July 18, 2013 - The Essex Reporter

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July 18, 2013 - The Essex Reporter
Reporter
THE
www.essexreporter.com
ESSEX
JULY 18, 2013
Vol. 33, No. 29
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Burlington, VT 05401 Postal Patron-Residential
‘The town is not a bank’
Selectboard denies West Sleepy
Hollow residents flood assistance
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
Brian Hughes, right, of the Bombardier company discusses job opportunities with Dave Jones of Winooski.
Photo by Jason Starr
Former IBMers search for
their next move
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
Do IBM skills translate to other Vermont
companies? Hundreds of workers who lost jobs in
IBM’s layoffs this summer are finding out through
a series of job fairs and unemployment information
seminars sponsored by the Vermont Department of
Labor.
Dozens of employers set up shop Monday at
the Sheraton in South Burlington to meet with
IBMers who have recently lost jobs. Information on
transitioning health coverage (IBM is offering to
maintain insurance coverage for laid off workers for up
to a year), starting your own business and government
unemployment benefits was also available.
For John Anderson and about a dozen others
who sat in on the Small Business Development
Center’s seminar on starting your own business, selfemployment seemed like an appealing option.
“My skills are great within IBM but not so great
to go to another company with,” Anderson said. “You
build up a networking team over 20-odd years, you
can’t walk away with that to another company.”
Anderson said he was considering a stone-cutting/
silver-working/jewelry-making business. Two other
recently laid off IBMers were working on the idea
of starting their own semiconductor manufacturing
operation — using the same skills they used at IBM
— and pitching themselves as a potential satellite
operation for existing technology companies.
They realize, however, that the financial risks
to that model are great and the investment capital
required may not be readily available.
“Is the economic climate right for other companies
to invest in remote offices?” asked former IBMer John
Oleszkiewicz. “It’s certainly possible. We haven’t
given up, but it’s been difficult to find interest.”
Oleszkiewicz noted a second possibility of setting
up a semiconductor shop to do business with the U.S.
government, but a track record of at least two years
must be established to work with the government,
– See IBM on page 3a
West Sleepy Hollow Road has
been described as unsafe and
barely passable since torrents
from the hills of northeastern
Essex overwhelmed it in late May.
Residents who have dealt with
the flood damage for more than
a month returned to the Essex
Selectboard last week to reiterate
a request for financial assistance
with repairs.
The road is categorized as a
Class 4 Town Highway, which
means the town technically owns
it, but takes no responsibility
for its maintenance (other than
winter snow plowing). The road
is maintained by a nine-member
homeowners
association
that
has been shell-shocked by the
estimated $35,000 cost to return
the road to its pre-flood condition,
especially since members are
also dealing with the cost of flood
repairs to their homes.
In
successive
selectboard
meetings since the flood, the
homeowners have asked not only
for immediate assistance with
repairs, but also a long-term
solution of reclassifying the road to
bring it under full town ownership.
On Monday, the selectboard denied
both requests, with administrators
pointing to an existing ordinance
precluding the town from taking
ownership of new gravel roads, and
board members expressing distaste
for extending the town’s credit in a
loan to cover immediate repairs.
“I’m sorry but you did choose
to live on a Class 4 road. Whether
each of you individually realized
what that meant, that is a fact,”
selectboard chairwoman Linda
Myers said.
Resident Kristin Gehsman has
researched with state agencies the
responsibilities associated with
different town road classifications,
and she impressed upon selectboard
members their prerogative to take
“Fixing private
problems with public
money is always
dicey. Saying no is the
consistent thing.”
Pat Scheidel
Essex Town Manager
greater responsibility for West
Sleepy Hollow Road. A complicating
factor, however, is that the road
was originally built as a singlelane driveway serving a handful
of houses but has been improved
into a road through subdivision
development. Older residents
were grandfathered from financial
responsibility for the road, leaving
a smaller group of newer residents
to carry the burden of annual
upkeep – and now major repairs.
“It feels as though everyone
is responsible and nobody is
responsible,” Gehsman said to the
selectboard. “It’s a very complicated
situation in which we need your
assistance and your leadership.”
The selectboard considered
offering a three-year loan at a
12 percent interest rate to fund
repairs, but a motion to that effect
was shot down 3 to 1 with Dave
Rogerson, who made the motion,
supporting and board member
Brad Luck absent. Previous town
loans for private infrastructure
were approved by a townwide vote,
Public Works Director Dennis Lutz
said.
– See FLOOD on page 3a
Saxon Hill development approved
Neighbors worry about
light and noise from
industrial buildings
By JASON STARR
The Essex Reporter
Essex planners conditioned site plan
approval for 420,000 square feet of new
industrial space on the mitigation of light
pollution, in deference to concerns from
residential neighbors of the Saxon Hill
Industrial Park.
Three new buildings on Allen Martin
Drive, developed by Bob Miller/R.E.M.
Development, will replace an existing
180,000-square-footer that was once leased
by IBM and later owned by the State
of Vermont. Miller bought the building
earlier this year with plans to demolish
it and erect warehouse/manufacturing
facilities in its place. Last Thursday, the
Essex Planning Commission approved
Miller’s plans.
Miller intends to build the buildings in
phases while recruiting tenants to occupy
them.
Neighbors along Maplelawn Drive
and Sand Hill Road who attended last
Thursday’s Planning Commission meeting
are aghast at the size of the approved
buildings — estimating they rival the size
of two Wal-Mart stores — and concerned
about parking lot lights and operational
noise.
“I thought the IBM property was huge,
and that building is miniscule compared
to what they are putting behind us,” said
Maplelawn resident Rozann Wadleigh.
“It’s huge. We all figured somebody would
build, but nobody expected this … It’s going
to change the nature of our street, and it
will impact our home values.”
While Essex regulators have no
authority over noise emissions — that is
the jurisdiction of the Vermont Natural
Resources Board and the Act 250 process,
which the development is subject to — they
are authorized to regulate light emissions.
The light-emitting diode (LED) lights
planned for the parking lot give off sharp
points of light visible from neighboring
homes, and that was the primary concern
among neighbors.
The planning commission placed a
restriction on lights on the property to
run between 6 a.m. and 8 p.m. then be
Gardens open in Jericho
Some of the loveliest gardens in Jericho and
Underhill will be open for visitors on July 20 from
9 a.m. to 2 p.m. There will be eight unique gardens
open for self-guided tours.
For example, Mary Jo and Rob Schantz’s
Victorian home is surrounded by patios integrated
into walkways. A water feature nested under a
tree is a perfect retreat from summer sun.
A do-it-yourself garden nestled into the side of
a wooded hill is the creation of Betsy and Ruth
Wilder. There visitors will find terraces and beds
filled with vegetables and flowers started in a
greenhouse heated with manure.
Lorraine Vorse’s gardens wrap around trees,
ledges and multi-level decks.
For the first time a library designated as a
“Master Garden Site,” will be on the tour featuring
a newly planted butterfly garden, perennial
gardens and a vegetable garden that shares
produce with the local food self.
Sheila Aiken’s garden showcases flowers that
grow well in Vermont; her son — a stonemason —
has created stonewalls, patios and walkways that
provide backdrops to her gardens.
Page Manning’s garden consumes the entire
side yard draped in lush foliage, featuring unusual
trees, a small gurgling pond and brightly covered
outbuildings.
Susan Skelly’s gardens are a paradise in
The “Mad Hatters Tea” will be held in Ann and Dick
Squires garden during this year’s Jericho Garden
daylilies hoping to create a daylily variety of her
own, while Dick and Ann Squires’ garden is the
“Mad Hatters Tea” site. The garden is composed
of rooms based on the storybook themes, including
characters from Alice in Wonderland.
At the tea, artist Betsy Chapek will
demonstrate how to construct cement mushroom
ornaments for your garden, and the Mad Hatter
— played by Elizabeth Bernstein — will join in.
“Elizabeth is on the [Garden Tour] committee
– See GARDEN on page 2a
reduced to 50 percent power during the
overnight ours. Miller was amenable to
the restriction, saying the Essex Police
Department is interested in overnight
lighting as a crime prevention device.
“We are all for saving the power,” said
Miller. “So if we don’t have to have them
on, we won’t have them on. If there’s no one
in there at night, who cares?
“I think it behooves us to leave
something on to reduce vandalism, and the
police want that, but certainly we can cut
it in half.”
There is some uncertainty as to the
noise and light emissions because no
building tenants have been secured. Any
tenant wishing to operate outside the 6
a.m. to 8 p.m. timeframe would need a
– See SAXON on page 2a
Village Block Party
celebrates 12th year
The 12th annual Essex Junction
Block Party & Street Dance will once
again take over Railroad Avenue on
Saturday.
The celebration will kick off at 9
a.m., when Essex Junction Parks and
Recreation hosts its sixth annual Block
Party Fun Run. The 5K will start and
end on Railroad Avenue, with an award
ceremony following the race. Race day
registration will be $15 and all proceeds
will benefit the Block Party.
