now proposes
to inaugurate this social policy in
Vermont by ending welfare benefits after
three years and instituting a lifetime
maximum of five years. This would bring
us in line with other states. It would also
jeopardize the well-being of thousands
of Vermonters. Indeed, just last year,
a report from the Agency of Human
Services acknowledged that eliminating
assistance for the few families that did
exceed a 60 month limit on receipt of
welfare would leave “families destitute
and at risk and … create a large hole
in the fabric of Vermont’s safety net
for those most in need” because those
families have “three times as many
barriers to gaining self sufficiency as the
general Reach Up caseload population.”
Just to be clear, the Reach Up program
that Governor Shumlin is proposing
to limit is by no means a free ride.
About a third of Reach Up participants
already work or comply with other
requirements to get the meager benefits
they receive. Many others are training
or pursuing educational goals. Others
have a deferment to care for an infant, or
another family member requiring care,
or due to disability – essentially meaning
they cannot (and are not required to)
work for a period of time.
The data show that arbitrary time
limits do not help any welfare recipients
– whether they are currently employed,
in training or educational programs,
or deferred for the time being. A long
series of studies, from a broad variety
of agencies, has demonstrated that time
limits have negative consequences.
Recipients pushed off welfare by time
limits land in jobs that are less durable
and less remunerative than are found
by those who leave voluntarily; timelimit leavers are also more likely than
voluntary leavers to experience a
worsened state of financial well-being.
Most recently, and of perhaps the most
direct relevance to Vermont, a new
report from the State of Maine documents
the “severe hardships” families endure
when arbitrary time limits are imposed
on temporary cash assistance, such as
that now provided by Vermont’s Reach
Up program. As is the case in other states,
these hardships include food insecurity,
housing destabilization, and utility shutoffs.
To compound the probable injury,
Governor Shumlin has also proposed
to reduce the amount of state dollars
spent to provide low-income, working
Vermonters with tax credits under the
Earned Income Tax Credit program, a
program that has been hailed by many
as the most effective anti-poverty policy
that exists. Because it increases the
ability of workers in low-paying jobs to
support themselves and their families,
it is of special importance to working
Vermonters as they seek to transition off
welfare.
Vermonters are known for their
common sense and compassion. We
should invest in programs that work and
that help Vermonters get back on their
feet. Arbitrary time limits on temporary
cash assistance is proven not to work and
is at odds with our instincts for common
sense and compassion.
To be sure, the Governor has
proposals to help the low-income,
working population, through bolstering
the funding for child care subsidies. But
that bolstering will be of little help on a
cold night when the fuel runs out.
Margaret K. Nelson is a professor of
sociology at Middlebury College.
Publisher
Lynn Publications Inc.
Published Thursdays
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Mailing Address:
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The Essex Reporter is family owned and operated; it is published by Angelo Lynn and Emerson Lynn of Lynn Publications, Inc. and is a
member of the Champlain Valley Newspaper Group.
The Essex Reporter makes every effort to be accurate. If you notice an error, please contact us at 878-5282, or by e-mail at [email protected]
com. Note “correction” in the subject line.
5a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Bradley David Nadeau
(September 22, 1994 – April 28, 2012)
Our hearts still ache for you Brad. We remember your strength, your
kindness to others and your love for family and friends. We will hold on
tight to the memories of the life you shared with us and our hearts will
always be filled with the love we have for you. We miss you – Love, Your
Family.
It’s been a year since the angels came for you and I’ve thought of you
everyday my baby boy. I sat on your bench at school the other day. It’s a
place I like to go when it’s quiet and no one is around. I can sit and look out
at the field, and when I close my eyes I can see you running like the wind
with that smile of determination on your face. I miss having you here with
us. I miss the sound of your laugh, our heart to heart talks and your big
hugs. I hold so many memories of you in my heart – some that make me
smile and some that make me cry. I am grateful for all the moments with
you and love you more than words could ever say. You brought something
so precious to my life in the short time you were able to be here on this earth
and that is worth every tear I will shed missing you.
Love ya 4, Ma
Find This
Sunflower!
This week we’ve hidden a sunflower, but in
how many different places?
Find them all and let us know – we’re putting
you through your paces!
You’ll get a free online subscription just for
entering - so it can’t hurt
And if you’re the winner of the draw you’ll
even get a t-shirt!
Riders "rein" in recognition
Submit online at
www.essexreporter.com/contest
802-878-5282 by May 23.
Winner will be announced on June 6.
Achievements
Equestrians from Freedom Farm in Jericho recently attended the 2012 Vermont Horse Shows Association Year End Awards
banquet. From left: Alexis Walker (Champion Junior English Equitation, Reserve Junior Showmanship and Junior Pleasure);
Beth Shelley (Champion Morgan Geldings and Morgan Hunter Pleasure Horse, Reserve Justin Morgan Standard), Jolene
Fontaine (Champion Quarter Horse Mares, Open Western Pleasure and Quarter Horse Western Pleasure, Reserve Adult Stock
Seat Equitation and Adult Trail), Kira Clokey (Champion Paint Horse Under Saddle, Owner to Ride, Senior English Equitation
and Senior Pleasure, Reserve Senior Showmanship), Carly Jenkins, Eva Joly (Champion Beginner Horsemanship, Beginner
Equitation, Model Pony Beginner Pleasure and Trail, Reserve Beginner Showmanship, High Point Pony), Connor Jenny
(Champion Junior Showmanship, Quarter Horse Trail, Junior Pleasure and Junior Trail, Reserve Junior Stock Seat Equitation
and English Equitation), Kaelyn Jenny (Champion Western Road Hack, Senior Showmanship and Senior Trail, Reserve Quarter
Horse Hunter Under Saddle, Quarter Horse Trail, English Road Hack, Senior Stock Seat Equitation). Not pictured: Cara Turnbull
(Champion English Road Hack, Reserve Hunter Pleasure Horse, Hunter Model and Senior English Equitation) and Chantel
Charlebois (Champion Senior Stock Seat Equitation and Senior Pleasure, Reserve Senior Trail). Photo contributed
The Headlines First • Video Reports
Find us on Facebook at: www.facebook.com/essexreporter
Daniel W. Rieder, of
Jericho, received a Bachelor
of Science degree in civil
engineering from Clarkson
University in Potsdam, N.Y.
in December 2012.
Warren Irish, son of
Gary and Penny Irish of
Jericho, was named to the
fall 2012 semester Dean’s
List at Vermont Technical
College in Randolph Center,
Vt. Warren is a sophomore
in
their
architectural
engineering program, and
a 2011 graduate of Mount
Mansfield Union High School
in Jericho.
Erin
Bentlage,
of
Jericho, was named to the
fall 2012 semester Dean’s
List at Berklee College of
Music in Boston, Mass.
William
Frick,
of
Jericho, a first-year student,
was named a Charles O.
Thompson Scholar for the
2012-2013 academic year
at Worcester Polytechnic
Institute (WPI) in Worcester,
Mass.
Jenna
Heath
was
named to the fall 2012
President’s List at Southern
New Hampshire University
in Manchester, N.H. Heath
is studying for her BA Middle
School Mathematics Ed.
Krista Luchini was
named to the fall 2012
President’s List at Southern
New Hampshire University
in Manchester, N.H. Luchini
is studying for her BA
Elementary Education.
Samantha Ward was
Congratulations students
for a job well done this
semester! Email [email protected]
essexreporter.com to
receive a free online
subscription to The Essex
Reporter.
named to the fall 2012
President’s List at Southern
New Hampshire University
in Manchester, N.H. Ward is
studying for her BA Graphic
Design and Media Arts.
Sara Till, of Jericho,
was named to the fall 2012
semester Dean’s List at
Rensselaer
Polytechnic
Institute in Troy, N.Y.
Maura
Spillane,
daughter of Mary and Philip
Spillane of Jericho, recently
performed a voice and
clarinet recital sponsored
by the Connecticut College
Department
of
Music.
Spillane is a 2009 graduate of
Mount Mansfield Union High
School, and is currently a
senior at Connecticut College
in New London, Conn.
Ian Cohen, of Jericho,
was named to the fall 2012
semester Dean’s List at
Boston University in Boston,
Mass.
Chantel
Charlebois,
of Jericho, was named to
the winter 2013 semester
Dean’s List at Rochester
Institute of Technology in
Rochester, N.Y. Charlebois
is a second-year student in
RIT’s Kate Gleason College
of Engineering.
Essex Automotive Services
HAVE YOU GOT CABLE(S)?
All it takes is one experience of
being stranded with a dead battery
to convince vehicle owners that a set
of battery jumper cables is a great
investment. Once they are in hand, it’s
only a matter of finding a helpful driver
with a live battery to get started again.
Jumpstarting a dead battery requires
careful attention during cable hookup.
First, connect the red cable between
the positive terminals of both batteries.
Then, connect the black cable to the
negative terminal of the live battery
and to a good metal ground point in
the engine compartment of the car with
the dead battery. Once the vehicle is
restarted, remove the cables carefully,
being sure not to touch the clamps
together.
If you pay attention to your car’s
battery and conduct a few tests and
observations along the way, you’ll
reduce your risk of being stranded on
the road. At ESSEX AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICES, we assure you that you
and your family’s safety are our number
one concern. We guarantee all work
performed. If you have any car related
questions please come to 141-147 Pearl
St, Essex Jct., or call 802.879.1966
today. You can trust us, and we guarantee
your satisfaction with any service we
provide. We offer same day service, and
free customer shuttle. Ask us for details.
We open at 6:59am, with no appointment
needed. We feature A.S.E. Technicians
including Master Techs. “Service You
Can Trust” “We do it all!” We are open
for Business!!!
OPEN 6:59 AM
NO APPT. NEEDED
HINT: If the interior dome light comes
on in the vehicle with the dead battery
after the jumper cables are connected,
it’s a good sign that the cables have been
correctly connected.
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change cap is 0.500%, with a lifetime change cap of 4.000% over the first year rate. Loan offer is subject to credit approval. Requires auto-payment from a Merchants
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6a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Essex Area
Religious
Directory
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH- (Fundamentalindependent.) 61 Main St., Essex Junction, 878-8341.
Pastor James Gangwer. Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship
Service 11 a.m. Sunday evening worship 6:30. Wednesday
evening youth groups; Awana, Pro-Teens and Prayer
meeting 7 p.m.
CHRIST MEMORIAL CHURCH- Route 2A, Williston, just
north of Industrial Ave. Wes Pastor, Senior Minister, 8787107, Proclaiming Christ and Him crucified Sundays at 8:15
a.m. and 10:15 a.m. www.cmcvermont.org
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY
SAINTS - Sacrament Meeting each Sunday at 10am 73
Essex Way, Essex Junction, VT 05452, 802-879-9142,
[email protected] All visitors welcome to attend
church services each Sunday at 10am. We learn about
the restored gospel of Jesus Christ and how we can follow
Him. We believe in strengthening families and serving one
another. Learn more about members and the church at
www.mormon.org.
DAYBREAK COMMUNITY CHURCH 67 Creek Farm
Plaza, Colchester VT. 05446 802-338-9118 www.
daybreakvermont.org or [email protected]
Sunday Service at 10:30am Lead Pastor, Brent Devenney
ESSEX ALLIANCE CHURCH- 37 Old Stage Road in Essex
Junction. Sunday Services: 7:45 am, 9 am, 10:15 am and
11:30 am. Phone: 878-8213. www.essexalliance.org
ESSEX CENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH- Please
join us for worship that combines the best of traditional and
contemporary music and spirituality. We are a safe and
welcoming space for all people to celebrate, worship, ask
questions, and put down spiritual roots. One service at
10:00 am. Sunday school and childcare provided. We offer
a variety of small groups for prayer, Bible study, handson ministry, and studying contemporary faith issues. 119
Center Rd (Route 15) Essex Center. Rev. Mitchell Hay,
pastor. 879-8304.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF ESSEX- 39
Main Street, Essex Junction, VT 05452. Telephone
(802) 878-5745, Fax: (802) 872-8236; Email: [email protected]
fccej.org Rev. Mark Mendes, Senior Pastor, Rev. Ryan
Gackenheimer, Associate Pastor. Sunday worship services:
8:30 and 10:15 a.m. Communion: first Sunday of every
month. Sunday School meets weekly at 10:15 a.m. Junior
High Youth Group meets regularly Sundays from 11:30 a.m.
to 1 p.m.; Senior High Youth Group meets regularly Sunday
evenings from 5 to 7 p.m. Adult Choir, Junior Choir, Cherub
Choir, Handbell Choir, Men’s Choir, Ladies Choir.
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH- (ELCA)- 273
VT. Rte. 15 – Between Jericho and Underhill – 899-3932.
Sunday Worship - 9:00 a.m./Sunday School for all ages 10:30 a.m.. [email protected] All are welcome. Rev.
Phillip Roushey. Email: [email protected]
org.
GRACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH- 130 Maple
Street, Essex Junction. 878-8071. 1 mile south of the
Five Corners on Maple Street / VT. Route 117. Worship
Sundays at 9:30 a.m. with concurrent Church School Pre-K
to High School. Handicapped-accessible facility. Adult
Study Group Sundays at 11:00 a.m. Adult Choir / Praise
Band / Women’s Fellowship / Missionally active. Korean
U.M.C. Worship Sundays at 12:30 p.m. Come explore what
God might be offering you!
HOLY FAMILY- ST. LAWRENCE PARISH, Essex Junction,
- Mass Schedule: Holy Family Church located at 36 Lincoln
Street, Sundays, 8a.m, 11a.m. and 7:30p.m. St. Lawrence
located at 158 West Street, Saturdays, 4 p.m.-Sundays,
9:30a.m. Reconciliation: St. Lawrence, Saturdays, 3:153:45p.m. For more information visit our web page http://
www.hfslvt.org.
ISLAMIC SOCIETY OF VERMONT- 182 Hegeman Ave,
Suite 1, Colchester, VT 05446. Join Imam Islam Hassan
([email protected]) for the five daily prayers. Timings at
ISVT homepage www.isvt.org The call for Friday Jumah
prayers is exactly at 1:00PM followed by Khutbah and
prayer. Additional Friday night lectures between Magrib
and Isha prayers. Weekend Islamic classes on Sundays
9:45AM-1:30PM for all children 4 years and older during
the school year. Interested non-members always welcome.
(802) 655-6711 or [email protected] or Facebook.
MT. MANSFIELD UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
FELLOWSHIP- Visit www.mmuuf.org. Services are held at
9:30 a.m. on the second and fourth Sunday of each month
from Setpember through June. 195 Vermont Route 15,
Jericho (the red barn across from Packard Road). 899-2558
ST JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH- 4 St. James Place
(Gate F to the Fairgrounds) Essex Junction 878-4014 http://
www.stjamesvt.org. Services: 8:15 am Holy Eucharist Rite
II without music. 10:30 am Holy Eucharist Rite II with music.
Coffee hour to follow. Adult education at 9:30 and Godly
Play for PK-3rd graders at 10:15
ST. PIUS THE TENTH CHURCH- 20 Jericho Road,
Essex, 878-5997. Pastor: Rev. Richard W. Tinney. Masses:
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 8:30
and 10:30 a.m. Confessions Sat. 3:30 p.m. 4 p.m. www.
together.net/~stpius
ST. THOMAS CHURCH- 6 Green St., Underhill Center.
Father Charles R. Danielson, Parish Priest. Weekend
Masses: Saturday-4:30 p.m., Sunday-8:30. Daily Masses:
Check with wwwlstthomasvt.com or call 899-4632
C alendar
2
Thursday
Fundraiser. Guest speaker: Armando Vilas-
eca, Vermont’s Commissioner of Education. Benefits The Caroline Baird Crichfield
Fund for Women in Need. St. John’s Club,
9 Central Avenue, Burlington, 5-7 p.m.
Curator talk. Join the conversation with artist Kathy Marmor, her engineer collaborator Michael Fortney, and BCA Curator
DJ Hellerman. BCA Center, Church Street,
Burlington,
7 p.m.
Interactive presentation. During the Essex Art League’s monthly meeting, UVM
professor and artist Michael Strauss will
give a talk and drawing workshop focusing on his new book, “The Mind at Hand.”
Copies will be available at the presentation. Please bring your own paper and
soft pencil/charcoal. First Congregation
Church, 39 Main Street, Essex Junction,
9:30-11 a.m. Visit: www.essexartleague.
com
Workshop. Building Bright Futures parenting
workshop. Topic: positive discipline. Essex
Elementary School, 6:30-7:45 p.m. Contact: 878-6715 or [email protected]
com
Spring conference. Women Business Owners
Network. Keynote Speaker: Former Ambassador Linda Tarr-Whelan. Featured
Speaker: Josie Leavitt of Flying Pig Bookstore and Vermont Comedy Divas. Hampton Inn, Colchester, all day. Register: www.
wbon.org
Theater production. “Wait Until Dark” is a
thriller involving a blind housewife, 3 conmen and a mysterious doll with a surprise
inside. Presented by the Colchester Theatre Company. Runs through May 4. Tickets: $5. Colchester High School, 7:30 p.m.