Then street vendors and musical
performances will take to Railroad
Avenue from 4-9 p.m. The festivities will
include a roaming railroad, a bounce
castle, a dunking booth, an obstacle
course, face painting, balloon art and
a variety of local food vendors. New to
the Block Party this year will be a mini
fitness boot camp run by Fit to Excel.
The Contois School of Music AllStar Band will perform from 4-6 p.m.,
followed by the Dave Keller Blues Band
from 6-9 p.m. But the revelry could be halted if
What: Essex Junction Block Party
& Fun Run
Date: Saturday, July 20
Where: Railroad Avenue
inclement weather moves through town
on Saturday.
“We’ve been lucky to have had 11
years of no rain and we’re hoping our luck
will hold out this year,” explained Patty
Benoit, an administrative assistant
for the Village. “We aren’t planning a
rain date, so in the case of heavy rain
or thunder we would just cancel the
event without rescheduling. We’re
obviously really hoping that doesn’t
happen, especially since the Block Party
Committee has been planning this event
since January.”
2a
Q&A
With ...
Katie Matthews
Author of “Chasing Down Secrets”
At the age of 7, Katie Matthews read the
entire Harry Potter series. Matthews now a
junior at Colchester High School remembers
that as the time she fell in love with reading and
writing, and the moment she knew she wanted
to become an author some day.
“I was inspired by J.K. Rowling and the
struggle she went through to become a famous
author,” Matthews explained.
Although perhaps not famous yet, Matthews
recently self-published her first book, “Chasing
Down Secrets,” through Amazon.com.
Matthews wrote about four pages a day
during her two-hour study hall/lunch break
during the school day. It took her six months to
complete the novel.
“I wanted to tell people all about the book,”
she said, “but I didn’t really because I wanted
them to read it. I had to keep most of it to myself.”
The roughly 100-page novel follows Maria,
18, and Emmet, 20, as they flee a concentration
camp, guarding their forbidden love.
Matthews recently elaborated on her first
book and her hopes for future writing.
Q: How would you describe your book?
A: It’s about this girl named Maria Kaiser
who is brought to a concentration camp when she
is 13 because they think she is Jewish. She stays
there for five years. Then she falls in love with
a Nazi named Emmet. There is an opportunity
for them to escape and they do. Then they are
on the run.
Maria comes to learn why she was mistaken
as a Jew and why her mother hid her when the
Nazis came… that’s the mystery of the book.
It’s a page-turner.
I always try to end on a suspenseful note.
Sometimes I don’t know what is going to happen
next and so it is a mystery for myself when I end
the chapter.
GARDENS
from page 1a
and board,” explained Orelyn
Emerson, a resident of Jericho for
the past 35 years. “She likes to do
things like this.”
Emerson and Delight Wing, also
a resident of Jericho, have been cochairs of the committee for the past
15 years. “We’ve done it every year
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Q: How did you decide what to write
about?
A: I didn’t really know what my book was
going to be about until I wrote the preface of
it. The characters just kind of came to life as I
wrote them. I knew that Emmet was going to
be a really strong character and Maria would be
kind of weaker but strong in her own way.
I know where I want my characters to end
up, it’s just getting them there. That’s the
creative part.
Q: What genre would you say your book
is?
A: A romance novel. But there are a lot of
twists and turns that aren’t about romance; it’s
about Maria’s life.
Q: Why did you use the Holocaust as a
backdrop for your book?
A: The Holocaust has always been a big
interest of mine. I wanted to write about the
Holocaust, but I also wanted to write a romance
novel. I wanted to make it dramatic and
complicated.
Q: Did you enjoy writing your first
book?
A: It was really fun. It was really good on
days I knew what to write, but then on the
days I didn’t know what to do next it was really
challenging. I just knew that I wanted to finish
it.
Q: How many books will there be in
your series?
A: There will be three books. I am working on
the second book now. It’s a little bit more difficult
than the first one because I have to think of new
ideas. I also can’t change the characters now
because they are set in stone from the first book.
They characters have grown a little bit, so
that gives me some flexibility.
I hope to be done with the second book before
school starts.
I hope to finish the third book by the time
I’m a senior.
Q: Why did you decide to self-publish
your book?
A: I didn’t know I was going to publish it. I
was just writing it for me. Then when I finished
it my mom encouraged me to try to publish it.
I was a little nervous. I didn’t know how it
would do.
Q: What are your reactions to the
feedback readers give you on amazon.com?
A: It is helpful. I am still young and have a
lot to learn.
together,” Emerson said.
Last year the garden tour was
replaced by a barn tour, but this
year it’s back again.
“People just love to come and
see our country gardens,” said
Emerson. “They say our gardens
are ‘so country,’ they are not overly
manicured.”
The tour is self-guided so, as
Emerson says, people can go where
they want to when they want to.
“The ticket explains all about all
SAXON
from page 1a
Katie Matthews sits at her home in Colchester on
July 5. Photo by Oliver Parini
Q: Do you still want to have your book
published by a publisher?
A: I want to be an author when I get older.
And I do want to be published. I am actually in
the process of writing a query letter so that I can
send my book into publishers.
I’m considering young author publishers.
Q: Where do you see yourself in 10
years?
A: I hope that I’ll have a major in psychology
and that I’ll be on my way to becoming a really
successful author.
I took a psychology class this year and the
mental illnesses really intrigued me and so I
know when I am older I want to study criminal
psychology or mental illnesses. These types of
illnesses are something that anyone can become
susceptible to; I want to know why and what
triggers it.
Being an author is not a steady path, so
going into psychology is a way to make sure I
have an income that can help me while I try to
become an author.
– Elsie Lynn
the gardens, has directions, a map
and explains about the tea site,”
she said.
Tickets cost $12 and can be
purchased at Jericho Center
Country Store, Old Mill Craft
Shop and Underhill Country Store.
The day of the tour tickets can
only be purchased at the Jericho
Center Country Store. For more
information contact Emerson at
899-3853.
Money raised from the tour will
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support the Community Center
in Jericho, which is a nonprofit
organization that maintains a
historic building in Jericho Center
for public use.
“Gardeners are very wonderful
people,” added Emerson, “they
are outside all the time and they
want to share what they produce
with the land and what they have
accomplished.”
– Elsie Lynn
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new approval from the Planning
Commission.
“Most of the large industrial
properties in Chittenden County
are owned by us, and we have
residential neighborhoods that
back up to every one, and we’ve
never had neighbors come up and
say ‘it’s too loud’ or ‘we can’t look
at it,’” Miller assured. “We don’t
take every tenant that walks
through the door. We screen them.
Our tenants understand how to be
good neighbors and be aware of
what’s going on around them.”
Planning
commission
members Tom Furland and Josh
Knox noted that the current
building emits light visible to the
surrounding residential areas.
They said the lighting plan
associated with the new buildings
will be an improvement for some
neighbors, depending on their
location.
“Remember, it is an industrial
zone,” Planning Commission
Chairman Dustin Bruso said.
The buildings will be designed
in 30,000-square-foot units. The
52-acre parcel will be completely
cleared of trees to accommodate
the buildings. About 42 percent
of the acreage will be covered in
impervious surface, and an onsite stormwater treatment system
is being designed to handle runoff.
The Planning Commission
dropped
a
requirement
recommended by the Essex Public
Works Department to install
solar-powered, lighted crosswalks
across Allen Martin Drive. Miller
noted that the property is not
near schools and does not get a
significant amount of pedestrian
traffic. He offered to install lessexpensive painted crosswalks.
“We might have three adults
cross during the day,” he said.
Miller plans to build one
of
the
180,000-square-foot
buildings first, followed by the
60,000-square-foot building if and
when the first building attracts
enough tenants to be 80 percent
occupied.
“This could be a 10-year plan
before it’s done,” he said.
The planning commission
approved the application 6-0 with
member David Raphael absent.
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3a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Marleys coming to CVE
Police Beat
Strong-arm robbery
Essex Police responded to a reported robbery at
Simon’s Mobil on Colchester Road at around 10 p.m. on
July 8.
The suspect, described as a white male approximately
5-feet 8-inches tall, was wearing a grey hooded
sweatshirt, jeans, light colored running shoes and a
white hat. The male had dark hair and a beard, and his
face was partially concealed by a white material that
appeared to be a bandage.
The male forcibly removed cash from the register
drawer while the clerk was making change for a
purchase before departing on foot.
The investigation into this incident is ongoing.
“We are working on some leads,” explained Det.
Lt. George Murtie. “It’s too early to tell how promising
they’ll be, so stay tuned.”
Murtie noted that the Essex Police Department is
investigating the possibility that the perpetrator of this
robbery could be linked to other recent strong-armed
robberies in the area and is working with other local
departments to explore that possibility.
Anyone with information about this incident is asked
to contact the Essex Police Department at 878-8331.
FLOOD
from page 1a
“I can’t support the loan,” board
member Mike Plageman said. “It creates
a very dangerous precedent for which
there is no endgame. The town is not a
bank. They are not set up to be a lender,
and I’m scared to death of the precedent
it sets.”