3
Friday
Gallery reopening reception. The Brandon
Artists Guild will reopen with all new
work. “Nature Reflected: Water, Line
and Form” features kinetic sculptures and
paintings to delight the senses. Exhibit
runs through July 2. Brandon Artists Guild,
7 Center Street, Brandon, 5-7 p.m. Visit:
www.brandonartistsguild.org
Indoor yard sale. Rain or shine. Something for
everyone: furniture, tools. Household items
and more. Williston Federated Church, 44
North Williston Road, Williston, 9 a.m.-6
p.m. Also May 4: 8 a.m.-1 p.m. Contact:
862-7400.
First Friday art walk. Over 40 galleries and
art venues stay open late to welcome
walkers and share in the art scene. Check
out www.artmapburlington.com to see a
list of participating venues. City-wide,
Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Contact: 802-2644839 or [email protected]
First Friday fish night. Baked or fried haddock and all the fixings. Cost: $10/plate.
Live entertainment. Open to the public.
VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex
Junction, 6-7 p.m. Contact: 878-0700.
Theater production. "The Good Doctor."
Presented by the Lamoille County Players. Runs through May 5. Tickets: $18
adults, $12 students/seniors. Hyde Park
Opera House, 7 p.m. Contact: 888-4507. Reception. “Transportation Stories of Burlington’s Bikers and Walkers.” A new exhibit from Alyson Wall. Hear stories about
people who walk and bike rather than use
motor powered transportation. This series
includes transcriptions from each interview, as well as photographic portraits of
each individual. Handicapped accessible.
North End Studio A, 294 North Winooski
Avenue, Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Contact:
802-863-6713
Rummage sale. Clothes, books, toys and
white elephant. Benefits the Ladies of the
United Church of Fairfax. Also May 4: 9
a.m.-2 p.m. Baptist Building, Main Street,
Fairfax, 3-7 p.m. Contact: 849-6313
4
Saturday
Soup n’ chocolate supper. A fundraiser for
the UCW Church featuring all you can eat
soup, chili, salad, artisan bread, chocolate desserts and a silent auction with lots
of prizes. Cost: $8 adults, $5 children.
Red Brick Meeting House, Route 128,
Westford, 5-7 p.m.
Perennial garden workday. Master Gardeners and volunteers needed to help
Brian Vaughan, Perennial Garden Curator, tidy up the garden in time for the May
11 Bloom-Time Festival. Learn proper
techniques for dividing perennials. Bring
pruning shears and weeding tools if you
have them. Take home a free perennial
plant. Free. The Horticultural Research
Center, 65 Green Mountain Drive, South
Burlington, 9 a.m.-12 p.m. Register: 802864-3073 or [email protected]
org
Tree planting. Help Branch Out Burlington!
plant trees. No experience needed. Live
entertainment and refreshments. UVM
Horticulture Farm, Shelburne Road, Burlington, 9 a.m.-11 a.m.
The Clothes Exchange. Shop for bargains
and a cause. Proceeds from this event
will benefit DREAM, a nonprofit organization. Burlington Town Center, 101 Cherry
Street, Burlington, 10 a.m.-6 p.m. Visit:
www.theclothesexchange.org
Ham dinner. Menu: ham with pineapple, mac
and cheese, southern green beans, coleslaw, homemade desserts, rolls and beverages. Also featuring a silent auction
from 4:30-7:30 p.m. Cost: $10 adults,
$6 children 10 and under. Tickets available at the door. Faith United Methodist
Church, 899 Dorset Street, South Burlington, 5 p.m. and 6:15 p.m. Contact: 8607014
Volunteer work day. Help prepare the Birds
of Vermont Museum for its 2013 season.
Refreshments provided. Help clean nest
boxes, spruce up trails, prepare handouts,
input bird data and much more. Call before coming. Birds of Vermont Museum.
900 Sherman Hollow Road, Huntington,
9 a.m.-1 p.m. Contact: 802-434-2167 or
[email protected]
VSO Masterworks series. “Russian Blockbusters.” The season finale for the VSO
presents two blockbuster works: Rachmaninoff’s Piano Concerto No. 3 and
Rimsky-Korsakov's Scheherazade. Single
tickets: $16. Flynn Center, Burlington, 8
p.m. A pre-concert discussion, "Musically
Speaking," moderated by VPR classical
music host Joe Goetz will be held at 7 p.m.,
free for members of the audience. Tickets:
www.flyntix.org, 802-86-FLYNN or www.
vso.org. Beginning Arduino workshop. Arduino is a
tool for making computers that can sense
and control more of the physical world
than your desktop computer. Pre-register
at burlingtoncityarts.org, suggested $20
donation. BCA Center, Church Street, Burlington, 1-5 p.m.
Tag sale. Find household items, treasures, tools,
and toys. Benefits the Westford Volunteer
Fire Department. Hot dogs, baked goods
and beverages also for sale. Westford
Town Garage, Cambridge Road, Westford, 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Contact: 878-7573.
Mayfest. Outdoor fun and activities including
Maypole dancing, face painting, pony
rides, food, and live music. For families
with children 6 and under. Free and open
to the public. Lake Champlain Waldorf
School, 359 Turtle Lane, Shelburne, 10
a.m.-2 p.m. Contact:
802-985-2827
Bird banding workshop. Learn more about
bird banding and to walk the new trail
created by UVM students. Preregistration required. Geprags Community Park,
Hinesburg, 8 a.m. Contact: 863-2436 or
[email protected]
Fundraising event. An evening of fun, laughter, dancing, and celebrating the life of
Grace Emery. Grace was an inspirational
young woman and life-long camper at
Camp Ta-Kum-Ta. Tickets: $50 per person. Includes dinner, dessert and dancing.
Live music by The Hit Men. Silent auction
throughout the event. To benefit Camp TaKum-Ta, a year-round camp for children
with cancer. Old Lantern, Charlotte, 6 p.m.
For tickets, visit: http://forgrace.kintera.
org. Info: 802-318-1218 or 802-2386157 or [email protected]
Touch A Truck. Free family event. Check out
trucks first hand and up close, honk horns
and have a blast! Sand Hill Park, Essex, 9
a.m.-12 p.m.
5
Sunday
Community breakfast. Sponsored by the La-
dies Auxiliary to the Veterans of Foreign
Wars. All are invited, both members and
non-members. Cost: $6 adults, $3 children
VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex
Junction, 9-11 a.m. Contact: 878-0700
“Tour of Gowns.” A charity wedding gown
sale with up to 85% off retail price to
benefit Brides Against Breast Cancer.
$20 VIP early unveiling of gowns from
11 a.m.-1 p.m. Otherwise, free general
admission. Sizes ranging from 0-30. Featuring entertainment, food, drinks, giveaways and wedding vendors. Dress donations accepted at the show. Sheraton
Burlington Hotel and Conference Center,
870 Williston Road, Burlington, 1-6 p.m.
Visit: www.bridesabc.org. Register: 877721-HOPE
Poetry reading. Mary Jane Dickerson will
read from her first published book of poems. Emile Gruppe Gallery, 22 Barber
Farm Road, Jericho, 3-4:30 p.m.
Concert. “Bouquet of Song.” The Vermont
Choral Union presents a performance of
a cappella music, spanning five centuries
and featuring works by Gibbons, Tallis,
Rossi, Brahms and Mendelssohn Hensel.
Admission at the door: $15 adults, $10
seniors/students and free under 12. McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael’s College,
Colchester, 3 p.m. Contact: 802-9897355 or [email protected]
Reception. “Trick of the eye.” A juried group
of photos that explores the art of illusion.
Free and open to the public. Refreshments
served. Exhibit runs through May 26.
Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main Street, Essex
Junction, 4:30-6:30 p.m.
Reception. Includes an artists’ roundtable.
“Travels with Alden.” Celebrate the 100th
birthday of the late Founder of Bryan
Memorial Gallery with an exhibition of
his paintings, painted in 26 countries over
a span of 60 years. Exhibit runs through
Sept. 2. Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180
Main Street, Jeffersonville, 1-4 p.m.
Concert. Organist Wayne Schneider and soprano Lisa Wolff combine their talents to
present an all Brahms program. Unitarian
Church, top of Church Street, Burlington,
2-3:30 p.m.
6
Monday
Meeting. Jericho Underhill Land Trust. Guest
speaker: Craig Newman, from Outreach
for Earth Stewardship. Newman will be
MAY 4
Green Up day
Clean roadsides, drainage
swales and park/common areas
in Essex and Essex Junction!
All Green-Up litter must be put
in specially marked bags.
Signs will mark designated pick
up areas for filled bags. All
residents are requested to bring
filled Green-Up bags to the
pick-up points.
As a thank-you to volunteers, hot
dogs, chips and healthy snacks
will be available at the Town
of Essex Public Works yard on
Sand Hill Road from 11 a.m.-1
p.m. while they last.
Essex and Essex Junction, 9 a.m.2 p.m.
For Essex Junction: Pick up bags
at Village Office, Library or
Parks and Rec. office. On the
day, pick up bags at 5 Corners
9 a.m.- 12 p.m.
Questions? Contact Ally:
[email protected] (Town) or
Mary: 878-3035 (Village)
presenting a slide show detailing the
organization’s work, as well as bringing some rehabilitated raptors for viewing. Open to the public. Town Hall, Underhill, 6:30 p.m. Contact Livy: 899-2693.
Exhibit reception. “Breeding Bird Atlas: Science and Art.” Roz Renfrew of the Vermont Center for Ecostudies discusses the
project. Free, donations welcomed. Open
to adults and teens. Birds of Vermont Museum. 900 Sherman Hollow Road, Huntington, 6 p.m. Contact: 802-434-2167
or [email protected]
7
Tuesday
Concert. “Dancing on the Wind.” A tribute to
the beauty of the dance in music, this program features works by Corelli, Couperin,
Mozart, Godard, and Rutter. St. Paul’s
Episcopal Cathedral, 2 Cherry Street,
Burlington, 12-1 p.m. Contact: 864-0471.
Colchester School District art show opening. Includes work from all CHS art stu-
8
dents for the entire school year, as well as
work from each school in the district. Runs
through May 10. Colchester High School,
8 a.m.-4 p.m.
Wednesday
Dinner meeting. The League of Women Vot-
ers of Champlain Valley. Guest speaker:
Anya Rader Wallack, chairwoman of the
Green Mountain Care Board. Wake Robin, Shelburne, 6:30 p.m.
Essex Rotary meeting. Guest speaker: Steve
Wark, Communications Director. “What’s
Going on at Vermont Gas?” Serving the
communities of Essex, Essex Junction, Jericho and Underhill. The Essex, Essex Junction, 12:10 p.m.
Start the Conversation. A program that encourages families to learn about end-oflife care options. Open to the public. The
Pines Senior Living Community, 7 Aspen
Drive, South Burlington, 1-2 p.m. Visit:
www.StartTheConversationVT.org
Look Good —Feel Better Program. Free
program that teaches female cancer
patients techniques to help restore their
appearance during chemotherapy and
radiation treatments. American Cancer
Society Hope Lodge, Lois McClure-Bee
Tabakin Building, 237 East Avenue, Burlington, 11 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Contact Hope
Lodge: 802-658-0649
Vermont all state parade. Featuring the Essex Bands and other area students. Winooski, 6 p.m.
9
Thursday
Workshop. Building Bright Futures parenting
workshop. Topic: intentional language.
Essex Elementary School, 6:30-7:45 p.m.
Contact: 878-6715 or [email protected]
gmail.com
Mexican night. Nachos and tacos. Hosted
by the Blue Star Mothers. Live entertainment. Cost: $5. VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl
Street, Essex Junction, 5:30 p.m. Contact:
878-0700.VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl
Street, Essex Junction, 5-7 p.m. Contact:
878-0700.
10
Friday
Indoor lawn and rummage sale. Hosted by
The Catholic Daughters of Court Fanny Allen #1060. Also May 11: 9 a.m.-1 p.m.
St. Pius X Parish, 20 Jericho Road, Essex
Junction, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Contra dance. Queen City Contras will
hold its regular dance as a part of Young
Traditions weekend. All are welcome, all
dances taught, no partner or experience
7a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
C alendar
necessary. Beginners’ session at 7:45 p.m.
Admission: $8 adults, free for under 12.
Please bring clean, soft-soled shoes for
dancing. Shelburne Town Hall, 5376 Shelburne Road, Shelburne, 8 p.m. Contact:
802-371-9492 or 802-343-7165
Performances. The Vermont Symphony Orchestra’s “Fiddlesticks!” String Trio will
present performances at two schools
in Colchester. Porter’s Point Elementary
School, Colchester, 8:45 a.m. & Union
Memorial School, Colchester, 10:15 a.m.
Contact: 800-876-9293, x14. Ladies night. Dress in costume and play “Let’s
Make a Deal” to win cash and prizes.
Register by May 6. United Christian Assembly, Raceway Road, Jericho, 6 p.m.
Contact: 802-899-2949
Blood drive. Open to the public to eligible
donors over 16. Appointments will have
priority over walk-ins and help to reduce
long wait lines. Essex High School Ice Rink,
9 a.m.-3 p.m. Reserve a spot: www.redcrossblood.org
PechaKucha. Share thoughts, ideas and designs. Each presenter shares 20 slides with
each slide appearing on screen for 20
seconds. Fleming Museum of Art, Burlington, 6 p.m. Contact: 656-8582 or [email protected]
11
Saturday
Mini-fair. Mother’s Day gifts: plants, white
elephants, crafts, and homemade baked
goods. Also pick-a-pocket, root beer
floats, and hot dogs. Benefits local community groups that serve children and
youth. First United Methodist Church, 21
Buell Street, Burlington, 11 a.m.-3 p.m.
Vermont Respite House 5k Fun Run and
Jiggety Jog. A run/walk/bike/skate fun-
draiser on a 5k course to benefit Vermont
Respite House in Williston. $20 registration fee or collect pledges. Allen Brook
School, 497 Talcott Road, Williston, 8 a.m.
Register: www.vnacares.org/run. Contact:
860-4435.
Loon carving class. All carvers welcome.
Carve and paint an 11-inch loon with
David Tuttle. Wood blanks, snacks, coffee provided. Pre-registration required.
Bring tools. Cost: $25-35. Open to adults
and teens. Birds of Vermont Museum. 900
Sherman Hollow Road, Huntington, 9 a.m.4 p.m. Contact: 802-434-2167 or [email protected]
Bloom time festival. Lectures and plants for
sale. Also featuring hayride tours of the
Horticultural Farm and plein air artists
on site. Free and open to the public. The
Horticultural Research Center, 65 Green
Mountain Drive, South Burlington, 10 a.m.3 p.m. Contact: 802-864-3073 or [email protected]
friendsofthehortfarm.org
Local pastured meat workshop. Free and
open to the public. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, 359 Turtle Lane, Shelburne,
6-8 p.m. Contact: 802-985-2827
12
Sunday
Happy Mother’s Day!
Concert. “The Ceremonial Mr. Handel” with
the Oriana Singers. Includes Zadok the
Priest and others. Admission: $25 adults,
$10 students. St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral, 2 Cherry Street, Burlington, 4 p.m.
Contact: 864-0471.
Commencement. St. Michael’s College students earn their bachelor’s degrees.
Speaker: Mark Shields, TV commentator.
Ross Sports Center, St. Michael’s College,
Colchester, 10 a.m.
Ongoing
After school camera club. Thursdays. Stu-
dents are invited to use cameras to make
community TV and edit programs in Final
Cut. Free and open to grades 6-10. Session runs through June 27. Channel 17
studios, 294 North Winooski Avenue, Burlington, 3:30-5 p.m. Register: http://www.
cctv.org.
Baby playgroup. Wednesdays. Connect with
other parents of children ages 0-5. Story
time and music also included. Richmond
Free Library, 201 Bridge Street, Richmond, 8:45-10:15 a.m. during the school
year. Contact: 434-3036, [email protected]
Bingo. Sponsored by the Whitcomb Woods
Residents Association. Whitcomb Woods,
128 West Street, Essex Junction. Mondays
at 6 p.m. Contact: 879-1829.
Beginner yoga classes. Tuesdays. In lieu of a
fee, please bring a non-perishable item or
monetary donation for the Richmond Food
Shelf. Richmond Free Library, 201 Bridge
Street, Richmond, 6-7 p.m. Contact: [email protected] or 802-318-5570
Branch Out Burlington tree sale. Bare-root
trees for $45 each. Trees are 6 feet and
branched. Order early. Selections include, peach, plum, crabs, maple, American linden. Details and order form at
www.branchoutburlington.org. For more
info, contact Kyle: 863 0134 or [email protected]
northstarleasing.com
Cell phones for soldiers. Local residents can
support these collection drives by donating their old cell phones at A. W. Rich Funeral Home, 57 Main Street, Essex Junction. Collections accepted 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Contact: 849-6261.
Early birder morning walks. Sundays. Enjoy the start of the day with birds, and
other woodland inhabitants. Walks are
led by experienced birders familiar with
Vermont birds. Best for adults and older
children. Free, donations welcomed. Birds
of Vermont Museum. 900 Sherman Hollow
Road, Huntington, 7-9 a.m. Contact: 802434-2167 or [email protected]
org
English as a second language classes. Improve your English conversation skills and
meet new people. Wednesdays. Pickering
Room, Second Floor: Intermediate/Advanced. Administrative Conference Room:
Beginners. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Contact Elena Carter, FFL
Outreach Department: 865-7211.
Essex Art League. Meets the first Thursday of
the month. The meeting agenda includes
a business and social time, and features
a guest artist presentation. Essex Junction
Congregational Church on Main Street,
Essex Junction, 9-11 a.m. Visit: www.essexartleague.com
Essex Junction Block Party Committee.
Want to help plan the block party on
July 20? Use your talents to put together
a family-friendly community event in the
heart of a historic downtown. Meetings
are the 4th Monday of every month. Essex
Junction Municipal offices, 2 Lincoln Street,
Essex Junction, 4 p.m. Contact Patty: 8786944 or [email protected]
Essex Rotary meeting. Essex Rotary Meetings are held on Wednesdays at 12:10
p.m. at The Essex. Serving the communities of Essex, Essex Junction, Jericho and
Underhill.
Family Support Group. Outright Vermont
holds support group meetings for family
members of youth going through the process of coming out. One Sunday evening
and one Wednesday morning each month
at Outright Vermont. Contact: 865-9677.
Genealogy. Let the experts find that missing
ancestor. Resources available for New
England and New York. Vermont Genealogy Library, Hegeman Avenue, Fort Ethan
Allen, Colchester, Tues: 3-9:30 p.m. and
Sat: 10 a.m.-4p.m. Contact: 802-2385934 or http://www.vt-fcgs.org.
Infant and toddler programs. Join us for a
rhythmic morning of play, song, puppetry and community for families with toddlers. Come once a week: every Tuesday,
Wednesday or Thursday. Infant classes
offered Fridays. Lake Champlain Waldorf School, Shelburne, 9-11 a.m. Contact: 985-2827
Italian conversation group. Open to all interested in learning/hearing the Italian
language. Room 101, St. Edmunds Hall,
St. Michael's College, Colchester. Every
second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 7-9 p.m. Mount Mansfield scale modelers. Informal gathering of model enthusiasts. All
skill levels welcome. Third Thursday of
each month. Kolvoord Community Room,
Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:308:30 p.m. Contact: 878-0765.
Preschool playgroup. Tuesdays and Thursdays. For ages birth through five years.
Essex Junction Recreation and Parks Department, Maple Street, 9:30-11 a.m.
Follows school calendar. Contact Saramichelle: 872-9580
Reading with Frosty and friends. Tuesdays.
All dogs registered with Therapy Dogs
of Vermont. Bring a book and read to a
dog. All ages. Pre-register for 10-minute
individual sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston,
3:30-4:30 p.m. Contact: 878-4918
Sing and dance with Constancia. Thurdays.
Music in both Spanish and English with
stories and movement for children up to
age 6. Free. No pre-registration. Dorothy
Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane,
Williston, 10:30 a.m. Contact: 802-8784918.
Toy library playgroup. Fridays. Ages birth
through five years. Memorial Hall, Essex,
9:30-11 a.m. Contact Lauren: 878-6715.
May 8
PBSKids "Sid the Science
Kid." Vermont Public Television
is sharing a sneak peek at new
episodes of their series that
promote STEM learning (Science,
Technology, Engineering, Math).
More info on vpt.org. Brownell
Library, Essex Junction, 3:30-4:30
p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
May 10
Drop-in story time for kids
of all ages. Babies, toddlers and
preschoolers are welcome to come
listen to picture book stories and
have fun with finger plays and
action rhymes. No registration
required. Brownell Library, Essex
Junction, 10-10:30 a.m. Contact:
878-6956.
MPH
(Middle
School
Planners and Helpers). Students
in grades 6-8 help out with projects
and play games. Snacks too.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction,
3:30-4:30 p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
Teen movie. “Les Miserables”
is set in19th-century France. It
follows Jean Valjean, who for
decades has been hunted by the
ruthless policeman Javert after he
breaks parole and agrees to care for
factory worker Fantine’s daughter,
Cosette. The fateful decision
changes their lives forever. Free
popcorn and soda. Rated PG-13.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction,
6-8:45 p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
Dungeons and Dragons.
Embark
upon
imaginary
adventures. A Dungeon Master
serves as the game’s referee and
storyteller. Grades 6 and up.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction,
6-8 p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
May 11
Bulletin
board
summer
prep. Teens help make a backdrop
for the bulletin board for the
summer reading program “Dig
community newspapers
satisfy a basic human craving
that the big dailies can’t do.
That is the affirmation of the
sense of community,
a positive and intimate reflection of the
sense of place,
a stroke for us-ness, our extended
family-ness and our profound and interlocking
”
connectedness.
Quote from
“Community Journalism/
The Personal Approach”
by Jock Lauterer
Showcase
of
Homes
OPEN
1pm-3pm
May 5
To view more ongoing events go to:
www.EssexReporter.com/calendar
Local Libraries
May 3
Songs and stories. Matthew
Witten performs songs about our
world and tells adventurous tales.
For all ages. No registration.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction,
10-10:45 a.m. Contact: 878-6956.
Spanish
musical
kids.
Constancia Gomez from Argentina
will lead children in Spanish songs
and movement. For kids in grades
K and up. Brownell Library, Essex
Junction, 3:30-4:15 p.m. Register:
878-6956.
Magic:
The
Gathering.
Whether you know the game or are
curious about finding out more,
join us for Magic night. Grade 6
and up. Brownell Library, Essex
Junction, 6-8 p.m. Contact: 8786956.
“
At their best,
into Reading.” Involves painting.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction,
2-3:30 p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
Ongoing events
Drop-in story-time. Mondays.
Reading, rhyming, and crafts
each week. All ages welcome. No
registration required. Essex Free
Library, 2 Jericho Road, Essex,
10:30 a.m. Contact: 802-879-0313
or [email protected]
Drop-in knitting group.
Tuesdays. Spend the evening
knitting and socializing with
fellow knitters. Essex Free
Library, 2 Jericho Road, Essex,
6:30 p.m. Contact: 802-879-0313
or [email protected]
Kinect nights. Thursdays.
Play video games in the Activity
Room. Essex Free Library, 2
Jericho Road, Essex, 6-7:30
p.m. Contact: 802-879-0313 or
[email protected]
Toddler
story-time.
Wednesdays. Stories, songs and
crafts for ages 18 months-2.5
years. No registration required.
Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho
Road, Essex, 10:30 a.m. Contact:
802-879-0313 or [email protected]
essex.org
Preschool
story-time.
Thursdays. Books, songs, rhymes
and crafts for ages 3.5-5 years. No
registration required. Essex Free
Library, 2 Jericho Road, Essex,
10:30 a.m. Contact: 802-879-0313
or [email protected]
Story-time for babies and
toddlers.
Tuesdays.
Picture
books, songs rhymes and puppets.
Brownell Library, 6 Lincoln Street,
Essex Junction, 9:10-9:30 a.m.
Contact: 878-6956.
Story-time for 3-5-year-olds.
Tuesdays. Picture books, songs,
rhymes, puppets & flannel stories
for preschoolers. Brownell Library,
6 Lincoln Street, Essex Junction,
9:10-9:30 a.m. Register: 878-6956.
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8a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Current
Exhibits
September
WEB
SPOT:
VERMONT PASTEL SOCIETY. A juried exhibition. Runs through May 19. Emile Gruppe
Gallery, 22 Barber Farm Road, Jericho.
Visit us online
for exhibit web links!
www.EssexReporter.com/
Community/arts-and-entertainment
The month of May is abloom with local art
VERMONT PHOTO GROUP. Eight photographers, including Essex Junction residents
Harry Summerfield and Sheri Larsen, present
vibrant images of nature, landscapes, and
portraits of Lake Superior Chippewa Band
Dancers. Runs May 2-30. Mirabelles Cafe, 198
Main Street, Burlington. Contact: 658-3074.
“TRAVELS WITH ALDEN.” Celebrate the
100th birthday of the late Founder of Bryan
Memorial Gallery with an exhibition of his
paintings, painted in 26 countries over a
span of 60 years. Exhibit runs through Sept.
2. Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180 Main Street,
Jeffersonville.
“USER REQUIRED.” A multi-floor exhibition
featuring innovative light and sound-focused
technologies. Runs through May 18. BCA
Center, Church Street, Burlington.
An annual juried exhibition
of the Vermont Pastel Society.
Gallery hours are 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
Thursday through Sunday or by
appointment.
Visit the gallery on Sunday,
May 5 for a poetry reading
by Mary Jane Dickerson —
who will read from her first
published book of poems from
3-4:30 p.m.
Vermont Pastel
Society. Runs
through May 19.
Emile Gruppe
Gallery, 22 Barber
Farm Road, Jericho.
Contact: 899-3211
While brunching and lunching at local eatery, The
Firebird Café, take a look on the walls. Sachie Kohlman's
whimsical and realistic pet portraits will brighten your
afternoon.
“I believe there is a special connection between their
pets and humans and my goal is to express that connection
through my portraits," Sachie Kohlman revealed. "I try to
record each animal's unique personality and soul on to the
paper. I hope when you see the portraits on display you will
see that as well.”
COLCHESTER TOWN OFFICE EXHIBIT. The
Colchester High School Art Department has
selected seven new artworks. Media include
paper with ink, paints, pencils, and photographs. Artists include Paige Russell, Saige
Papariello, Sadie Anderson, Taylor Lance,
Molly Dickin, Robbie Peeters and Sierra
Cummings. Runs through the end of May.
Colchester Town Office, Colchester.
“Ali — Boxer.” Pet
portrait by Sachie
Kohlman of Essex
Junction.
TWO SOLO EXHIBITS. “Time Travelers” features the wood sculptures of Clarke Derbes.
“Lines in Winter” features the graphite and
charcoal works of Sarah Horne. Runs through
May 15. West Branch Gallery, Stowe. Contact:
802-253-8943 or [email protected]
com.
“Trick of the eye.”
Runs through May
26. Darkroom Gallery,
12 Main Street,
Essex Junction.
Contact: [email protected]
darkroomgallery.
com
or 802-777FOTO.
Each shot is a celebration of illusionist art.
Catch the reception on May 5 at the gallery,
starting at 4:30 p.m.
Ken Signorello, founder of Darkroom, added,
“Juror Benjamin Von Wong will be visiting on
May 5 to give a lecture on ‘Inspiration and
Motivation.’” The talk will take place before the
reception at 1:30 p.m. and tickets are $45 per
person.
Upcoming Events
5/2 — CURATOR TALK. BCA Center, Church
Street, Burlington,
7 p.m.
5/2 — INTERACTIVE PRESENTATION.
UVM professor and artist Michael Strauss
will give a talk and drawing workshop. First
Congregation Church, 39 Main Street, Essex
Junction, 9:30-11 a.m.
5/3 — GALLERY REOPENING RECEPTION. “Nature Reflected: Water, Line and
Form.” Brandon Artists Guild, 7 Center Street,
Brandon, 5-7 p.m.
“Obscenity In Pink” by Anick Morel.
This photo was taken on the
reservation at the 2012 powwow of
the Lake Superior Chippewa Band
in Grand Portage, Minn.
Summerfield, who grew up in
Minnesota, explained, “As I worked
on each photo, it was a stunning
realization that each dancer is
fully absorbed in his or her dance.
The jumble of activity around them
seemed no distraction to the dancer.
So, I decided to isolate each dancer
from the setting. I hope it worked
to represent each dancer in his or
her full concentration somewhat
Lake Superior Chippewa
like each may have experienced
Band Dancer. Photo by Harry
the dance.”
Summerfield of Essex.
5/3 — FIRST FRIDAY ART WALK. Check
out www.artmapburlington.com to see a list
of participating venues. Citywide, Burlington, 5-8 p.m. Contact: 802-264-4839 or
[email protected]
5/3 — THEATER PRODUCTION. "The
Good Doctor." Presented by the Lamoille
County Players. Runs through May 5. Tickets:
$18 adults, $12 students/seniors. Hyde Park
Opera House, 7 p.m. Contact: 888-4507. 5/3 — RECEPTION. “Transportation Stories
of Burlington’s Bikers and Walkers.” North
End Studio A, 294 North Winooski Avenue,
Burlington, 6-8 p.m. Contact: 802-863-6713
@
@
Vermont Photo Group
show. Runs through
May 31. Mirabelles
Cafe, 198 Main
Street, Burlington.
Contact: 658-3074
“TRICK OF THE EYE.” A juried group of
photos that explores the art of illusion. Runs
through May 26. Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main
Street, Essex Junction.
“HARD LINE, SOFT COLOR.” Works by Robert Hitzig. Using a wide variety of woods, colored shellacs and epoxies, Hitzig constructs
pieces that take full advantage of grain
patterns. Runs through June 28. A photo ID
is required for admission. Governor’s Gallery,
Pavilion Office Building, Montpelier.
“Hilltop Farm.” Pastel painting by Phil Laughlin of Williston
Sachie Kohlman.
"Pet portraits on
paper." Through May
31. Firebird Café,
Pearl Street, Essex
Junction. Contact
Kohlman: [email protected]
modernpetdesign.
com
“NATURE REFLECTED: WATER, LINE AND
FORM” features kinetic sculptures and paintings to delight the senses. Runs through
July 2. Brandon Artists Guild, 7 Center Street,
Brandon. Visit: www.brandonartistsguild.org
5/4 — VSO MASTERWORKS SERIES. “Russian Blockbusters.” Single tickets: $16. Flynn
Center, Burlington, 8 p.m. Tickets: www.
flyntix.org, 802-86-FLYNN or www.vso.org. EMAIL BLASTS
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9a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Visit These Fine Merchants For
Shop smart for Mother’s Day Mother’s Day: A day for reflection
Come spring, shoppers
often ask, “What gift should
I get Mom for Mother’s Day?”
How do people transform
the sentiments they have for
their mother into gifts that
represent love and devotion?
Buying a Mother’s Day gift
is no easy task, especially for
those who wait until the last
minute to do their shopping.
Beginning early can ease
the pressure of Mother’s
Day shopping. Research gift
options at least a month prior
so that you can read reviews
on products and services to
guarantee quality. You also
want to make sure the gift
will arrive on time if you will
be ordering online. Here are
other ways to shop smart for
Mother’s Day.
Do some sleuthing. Play
detective and take inventory
of what Mom likes to do the
most. If you ask your mother
what she wants, she will
likely brush off the question
and tell you nothing. It is up
to you to do the investigative
work. Pay attention to
conversations
and
see
if there is anything she
mentions wanting to try or
something around the house
that may need updating.
Practical gifts are less likely
to end up unopened in the
basement or attic.
Check expiration dates.
Gift certificates and cards for
particular stores or services
are popular come Mother’s
Day. But it is essential to
check expiration dates on
the certificates or gifts,
as there is a good chance
Mom will put off pampering
herself and you would not
want the gift to expire before
she has a chance to use it.
In compliance with the law,
chain restaurant gift cards
don’t expire for at least
five years from the time of
purchase. Those might be
your safest bet.
Verify
a
business.
Although Mom may love
a cute boutique that just
opened, verify the business
before buying a gift card
from it. An unpredictable
Metro Creative
economy has made it even
harder for new businesses
to succeed, and you don’t
want Mom to be stuck with
a gift card she can’t use. If
she really likes a particular
new business, take her on a
shopping spree at the store
instead.
Skip
the
chocolate
overload.
Flowers
and
chocolates are traditional
Mother’s Day gifts. However,
calorie-conscious women may
not want to be faced with the
temptation of a warehousesized box of chocolate treats.
If Mom truly loves chocolate,
treat her to a gourmet piece
or two, but don’t make that
your main gift.
Avoid “final sale” items.
It can be tempting to peruse
the deep-discount rack at
Mom’s favorite store when
retailers cut prices on items
in anticipation of a new
season. However, these sales
may come with restrictions
on returns or exchanges.
Unless you know Mom will
like what you pick out, avoid
the “final sale” racks in favor
of items that can be returned
or exchanged.
Ask for a price match.
In an effort to keep a loyal
customer base, many stores
will price match against
competitors’ ads. Therefore,
if you feel more comfortable
at a certain store, print out
the advertised price and
bring it to your favorite store.
There’s a good chance they
will give you the item for
the same price. This works
particularly well for tech
gifts that typically go on sale
in the days leading up to a
holiday or special event.