The Federal Emergency Management
Agency (FEMA) has been surveying
IBM
from page 1a
he said — even though many IBM
employees have government contracting
experience.
“The government contracts a lot of
semiconductor product design and a lot
of people here are already skilled to do
that work,” he said.
“(Going into) business is not my first
choice,” he added. “But if the right idea
comes along …”
Companies
like
MyWebGrocer
and Dealer.com, Chittenden County
technology companies that are growing,
were
recruiting
Monday
mostly
for software engineers. Company
representatives said they’ve started
the interview process with a handful
Damian and Stephen
Marley are bringing their
unique blend of Reggae
music and world peace to this
year’s Champlain Valley Fair
on Aug. 31 at 5 p.m. Their
first appearance together
in Vermont will be in the
Coca-Cola grandstand at this
year’s Fair.
Both sons of Reggae
Legend Bob Marley have
worked assiduously to carve
their own niche in music
history and to add a new
perspective to the Marley
legacy for the 21st century.
The second son of Bob
and Rita Marley, Stephen
was born on April 20, 1972;
he began his career as a
precocious
six-year-old
singing, dancing and playing
percussion with his siblings
in the group. The Melody
Makers first single “Children
Playing In The Streets” was
produced by their father.
Just like his older brother
Ziggy, Stephen acquired
his initial studio skills by
watching his father. In 1993
Ziggy and Stephen founded
Ghetto Youths International
as a means of controlling
their own music and helping
upcoming artists.
Damian Robert Nesta
Marley, also known around
the world as “Junior Gong”
and more recently as
“Gongzilla”, was born in
1978 to parents Bob Marley
and Cindy Breakspeare,
Miss World 1976. As a young
adult, he developed a passion
and a gift to speak for those
who cannot always speak
for themselves. He was a
self-proclaimed
‘Spiritual
Revolutionary’.
Tickets have been on sale
flood damage in Chittenden County
since late June. The agency is committed
only to financing repairs to public
infrastructure, which doesn’t include
Class 4 Town Highways, Lutz said.
He estimates the town is facing
about $400,000 in total road repair, with
FEMA expected to reimburse the town
for the majority of that expense. The
town can expect an unbudgeted expense
of up to $50,000 in the current fiscal
year, he said.
“We do not have the money to repair
(West Sleepy Hollow) road,” Myers said.
“It boils down to that. We’re talking
$35,000 to $50,000 as it stands right now
that we’re going to have to figure out a
way to come up with.”
The board later unanimously
approved a motion that formally
denied the West Sleepy Hollow Road
homeowners’ request.
“Fixing private problems with public
money is always dicey,” Town Manager
Pat Scheidel said. “Saying no is the
consistent thing.”
of former IBM employees. But Glen
Gehrkens of MyWebGrocer said the
manufacturing skills coming out of IBM
are incongruent with his company’s
needs.
“They don’t’ have a ton of software
experience so it’s hard to transition,” he
said. “You have to be able to train them
from the ground up.”
Christina Lord of Dealer.com said
the company has hired former IBMers
in the past and is interviewing a handful
for current openings.
“We have absolutely found some
transferable skills,” she said.
Kurt Nielson, head recruiter for
Green Mountain Coffee Roasters, said
the openings at his company’s growing
Essex facility in “process and packaging
engineering” translate well from IBM’s
operations.
“We’ve hired a lot of people from IBM
in the past,” he said.
Labor Secretary Annie Noonan is still
trying to nail down the scope of IBM’s
layoff. The labor department needs
that information, she said, to tailor its
job retraining, unemployment and reemployment services.
Noonan has asked IBM officials
for specifics on the number of workers
laid off as well as their salary histories,
addresses and names. As of Monday, the
company had only shared that it had
laid off more than 25 workers. Noonan
said at least 350 laid off IBMers had
taken advantage of recent Department
of Labor job fairs.
“We’ll be pursuing as much
information as we can get,” she said. “It’s
not a matter of idle curiosity. We want to
connect with these people quickly.”
Loretta’s
Damian and Stephen Marley
since March 29 through the
Flynn Box office on Main
Street in Burlington, by
phone at 802-86-FLYNN, or
on-line atwww.flynntix.org.
The Marleys will be part
of a mini music festival at
this year’s Fair and will be
joined by two other bands, to
be announced soon.
Photo contributed
The
Champlain
Valley Fair, presented by
Progressive, runs Aug. 24Sept. 2.
For more information
on the Bud Light Concert
Series at the Champlain
Valley Fair, visit www.
champlainvalleyfair.org.
Essex – Westford
repaving project
On Monday Frank W. Whitcomb Construction
Corp. began repaving Route 128 from the intersection
of Routes 15 extending northerly on 128 for 5.7 miles.
The project should be completed by Oct. 4 this year.
This project will consist of grinding the exiting
pavement and recycling the material into a new base,
resurfacing the existing pavement with two more
courses of pavement along with new signs, guardrail
and other incidental items.
During this construction period, motorists should
expect traffic flow to be maintained at all times with
traffic control present. Motorists are asked to use
extreme
caution
while
traveling
through the zone.
The speed limit will
be strictly enforced
as the safety of the
workers along with
the motorists is of the
utmost importance.
Questions
or
concerns?
Contact:
862-6085.
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4a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Opinion
Perspective
Winning a wish
Joining Obama on
climate action
By JAKE BROWN
This month’s climate action plan laid out by
President Obama demonstrates bold leadership.
It could chart a clear path forward on energy and
climate action for our country, and the world.
This speech, while overdue, is an important
challenge to America: If we harness our collective
ingenuity and entrepreneurial spirit we can turn a
potential crisis into opportunity. It is a very positive
step.
In his speech, President Obama affirmed what
the Vermont Natural Resources Council and many,
many people across the country have been saying for
years: We need to aggressively reduce global warming
pollution through energy efficiency, conservation
and the adoption of low-carbon renewable energy. It
was noteworthy that the president strongly denied
the climate deniers, sweeping aside the contention
that global warming is not caused by human activity.
President Obama also seemed to suggest that North
America should bypass the production of tar sands oil
in favor of 21st century, clean energy sources, saying
his administration would approve the controversial
Keystone XL pipeline – a key outlet for climate-killing
tar sands production – only if it doesn’t exacerbate
the climate problem. Greater reliance on tar sands oil
would be, as NASA scientist James Hansen has said,
“game over for the planet.”
The president’s remarks on Keystone strike close
to home in Vermont. His position strongly suggests
that federal regulators would not allow the use of
an existing crude oil pipeline – which runs from
Portland to Montreal through the Northeast Kingdom
– to carry tar sands oil, given the direct link between
extracting, processing and burning tar sands oil and
a hotter, more unstable atmosphere.
President Obama also said energy efficiency and
conservation are essential for combating global
warming. Vermont was the birthplace of Efficiency
Vermont — the nation’s first energy efficiency utility.
As a result, the state has been a leader in electric
energy efficiency. This coming year the Legislature
will, we hope, build on this accomplishment and enact
a strong, well-funded program to help Vermonters
tighten up their drafty homes. Such a program could
save the average homeowner $1,000 a year in reduced
heating bills, while slashing one of Vermont’s bigger
sources of greenhouse gases and creating new jobs.
Vermont must continue recent progress made
on renewable energy, especially the distributed,
community-scaled
energy
projects
that
are
transforming places like Waterbury and Rutland, and
reconsider expensive, 20th-century energy solutions
— such as the extension of the Vermont Gas pipeline
— that only reinforce our dependence on fossil fuels.
The president also recognizes that we need to adapt
to changes already underway. In Vermont that means
we need to keep up our natural defenses against the
ravages of climate change. Our forests must remain
intact and healthy, our downtowns resilient and
our neighborhoods accessible for walkers, bicyclists
and public transit. Our farmland needs to be able
to produce food, and we’ve got to keep our drinking
water plentiful and clean.
You can feel both the urgency and the optimism
the president expressed in his speech in Vermont’s
town halls, granges, churches and school cafeterias.
It’s in these community centers where Vermonters,
many of whom are members of the 100 and growing
local energy committees, are working to reduce
energy use and cut climate change pollution in their
own towns.
President Obama has called on Americans to raise
their voices in support of his agenda. We’ve got to
keep up the volume, so to speak, in our hometowns,
at the state level, and even nationally. We all share
a responsibility to create a healthy, economically
strong, and safe future for our kids and grandkids.
Let’s work with the President to do just that.
Jake Brown is the communications/government affairs
director for the Vermont Natural Resources Council.
Jenna and Justin Lancour unite on the ice during Make-A-Wish Foundation’s annual Twin-State All-Star Hockey Classic on
Saturday. Jenna represented Essex on the Vermont women’s squad, helping her team to a 4-0 victory over New Hampshire,
while Justin, who was granted a wish from the Foundation when he was 5-years-old, served as a Wish Ambassador for Vermont.
Photo contributed
Letter to the Editor
Balancing privacy and law
enforcement needs
On the drive home from a work
meeting, I caught a radio program
featuring the Brookline, Mass.,
police chief and a staff attorney
for the Massachusetts affiliate of
the ACLU. They were discussing
law enforcement’s use of advanced
license plate readers (ALPRs) in
Massachusetts. These vehiclemounted cameras are able to
capture video images of hundreds
of license plates an hour and match
the plate numbers against law
enforcement records. It was clear
to me from the beginning that these
devices have great potential to aid
law enforcement, but that they
also have the potential to threaten
individual privacy. By SCOTT GILES
The interest rate on federally
subsidized student loans increased
from 3.4 to 6.8 percent on July 1.
Even before this increase took
effect, the Congressional Budget
Office (CBO) estimated that the
government earned a $50 billion
profit on federal student and parent
loans last year.
Lost in the hype is the fact that
this increase applies only to a loan
type that fewer than 40 percent
of all undergraduates are eligible
to receive. Most college students
already pay the 6.8 percent rate, and
graduate students and parents pay
an even higher rate of 7.9 percent.
At a time when interest rates are
near historic lows, the government
profits by charging students and
parents above-market rates.
And despite the heated rhetoric
Published Thursdays
Advertising Deadline: Friday
5 p.m.
Editor
Elsie Lynn
[email protected]
Reporter/
Editorial Page Editor
Jason Starr
[email protected]
Sports Editor
Kelly March
[email protected]
Office Manager/
Web Editor
Susan Bondaryk
[email protected]
Advertising Manager
Wendy Ewing
[email protected]
Advertising Sales
Kelly K. Malone
[email protected]
Advertising Sales
Miles Gasek
[email protected]
who are not suspected of any
wrongdoing.
As technology continues to
advance, we’ll struggle more and
more to protect individual privacy,
but we must do so lest there be
no difference between public and
private lives.
I want to thank Public Safety
Commissioner Keith Flynn and
Allen Gilbert of the ACLU-VT
for their work striking a healthy
balance
between
legitimate
law enforcement needs and
Vermonters’ privacy.
Tim Ashe
Burlington
Tim Ashe is a State Senator representing
Chittenden County
First do no harm on
student loan legislation
Publisher
Lynn Publications Inc.
General Manager
Suzanne Lynn
After doing some research, I
learned that several dozen law
enforcement agencies in Vermont
were using these devices on their
cruisers. The Legislature had
no idea, and from the notes and
calls I received from constituents,
neither did most Vermonters.
Most troubling was that the
images detailing our whereabouts
were being stored in one master
database for many years whether
we’d done anything wrong or not.
To address this civil liberties
issue, I introduced S.18. The bill,
which passed both the House and
the Senate and is now law, sets new
parameters on the use of ALPRs,
creates a protocol for access to the
database, and restricts the amount
of time that law enforcement may
retain information on people
Subscription Rates:
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$38 half-year
Mailing Address:
462 Hegeman Ave., Ste.105
Colchester, VT 05446
Phone: 802-878-5282
Fax: 802-651-9635
The Essex Reporter is family owned and operated; it is published by Angelo Lynn
and Emerson Lynn of Lynn Publications, Inc. and is a member of the Champlain Valley Newspaper Group.
The Essex Reporter makes every effort to be accurate. If you notice an error, please contact us at 878-5282, or by e-mail at
[email protected] Note “correction” in the subject line.
and
partisan
finger-pointing,
Washington doesn’t seem to see
a problem. The proposals that
have been considered — with one
exception — do not reduce the
government profit on education
loans. Instead, under the guise of
letting the market set rates, they
temporarily reduce rates for some
borrowers while increasing rates
on others.
The House-passed Republican
proposal converts student and
parent loans from fixed- to variablerate loans that reset each year.
Using Congressional Budget Office
(CBO) interest rate projections,
the subsidized student loan would
convert from today’s 3.4 percent
fixed rate (stays the same for the life
of the loan) to a 5 percent variable
rate (changes each year). By 2017,
however, this rate is projected to
rise to 7.4 percent. The same is true
for PLUS loans (used by parents
and graduate students) — the
interest rate drops briefly but by
2016 climbs to nearly 9 percent.
President Obama has offered
a similar proposal. Subsidized
student loan rates would be set
each year (unlike the House
proposal, remaining the same for
the life of the loan). Using the same
CBO projections, the rate would
remain low the first year and rise
and rise to 6.13 percent by 2018.
To pay for this, in 2016 the
federal student loan taken by
the majority of students would
rise from today’s 6.8 percent
to above 7 percent and keep
rising in successive years, with
no established maximum. In
addition, graduate students and
parents who borrow PLUS loans
would pay higher rates beginning
in 2016.
The same is true of the
“bipartisan” Senate proposal:
Today’s student borrowers would
receive slightly lower rates that
would be paid for by charging
higher rates to future borrowers.
All of this is further subsidized
by increasing the rates paid by
graduate students and parents in
2016 and beyond.
The Vermont Congressional
delegation has worked hard to
bring these issues to the public
attention. We at VSAC, and state
agencies across the country,
are working to combat these
inequities by offering state-based
student loan rates that reflect the
market. VSAC’s fixed-rate loans
are as low as 5.6 percent. There
is no reason that the federal
government cannot do the same.
One of the guiding principles of
good legislative policy is to “First
do no harm.” Unfortunately,
most of the solutions before
us do not meet this test. Many
borrowers — particularly middle
income borrowers — are actually
better off under current law —
even with the interest rate hike
— than they would be under the
proposals now being put forward.
Our Congressional delegation
has been leading the fight for a
fair student loan policy for the
past two years. Congress should
buy themselves some time with a
simple one-or two-year extension
of the lower rate and take the
time to listen to Sens. Patrick
Leahy and Bernie Sanders and
Rep. Peter Welch. This would
allow Congress time to arrive
at a fair solution that will not
further burden students and
their families.
Scott Giles is President/
CEO of the Vermont
Student Assistance Corporation.
5a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
EHS Class of ‘73 celebrates 40 years
Lumber
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Classmates of Essex High School Class of 1973 celebrate their 30th reunion. Photo contributed
PIPWICK
All Pine is Kiln Dried
Pitch set @ 170°
DRESSED 4 SIDE
The Essex Junction
High School Class of ’73
will celebrate their 40th
high school reunion the
first weekend in August. Classmates can tour the
school at 3 p.m. on Aug. 2
followed by an Ice Breaker
at On Tap at Five Corners
in Essex Junction. Saturday
a hike up Camel’s Hump is
scheduled to begin at 9:30
a.m., weather permitting. Saturday night the reunion
gets into full swing with a
dance party at Splash on
the Burlington waterfront
starting at 5 p.m. The
deadline for tickets ($45 per
person) is July 22. Tickets
available at www.ejhs73.com
or send a check to Marcia
Demore Purvis, 364 Hidden
Oaks Drive, Colchester, VT
05446. The Class of ‘72 has
also invited all classmates to
a BBQ at Maple Street Park
in Essex on Aug. 4. Tickets
for that event are $12 and
may be mailed to Deb Wallis,
PO Box 461, Norwich, VT
05055.
on many boards and
committees. He also served
faithfully in many areas of
ministry including, Divorce
Care, Single Again, Care
Partners
and
Men’s
Ministry Teams. To know
him was to be cared for
by him. After committing
his life to Jesus Christ
his heart’s desire was to
lead others to know Him.
Dennis gave generously of
himself in service to his
Lord and to others.
Dennis leaves behind
and will be sadly missed
by his best friend and
“sweetheart”,
Cathie
Andreyko and her children
Eric, Nicole, Ashley and
Brianna. He was predeceased by
his parents Noella Vincent
and Alexander Racine
and his brother Paul
Racine. He is survived
by his brothers Marcel
Racine and wife Louise of
Williston, James Racine
and wife Claudette of St.
Albans, Patrick Racine of
Montgomery, sister-in-law
Monica Racine of Essex,
uncle Leland Vincent of
Richford, many nieces and
nephews, his buddy “Jake”
(his cat), and many, many
dear friends.
A Memorial Service
was held in his memory
and celebration of his life
at Essex Alliance Church
The A . Johnson C o.
WHOLES ALE • RETAIL
L U M B E R
995 South 116 RD
Bristol, VT 05443
802-453-4884
7am - 4pm Mon-Fri
Showcase
Obituariy
DENNIS “DENNY”
RACINE
ESSEX JUNNCTION
— Dennis “Denny” Racine
died suddenly of natural
causes on Tuesday, June
18 at his home in Essex
Junction. Born on Aug.
21, 1953 in St. Albans,
he grew up in Richford,
graduating from Richford
High School in 1971 and
from Champlain College in
1973. He went on to work
for Howard Bank, Bank
North, Chittenden Bank
and most recently People’s
United Bank where he was
the Director of Business
Card Services. Dennis
loved sports and played
basketball and soccer in
high school. As an adult
he enjoyed golf, volleyball,
watching auto racing and
Red Sox baseball.
Dennis was an active
member of Essex Alliance
Church where he served
Cash & Volume Discounts
Great Specials • Friendly Service
of
Homes
Dennis “Denny” Racine
on Monday, June 24. A
private family burial will
be planned at a later date.