Metro Creative
Most people spend
Mother’s Day bestowing
flowers, gifts and heartfelt
sentiments upon their
moms. But for some,
knowing how to honor
their mother is not so easy.
After all, mothers are only
human, and not all of them
are perfect.
Take it from Keith L.T.
Alexander, author of the
new coming-of-age memoir
“Forgery-of-the-Month
Club,” which details his
difficult relationship with
his mom. Unable to make
ends meet, his mother
Anita became a con-artist,
a master at theft, mail
fraud and art forgery. In
doing so, she implicated her
son in different schemes
throughout his childhood
and adolescence, setting
him on a potentially selfdestructive path in life.
Now with a daughter
of his own and his mom a
grandmother,
Alexander
believes that forgiveness
and love are important
for moving forward, no
matter your complaints
about the past. In time for
Mother’s Day, he offers
four considerations to make
when thinking about your
own mother: Your mother is an adult
who makes her own choices.
To judge or criticize her is
a choice you are making,
which can come at a cost
to
your
relationship.
Work to let go of any fear,
anger, resentment and
cynicism that hold you
back from improving your
relationship.
The primary influences
on your perspective of
your relationship with
your mother are your
childhood experiences and
the feelings you associated
with
those
memories.
Coming to terms with
those feelings can help you
move forward.
Your point of view
about your mother is not
Make a pancake breakfast for Mom
Ingredients
1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
3 1/2 tsp baking powder
1 tsp salt
1 tbsp white sugar
1 1/4 cups milk
1 egg
3 tbsp butter, melted
Strawberries and/or blueberries and
powdered sugar, for garnish
Method of preparation
Sift dry ingredients together, then
add the wet ingredients. Mix until just
incorporated and let stand five minutes.
Essex Prom
Don’t Forget
Mother’s Day
May 12!
Special!
Prepare a griddle or flat skillet
by heating over medium-high heat
and greasing with butter or non-stick
cooking spray.
Spoon about 1/4 cup of batter onto
griddle for each pancake. Wait until
bubbles form in the center and then
flip. Let cook on other side until golden
brown, then remove.
Repeat until pancake batter is done.
Cut a small cleft into the top of
sliced strawberries to make them look
like hearts and garnish the plate with
powdered sugar.
Limited Time Special $99SRP
www.vgfloristvt.com
60 Pearl Street Essex Junction | 802.879.7980
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10-3 Sat
Closed Sunday
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PaPa Frank’s
Because love is always in style.
15% OFF!
unplanned,
spontaneous
moments, the opportunities
to show love to your child,”
says Alexander. “Those
unexpected
moments
strung together throughout
a child’s upbringing are
part of what makes up
the spine of a child’s selfconfidence, and ultimately
what influences his or her
future.”
Whether your mother
has a tendency to nag you
or a tendency to implicate
you in her major crimes,
consider forgiving her for
her faults this Mother’s
Day.
Metro Creative
Mother’s Day
Designer Gift Sets
Order your
corsage or
boutonniere by
May 20th and get
the “truth.” No matter
how much evidence you
can present or how many
people agree with you, you
have chosen a point of view
which is only one of many
ways to view your mother. Consider what kind
of relationship you would
have with your mother
if you could recreate it
differently: What would it
be like? How would it feel?
“Now that I have
children of my own, I have
learned that the secret to
being a good father is to
be around and available
to your child – not simply
for
the
recitals
and
soccer games, but for the
Premiun Pack
Annuals &
Veggies
Easy Pancakes
Breakfast in bed is one of the staples of
Mother’s Day celebrations. Pancakes are an
ideal breakfast to serve Mom because they are
easily made with just a few common kitchen
ingredients. Young children should be supervised
if helping
with
the
preparation
of breakfast.
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Sunday 4pm-9pm
Call: 655-2423 www.papa-franks.com
10a
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Visit These Fine Merchants For
Famous quotes
for Mother’s Day
M
other’s Day is celebrated
on various days in many
parts of the world. Many
countries and cultures choose
to celebrate Mother’s Day in
March, April or May. Though
the Mother’s Day many people
know today dates back little
more than a century, historians
note that ancient Romans kept a
festival to Cybele, a great mother
of the gods. In addition, Europe
has several traditions aimed at
honoring mothers that date back
quite a while.
One of the traditions
associated with the current
Mother’s Day is to give Mom a
gift. Some people only give their
own mothers and wives gifts, while
others extend their generosity to
sisters with children, mothers-in-
“Of all the rights of women, the greatest is to be a
- Lin Yutang, Chinese writer
mother.” “All women become like their mothers. That is
their tragedy. No man does. That’s his.”
- Oscar Wilde, Irish poet
“If I was damned of body and soul, I know whose
prayers would make me whole, Mother o’ mine, O
Mother o’ mine.” - Rudyard Kipling, in his poem “Mother O’ Mine”
“The heart of a mother is a deep abyss at the
bottom of which you will always find forgiveness.”
- Honore de Balzac, French playwright
“The future destiny of a child is always the work
- Napoleon Bonaparte, Emperor of France
of the mother.” law and even grandmothers. Over
the years Mom’s gifts have run the
gamut, from a homemade treasure
kids made in elementary school to
jewelry from hubby to breakfast in
bed. For those who want to add a
literary tilt to their Mother’s Day
gift this year, consider including
any of the following motherly
quotes when preparing a gift Mom
won’t soon forget.
“I remember my mother’s
prayers and they have
always followed me. They
have clung to me all my
life.”
- Abraham Lincoln, 16th President
of the United States of America
“Youth fades; love droops;
the leaves of friendship
fall; A mother’s secret hope
outlives them all.”
Mother’s Day tidbits and trivia
Mother’s Day is a day devoted to celebrating mothers and expressing love for the
special women in our lives. It can also be a time to learn and share some trivia and
tidbits with those special women who mean so much.
Americans owe Mother’s Day to West Virginia native Anna Jarvis, who held a
memorial for her mother two years after she died in 1905. After the memorial, Jarvis
devoted her efforts to a campaign to make Mother’s Day a national holiday. The day
was nationally recognized in 1914.
Jarvis and her sister, Ellsinore, eventually grew to detest what they felt Mother’s
Day had become. The sisters felt the day had grown too commercialized, and spent
their family inheritance campaigning against Mother’s Day.
Ironically, Jarvis never married and had no children.
Ancient Egyptians had their own form of Mother’s Day by honoring the goddess
Isis, who was known as the mother of pharaohs.
The wife of Russian peasant Feodor Vassilyev is considered to be the record holder
for birthing the most children. Mrs. Vassilyev is believed to have delivered 69 children
between 1725 and 1765. These children were delivered in a total of 27 births, including
16 pairs of twins, seven sets of triplets and four sets of quadruplets. Though little is
known about the births or Mrs. Vassilyev, 67 of the 69 children were said to have
survived infancy.
The bond between mother and child is not exclusive to the human race. Mother
chimpanzees, for instance, are said to develop lifelong relationships with their
children.
Carnations are the flowers most associated with Mother’s Day. White carnations
are worn in the memory of deceased mothers, while red and pink carnations are worn
for those mothers who are still alive.
– Metro Creative
- Oliver Wendell Holmes,
American author
“A man loves his
sweetheart the most, his
wife the best, but his
mother the longest.”
- Irish proverb
Great Gifts For Mom
Our garden center is open and full of lovely
hanging baskets, annuals, vegetable starters and
lots of Spring bulbs, including woodland varieties
like Trillium. We have onion sets, onion plants
and seed potatoes; as well as a variety of seeds in
5 brands, from seed tapes to bulk seeds.
Our shelves are stocked with fresh items for
spring including Catamount Grass Seed,
Green Mountain Fertilizer, compost, mulch,
top soil, and all the tools you need including
gloves, shovels and rakes!
If you’re not sure what to choose, let mom pick
out exactly what she wants by giving her a gift
certificate to Depot Home and Garden.
DEPOT
HOME & GARDEN
The Little Store With More
802-878-8596 • 36 Park Street, Essex Jct.
Open: Monday-Saturday 8-6, Sunday 10-4
Check out our monthly coupon at
DepotHomeAndGarden.net
“Beauty
isit’s
it’sown
ownreward”
reward”
“Beauty is it’s“Beauty
own reward”
is
“Beauty
is it’s
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This Weekend
O n ly
Sports
B Section
The Essex Reporter •
May 2, 2013
ALSO IN THIS SECTION:
• School News
• Classifieds
• Legal Notices
• Food
Essex continues winning streak
ABOVE: Recently retired Hornet softball coach Bill O’Neil is honored before Thursday’s game against Missisquoi for his many years
at the helm with a presentation from current players.
RIGHT: Essex outfielder Lauren Gilbert comes in to make a catch during the Hornets’ 6-5 softball victory over Missisquoi on Thursday.
BOTTOM RIGHT: Essex freshman Allison Rutz watches a pitch from second base after hitting the last of her three straight doubles
during Thursday’s game against Missisquoi.
Photos by Josh Kaufmann
By JOSH KAUFMANN
For The Essex Reporter
Two teams that have been and expect to remain
among the top contenders in Division I softball renewed
their rivalry Thursday afternoon, and while Missisquoi
and Essex didn’t play as sharp a game as usual it was
another nail-biter down to the final out.
On the field where their season has ended in mostly
dramatic playoff losses four of the past six years, the
Thunderbirds again saw a lead disappear and the Hornets
come out on top, this time by a 6-5 margin with a potential
tying run left standing on second base.
“We had what my old principal used to call pockets of
excellence,” said MVU coach Jay Hartman. “We had some
good pockets and we made some good plays. But we just
didn’t play with that zip and with that enthusiasm we’re
accustomed to.
“I thought we played most of the afternoon with our
heads looking down at the ground, waiting to see what the
next mistake was going to be.”
And on both sides, there were more mistakes than
usual in MVU-Essex softball. The play on the field was not
typical of the battles two of the state’s premier programs
have waged in recent seasons.
“They’re a (good) club,” said Hartman, on an afternoon
when he and others honored longtime Essex coach Bill
O’Neil, who after two years co-coaching softball with
Randy Wells retired this spring, though he remains the
head coach for girls’ soccer and boys’ hockey. “As Randy
said, we both tried to give it away. Unfortunately, we did
a little bit better job than they did.”
Each side benefitted from misplays in the field and on
the basepaths, and they were equal in most facets of the
game. MVU had seven hits and made two errors to six
hits and three errors for Essex. Each had a runner thrown
out trying to advance, and picked up three unearned runs
in the game. The biggest difference was Essex pitcher
Allison Rutz’s ability to keep the ball in an inconsistent
strike zone, with the T-Birds drawing just two walks
— both in the third inning and neither scoring — while
the Hornets walked seven times.
Three of those free passes came in the first inning,
when Essex quickly answered MVU’s three-run top half
with three in the bottom to tie it.
Kirstin Ward led MVU from the top of the order with
– See WINNING on page 2b
Hornets squeak by MVU
Three stolen bases by Missisquoi Valley
senior Matt St. Amour led to a two run lead
in the first 2 1/2 innings of a Metro Division
baseball matchup at Essex High School on
Thursday. But the Hornets fought back with a
run in the third and two in the fourth, taking
the lead on a suicide squeeze bunt and holding
on for a 3-2 victory.
“Both teams played sound baseball,” said
Missisquoi coach Roy Sargent. “Both teams
were able to execute multiple bunts.”
Senior Hudson Seman opened scoring for
the Hornets in the third inning after reaching
base with a single. Senior Tyler Warren then
ran in a tying run in the fourth, before senior
Luke Salerno ran home on junior Jonathon
Palmer’s bunt for the lead.
Essex senior Steve Jurkiewicz earned the
win, pitching five innings with five strikeouts,
while senor Josh Baez spent two innings on
the mound.
Elijah Eaton pitched four innings for the
Thunderbirds, with two strikeouts and no
walks as he scattered eight hits. Eaton also
contributed at the plate with a base hit. Caleb
Lothian pitched two innings of relief, allowing
no runs on two hits, a walk and a strikeout.
R.J. Machia and Matt Minckler had sacrifice
bunts.
St. Amour set up MVU’s first run after he
singled and stole second and third in the top
of the first inning. He reached on an error to
lead off the top of the third, again getting to
third with a steal.
The Hornets looked to up their two-game
winning streak during a matchup against
Vergennes Tuesday, after the time of press,
and will travel to Milton on Thursday at 4:30
p.m.
– Josh Kaufmann and Kelly March
Hornets’
SCHEDULE
Essex senior Steven Jurkiewicz pitches for Essex during the Hornets’ 3-2 victory over Missisquoi.
BASEBALL:
5/2 Essex at Milton.............................. 4:30 p.m.
5/7 Essex vs. CVU............................... 4:30 p.m.
GOLF:
5/2 Essex girls at St. J......................... 3:00 p.m.
5/7 Essex boys at Barre...................... 3:00 p.m.
BOYS’ LACROSSE:
5/3 Essex at Middlebury...................... 4:00 p.m.
5/8 Essex vs. CVU............................... 4:00 p.m.
GIRLS’ LACROSSE:
5/3 Essex vs. Middlebury.................... 7:00 p.m.
5/7 Essex at CVU................................ 4:30 p.m.
SOFTBALL:
5/2 Essex at Milton.............................. 4:30 p.m.
5/6 Essex vs. CVU............................... 4:30 p.m.
BOYS’ TENNIS:
5/3 Essex at St. J................................ 3:30 p.m.
5/6 Essex vs. Rice............................... 3:30 p.m.
Photo by Josh Kaufmann
GIRLS’ TENNIS:
5/3 Essex vs. St. J............................... 3:30 p.m.
5/6 Essex at Rice................................. 3:30 p.m.
TRACK:
5/4 Essex at Burlington......................10:00 a.m.
5/8 Essex at St. J................................ 3:30 p.m.
2b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
S ports
Essex tops vacation meet
While most Hornet squads had the
weekend off, Essex High School track and
field hosted a “Vacation Meet” on Friday.
The Essex girls’ team placed first
of nine, topping second-place finisher
Champlain Valley Union by 146 points.
Burlington (70 points), BFA-St. Albans (39
points) and Milton (38 points) rounded off
the meet’s top five.
Olivia DiMambro (2), Shelby Kranz,
Irma Melezovic, Rose Monahan, Rachel
Pinto, Mariah Neverett, Kira Hancock,
Olivia Fontaine and Sarah Correia
each recorded an individual first-place
finish for the Hornets.
The Essex boys’ team placed second of
nine, falling behind South Burlington’s
140-point tally by 21 points. Mount
Mansfield (88 points), BFA-St. Albans
(46 points) and Burlington (44 points)
completed the top five.
Tim Yandow led the Hornets with three
individual first-place finishes, while Ryan
Elliott captured a fourth first for the squad.
For a full list of the Hornets’ individual
results from the meet, visit us online at
www.essexreporter.com.
– Kelly March
Essex junior Ellie Pinto competes in the 3,000-meter during the Essex Vacation Meet on Friday.
Photo by Josh Kaufmann
Sap run
WINNING
from page 1b
William Jones, of Essex, competes in
Sunday’s Vermont Maple Festival Sap
Run, an 8.5-mile race from Swanton
to St. Albans. Jones finished first in
the 70-and-older category, coming in
81st out of more than 220 runners in
1 hour, 12 minutes and 50 seconds.
Photo by Josh Kaufmann
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Boneless
three hits, including a huge
triple to the fence in rightcenter field leading off the
seventh. Emily Gold added
two singles with an RBI,
Molly Metayer drove in a
run with a hit and Megan
Rowell singled.
For Essex, Rutz jumped
into the rivalry in a big
way, starting with a walk
to load the bases in the
first and then slamming
three straight doubles in
her remaining at bats,
each time knocking the ball
to the fence in left or leftcenter. The freshman drove
in one run and scored a
pair.
Hillary Danis added a
pair of hits for the Hornets,
Jessica Barnett had an RBI
single and Olivia Mueller
drove in a run with a perfect
safety squeeze bunt.
MVU quickly jumped in
front, bringing three of its
first four batters home for a
3-0 lead. Ward led off with a
bunt single, was sacrificed
over by Metayer, and
scored on Rowell’s hit into
center field. Rowell scored
when Dakota Raleigh’s
grounder was misplayed,
and Raleigh came around
on a fielder’s choice and
Gold’s RBI single.
The 3-0 lead didn’t
last long, though, as
Essex topped the T-Birds
by scoring its first three
hitters.
Danis
started
things with a hit, and
Mueller barely reached
base when her sacrifice
bunt was bobbled. Rutz
walked to fill the bases
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with none out, and Barnett
knocked two in with a line
shot into center field for
a single. Another walk
reloaded the bases for
Ashley Gehsmann, who
drew another base on balls
to force in the tying run.
Rutz found her rhythm
in the top of the second,
striking out all three hitters
for a 1-2-3 inning, and
Missisquoi’s Arica Bushey
did the same in the bottom
of the half with the help of
a base-running mistake.