◊
Obituary
Submission Guidelines
We welcome submitted obituaries. Send
obituaries of 300 words or less to [email protected]
essexreporter.com. Photos are encouraged.
Obituaries are subject to editing. Please submit
obituaries no later than Thursday at 5 p.m. for
publication in the following week’s edition.
We also offer the option of paid space if you
prefer a longer or unedited obituary. Paid obituaries
are marked by ◊. Contact [email protected]
or 878-5282 x 207 for more information.
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60 B Pearl Street Essex Jct | 802-879-0740
Mon-Fri 9:30am-8pm | Sat 9am-5pm • Sun 10am-5pm
BIG DIFF!
Because the “differential” is
located under the vehicle towards
the rear, it is difficult to see and often
overlooked. This is very unfortunate
because every vehicle relies on the
differential to compensate for the
difference in distance that the inner
and outer wheels travel when the
automobile turns a corner. In order
for this component to maintain its
ability to perform this vital function,
vehicle manufacturers recommend that
differential oil be changed every 30,000
to 50,000 miles. This maintenance chore
is as important as changing engine oil
at recommended intervals. Cleaning
metal shavings out of the housing is
also recommended. Not changing the
differential oil leads to gear wear and
failure that can quickly bring things to
a halt.
The differential is the device
that splits the engine torque two ways,
allowing each output to spin at a different
speed. At ESSEX AUTOMOTIVE
SERVICES, we are dedicated to
providing professional customer service
and automotive repair. Our goal is to
provide our customers with honest,
quality service in a timely manner.
We believe our customer’s needs and
satisfaction come first. Located at 141147 Pearl St, Essex Jct., we invite you to
consult with us, your local automotive
experts, if you have questions regarding
your differential. Call 802.879.1966
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RARE “CAMEL’S HUMP” OPPORTUNITY
Enjoy the picturesque trip to Camels Hump Road and this Clean, Comfortable, very well maintained
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6a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Essex Area
Religious
Directory
C alendar
18
Thursday
er: Tim Cope - Fleischer Jacobs. Serving
the communities of Colchester, Milton and
the Champlain Islands. Hampton Inn, Colchester, 12 p.m.
public. Featuring the Morrisville Military
Band. Noyes House Museum, 122 Lower
Main Street, Morrisville, 6-8 p.m. Contact
Scott: 888-7617.
CHRIST MEMORIAL CHURCH- Route 2A, Williston, just
north of Industrial Ave. Wes Pastor, Senior Minister, 8787107, Proclaiming Christ and Him crucified Sundays at 8:15
a.m. and 10:15 a.m. www.cmcvermont.org
THE CHURCH OF JESUS CHRIST OF LATTER-DAY
SAINTS - Sacrament Meeting each Sunday at 10am 73
Essex Way, Essex Junction, VT 05452, 802-879-9142,
[email protected] All visitors welcome to attend
church services each Sunday at 10am. We learn about
the restored gospel of Jesus Christ and how we can follow
Him. We believe in strengthening families and serving one
another. Learn more about members and the church at
www.mormon.org.
DAYBREAK COMMUNITY CHURCH 67 Creek Farm
Plaza, Colchester VT. 05446 802-338-9118 www.
daybreakvermont.org or [email protected]
Sunday Service at 10:30am Lead Pastor, Brent Devenney
ESSEX ALLIANCE CHURCH- 37 Old Stage Road in Essex
Junction. Sunday Services: 7:45 am, 9 am, 10:15 am and
11:30 am. Phone: 878-8213. www.essexalliance.org
ESSEX CENTER UNITED METHODIST CHURCH- Please
join us for worship that combines the best of traditional and
contemporary music and spirituality. We are a safe and
welcoming space for all people to celebrate, worship, ask
questions, and put down spiritual roots. One service at
10:00 am. Sunday school and childcare provided. We offer
a variety of small groups for prayer, Bible study, handson ministry, and studying contemporary faith issues. 119
Center Rd (Route 15) Essex Center. Rev. Mitchell Hay,
pastor. 879-8304.
FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH OF ESSEX
JUNCTION, UCC – 1 Church Street, Essex Junction,
VT 05452. Telephone (802) 878-5745, Fax (802) 8728236, Email: [email protected] , Website: www.fccej.org,
Facebook: First Congregational Church of Essex Junction
UCC. Senior Pastor, Rev. Mark Mendes, Associate Pastor,
Rev. Ryan Gackenheimer. Summer Sunday Worship
Service at 9:00am. Communion on the first Sunday of each
month. Nursery Services available and Summer Youth
Activities. Vacation Bible Camp, August 12-16, 2013 from
9-11:45am. Registration form on our website, call for more
information. We are a welcoming community, accepting
and serving all in the Spirit of Christ.
GOOD SHEPHERD LUTHERAN CHURCH- (ELCA)- 273
VT. Rte. 15 – Between Jericho and Underhill – 899-3932.
Sunday Worship - 9:00 a.m./Sunday School for all ages 10:30 a.m.. [email protected] All are welcome. Rev.
Phillip Roushey. Email: [email protected]
org.
GRACE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH- 130 Maple
Street, Essex Junction. 878-8071. 1 mile south of the
Five Corners on Maple Street / VT. Route 117. Worship
Sundays at 9:30 a.m. with concurrent Church School Pre-K
to High School. Handicapped-accessible facility. Adult
Study Group Sundays at 11:00 a.m. Adult Choir / Praise
Band / Women’s Fellowship / Missionally active. Korean
U.M.C. Worship Sundays at 12:30 p.m. Come explore what
God might be offering you!
HOLY FAMILY- ST. LAWRENCE PARISH, Essex Junction,
- Mass Schedule: Holy Family Church located at 36 Lincoln
Street, Sundays, 8a.m, 11a.m. and 7:30p.m. St. Lawrence
located at 158 West Street, Saturdays, 4 p.m.-Sundays,
9:30a.m. Reconciliation: St. Lawrence, Saturdays, 3:153:45p.m. For more information visit our web page http://
www.hfslvt.org.
ISLAMIC SOCIETY OF VERMONT- 182 Hegeman Ave,
Suite 1, Colchester, VT 05446. Join Imam Islam Hassan
([email protected]) for the five daily prayers. Timings at
ISVT homepage www.isvt.org The call for Friday Jumah
prayers is exactly at 1:00PM followed by Khutbah and
prayer. Additional Friday night lectures between Magrib
and Isha prayers. Weekend Islamic classes on Sundays
9:45AM-1:30PM for all children 4 years and older during
the school year. Interested non-members always welcome.
(802) 655-6711 or [email protected] or Facebook.
MT. MANSFIELD UNITARIAN UNIVERSALIST
FELLOWSHIP- Visit www.mmuuf.org. Services are held at
9:30 a.m. on the second and fourth Sunday of each month
from Setpember through June. 195 Vermont Route 15,
Jericho (the red barn across from Packard Road). 899-2558
ST JAMES EPISCOPAL CHURCH- 4 St. James Place
(off Rt. 2A at the Fairgrounds Gate F) 802/878-4014 www.
stjamesvt.org The Rev. Ken Hitch [email protected]
com 8:15am Holy Eucharist Rite II (no music) 9:30am Holy
Eucharist Rite II (with music) 10:30am Adult Ed: Bible Study
ST. PIUS THE TENTH CHURCH- 20 Jericho Road,
Essex, 878-5997. Pastor: Rev. Richard W. Tinney. Masses:
Mon.-Thurs. 8:30 a.m.; Saturday 4:30 p.m., Sunday 8:30
and 10:30 a.m. Confessions Sat. 3:30 p.m. 4 p.m. www.
together.net/~stpius
ST. THOMAS CHURCH- 6 Green St., Underhill Center.
Father Charles R. Danielson, Parish Priest. Weekend
Masses: Saturday-4:30 p.m., Sunday-8:30. Daily Masses:
Check with wwwlstthomasvt.com or call 899-4632
July 20, 4-9 pm
Essex Junction Block Party
Colchester-Milton Rotary meeting. Speak-
Open house. The museum will open to the
CALVARY BAPTIST CHURCH- (Fundamentalindependent.) 61 Main St., Essex Junction, 878-8341.
Pastor James Gangwer. Sunday School 10 a.m. Worship
Service 11 a.m. Sunday evening worship 6:30. Wednesday
evening youth groups; Awana, Pro-Teens and Prayer
meeting 7 p.m.
BLOCK PARTY & STREET DANCE
SATURDAY, JULY 20, 2013
RAILROAD AVENUE, 4-9 PM
19
Friday
“Digging in the Dirt.” Meet live turtles, toads
and snakes from Southern Vermont Natural History Museum. All ages. Dorothy
Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane,
Williston, 11 a.m. Contact: 878-4918. Wing night. Hosted by the Men’s Auxiliary.
Live entertainment: One Duzzi. Cost: $47. VFW Post 6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex
Junction, 5:30 p.m. Contact: 878-0700.