After first baseman Hannah
Boudreau made a tough
catch on a short pop-up for
the second out of the inning,
Rutz belted the first of her
three doubles. Rutz broke
for third with the MVU
third baseman playing in
against a potential bunt,
but shortstop Rowell beat
her to the bag and caught a
strong throw from Metayer
long before the runner
arrived to be tagged out.
Rutz issued her only
walks of the day to Rowell
and Katie Campbell in the
top of the third, but left
them at first and second
when she caught a pop-up.
Essex followed suit with a
quick bottom half, getting
nothing from a leadoff walk
when Bushey struck out
the next batter, got a fly
to Rowell, and left fielder
Laura Flint ran down a
tough line drive near the
foul line for the third out.
Essex
showed
its
defensive skill in the
fourth, backing Rutz with
superb plays on consecutive
hard-hit ground balls to
the left side of the infield,
with first baseman Taylor
Picard stretching far and
low to glove throws while
barely keeping a foot on
the bag for outs.
Then
the
Hornets
opened the fourth with
their fifth walk of the day,
and it opened the way for a
decisive, three-run inning
and a 6-3 lead.
No. 8 hitter Samantha
Poratti moved to second
on a passed ball, took third
on Danis’ one-out single
and scored on a bunt by
Mueller to put Essex ahead
for good. Rutz made it 5-3
with another double past
the outfielders, and she
came home from second on
an infield throwing error.
Essex threatened to do
more damage when Bushey
walked the last batter
she would face and relief
pitcher Raleigh did the
same to the first hitter she
saw, but Raleigh recovered
with a bases-loaded, fullcount strikeout to end the
inning.
Ward, who would score
MVU’s final two runs
after leading off with hits,
started the fifth with a
single that fell into shallow
left field. She advanced to
third on a passed ball and
a ground out, scoring when
Raleigh reached via error
for the second time.
Raleigh
shut
down
Essex from there, getting
the side in order in the
fifth and negating Rutz’
third double with a pair
of strikeouts and a great
catch by Rowell on a pop-up
behind third.
The T-Birds appeared
ready to rally after Ward
led off the top of the seventh
with a rocket to the fence in
right-center for a triple and
scored on Metayer’s RBI hit
up the middle. An error put
runners at first and second
with none out, but Essex
got two outs when a popup fell in after the umpire
called the batter out under
the infield fly rule. The
runner at first broke for
second, where Metayer was
already safely standing,
and was tagged out for a
double play. Rutz closed out
the win with a soft ground
out to second.
The
victory
keeps
Essex undefeated through
four games, heading into
contests against Division
II Vergennes Tuesday,
after the time of press, and
Milton Thursday at 4:30
p.m.
Editor’s note: Visit us at
www.essexreporter.com to
watch a video of Missisquoi
softball coach Jay Hartman
discussing
the
rivalry
between MVU and Essex
during a ceremony honoring
former Essex coach Bill
O’Neil.
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The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Essex Police Report
Engagement
Debbie Houle Greer, of
Essex Junction, announces the
engagement of her daughter,
Jennifer Elaine Houle, to
John James Moriarty, son of
Colette and Michael Moriarty
of Dublin, Ireland. Jennifer is
also the daughter of the late
Michael Houle of Jacksonville,
Fla. She is a 2002 graduate of
Essex High School and a 2006
graduate of the University
of Maine. She received her
MSc from the University of
Limerick, Ireland. John is
a 2004 graduate of Gonzaga
College and a 2007 graduate
of the National University
of Ireland, Galway, Ireland.
He received his masters
from Trinity College, Dublin,
Ireland. Both are currently
finishing their PhDs at
Queen’s University Belfast,
Northern Ireland.
The
couple became engaged over
Christmas 2012. A September
2013 wedding in Bar Harbor,
Maine is planned.
Emergency 911 • Non-emergency 878-8331
81 Main Street, Essex Jct., VT 05452 • www.epdvt.org
April 22-28, 2013
Monday, April 22
0630 Agency Assist in Williston
0752 Citizen Dispute on Maplelawn Dr
0840 Citizens Assist on South St
0852 Theft on Sand Hill Rd
0858 Illegal Dumping on Pearl St
1014 Stray Dog on Main St
1130 Alarm on Sand Hill Rd
1132 Citizens Dispute Maplelawn Dr
1135 MV Complaint on Forest Rd
1146 VIN Inspection on Center Rd
1202 Domestic Assault on West St
1300 MV Complaint on Pearl St
1340 Susp Circumstances on Pearl St
1502 Citizens Dispute on South St
1526 Citizens Assist on Saxon Hill Rd
1555 Theft on Gauthier Dr
1711 Shoplifting on Susie Wilson Rd
1829 Alarm on Founders Rd
1847 Citizens Assist on South St
1917 DUI on Main St
1946 Theft on Essex Way
2031 Accident on I289
2108 Alarm on Morse Dr
2130 Suspicious Circumstance Elm St
2245 MV Complaint Susie Wilson Rd
1130
1227
1329
1419
1445
1451
1459
1527
1619
1629
1741
1805
1815
2047
2259
Accident on River Rd
Citizens Assist on Main St
Welfare Check on South St
Theft on Upper Main St
Citizens Assist on Brickyard Rd
Accident on Susie Wilson Rd
Shoplifting on Center Rd
Shoplifting on Pearl St
Suspicious Person on Center Rd
Late Reported Suspicious Person West St
Theft on Upper Main St
Stray Dog on Osgood Hill Rd
Reckless Endangerment on Kellogg
Barking dog complaint on Maplewood Ln
Assault on Rosewood Ln
Wednesday, April 24
0030 Juvenile Problem on Camp St
0159 Alarm on Pearl St
0902 VIN Verification Colchester Rd
0906 Agency Assist on Colchester Rd
0947 MV Complaint on Warner Ave
0951 Suspicious Person Bixby Hill Rd
1312 Agency Assist on Carmichael St
1326 Juvenile Problem Brickyard Rd
1410 Animal Problem Indian Brook Rd
1629 Citizens Assist on Elm St
1839 Juvenile Problem on Irene Ave
1843 MV Complaint on Sand Hill Rd
1849 Suspicious Circumstance Upper Main St
1851 Found Property on Center Rd
1913 Burglary on Sleepy Hollow Rd
1955 Susp Circumstance on Fuller Place
2020 Alarm on Founders Rd
2143 Barking Dog Complaint on South Hill Dr
2221 Runaway on Creek Rd – Returned Home
Tuesday, April 23
0053 Family Fight on Main St
0248 Alarm on Market Pl
0403 Suspicious Circumstance Pearl St
0434 Agency Assist Brigham Hill Rd
0844 Agency Assist on Elm St
0903 Alarm on Thasha Ln
0923 911 Hang-up Locust Ln
1005 Harassing Phone Calls on Juniper Ridge
Rd
1059 Theft on Pearl St
1122 Alarm on Essex Way
Thursday, April 25
0112 Agency Assist on Brickyard Rd
0515 Agency Assist on Camp St
0726 Accident on Main St
1014 Accident on Jericho Rd
1101 Agency Assist on Woodlawn Ct
1157 Runaway on Iroquois Ave – Returned
Home
1301 Theft on Upper Main St
1450 Citizens Assist on Franklin St
1627 Custodial Dispute on Indian Brook
1706 Juvenile Problem on Chapin Rd
1933 Domestic Assault Jericho Rd
2138 Two Runaways on Edgewood Dr –
Returned Home
2353 Welfare Check on Railroad Ave
Friday, April 26
0038 Alarm on Pearl St
0648 Alarm on Educational Dr
0747 Directed Patrol on Lincoln St
0748 Alarm on Hubbells Falls Dr
0911 Agency Assist on Main St
0956 Agency Assist on Main St
1058 Accident on School St
1206 Susp. Circumstance on Baker St
1337 VIN Verification on Main St
1417 Alarm on Essex Highlands
1447 Alarm on Roscoe Ct
1550 Citizens Assist on Greenbriar Dr
1558 MV Complaint on West St
1641 Accident on Maple St
1647 Welfare Check on Aspen Dr
1721 Citizens Assist on Main St
1724 DLS on Colchester Rd
1732 Juvenile Problem on Pearl St
1805 Burglary on Maple St
1845 Citizens Dispute on Prospect St
1957 Accident on River Rd
2131 Assist Rescue on Drury Dr
2201 Juvenile Problem on Frederick Rd
3b
2253 Suspicious Circumstance on Corporate Dr
2306 Assault on Pinecrest Dr
Saturday, April 27
0752 Alarm on Educational Dr
0849 Accident on Park St
0907 Alarm on Educational Dr
1434 DLS on Browns River Rd
1450 Agency Assist in Williston
1512 Shoplifting on Susie Wilson Rd
1522 911 Hang-up on Bobolink Cir
1543 Citizens Assist Browns River Rd
1704 Shoplifting on Essex Way
1749 Agency Assist on Greenbriar Dr
1846 MV Complaint on Weathersfield Bow
1951 Alarm on Pearl St
2017 Illegal Burning on Roscoe Ct
2232 Suspicious Circumstance on I 289
2334 DUI on Pinecrest Dr
2242 Suspicious Circumstance on Wilkinson Dr
2256 Assist Fire Dept on Founders Rd
2320 Assist Rescue on Railroad St
Sunday, April 28
0053 Suspicious Circumstance West St
0216 Susp. Circumstance on River Rd
0241 Agency Assist in Williston
0920 Suspicious Person on Park St
1017 Susp. Circumstance on Foster Rd
1029 VIN Verification on Orchard Ter
1107 Alarm on Educational Dr
1142 Alarm on Founders Rd
1203 Citizens Dispute on Logwood Cir
1250 Alarm on Educational Dr
1254 Accident on Colchester Rd
1254 Accident on Jericho Rd
1332 Juvenile Problem on Maple St
1453 Citizens Assist on Pearl St
1707 Alarm on Market Pl
1740 Citizens Assist on Main St
1802 VIN Verification on Main St
1805 Intoxication on Roscoe Ct
1832 Stray Dog on Baker St
1834 Citizens Dispute on Saybrook Rd
1910 Citizens Assist on Thasha Ln
1920 Barking Dog on Brigham Hill Rd
2140 Safety Hazard on Railroad Ave
2234 Alarm on Essex Way
Traffic Citations Issued: 14
Warnings Issued: 58
CHILD FIND NOTICE 2013
Any individuals from birth through age 21 with disabilities currently residing within Essex
Junction, Essex Town, or Westford, and who are in need of special education and related
services need to be identified, located and evaluated by Chittenden Central Supervisory Union
(CCSU) and its member school districts (listed below). This includes children: not enrolled
in school, attending private or independent schools located within the afore mentioned towns,
enrolled in home study programs, suspected of having a disability despite advancing from grade
to grade, who are highly mobile (such as migrant children), and who are homeless or wards
of the state. Any person with information about any disabled person fitting these descriptions
should contact CCSU.
In accordance with CCSU’s policies and with 34 CFR Part 99 (the Family Education Rights
Privacy Act of 1974), this public notice informs all parents within their jurisdictions about how
information is maintained when it is collected during identification, location and evaluation of
all people with disabilities.
•
Personally identifiable information will be protected by each school.
•
Personally identifiable information about people eligible, referred or considered for
special education services is maintained.
•
Parents have the right to know what types of information have been designated
as directory information (i.e. contained in a student’s education record and is not generally
considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed). This information includes the
student’s name (unless otherwise requested), address, phone number, date/place of birth, major
field of study, participation in officially recognized activities/sports, weight/height, membership
in athletic teams, dates of attendance, degrees/awards received, and the previous school
attended.
•
Parents have the right to know the types and locations of educational records kept by
the school and the titles and addresses of officials responsible for the records.
•
A list of the names and positions of employees within CCSU who have access to
personally identifiable information shall be available for public inspection.
•
If anyone other than an authorized CCSU employee looks at the educational record of
a child, that person shall so indicate by signing his/her name, date and purpose for reviewing
the record on a form to become part of the education record.
•
Parental permission will be obtained prior to disclosing confidential information to
anyone who is not an authorized employee of CCSU.
•
Information relevant to a child’s specific disability (such as: medical information,
intelligence test results, social/developmental history, comprehensive evaluation report and the
individualized education program) will be part of the education record.
•
Personally identifiable information will be gathered from screenings, qualified
diagnostic centers and other sources, as deemed necessary, to complete a comprehensive
evaluation.
•
Parents, or an eligible student, will be able to access personally identifiable information
and inspect and review their education record(s) no later than 45 days after the request is
made.
•
Parents have the right to a response to reasonable requests for explanations and
interpretations of the educational records.
•
Parents may obtain a copy of the educational record without a fee for copying, if a fee
will be a financial burden and/or will prevent them from obtaining the records.
•
Parents have the right to request the education record be amended. The school district
will decide whether to amend the record within a reasonable time of the request. If the district
refuses to amend the record, it shall inform the parent and advise the parent of the right to a
hearing. If, as a result of the hearing, it is found the educational record must be amended,
the school district will amend the record and inform the parent in writing. If, as a result of
the hearing, it is found the disputed information is not inaccurate, misleading, or otherwise in
violation of the privacy right of the child, the school will inform the parent of his/her right to
place in the educational record a written statement commenting on the information or stating any
reasons for disagreeing with the results of the hearing. This written statement will become part
of the educational record and will always be included whenever the contents of the education
record is properly viewed or requested.
•
Parents have the right to a hearing to challenge the educational records of their child.
•
Parents will be notified prior to the school district’s destruction of personally identifiable
information about their child.
•
The parent has the authority to inspect and review records relating to his/her child
unless CCSU has been advised that the parent does not have the authority under applicable state
law governing matters such as guardianship, separation and divorce.
•
Parents have the right to file a complaint with the Secretary of the U.S. Department of
Education concerning alleged failures by the CCSU to comply with this policy.
NOTE: If there are parents within the above mentioned towns who need this information
interpreted, please notify the CCSU.
Announcing
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Model Home Open Thursday – Monday, 12 – 5
SnyderHomesvt.com
802-857-5673
CHITTENDEN CENTRAL SUPERVISORY UNION
Union High School #46
Essex Junction School District
Westford School District
CONTACT: Executive Director of Student Support Services
51 Park Street
Essex Junction, VT 05452
Phone: 857-70
4b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
S chools
ADL
Agenda
From Principal Laurie
Singer
Kudos to ADL students in
the cast and musical director
Liz Leroux of this year's
musical selection "Hello
Dolly." The school's annual
production included more
than 50 students who
acted, built and moved sets,
handled lights and sound,
and
organized
props
and costumes. Parents/
guardians rounded out the
crew by providing a helping
hand
with
programs,
costumes, sets, make-up
and of course, running
students to rehearsals from
January to April. Standing
room
only
audiences
packed the cafeteria each
of the three nights students
performed. Stay tuned for
next year's musical and
mark the calendar for April
10-12, 2014 when ADL
students will hit the stage
once again.
ADL Track
The ADL boys’ and girls’
track team had a successful
start to their 2013 season
Other News
Area families may participate in
cultural exchange
Kristin Kany is interviewing families
in the CCSU school district who are
interested in participating in a cultural
exchange experience by hosting an
international high school student during
ADL students (pictured from left) Leah Kelleher, Hannah Baker,
Cameron McClellan and Alex Rizvanov display their awards
given at the World Language Poetry Slam in South Burlington
on April 12.
Photo contributed
with a victory on April 16
over
Colchester
Middle
School. The 106 members of
the ADL team showed great
promise as the Chargers
great depth in every event
paid off in the overall score. ADL's next meet will be at
Essex Middle School on May
3 in a meet with ADL, EMS
and Westford.
World Language Poetry
Slam
ADL
students
participated in the first
World Language Poetry
Slam in South Burlington
at Tuttle Middle School on
April 12. Leah Kelleher won
first place for a self-authored
poem in French. Hannah
Baker
won
honorable
mention for eighth-grade
French. Cameron McClellan
won honorable mention for
eighth-grade Spanish and
Alex Rizvanov won honorable
mention for seventh-grade
Spanish. Also representing
ADL as participants and
alternates were: Eric
DeWitt, Hannah Loggins,
Chloe
Jensen,
Hamza
Halilovic
and
Hannah
Turner.
the 2013-2014 academic year.
Kany is the area Community
Coordinator for PAX, the Program of
Academic Exchange. PAX is a nonprofit foundation that provides a U.S.
high school and homestay program for
students from over 75 different countries
in Europe, Eastern Europe, Africa, Asia
and Latin America. PAX students are
between the ages of 15 and 18, speak
English, have full insurance coverage
and their own spending money.
Students from different countries
look forward to living like American
teens for a school year — joining sports
teams, experiencing high school and
participating fully in family life. PAX
families are asked to provide students
with meals, a place to sleep and study,
and a warm, supportive environment.
Private rooms are not required, and
single parents, young couples and emptynesters are welcome to apply.
For information call Kristin Kany at
802.324.4566, [email protected] or
visit www.pax.org.
ETSD News
Kindergarten
students
at
Essex Elementary School
play a native dart game with
corncobs as the dart. Essex
Elementary School recently
hosted Judy Dow as their
Artist in Residence thanks
to generous grants from the
Vermont Arts Council and the
Essex Town School District's
PTO.
The sixth-grade Kiva Team at Essex Middle School shared writing with fifth-graders from
Founders Memorial School. Kiva students wrote narratives using the research they conducted
into the culture and human rights challenges facing children around the world. Students pictured
from left to right: Michael Lemieux, Nolan Davis, Dominic Minadeo and Galen Salatino.
Photo by Carol Scrimgeour,
Learning Center Director at EES
Photo by Alison Levy, Kiva Team Teacher, EMS
Hiawatha Highlights
Green Mountain Sing
Hiawatha staff and students
welcome the community to join
them for songs during a school-wide
Green Mountain Sing assembly on
May 7 at 1:30 p.m.
PTO News
Hiawatha
celebrated
the
Week of the Young Child. Monday
was “high-five” day. Tuesday
was information on bullying.
Wednesday was “Turn off TV,
Turn On Life” day. Thursday was
Literacy Awareness and Friday
was Spirit Day.
Teacher Appreciation Week is
May 6 to May 10. The PTO will be
providing some special treats for
our fabulous teachers that week.
Look out for information about how
you can help out with any school-
wide appreciation event. Visit The
Essex Reporter online for some
simple ways to show appreciation.
Spring Fling is coming. More
information will be coming home
about this community building
event that will be held in May.
Don’t
forget
about
our
fundraiser with the Vermont
Lake Monsters. Each ticket costs
$6 and for every ticket sold, the
PTO earns $3. The date on the
tickets is for a game on June 22,
which will be Hiawatha night at
the Lake Monsters. Additionally,
there will be a party with Champ
if our school sells 250 tickets. This
means only one ticket per student
needs to be sold to reach that goal.
Need a ticket? E-mail Missy at
[email protected]
The next PTO meeting is
Pet of the Week
Keiran
On Tuesday, April 2, Ms. Martel's third grade class shared a performance of songs and dances for the Senior Citizens
in Shelburne (pictured). On Wednesday, April 3, Ms. Kolter's third grade class performed songs and dances for the
Senior Citizens in Essex Junction.
Photo contributed
scheduled for Tuesday, May 7 at
6:30 p.m. in the Learning Center.
Childcare available.
Reminders and Other
Information
Kindergarten registration is
now open. Contact Mindy Deibler
at 878-6419 or e-mail [email protected]
ccsuvt.org to set up an appointment
for Kindergarten Screening at
Hiawatha on June 7.
*For more information on
these “highlights” and other
school news, visit www.ccsuvt.org/
hiawatha or contact Judy Cohan
at 878 1384 or Tom Bochanski at
[email protected]
Spring Cleaning?
5 year old Neutered Male
Reason Here: Animal control; stray
SUMMARY: Keiran is what some folks in the dog world call a
“white and fluffy.” He came to us as a stray, which is unusual for
fancy little guys like him. We can tell he’s
had some previous training, we guess
he’s about five, and we’re sure
he’s got a lot of spirit for a dog
his size! Keiran is quite food
motivated (makes training
a breeze), and he loves to
play (tug is his favorite)! He
also has a lot to say about
the world, so we wouldn’t
recommend him for homes
with neighbors in close proximity.
If the thought of chasing down a
cheeky squeaky toy gets your
motor revved, you’ve got to
meet Keiran. He’ll show you
what having fun (while
staying glamorous) is all
about.
Humane Society of Chittenden County
802-862-0135
“I used to always keep
my mouth closed when
I smiled. Not anymore!”
— Jessica, 24
“Treat yourself this
Mother’s Day
get the smile you deserve!”
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Open to the Public Wed. - Sat. 9 a.m - 5 p.m.
Your appearance. Your smile.
Whether you’re considering clear aligners, retainers or today’s braces,
an orthodontist is the smart choice. Orthodontists are specialists in
straightening teeth and aligning your bite. They have two to three years
of education beyond dental school. So they’re experts at helping you
get a great smile – that feels great, too.
ORTHODONTICS
mylifemysmile.org
Williston
878-5323
DRS. PETERSON, RYAN & EATON
St. Albans
527-7100
www.champlainortho.net
5b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
S chools
Upcoming events
Teacher Appreciation Week starts
Monday, May 6
ETSD
CCSU
Tuesday/Wednesday, May 7 and 8
What: Science NECAPS For Grade 4
Where: Founders Memorial School
When: During Day
Monday, May 6
What: Westford School Board meeting
Where: Westford School
When: 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 14
What: Spring Choral Concert
Where: Founders Memorial School
When: 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday, May 7
What: Summit Natural Playground
Committee Meeting
Where: Summit Learning Center
When: 6:30 p.m.
Tuesday/Wednesday, May 15 and 16
What: Science NECAPS For Grade 8
Where: Essex Middle School
When: During Day
Wednesday, May 8
What: ADL Track Meet
Where: Essex High School
When: 4 p.m.
Mater Christi
Eighth graders make a
retreat at Mercy Farm
in Benson, Vt.
Early in April, the
Mater
Christi
School
eighth graders had an
opportunity to make a
retreat at Mercy Farm.
This was the first time
that students from MCS in
Burlington had visited the
farm.
The students traveled
by
school
bus
from
Burlington to the farm.
Their morning consisted
of “ice-breakers,” Mass
celebrated by Fr. Jim
Lawrence, pastor of a
neighboring parish, and
a presentation by Sr.
Dale Jarvis, RSM. After
lunch, the group helped
plant fruit trees, clear a
hillside for potatoes and
plant vegetable seeds. The
eighth graders and their
teachers also toured part of
the farm and learned in the
process about respect for
the land and sustainable
living. In gratitude for
the wonderful experience
for their students, MCS
personnel donated two
apple trees to Mercy Farm.
Two years ago, the
Sisters of Mercy in Benson,
Vt., had transformed their
39 acres of land into a
center for sustainability
and
simple
living.
They set up the Mercy
Farm to offer a space of
hospitality in the beauty
of a natural environment
for individuals, families
and groups. As a working
farm and an Eco-Spiritual
center, Mercy Farm has
developed
an
organic
vegetable garden, which
consists of both raised
beds,
and
flat
plots
growing a variety of
vegetables, berries and
herbs. The produce from
these gardens augments
the food for houseguests
as well as the local needs
of the community, when
available. The farm also
supports hens, goats and
honey bees.
Mercy
Farm
is
sponsored by the Sisters
of
Mercy,
Northeast
Community
and
was
recently
incorporated,
allowing it to welcome
people of all ages to its
retreat facilities and farm.
The Mater Christi School
community hopes to make
this retreat experience an
annual one for its students.
St. Francis Xavier
Fleming
Flyer
Technology At School
The Thomas Fleming
School has a policy in
place concerning student
use of their own digital
devices
during
school
hours. Students may bring
devices that can be used
as e-readers to school,
including Kindles, Nooks
and tablet computers such
as iPads and Android
tablets.
Smartphones
are not an acceptable
device. Student devices
are to be used only in
approved classrooms (at
teacher discretion) and
with a specific educational
purpose. Students must
return a consent form
signed by themselves and a
parent before they bring an
e-book or tablet to school.
To see the complete list of
Fleming “Bring Your Own
Technology”
guidelines
go to http://tinyurl.com/
tfstechguidelines.
Village Kids Sponsor A
Food Drive
Students from Village
Kids have been in front of
the school from 3-3:15 p.m.
collecting non-perishable
food and toiletry donations
for the Heavenly Food
Pantry in Essex Junction
since April 30; they will
conclude today, May 2. The
food pantry is currently
most in need of deodorant
and conditioner. Students
may also drop off donations
in the front office. This
project is sponsored by a
grant from Generation On.
Thank you for your support.
Last Day Of School
The last day of school
for Fleming students is
projected to be Monday,
June 17. Students will be
dismissed at 11:25 a.m. on
that final day.
Heart And Soul Of
Essex
Heart and Soul of Essex
needs your input! Take
their brief survey (http://
heart andsoulofessex.org/
survey) to let them know if
these values are important
to you, and share your
ideas for making Essex the
best it can be!
St. Francis Xavier School
Second Trimester 2013 Honor Roll
The following St. Fancis Xavier School students from Essex Junction were
named to the second trimester 2013 honor roll:
Grade 8 High Honors
Sarah Eustis
Grade 7 Honors
Justin Carlson
Photos of the week
That’s a lot of cabbage
EHS News
Tom Begley (EHS junior), Glory Reinstein (EHS Choral Director), Faith Schumacher (EHS junior)
and Annie Beliveau (EHS junior) stand together at the NAfME (National Association for Music
Educators) conference in Hartford, Conn. The students were selected to participate in high school
honor ensembles along with students from Maine to Washington D.C. Lee Murphy (EHS senior)
and Ryan Wolbach (EHS senior) were also selected to perform in the instrumental ensembles.
The EHS students were five of 14 Vermonters selected to participate. Participation was based
on Vermont All State scores and teacher recommendation. The conference ended with the honor
ensemble performances at the Bushnell Performing Arts Center.
Photo contributed
Lumber
Superior Quality
Great Prices
Mill Direct
Kiln Dried 6-8%
Last year at Founders Memorial School, third graders grew cabbages over the summer
as part of a state-wide competition sponsored by Bonnie Plants. This year, an FMS
student, Walker Stapleton, won the state-wide competition, by growing a cabbage that
weighed 25 pounds last season. At a school-wide assembly on Wednesday, April 17,
Walker was awarded a $1,000 scholarship prize from Bonnie Plants. Needless to say,
this year’s third graders are very motivated to grow some big cabbages this upcoming
summer.
Photo by Laurie Wilcox
Preschool Openings
Center for Technology, Essex
Fall openings 2013
As projects move indoors....
HARDWOOD FLOORING
3/4” finished thickness. Random length 4’ - 12’ (some longer)tongue and
groove, recessed back (not end matched). MAPLE, CHERRY, OAK, BIRCH
Price & availability can vary. Call ahead to confirm.
HARDWOODS ROUGH
Hard & Soft MAPLE, CHERRY, Red & White OAK, ASH, BASSWOOD
MAHOGANY, WALNUT & YELLOW POPLAR. No quantity too small.
ALMOST WHOLESALE
500’ BF pkgs of lumber - Hard Maple, Yellow Birch, Cherry & Red Oak.
Select & better. Ask Ken for details.
Morning and afternoon classes
available for
3 to 5 year olds
E
N
PI
BEADED
SHIPLAP
FLOORING
V-JOINT
PIPWICK
DRESSED 4 SIDE
Cash & Volume Discounts
Great Specials • Friendly Service
The A . Johnson C o.
WHOLES ALE • RETAIL
L U M B E R
All Pine is Kiln Dried
Pitch set @ 170°
995 South 116 RD
Bristol, VT 05443
802-453-4884
7am - 4pm Mon-Fri
Reggio
preschool for
withmore
many
PleaseEmilia
contactinspired
Lissa at 879-8150
opportunities
for or
experimenting
information
for registration.with art
materials, gross motor play, dramatic play,
language arts, math, science and diversity.
Please contact Lissa at 879-8150 for more
information or for registration.
6b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Friday at 5 p.m.
for display ads
CONTACT US
for a free quote or to place an ad
PHONE: 802-878-5282
FAX: 802-651-9635
EMAIL: [email protected]
MAIL:
The Essex Reporter
462 Hegeman Avenue, Suite 105
Colchester VT 05446
www.essexreporter.com
SERVICES
For over 35
years, LAFAYETTE
PAINTING has
provided top quality
interior and exterior
painting services.
Our multiple,
specialized crews,
can do your job
quickly and the
finished project is
guaranteed to look
great. Call 863-5397 PRESCHOOL
OPENING
HUGGA BEAR
PRESCHOOL in
Essex Junction has
one opening in
the 4-5 year-old
Pre Kindergarten
group and two
in the 3-year-old
Nursery group. These
programs prepare
your child for school.
State Licensed and
maintain low tuition
fees for affordability.
Classes start in
September. Please
call after 11 a.m. for a
visit. Carol Woodbury:
879-1710
BRIGHTSIDE
SERVICES. Spring
clean-up and home
maintenance, repairs,
and painting. We do
just about anything.
Outside, inside.
Raking; fertilizing;
seeding; brush
removal; topsoil;
bark mulch; crushed
stone; edging;
trimming; scraping;
sanding, priming;
painting; trim;
gutters; shutters;
much more. No job
too small. Quality
workmanship.
Honest; dependable;
IT’S MORE THAN A CAREER - IT’S YOUR LIFE.
Come work where the rewards are real.
Burlington Health and Rehabilitation Center
300 Pearl Street, Burlington, VT 05401
Who is Burlington Health and Rehabilitation Center? A gruop of diverse people
with A COMMON MISSION to PROVIDE EXCELLENT PATIENT CARE
and ENJOY WORKPLACE SATISFACTION. Our staff members are the very
foundation of our reputation. We know that without dedicated, caring health
care workers, we would not exist. That is why we work hard to find and keep good
employees - like you!
FULL/PART TIME and PER DIEM POSITIONS AVAILABLE FOR:
RNs / LPNs and LNAs
Competitive wages based on experience plus shift
differentials with full and/or partial benefit packages
for anyone working 20+ hours per week.
Send resume or get additional details via e-mail
Lisa McDonald, DNS at [email protected]
Apply via fax or on-line at 802-863-8016
reveraBurlington.com
EOE/M/F/D/V
TOWN OF ESSEX PLANNING COMMISSION
AGENDA-PUBLIC HEARING
MAY 23, 2013 - 6:00 P.M.
MUNICIPAL CONFERENCE ROOM, 81 MAIN ST.
ESSEX JCT., VT
1. Executive Session to discuss pending litigation.
2. Public Comments
3. CONSENT AGENDA:
• Town of Essex-SITE PLAN AMENDMENTRequest to restore an existing trail to accommodate
cross country invitational meets located at 103 Old
Colchester Rd in O1 Zone. Tax Map 6, Parcel 2.
4.
Allen Feeley & Nathan MaKay-SITE PLAN
AMENDMENT- PUBLIC HEARING-Proposed addition
to the existing dental office building; parking lot & lighting
expansion & other site improvements for property located at
11 Market Place in the R2 Zone. Tax Map 47, Parcel 12-6.
5. Minutes (05-09-13)
6. Other Business
• PC File Folders
CONCRETE CONST. INC. & REDI MIX CORP.
EXIT 18, GEORGIA, VT
LOOKING TO HIRE
• CDL DRIVERS •
Georgia & Morrisville
Locations
FULL TIME POSITIONS
CALL 802-849-6688
Offering competitive wages,
health insurance, 401K plan
and much more.
CUSTOMER SERVICE
This is a full time position with key skills that include
the ability to interact with customers, to provide and
process information in response to inquiries and requests
regarding the St. Albans Messenger circulation
services.
Main duties of the successful candidate will be dealing
directly with customers via telephone, electronically or
face to face. The Customer Service Representative will
provide answers for pricing, delivery questions as
well as resolving complaints in a calm, respectful
manner. Time management is essential and subscribers
concerns are to be addressed promptly. Must be able to
handle clerical duties pertaining to customer issues.
Customer service principles and practices along with
listening and persuasive conversational skills a plus.
Computer knowledge along with written language,
oral, and bookkeeping skills a great asset.
Send resume to:
[email protected]
NOTE: Information and plans regarding these applications are
available at the Community Development Department in the
Municipal Offices at 81 Main Street in Essex Junction during regular
business hours. An on-line illustration of the proposed project may be
available on the Town website www.essex.org under Maps/Plans.
TOWN OF ESSEX PLANNING COMMISSION
AGENDA-PUBLIC HEARING
MAY 9, 2013 - 6:30 P.M.
MUNICIPAL CONFERENCE ROOM, 81 MAIN ST.
ESSEX JCT., VT
REVISED
1. Public Comments
2. CONCEPTUAL PLAN: Jenkins Properties, LLC & Charmed
Life, LLC-Proposal to construct a 6,000 sq. ft. trucking facility
to include a small office area; multiple docks on each side of
the building; maintenance service bay; and trailer storage for
property located at 4 Corporate Dr in the RPD-I Zone. Tax Map
72, Parcel 3, Lot 4.
3. CONTINUED PUBLIC HEARING FROM 03/14/13-A
& C Realty, LLC-SITE PLAN/HEIGHT WAIVER-Proposal
to construct a 15,050 sq. ft. commercial building for an indoor
rock climbing gym and a 58,500 sq. ft. building for an indoor
skate park and go-cart track, and other site improvements for
property located at 6A Susie Wilson Rd in the B1 Zone. Tax
Map 46, Parcel 7.
4.