Friday evening at The Bryan. The gallery
The 12th annual Essex
Junction Block Party
and Street Dance
Walk, bike or ride
to Railroad Avenue
this Saturday for a
neighborhood block
party and street dance!
Activities include:
Roaming Railroad
Face painting
Dunking booth
Balloon art
Bounce castle
Obstacle course
Food vendors
Live music:
Contois School of Music
All Star Band (4-6 p.m.)
Dave Keller Blues Band
(6-9 p.m.)
Dancing!
will keep its doors open for art and conversation, light refreshments and the live
performance of Shimmering Flutes. No
admission charge, and reservations are
not required. Bryan Memorial Gallery,
youth scholarship fund. Tickets: $25 at
180 Main Street, Jeffersonville, 5-7 p.m.
Essex High School JR ROTCthe door or $20Eye
Care of Grand
Vermont
Jason Leo Automotive
in advance.
Isle
Contact: 644-5100.
Bergeron, Paradis & Fitzpatrick
Associates
in
Orthodontics
Champlain Valley Expo
Lake House, Grand Isle, 6:30 p.m. Contact
Bailey
Spring
&
Chassis
Hornet’s
Nest
Pub
The
Flynn
for
tickets:
863-5966.
For
info:
372Look Good — FeelLight
BetterRadio/WGLY
program. Female
Brown bag book club. This month: "One Thou8889.
Bilodeau,
Wells
& Co.
Darkroom Gallery
Murray’s
Tavern
cancer patients
receive
beauty techniques
sand White Women:
The Journals
of May
to help restore
their appearance
and help
Scottand
Thompson,
DMD
Karen’s Kloset
Northfield
Savings Bank
Dodd" by Jim Fergus
J. Will Dodd.
Concert.Engineers
“Full Circle” is a group of fiveChildren’s
women
them feel and
goodEnrichment
about they wayCenter
they look
Books available atDonald
the frontL.desk. Coffee,
Hamlin
Consulting
Preschool
who sing and perform on recorders, hamArt by
Chris
Hemphill
during chemotherapy
and
radiation
treattea, juice and dessert provided. Free and
mered dulcimer, harp, guitar and drums.
ments. American Cancer Society Hope
open to the public. Dorothy Alling MemoFisk Farm, 3849 West Shore Road, Isle La
Lodge, Lois McClure – Bee Tabakin Buildrial Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston,
Motte, 2-4 p.m. Contact: 928-3364.
ing, 237 East Avenue, Burlington. 11 a.m.12:30-1:30 p.m. Contact: 878-4918. 12:30 p.m. Free. Contact: 658-0649.
SPONSORS
20
Saturday
Essex Block Party and Street Dance. A com-
munity celebration featuring live music,
demonstrations, face painting, a dunk tank
and lots of vendors. Celebrating 12 years!
Railroad Avenue, Essex Junction, 4-9 p.m.
Celebrate Colchester Artisans Sampler. A
showcase of live demonstrations and talks
in which traditional crafts are related to
local history. Colchester Middle School
Gym, Blakely Road, Colchester, 9:30
a.m.-4 p.m.
Historic tour of UVM. Professor emeritus William Averyt leads a walk through campus,
referencing architectural highlights and
notable personalities along the way. Meet
at Ira Allen statue on UVM Green, Burlington, 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Preregister: www.
uvm.edu.
“Spreading Light” music festival. Live per-
formances by the Adam Ezra Group and
the DuPont Brothers. All proceeds support Active Minds nonprofit, which aims
to change the conversation about mental
health on college campuses. Battery Park,
Burlington, 1:30-5 p.m. Contact John:
202-531-5605.
Jericho Plein Air Festival. An outdoor paint-
ing event. Free for visitors. Watch painters complete pieces at designated spots
around town. Afterward, peruse and buy
framed and gallery-wrapped originals
from the day. Emile A. Gruppe Gallery,
22 Barber Farm Raod, Jericho, 9 a.m.-4
p.m. Contact: 899-3211.
Jericho garden tour. Eight gardens open for
visitors on a self-guided tour. Each garden is unique, including the “Mad Hatters
Tea Site,” and the “Master Garden Site.”
Proceeds benefit the Community Center in Jericho. Tickets are $12 and can
be purchased at Jericho Center Country
Store, Old Mill Craft Shop, and Underhill
Country Store. Day of tour: Jericho Center
Country Store only. 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Contact:
899-3853.
21
Sunday
Benefit plant sale. Choose from a wide vari-
ety of ornamental trees, shrubs, perennials and annuals from nurseries and greenhouses throughout Vt. Proceeds support
plant collections maintenance and site enhancement projects at the Hort. Farm, as
well as it’s student intern program. Rain or
shine. UVM Horticultural Research Center,
off Green Mountain Drive, South Burlington, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Info: http://friendsofthehortfarm.org/
Concert. Rock group “No Left Turn” performs.
Open to the public. Westford Common,
7-8 p.m. Contact Andy: 879-3749.
Presentation. “The Re-birth of the Ethan Allen
Homestead" John Ewing and Thomas W.
Anderson will share anecdotes about historian Ralph Nading Hill and other visionaries who succeeded in making a dream
become a reality. Free and open to the
public. Ethan Allen Homestead, Burlington,
4 p.m. Concert. The Vermont Jazz Ensemble performs
music in big band style. All profits from
the concert are used for the Island Arts
22
Monday
Full moon hike. Watch the moon rise from
Cedar Point in the park on a guided
2-mile hike. Headlamp or flashlight and
good walking shoes strongly recommended. Cost: $3 adults, $2 children 4-13.
Space is limited; preregistration required.
Niquette Bay State Park, 274 Raymond
Road, Colchester, 7:15-9:45 p.m. Contact:
893-5210.
Cancer prayer and support meeting. Conversation, prayer, and support for those
living with cancer. Essex United Methodist Church, Route 15, Essex Center, 6:30-8
p.m.
23
Tuesday
Tai Chi. Gentle workout with Gwen Morey.
Free and open to everyone 50+. Bayside
Activity Center, 36 Blakely Road, Colchester, 1 p.m. Contact: 264-5646 or [email protected]
Bus Tour. Rock of Ages Quarry. Tour includes
free time in Barre to visit to the Vt. Historical Society or to grab lunch. Cost per
visitor: $10. All ages welcome. Seating
limited. Preregistration required. Meet at
Brownell Library parking lot, Essex Junction, 8:30 a.m.
“Fascinating Fossils.” Listen to stories and
explore the hidden world of fossils with
Kristen Littlefield. Free and open to the
public. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library,
21 Library Lane, Williston, 11 a.m. Contact: 878-4918.
Film screening. “Southwest (Sudoeste)” is
25
Thursday
Tai Chi. Gentle workout with Gwen Morey.
Free and open to everyone 50+. Bayside
Activity Center, 36 Blakely Road, Colchester, 1 p.m. Contact: 264-5646 or [email protected]
Colchester-Milton Rotary meeting. Speaker:
Onan Whitcomb - Robotic Milking. Serving the communities of Colchester, Milton
and the Champlain Islands. Hampton Inn,
Colchester, 12 p.m.
26
Friday
Pasta night. Live entertainment: Working Man
Band. No cover. $7 adults, $3 children
under 12. Open to the public. VFW Post
6689, 73 Pearl Street, Essex Junction,
5:30-10 p.m. Contact: 233-2673.
27
Saturday
Trunk show and sale. See the work of 70+
artists. Demonstrations daily. Grand Isle
art Works, 259 US Rte 2, Grand Isle, 10
a.m.-4 p.m. Contact Ellen: 378-4591.
Bird monitoring walk. Join experienced bird-
ers for monthly bird monitoring. Please
bring binoculars. Free, donation encouraged. Best for adults and older children.
Birds of Vermont Museum, 900 Sherman
Hollow Road, Huntington, 7:30-9:30 a.m.
Contact: 434-2167 or [email protected]
Flea market and craft fair. St. Amadeus Parish Center, Alburgh, 8 a.m.-2 p.m.
Introductory group rides. Free and open to
about a young woman who gives birth
on her deathbed to a child who, spirited
away to a remote lakeside village, lives
her lifetime in a single day, in this hauntingly dreamlike tale of incommensurable
life. Portuguese, with subtitles in English.
The BCA Center, Burlington, 7 p.m.
new riders. Rides are 12-20 miles at a leisurely pace for folks new to road cycling.
New cyclists will be taught the rules of the
road and how to ride in a group. Offered
by the Green Mountain Bicycle Club. Parking lot, Dorset Park, South Burlington, 10
a.m. Contact: 363-0963 or [email protected]
gmail.com.
Concert. “Jenni Johnson and The Junketeers.”
Festival of the Islands. Through July 28.
Free and open to the public. Islands Center, Knight Point State Park, North Hero,
6:30 p.m. Contact: 372-8400.
24
Wednesday
Author reading. “Pedal To the Sea” by Vt.
author Gilbert Newbury will share his true
story of a family with young children on
a remarkable coast–to-coast bicycle trip
across America pedaling a custom-made
bike. Book signing available. Free and
open to the public. Dorothy Alling Memorial Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston, 6
p.m. Contact: 878-4918.
Writing workshop. “Writing Stories From Your
Life” with Joe Ryan. Free and open to the
public. Bayside Activity Center, 36 Blakely
Road, Colchester, 1 p.m. Contact: 2645646 or [email protected]
Colchester Farmers’ Market. A weekly com-
munity event that showcases local produce, arts and crafts, prepared food and
health and wellness info. This week: The
Colchester Community Band and Community Wellness with Colchester Family
Practice. Rain or shine. Burnham Library
Green, Colchester, 4-7 p.m.
Family-friendly community events involving the Champlain Islands’ towns of Alburgh, Isle LaMotte, North Hero, Grand
Isle and South Hero. Activities vary by
town. Live music, vendors, fundraising
meals and rummage sales. Most events
are free. Champlain Islands, various times.
Contact: 999-5862.
Charity auction. Hosted by the Colchester Li-
ons Club. Many items for sale. Donations
are welcomed. Old Red Fire Station, Main
Street, Colchester Village, 9 a.m. registration. Contact Ken: 578-7483 or [email protected]
surfglobal.net.
28
Sunday
Voice recital. “Danke Schoen” features soprano Sierra Marcy accompanied on piano
by Michael Halloran and Mary Jane Austin. An hour of musical theatre selections.
Free admission; donations accepted. Recital Hall, McCarthy Arts Center, St. Michael’s College, 5-6 p.m. Contact Sierra:
324-6047.
Summer Greek Food Festival. Featuring full
Greek menu, Greek pastries, Greek music
and dancing. Rain or shine. Free admis-
7a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
C alendar
12-5 p.m. Contact: 862-2155.
Ongoing
Causeway Bike Ferry. The ferry runs this
summer through Sept. 2 on Fridays, Saturdays, Sundays and holidays from 10 a.m.6 p.m. Adult $8; youth (7-17) $5; under
age 6 riders are free.
Mount Mansfield scale modelers. Infor-
mal gathering of model enthusiasts. All
skill levels welcome. Third Thursday of
each month. Kolvoord Community Room,
Brownell Library, Essex Junction, 6:308:30 p.m. Contact: 878-0765.
Reading with Frosty and friends. Tuesdays.
All dogs registered with Therapy Dogs of
Vermont. Bring a book and read to a dog.
All ages. Pre-register for 10-minute individual sessions. Dorothy Alling Memorial
Library, 21 Library Lane, Williston, 3:304:30 p.m. Contact: 878-4918.
To view more ongoing events go to:
www.EssexReporter.com/calendar
Bayside Activity Center walk-ins. Every
Monday, Wednesday and Friday through
Aug. Grab a free hot coffee, socialize,
play cards, billiards and other games.
Open to the public. Bayside Activity Center, 36 Blakely Road, Colchester, 10 a.m.4 p.m. Contact: 264-5646 or [email protected]
colchestervt.gov.
Bingo. Sponsored by the Whitcomb Woods
Residents Association. Whitcomb Woods,
128 West Street, Essex Junction. Mondays
at 6 p.m. Contact: 879-1829.
Beginner yoga classes. Tuesdays. In lieu of
a fee, please bring a non-perishable item
or monetary donation for the Richmond
Food Shelf. Richmond Free Library, 201
Bridge Street, Richmond, 6-7 p.m. Contact: [email protected] or 318-5570.
Burlington Farmers’ Market. Saturdays. A
weekly selection of seasonal produce, artisan products and more from over ninety
outdoor stands. Free and open to the public. City Hall Park, Burlington, 8:30 a.m.-2
p.m.
Cell phones for soldiers. Local residents
can support these collection drives by
donating their old cell phones at A. W.
Rich Funeral Home, 57 Main Street, Essex Junction. Or at the American Legion,
3650 Roosevelt Highway, Colchester. Collections accepted 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Contact:
849-6261.
Colchester Farmers’ Market volunteer opportunity. Be a part of a great commu-
nity event by volunteering the Colchester
Farmers Market. The Farmers Market will
be held in front of the Burnham Memorial Library and will run every Wednesday through Sept. 11. We are looking
for helpers with parking control, set up,
special events, promo and marketing, and
much more. Contact Melissa: 878-1190
or [email protected]
Colchester-Milton Rotary meeting. Thurs-
days. Serving the communities of Colchester, Milton and the Champlain Islands.
Hampton Inn, Colchester, 12 p.m.
Early birder morning walks. Sundays. En-
joy the start of the day with birds, and
other woodland inhabitants. Walks are
led by experienced birders familiar with
Vermont birds. Best for adults and older
children. Free, donations welcomed. Birds
of Vermont Museum. 900 Sherman Hollow
Road, Huntington, 7-9 a.m. Contact: 4342167 or [email protected]
English as a second language classes. Im-
prove your English conversation skills and
meet new people. Wednesdays. Pickering
Room, Second Floor: Intermediate/Advanced. Administrative Conference Room:
Beginners. Fletcher Free Library, Burlington, 7-9 p.m. Contact Elena Carter, FFL
Outreach Department: 865-7211.
Essex Art League. Meets the first Thursday of
the month. The meeting agenda includes
a business and social time, and features
a guest artist presentation. Essex Junction
Congregational Church on Main Street,
Essex Junction, 9-11 a.m. Visit: www.essexartleague.com.
Essex Junction 5 Corners Farmers’ Market.
Check out this great community event! Every Friday until Oct. Local produce, activities, vendors and more. Lincoln Place,
Essex Junction, 3:30-7:30 p.m.
Essex Rotary meeting. Essex Rotary Meet-
ings are held on Wednesdays at 12:10
p.m. at The Essex. Serving the communities of Essex, Essex Junction, Jericho and
Underhill.
Family Support Group. Outright Vermont
holds support group meetings for family
members of youth going through the process of coming out. One Sunday evening
and one Wednesday morning each month
at Outright Vermont. Contact: 865-9677.
Genealogy. Let the experts find that missing
ancestor. Resources available for New
England and New York. Vermont Genealogy Library, Hegeman Avenue, Fort Ethan
Allen, Colchester, Tues: 3-9:30 p.m. and
Sat: 10 a.m.-4p.m. Contact: 238-5934 or
www.vt-fcgs.org.
Italian conversation group. Open to all in-
terested in learning/hearing the Italian
language. Room 101, St. Edmunds Hall,
St. Michael's College, Colchester. Every
second and fourth Wednesday of the
month, 7-9 p.m. Jericho Plein Air Festival is looking for
volunteers! This full-day event on July 21
will host artists from all over New England
as they paint outside. Begins with an early registration and breakfast, followed
by an afternoon of painting. At the end
of the day, there’ll be a reception with
framed paintings put on display. Want
to help out? Contact the Emile A. Gruppe
Gallery and ask for Emilie: 899-3211.
Local Libraries
The Brownell Library will be
closed on Saturdays in July and
August through Labor Day.
July 18
Lake Monsters story-time.
Listen as Lake Monster players
read aloud and “field” questions.
Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
Essex, 10:30 a.m. Contact: 8790313 or [email protected]
Movie.
“Pirates
of
the
Caribbean.” Join Captain Jack
Sparrow for dinner and a movie.
Rated PG-13. Pizza will be served.
Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
Essex, 5 p.m. Contact: 879-0313 or
[email protected]
“Booked for Lunch” Series.
Bring a bag lunch and listen to
a librarian read stories about a
different theme each week. This
week: “Dig into Trouble.” For kids
entering grades K and up. Dessert
supplied. Choose up to 3 sessions
thru July 27. Brownell Library,
Essex Junction, 11:30 a.m.-12:30
p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
“Dig into Reading” craft
series. This week: Pirate Patch
and Treasure Map. Each week
will be a different project. For kids
entering grades 1-5. Choose up to
two sessions thru July 27. Brownell
Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m.
Contact: 878-6956.
entering grades 1 and up. Brownell
Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m.
Contact: 878-6956.
Fresh, fun food for kids. Take
food fresh from the library garden
and create and taste delicious
dishes. Grades 6-12. Brownell
Library, Essex Junction, 2-3 p.m.
Contact: 878-6956.
July 24
Live
storytelling.
Join
storyteller Brendan Taaffe for
a “crankie” story, a moving
panorama, rolled up inside a box
and then hand-cranked so that it
scrolls across a viewing screen.
Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
Essex, 1 p.m. Contact: 879-0313 or
[email protected]
Summer preschool storytime. Theme: dinosaurs. For
preschoolers, but siblings are
welcome too. Brownell Library,
Essex Junction, 10-10:45 a.m.
Contact: 878-6956.
Chess for kids. Join Chess
Lovers from the Teen Advisory
Board for an hour of play. Chess
sets provided. Every Wednesday
through July. For kids entering
grades 3-8. Brownell Library, Essex
Junction, 3-4 p.m. Contact: 8786956.