Minutes (4/18/13 & 4/25/13)
5.
Other Business
• PC File Folders
NOTE: Information and plans regarding these applications are available
at the Community Development Department in the Municipal Offices
at 81 Main Street in Essex Junction during regular business hours. An
on-line illustration of the proposed project may be available on the
Town website www.essex.org under Maps/Plans.
DISTRIBUTION MANAGER
This is a part time/or full time position, the successful
candidate will be familiar with the skills necessary to
build and motivate a team. This includes the need
to be creative and highly energetic along with strong
customer service skills. Familiarity with computers
and social media a plus. Person is also required to
have a car.
Send resume to: [email protected]
St. Albans
Messenger
281 North Main St., St. Albans, VT
DEADLINES
Friday at 5 p.m. for line ads
to run in the following
Thursday paper
insured. Call now
for May scheduling.
Steve 802.734.9355
or email [email protected]
gmail.com
wonderful for camp
or starting out. $70.
802-868-2620
ANTIQUES
DELL, Windows
Vista. Comes with
everything. Works
great. $40. 802-8680096
DO YOU HAVE
A COMPUTER
PROBLEM? Call
802-655-1178 Ask
for Matt. Military
and College student
discounts with ID.
CompTIA Network+,
A+ certified
professional, ASCIM
ROCKING CHAIRS,
(2), good condition.
$50. each. 802-5245070
GAMES FOR
LAPTOP, (2), for
children. $10. for
both. 802-848-7818
BOOKS/READING
MATERIAL
CONCERT/EVENT
TICKETS
COOKBOOKS, (30).
$20. for all.
802-326-4260
TICKETS, (2), PUMP
House Water Park at
Jay Peak. Valued at
$70., will take $50.
Good thru November
2013. 802-868-2620
GARAGE SALES
GARAGE SALE. 19
Tanglewood Drive,
Essex. Friday and
Saturday May 3
and 4.
9 a.m.-3 p.m.
FOR SALE
OFFICE/COMPUTER
CHAIRS. Swivel,
tilt, adjustable
arms. Mesh back.
Upholstered seat.
Excellent condition.
$60 each.
Black and Decker
electric landscape
edger/trimmer. $50
Contact: 879-1970
MERCHANDISE
APPLIANCES
DRYER, ELECTRIC,
SPEED Queen, older
model. Works great,
COOKBOOKS,
MICROWAVE, SOFT
covered, 350 recipes.
Excellent condition.
$7. 802-891-6140
Building Materials
SHOWER STALL, 4
piece, 48x34x5. Like
new. Asking $550. or
best offer. 802-7825669
TOILET, LIKE NEW.
$40. 802-527-7822
COLLECTIBLES
DOLLS, PROCELAIN,
(2), $10 for both. 802848-7818
COMPUTERS/
SUPPLIES
DESKTOP
COMPUTER,
Private Sale of Storage Unit Contents
Gary Dearden, last known address of 28
South Street, Essex Junction, VT 05452
has a past due balance of $230.00 owed
since January 1, 2013. To cover this debt,
per our lease dated 11/1/12, the contents
of unit #10 will be sold at private silent
auction on May 18, 2013. Auction is not
open to the public.
Bookkeeper Position Available
Part-time full charge bookkeeper needed
for single doctor oral surgery practice.
Requires experience with payroll
processing and reporting, employee
benefits including cafeteria and retirement
plan administration, all aspects of accounts
payable and expertise with Quickbooks,
payroll software and Excel. Ability
to work independently and attention to
detail is required. Please mail resumes to
Tonya Lulek, 8 Carmichael Street, Essex
Junction, VT 05452.
Patient Care Coordinator
Position Available
Full time patient care coordinator needed
for single doctor oral surgery practice.
Requires experience with all aspects of
a computer including but not limited
to accurate data entry, appointment
scheduling, dental and medical insurance
claim filing, and accounts receivable
knowledge. Attention to detail and
excellent communication skills are
requisite.
If you are enthusiastic,
dependable and caring please send resume
to to Tonya Lulek, 8 Carmichael Street,
Essex Junction, VT 05452.
Hiring RCAs Rural Carrier Associates
in Colchester, VT 05446-9998
Job: Cases, delivers, & collects mail along
a prescribed rural route using a vehicle.
Benefits: This is a non-career position &
offers no benefits.
Requirements: Must have a valid driver
license & good driving record, Must be
a US citizen or have permanent resident
alien status and pass on-line computerized
exams. Qualified applicants must
successfully pass a pre-employment drug
screening. All RCAs are required to work
every Saturday unless they are scheduled
off, and in some cases provide your own
vehicle. Must be at least 18 years old.
CHILDREN'S ITEMS
CRIB SHEETS, (2),
white, 3 print. $3.
each or 5 for $15.
Excellent condition.
802-891-6140
CRAFTS & SEWING
SUPPLIES
FABRIC, VARIOUS
YARDAGE, different
textures. $.25 cents
to $15. All new. Large
quantity. 802-5245070
DISHES/PANS/
CUPS/ETC.
FRUIT DISH AND
candy dish, Stone
Crystal. $10. for both.
802-848-7818
ELECTRONICS/
CAMERAS/ETC.
CELL PHONE,
CHOCOLATE, flip
phone, 20 m/p
camera. 2 years old.
Good condition. $40.
802-868-4984
DVD/VCR COMBO,
LG, with remote.
Works great. Asking
$40. 802-868-0096
HOUSE SPEAKERS,
8", YAMAHA. Good
condition. $45. 802868-7613
ROUTERS, (3), ALL
work great. $30. for
all. 802-868-0096
SPEAKER/
AMPLIFIER, DENON.
Good condition. $15.
802-868-7613
SPEAKERS,
PIONEER, (3), for
surround sound. $25.
for all. 802-848-7818
TV, ZENITH, 27",
Excellent condition.
$20. 802-524-3882
EQUIPMENT/
MACHINERY
MIXER WAGON,
PATZ, model 3000.
POST POUNDER,
(3), DUMP BOXES.
Located in New
Haven, VT. 802-4533870
SAWMILLS FROM
ONLY $3997. Make
and save money with
your own bandmill.
Cut lumber any
dimension. In stock
ready to ship. FREE
Info /DVD:
www.Norwood
Sawmills.com
1-800-578-1363
Ext. 300N
EXERCISE/
SPORTING
EQUIPMENT
GOLF KITS, (3),
includes binnoculars.
$10. each. Call for
details. 802-735-8256
Salary: $15.45/hr with no benefits.
GOLF SHOES, 2 pairs,
sizes 11 1/2 and
9. Asking $3. each.
Excellent condition.
802-868-7613
Attention: We will communicate with you
by email concerning your application.
TOTAL GYM,
CROSSBOW, 65.
$100. 802-735-8256
Apply at the following sites:
[email protected], [email protected], and
[email protected]
TREADMILL, SEARS
& ROEBUCKS, older
model. $50. 802-5246018
7b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
BUSINESS DIRECTORY
CONSTRUCTION
B U I L D Building
I N G & L&Alandscaping
NDSCAPING
CONTRACTING & EXTERIORS
NOW! Bannister....
PLEASANT VALLEY, Inc.
9!
195
Decks ■
Roofing ■
Siding ■
Trim Work ■
Windows ■
Doors ■
Painting ■
S
Burlington
Area’s Leading
Roofing
Company Roofing
s Company
Burlington
Area’s
Leading
day
Call Us To rge
Provides Full Service Installation for:
o Cha
ce
in
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Provides Full Service InstallationfoCrfor:
n!
onsultatio
- Roofing
S
& New
-•Replacement
Vinyl and Fiber Cement Siding
- Replacement
Windows Windows
Construction
• Siding
& New Construction
• Decks
•Windows
Porches & Railings
- Exterior Doors
• Exterior Doors
- Decks
is
ce
in
0
862-785
9!
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oday
TInsured
Fully
Call U•s
& Certified Installers
• Fully Insured
e
&
Certified
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harg
C
for a No
tion!
a
lt
u
s
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o
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• Small Garages
2-7850
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8
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• Siding
E X C AVAT I N G
■ Lawn care
CONSTRUCTION
Residential and Commercial
•
•
•
•
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•
•
■ Clean Up
Concrete Contracting
■ Design
R.G. RUGG
All Phases of Excavating
Retaining Walls
Drainage
Driveway Repair/Installation
Septic Systems
Land Clearing
Patios & Walkways
■ Planting
CONSTRUCTION, INC.
Foundations • Footings • Walls • Floors
Insulated Concrete Forms
Residential and Commercial • Fully Insured
■ Excavation
■ Stone Walls
■ Walks & Patios
www.rgruggconstruction.com
CONTRACTING
802-425-3737 | 802-343-4820
[email protected]
802 893-7332
802.999.2547 • Jericho, VT • [email protected]
F E N C E I N S TA L L AT I O N
FLOORING
DAYTON
Enterprises
25
YEARS
EXPERIENCE
HOME REPAIR & REMODELING
FREE ESTIMATES
roofing· siding· windows· doors· decks· stairs· ceramic tile
general framing· metal studs· sheet rock· painting
FULLY INSURED
At the end of the day, you’re all set
[email protected]
WWW.SUNSETFENCEVT.COM
DALE LESAGE, Owner & Fully Insured
802.363.1544 | Georgia, VT
802 - 881 - 2235
INSTALLATION •SANDING •FINISHING •HARD & SOFT WOOD FLOORS
HOME IMPROVEMENT
HOME IMPROVEMENT
LANDSCAPING
Spring
and Fall
Clean-up,
Mowing
REMODELING •KITCHENS • ADDITIONS
DECKS • ROOFS • RESTORATION • PAINTING
Mulching,
Garden
& Lawn
Installation
Professional Property Maintenance
802-730-5857 or www.BouncingDogLandscape.com
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
LANDSCAPING
S CUTS FOR L
S
ES
RA
•
S
G
Spring Cleanups, Mulch Installation & Delivery
• spring clean-ups • lawn mowing
• planting • perennials • pruning
Lawn Mowing, Pruning & Planting
Fall Cleanups, Snow Plowing
Cell: 598-9977
Office: 863-8097
27 Years of Quality Service
NAIL SALON
Free Estimates - Great Rates
Call Larry Arnold at 343-7468
PAINTING
PREMIER PAVING, INC.
Under New Management
Spring Special

$5 off Mani Pedi Combo
“premier quality at a sensible price”
Commercial & Residential
Driveways • Parking Lots • Roadways
Sidewalks • Repairs • Trucking & Excavating
with this ad Exp 5/31
Call for appointment
Fully Insured
Vina Nail Salon
802-662-7870 | 65 Creek Farm Plaza, Colchester
Next to Dollar General Store

PLUMBING
Adam’s Plumbing
S E R V I C E
878 - 1002
The Reliable Local Pro!
For all your residential plumbing
repairs and installations
R E A L E S TAT E
•
over 28 years Experience
[email protected] • PremierPavingVT.com
phone: 524-0399 fax: 524-0799
local owner operator: Randy Howard; Georgia, VT
Free
Estimates
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
Fre e E st im ates
Care & Gardens,
Fence Installation/Repair,
Stone-Concrete
Walkways,
Lawn
Care
&&Gardens
- Perennials,
Shrubs, Pressure
Spring &Washing,
Fall Clean
up,
Trucking
- Stone,
Lawn
CareLawn
Gardens,
Fence
Installation/Repair,
Stone-Concrete
Walkways,
Walls
And Patios,Refurbishing
Firewood, Light- Yorkraking,
Trucking
Mulch, Topsoil, Sand
Driveway
Brushhogging,
Plowing,
Sanding &
&Brush
Salting,
Electrical
& much
more .more....
. .Mulching & Excavating
Spring & Fall Cleanups,
Driveway
Refurbishing,
Hogging,
Lawn
Dethatching,
SnowSnow
Plowing,
Sanding
Salting,
Electrical
& much
Office: 899-2919 - Cell: 734-8247
Fully Insured
Stephan
Griffiths
Jr. - since
Owner
Family
owned
and operated
1990
Essex, VT 05452
Thinking about Selling?
Rely on an Experienced Realtor!
Don’t Make a Move
Your Partner in SUCCESS!
...until you talk with your Neighborhood Specialist
Call Today!!
RE/MAX North Professionals
theexperience.
experience.
It’s It’s
the
SECOND HAND CLOTHES
Adult Clothes $2
All T-shirts: 25¢
Jeans, shirts, tops, dresses,
shorts & more!
S E W I N Gsewing
& G I&F gifts
TS
Selling
Unless otherwise marked!
Unless otherwise marked
Jennifer Giordano, Realtor
802-999-9906
[email protected]
StartingHome.com
Village GIFTS & Tailoring
Childrens’ Clothes: 25¢ & up
Tues. – Fri.
9 a.m to 1p.m.
Sat. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Colchester
825-1887
Donations Accepted
“Living & Working In Essex Junction For Over 30 Years”
INTERIORS
CATHEDRAL CEILINGS
STAIRWAYS
TAPING
RENOVATIONS
&
EXTERIORS
GUTTER CLEANING
PRESSURE WASHING
CUSTOM CARPENTRY
TRIM WORK
Call TJ Valley • 802- 355-0392
PROPERTY MAINTENANCE
Glenn Morrisseau
Milton, VT
802.578.5198
24 H o u r S e r v i ce
Commercial
…moving across town or across the country,
Certified Residential Specialist
Seniors Real Estate Specialist
PAINTING
VALLEY
PAINTING
Residential
For the Results You Deserve…
Janice Battaline
BOOK NOW!
Call Todd: 802-233-6368
Quality Touch Landscaping & Excavating
Free Quotes • Fully Insured
Essex Jct., VT
All Phase Property Maintenance, LLC
R E A L E S TAT E
802-861-6226
1-800-639-4520 x226
[email protected]
Spring Cleanup & Mowing
Property Maintenance, small excavating & landscaping
•
Driveways, small roads and drainage
Alterations & Tailoring
Willow Tree Figures
Pant Hems................................ $7.50
Webkinz
Pant Waists ............................ $12.00
Fair Trade Items
Skirt Hems ................. start at $12.00
Melissa & Doug Toys Suit Jacket Sleeves ................. $22.00
always 10% off
Laurie Wells, Owner/Seamstress
and much more !
899-1290 • 66 Vt. Rt. 15, Jericho
Tues. - Fri 8 to 5:30, Sat 8 to 5
www.villagegiftstailoring.com
• Fully Insured
• Free Consultation
Earthmoving & Landscaping
NEW KODIAK SERVICES
Lawn Care
Minimum .75 acres
Maximum 4 - 5 acres
Custom Plowing
Driveways/Walks/Paths
Dog Runs/Piles for Kids
Residential/Commercial/Condos/Churches
S E A L C O AT I N G
CHAMPLAIN VALLEY
SEAL COATING, LLC
• Seal Coating • Driveways/ Parking Lots
• Hot Rubber Crack Filling • Residential/Commercial
Discounts for multiple driveways in same neighborhood.
Insured, Call for estimates at anytime
802-777-5779 Milton,VT • Owner, Shawn Conner
Accepting All Major Credit Cards: Visa-Mastercard-Discover-American Express
TREE SERVICE
Tree Pruning & Removal
ISA Certified Arborist
Degree in Forestry
Fully Insured — Free Estimates
www.GinkgoTreeExperts.com 802-338-0729
8b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Jericho / Underhill
May 18: A Fowl Day in Jericho
By PHYL NEWBECK
For The Essex Reporter
They’ve done garden
tours, barn tours, historic
home tours and even tours
of rock walls but this year
the Board of Trustees of
the Community Center in
Jericho is trying something
different: a tour of chicken
coops. On Saturday May
18, from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.,
fowl lovers will have the
opportunity to visit 16
coops. Most are in Jericho,
but some are in Underhill
and there is one in Essex
and one in West
Bolton.
You
may
think that all
chicken
coops
are alike but
the Board of
Trustees
begs
to differ. Tour
organizer
Kim
Cleary
said
some people on
the tour made
their coops out
of
reclaimed
materials,
others
have
transformed
old
trailers
into coops and
still
others
have fashioned
coops from new
materials
and
include
such
amenities
as
slate roofs and
siding.
One
chicken
coop
even has its
own webcam.
“It runs
the gamut,” she said “and
that’s the beautiful thing
about the tour. There’s
a lot of diversity in what
you’ll encounter. You can
go deluxe or down home.”
Kevin Campbell, of
Underhill, owns the coop
with a webcam. When he
put the camera up a little
over a year ago his plan
had been to use it as a
weather camera, but he
became more interested
in what his chickens were
doing. Campbell admits he
doesn’t watch the webcam
very often but does use it
to show off his brood of six
to others. The webcam is
also useful for spotting
predators.
Campbell
recently noticed a raccoon,
which had entered the
run when the chickens
were in for the night.
The next morning he was
able to find the hole in
the fence through which
the raccoon had entered.
Since Campbell lost his
first chickens to predators,
he believes the webcam
may help him protect this
brood.
Two of the coops on
the tour are converted
children’s playhouses. At
the Mercer household,
the younger generation
outgrew a playhouse they
had never really loved.
Kim Mercer said they were
thrilled to help make it
a home for the chickens,
repainting it, building the
roosts and nesting boxes
and constructing the run.
Darcie Renzulli’s neighbor
no longer needed one for
his kids so her father took
it down and repurposed
it for her 11 chickens last
year. The coop resembles
its former structure enough
that a friend thought it had
been rebuilt for Renzulli’s
children rather than her
fowls.
Laura
Oliver
used
recycled
materials
to
create a movable
chicken tractor
for her ten birds.
The
trailer
portion
was
handed
down
from neighbors
but wooden barn
siding
came
from ReSTORE
in
Burlington
and other pieces
came from the
ReUse Zone at
the
Richmond
Transfer Station.
The
family
moves the trailer
around the yard,
depending
on
the season; the
sunniest spot in
the winter and
shade
in
the
summer. In the
winter the coop
sits in the garden
so the chickens
will fertilize the
plot, cut down on
weeds and break down the
compost pile.
It’s hard to predict how
many people will sign up
for the tour but Cleary
believes there will be a
good turnout. To the best
of her knowledge, nobody
has ever done a chicken
coop tour in Chittenden
County before although
she has heard of ones in
more urban areas. Cleary
Jericho-Underhill
open studio tour
Darcie Renzulli’s chicken coop.
believes the “back to land”
trend has prompted more
people to keep chickens.
When she moved to Jericho
Center 15 years ago there
were no chickens but now
the village center sports
three different backyard
chicken coops. “We could
be surprised with the
amount of people who
attend,” she said.
In addition to the tour,
a Funky Chicken Market
will be held outside on
the Green from 10 a.m. to
2 p.m. Vendors will have
chicken-themed
artwork
and wares, baked goods
Photo contributed
and other food. In case
of inclement weather, the
event will be moved indoors
to the Community Center.
Beth Dezon-Gaillard has
lined up 16 vendors for the
market including Phoenix
Books which will bring
chicken-themed
books,
greeting cards created by
Jericho Elementary School
students, local artists, and
crafts — chicken-themed,
of course — including pot
holders, pottery and garden
sculptures. From noon to 2
p.m., the Milo White Band
will play chicken-themed
songs.
Lastly, the Board will
host an egg hunt using eggs
“donated” by the chickens
of Jericho Settlers’ Farm
on the farm property. The
farm is part of the chicken
coop tour and the eggs
will be hidden around the
farm’s solar panels. The
hunt will begin at 2 p.m.
Tickets cost $10 in
advance and $12 on the day
of the tour. Kids under 12
are free. There is no fee to
browse the Funky Chicken
Market. Tickets can be
purchased at the Jericho
Center Community Store
and Jeri-Hill Hardware.
Good Shepherd
Lutheran Church
welcomes new reverend
When: May 25 and 26 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Where: Emile A. Gruppe Gallery, 22 Barber Farm Rd,
Jericho
Details: 14 local artists will open their studios to visitors
for sales and demonstrations. The artists include: Harold
Aksdal, Russ Fellows, Toby Fulwiler, Bruce GilbertSmith, Stuart Hall, Mary Hill, Carla Hochschild, Irene
Lederer LaCroix, Ken Morris, Carl Newton, Kristen
Richland, Kevin Ruelle, Dianne Shullenberger and Gerald
Stoner.
Contact: 899-3211
NOTE: Check back in the May 23 issue of The Essex
Reporter for a full map of artist locations.
Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Jericho welcomed
The Reverend Phillip Roushey as its pastor on April 28.
Roushey received his undergraduate degree from Houghton
College, Houghton, N.Y., and a Master of Divinity from
Luther Seminary, St. Paul, Minn. He was ordained into
the Lutheran ministry in November. He and his wife and
daughter reside in Underhill. Good Shepherd is located on
Route 15 in Jericho.
Reverend Phillip Roushey
9b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Food / Health
Roasted beet
salad with
cilantro and lime
Food styling and photography by Tracey Medeiros
Recipe from Sterling College
6 Servings
Ingredients:
8 medium red beets, tops removed, scrubbed
1 tsp cumin seeds
1/2 cup chopped cilantro leaves
4 scallions, thinly sliced
1/2 cup fresh lime or lemon juice (about 4 limes
or 3 lemons)
2 tbsp extra-virgin olive oil
Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper
Method of preparation:
Preheat oven to 400 F.
Place a large sheet of aluminum foil on a
baking sheet. Put beets (still wet from being
scrubbed) in the center and carefully wrap
them in the foil, making an airtight packet.
Roast until fork-tender, 1 to 1 1/4 hours. Set
aside to cool.
Toast the cumin seeds in a small nonstick
skillet over medium-high heat, stirring
frequently, until the seeds are dry and
fragrant, about 30 seconds. Crush the seeds
with a mortar and pestle, or on a cutting board
with the bottom of a frying pan. Set aside.
When the beets are cool enough to handle,
use a paper towel to gently rub off their skins.
Chop the beets into wedges and place in a large
bowl. Add the cilantro, scallions, citrus juice,
oil, cumin, and salt and pepper to taste. Toss to
coat and set aside to marinate for 30 minutes.
Serve. (The salad will keep, refrigerated, for
up to 3 days.)
Variations: This salad is delicious with
other types of vinegars such as sherry,
champagne, red wine or apple cider. Try it
with diced sweet white onions, scallions or
garlic. You can also add different herbs such
as chopped mint or dill.
Should you take a multivitamin?
Margaret
GordonFogelson
There
are
some
misconceptions
about
multivitamin
use,
specifically that they are
“medications” meant for
treating
or
preventing
disease.
Let’s
be
clear:
Multivitamins are not FDA
approved as medications.
They are not meant to cure
disease.
According to the federal
government’s 2010 Dietary
Guidelines for Americans,
“sufficient
evidence
is
not available to support
a
recommendation
for
or against the use of
multivitamin/mineral
supplements
in
the
primary
prevention
of chronic disease for
the
healthy
American
population.”
Currently,
many experts support a “no
benefit, no harm” role of
multivitamins.
A number of large-scale
randomized trials suggest
that, for the majority of
the American population,
taking
multivitamin
supplements
does
not
provide an overall benefit
to health and mortality. In
fact, multivitamin misuse is
associated with deleterious
effects on health.
So, when should you
take a multivitamin? Here
are some questions (and
answers) to help you find
clarity.
What if I’m not getting
enough of certain nutrients?
Multivitamins
are
meant to supplement diets
that are deficient in various
nutrients.
They
help
people get the suggested
amounts of vitamins when
they cannot meet their
needs from food alone.
A
multivitamin-mineral
is a dietary supplement
containing three or more
vitamins
or
minerals.
Although there are some
vitamins that our bodies
can make, we get other
vitamins from different
foods in our diet.
When dietary intake is
poor, multivitamins play a
beneficial role in preventing
vitamin deficiencies that
lead to serious illnesses.
For example, a lack of
Vitamin D may cause
rickets, which can result
in permanent deformities
in
children.
Vitamin
deficiencies are usually
due to dietary inadequacy,
impaired
absorption,
increased requirement, or
rapid excretion.
Do I need to eat fruits
and vegetables if I take a
multivitamin?
A multivitamin should
NOT replace eating fruits
and vegetables nor should
it supplement an already
healthy
and
balanced
diet. Healthy people with
adequate diets rich in
vitamins probably do not
require additional amounts.
In fact, too much of certain
vitamins can have harmful
effects. That being said,
many busy Americans find
it difficult to make time for
eating well-balanced meals.
Is there too much of a
good thing when it comes to
multivitamins?
Some
vitamin
pills
contain levels that are
much higher than you could
ever get from eating food
alone. Without appropriate
regulation, some pills may
contain doses that are
substantially higher than
Firewood
For Sale
Green or Dry
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do all the loading and clean-up.
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TELL US YOURS
[email protected]
www.essexreporter.com/submit
*To redeem this offer, present this ad at time
10/31/13. Cannot be
of pickup. Valid until 4/30/2013.
combined with any other offer and is not
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ROCKY’S PIZZA
39 Park St • Essex Jct •
Bus Day Trip to
AKWESASNE MOHAWK CASINO
Hogansburg, New York
MONDAY, JUNE 3
[
$30 PER PERSON
Please make your reservation no later than May 23.
FREE extras include: $15 Free Slot Play $10 Buffet Coupon
FREE Coffee & Donuts
Bottled Water
Movies Aboard
[
Meet at Colchester Park & Ride
Off I89 Exit 17 between 6:45am-7:15am
Bus Departs: 7:15am | Depart the Casino: 4:30pm
Leave a message for
Selling
Wood Pellets
Bags and Tons
Trusted junk removal since 1989
ONE MOSQUITO CAN KILL.
Margaret
GordonFogelson is a third-year
medical student at the
University
of
Vermont
College of Medicine. She
is pursuing a specialty in
primary care and family
medicine. Most recently,
she was a clerkship resident
with the Colchester Family
Practice, part of Fletcher
Allen’s network of family
medicine providers.
Island Beverage
We recycle
and donate
up to 100%
and run our fleet
on Bio-Diesel.
Heartworm disease in cats can be deadly and it only takes
one mosquito to infect your cat. Prevention is easy, safe
and inexpensive.
amounts of daily vitamin
intake. Consuming more
than the recommended
amount can have harmful
side effects.
According
to
the
experts, “trust your body.”
It will use what it needs
and get rid of the rest. Do
not buy multivitamins
containing more than 100%
of the recommended daily
amount. Your body will just
eliminate the excess.
Cost does not equal
quality. Just because it’s
expensive does not mean it
is better.
Learn
more
about
vitamins in Fletcher Allen’s
Health Library, stop by
the Frymoyer Community
Health Resource Center
to speak to a health
librarian, or tweet us your
questions at twitter.com/
fletcherallen.
BARBARA at 802.829.7403
Call for Delivery 802-324-1955
FIND US ON
the recommended daily
amounts. They may also
have other unspecified
nutritional and herbal
ingredients.
Vitamin A: In natural
doses,
can
provide
protective
antioxidant
effects. However, in large
amounts, the effects become
“pro-oxidant”
and
can
damage cells, blood vessels,
and organs like the liver.
Vitamin E: In normal
levels,
serves
as
an
antioxidant and protects
blood vessels from harmful
cholesterol.
In
some
studies, vitamin E toxicity
(over 1,000 mg/day) has
been associated with an
increased risk of bleeding
and possible long-term risk
of prostate cancer.
What is the best way to
choose a multivitamin?
Read
the
labels.
Specifically, consider:
What vitamins and
minerals are included?
Do you need all the
vitamins? Which vitamins
do you already consume
enough of from diet alone?
Which vitamins are you
lacking?
How much of each
vitamin is in the pill?
The USDA and CDC
publish recommendations
regarding
the
“safe”
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South Burlington
at Inland Marine
10b
The Essex Reporter • May 2, 2013
Eagle Scout
Musician
OF THE MONTH
Cedric Thompson, son of Dale and
Mary Thompson of Essex, from Troop
676 in Essex, earned the rank of
Eagle Scout on March 26. His project
was the removal of hazardous trees
along the Indian Brook Reservoir trail
in Essex Junction. Thompson thanks
everyone who helped make this
possible. Photo contributed
Volunteers
By SUE ALENICK
United Way Volunteer
Thursday from June-Sept. Must
be 16 or older.
The listings below are a
sample of the 300+ volunteer
needs from more than 200
agencies found on-line at
www.unitedwaycc.org. More
information available at 8601677, Mon.-Fri. from 8:30 a.m.4:30 p.m.
RIDE FOR CHILDREN
Lund is looking for
volunteers for the annual
Ride for Children. Help with
registration, activities and
festivities, set up or clean up.
Saturday, May 11, 4 hour shifts
between 7 a.m.-3 p.m.
GREEN UP
Missisquoi
National
Wildlife Refuge will be
focusing its Green Up Day
efforts on river clean up using
refuge boats. Volunteers will
meet at Louie’s Landing in
West Swanton. Physical fitness
important for this work! Friday,
May 3 from 9 a.m.-12 p.m.
WALK FOR THOUGHT
Brain Injury Assoc. of
Vermont
needs
volunteers
f o r
the “Walk
f o r
Thought”
o n
MORE GREEN UP
Go
to
www.
greenupvermont.org and
click “How to Participate”
to find Green Up Day
projects in your community.
ay
Schedule Your Vehicle Tod
PRESERVATION
Shelburne Museum is
seeking volunteers to help
preserve the last remaining
steam locomotive from the
Central Vermont Railway.
Volunteers will learn about
preservation techniques as
they arrest corrosion, protect
the metal and improve the
appearance of the locomotive.
Tools and materials provided. 4
hours per week Monday through
Burlington’s Bike Path and
at Oakledge Park. Greet and
direct participants, collect food
donations, serve refreshments,
ensure safety at pedestrian
crossings, etc. May 18, 2-hour
shifts
MARATHON
RunVermont/KeyBank
Vermont City Marathon
depends on volunteers for their
success. Volunteer for the
Marathon, Sports and Fitness
Expo or YAM Scram, May
17-26. Opportunities include
race packet stuffing or pick-up,
course monitor, merchandise
sales, runner’s food tent,
information, relay zone monitors
and more. 2-plus hour shifts.
MILTON CLEAN UP
Milton Community Youth
Coalition needs volunteers
for
a
community-wide
spring cleaning. Projects
may include prep of walking
trails, organizing at the library,
painting and general clean up.
End the day at an ice cream
social. May 18, 10 a.m.-3 p.m.
EXPAND THE DREAM
The DREAM Program
needs volunteers to work
with staff as they launch new
DREAM hubs in other cities
in the Northeast. DREAM
serves our most vulnerable
children with youth mentoring
and adventure programming. 5
hours per week.
$10 off
oil-change or State Inspection
ESSEX
Most vehicles. One coupon per customer. Not valid with
any other offers, coupons, promotions or warranty work.
Must present coupon. Only good at Essex-Vianor.
Expires 7/31/2013
4 David Drive
Essex Junction | 802-878-TIRE (8473)
news (n) –
Custom Pendants
information about
recent and
important events
Hand-stamped and personalized with your
childrens’ names for Mother’s Day, May 12.
These charming, hand-stamped pendants are available in
a variety of metals including sterling silver, 14-karat gold plate
and copper. You can personalize them to suit every occasion.
Beginning at $60. Uniquely lovely.
local news
here.
Ryan Wolbach is a senior
member of the Essex High
School instrumental music
program performing in Wind
Ensemble, Pep Band and
Jazz Orchestra. Wolbach is
a versatile wind player with
experience playing clarinet,
clarinet, alto sax and soprano
sax. He has played in the pit
orchestra for the past several
fall musicals at the school.
Wolbach has participated in
several festivals including
Districts,
Vermont
All
State and the New England
Music Festival. He recently
was one of 14 Vermont
students, and one of five
Essex High School students
to participate in the NAfME
(National Association for
Music Educators) eastern
division high school honor
ensembles
in
Hartford,
Conn. Wolbach participates
in VYO and was recently
a featured soloist with the
organization.
He is also
a member of the Williston
Town Band and the Vermont
Winds at UVM.
Essex High School band director Joshua Pauly said, “Ryan has an intense
interest in setting high standards for himself and is one of the most skilled
students I have worked with.” When asked what music means to Wolbach, he
replied, “Music is and always will be a major part of my life. It is so important to
have and maintain the arts in the community. Essex High School has given me
an incredible amount of opportunities to explore music in real depth, to the point
in which it is a major defining point to who I am.”
Outside of music, Ryan plays on the varsity tennis team and is presently a
co-captain. He will be attending UVM this fall majoring in Biochemistry with a
minor in music.
THINK SPRING
Adams Farm Market
Now
opeN!
Tour Our Greenhouses
Huge selection of Hanging Baskets,
Bedding Plants, Vegetable & Herb
Plants and more!
lots of Great
Mother’s Day Gift Ideas!!
(and how about a fresh baked pie!!)
$50 Greenhouse
Gift Certificates
Only $40
Save 20%
on produce
all season.
(Now thru May 12th)
Buy Your 2013
Produce Pass Today!
http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu
Find your
Ryan Wolbach
Only $25
Now thru Mother’s Day
Our Own Scoop Shop
opening soon!
Featuring
Kingdom Creamery
Hard ice Cream
Apple Cider SluShieS now AvAilAble
Like us on
Facebook!
TICK TOCK Jewelers
1168 Old Stage Rd.
Williston
Family Owned & Operated for 60 Years
185 Bank Street, Downtown Burlington
(802) 862-3042 Š www.ticktockjewelers.com
Fine Jewelry, Watch Repair & Batteries Changed On The Premises
apple orchard & farm market
ADAMSFARMMARKET.COM
879-5226
Open Daily 9-5:30