Snakes Alive! Meet a Corn
Snake, a kind of North American
Rat Snake that subdues its small
prey by constriction. This pet is
spending the summer in Essex
Junction. Paint a wooden snake
to take home. For kids entering
grades 3-6. Brownell Library, Essex
Junction, 7-8 p.m. Contact: 8786956.
Happy 250th
Essex!
A proud part of the Essex and Essex Junction
communities for 30 years
July 19
Musical story-time. Get your
groove on with songs, stories,
percussion and musical crafts.
Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
Essex, 10:30 a.m. Contact: 8790313 or [email protected]
DIY Terrariums. Using moss,
stones, and found objects, create July 25
“Booked for Lunch” Series.
a terrarium to take home. Grades
Healthy Older Individuals Needed for
6-12. Brownell Library, Essex Bring a bag lunch and listen to
Junction, 3-4:30 p.m. Contact: 878- a librarian read stories about a
Muscle Research Study
different theme each week. This
6956.
Are you an otherwise healthy, non-smoker between
week: “Dig into Rocks.” For kids
July 22
Game Day. Hang out and play entering grades K and up. Dessert
60 and 80 years of age that exercises on a regular
board games and XBox Kinect in supplied. Choose up to 3 sessions
basis?
the Activity Room. Essex Free thru July 27. Brownell Library,
Interested in9RMZIVWMX]SJ:IVQSRX1IHMGEP+VSYT6EHMSPSKMWXW`*PIXGLIV%PPIR%YKYWX
participating in research studying how
Library, 2 Jericho Road, Essex, Essex Junction, 11:30 a.m.-12:30
1-3 p.m. Contact: 879-0313 or p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
aging and exercise affect muscle function?
Are you an otherwise healthy,
“Dig into Reading” craft
[email protected]
You will receive:
Gardens. non-smoker between 60 and 80
Heavy equipment at Public series. This week: Zen0MJIMWMRXLIHIXEMPW
years
of
age
that
suff
ers
from
knee
Works. See the weekly vehicle Each week will be a different
inspection at the Public Works project. For kids entering grades osteoarthritis and is considering
● Free medical
Garage.
Learn
how
heavy 1-5. Choose up to 2 sessions thru knee replacement? Interested in
screening
equipment helps the crew keep July 27. Brownell Library, Essex participating in research studying how
● Muscle strength
things running smoothly under and Junction, 2-3 p.m. Contact: 878knee osteoarthritis affects skeletal
above ground. Grades 1-5. Brownell 6956.
testing
Story
time
with
Jane muscle function and how exercise may
Library, Essex Junction, 9-10 a.m.
● $225 compensation
Manning.
Meet the author improve muscle function?
Contact: 878-6956.
upon completion
Community
tent
yoga. and illustrator of the picture
45-60-minute sessions. Includes book, “Millie Fierce.” Essex Free You will receive:
Contact
poses, breath teaching and final Library, 2 Jericho Road, Essex, Free medical screening
PatricContact
k Savage a
relaxation with fun and laughter. 10:30 a.m. Contact: 879-0313 or
t
Muscle strength testing
8
4
Patrick
7-45Savage
Kids can do thirty-minute sessions. [email protected]
45 or at
Patr847-4545
[email protected] Patrick.
Spoken word slam poetry 3 ½ month training program
Bring a mat or carpet piece. Free for
tmednet.org.
all ages. No registration required. workshop. Explore the art of $650 compensation
[email protected]
Brownell Library, Essex Junction, spoken word with Vt. performance
upon completion
org.
poet Lizzy Fox. Ages 11+. Essex
10 a.m. Contact: 878-6956.
Reading
buddies.
Kids Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
;LIRXLIHIXEMPWQEXXIV]SYGERVIP]SRXLIYRTEVEPPIPIHI\TIVXMWISJSYVXIEQ%X*PIXGLIV%PPIRSYV
6:30 a.m. Contact: 879-0313
entering grades K-5 read for anXIEQEssex,
MRGPYHIW JIPPS[WLMTXVEMRIH 9RMZIVWMX] SJ :IVQSRX 1IHMGEP +VSYT 6EHMSPSK] TL]WMGMERW IRWYVMRK XLEX ER
or [email protected]
hour with Teen Mentors. BuddiesI\TIVMIRGIHWTIGMEPMWXMWEWWMKRIHXS]SYVGEVI%RHSYVXIEQMWLIVIIREFPMRK]SYVHSGXSVERH]SYXSUYMGOP]
meet every Monday until July 29,KIX XLI MRJSVQEXMSR RIGIWWEV] XS LIPT ]SY XLVSYKL ]SYV MPPRIWW SV MRNYV] -J ]SY´VI MR RIIH SJ E HMEKRSWXMG MQEKMRK
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July 26
ending with a party for ReadingWIVZMGIWYGLEWE'8WGER16-SVQEQQSKVEQEWO]SYVHSGXSVXSWIRH]SYXS*PIXGLIV%PPIRSVGSRXEGXYWHMVIGXP]
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“Groovin’ & Diggin’ to
Buddies and their Mentors.
Brownell Library, Essex Junction, Another World.” Jay Cook
brings many instruments to
2-3 p.m. Contact: 878-6956.
share his passion for world music
with children. An interactive,
July 23
stomping,
hand-clapping
Dorothy Canfield Fisher book foot
group. Discuss the DCF book “The performance for all ages. Brownell
Expeditioners” by Vt. author S.S. Library, Essex Junction, 3-4 p.m.
Taylor. Meet her on August 2nd at Contact: 878-6956.
Adult movie. “Gone Baby
6:30 p.m. at Memorial Hall. Grades
4-8. Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Gone.” Two Boston area detectives
Road, Essex, 6:30 p.m. Contact: investigate a little girl’s kidnapping,
879-0313
or
[email protected] which ultimately turns into a crisis
both professionally and personally.
essex.org.
Bus Tour of Rock of Ages Based on the Dennis Lehane novel.
Quarry. Tour includes free time in Rated R. Brownell Library, Essex
Barre to visit to the Vt. Historical Junction, 6:30 p.m. Contact: 878Society or to grab lunch. Cost per 6955.
visitor: $10. All ages welcome.
Ongoing events
Seating limited. Preregistration
Adopt a Beanie Pet. Want a
required. All ages welcome,
children must accompanied by cool pet of your own? Adopt one of
an adult. Rain or shine. Meet at our cute critters for a week. Keep a
Brownell Library parking lot, Essex daily journal to share with us. For
kids entering Gr. 2 and up.
Junction, 8:30 a.m.
Drop-in
story-time.
Weekly garden visit. Walk
up to the library garden plot at Thursdays. Reading, rhyming,
Summit Street School to tend the and crafts each week. All ages
plants, pull weeds and harvest welcome. No registration required.
fresh vegetables as they ripen. Essex Free Library, 2 Jericho Road,
Librarians will include garden Essex, 10 a.m. Contact: 879-0313 or
stories and information. For kids [email protected]
)UHH6WUHQJWK7UDLQLQJ
3URJUDPIRU2OGHU
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8a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
X
E
S
ES
Who was Susie Wilson?
By A. RICHARD
BOERA
For The Essex Reporter
We currently live in the
senior apartment complex,
Pinecrest at Essex, just
a block away from Susie
Wilson Road. One day last
week, my wife asked me,
Ò Who was Susie Wilson
and why was the road
named for her?Ó Hating to
admit that I had no idea,
I Ô GoogledÕ the subject
matter and was intrigued
with the (single, but very
rewarding) result.
It appeared that every
long-time resident of Essex
was familiar with the
rumor that Susie Wilson
had been a prostitute
during the time that Fort
Ethan Allen was operating
as a military base; some
said that she was a madam
and that the house in
which she lived was a
brothel. A vague article
in the Burlington Free
Press in 1994 stated, Ò she
had cooked, washed and
baby-sat for the officers
at Fort Ethan Allen.Ó It
also explained that Ò she
had migrated from Ireland
at age 17, had married
and been widowed, then
moved to the house that
once stood at the corner
of her namesake roadÓ (at
its intersection with Pearl
Street). Ò It gave her age
(incorrectly) at death Ñ in
1966 Ñ as 86...There was
also a quote from SusieÕ s
stepdaughter-in-law
attributing the honor of the
road name to the fact that
the bus stop, a social hub
was in front of her house.Ó
A student in Professor
Tim BrookesÕ writing class
at UVM over a decade
ago,
Jennifer
Goulart,
Happy 250th Birthday
Open House Cookout
July, 31 (2:00-6:00pm)
It gives us great pride and pleasure to
be part of this community.
We believe it’s important to express our
appreciation for the confidence you
place in us.
wasnÕ t satisfied with this
sketch of Ms. Wilson,
the tainted reputation or
with the rationale for the
road-naming honor. After
months
of
meticulous
research, she documented
in her term paper the
following results about
Susie Wilson:
Susanna Cassell was
born in Ireland in 1887 and
moved to New York in 1895.
Between 1895 and 1916,
Susie married her first
husband; she was married
and widowed four times.
Between 1909 and 1916,
her brother William (Susie
also had two sisters) moved
to Burlington; widow Susie
also moved to Vermont and
married Merrit Wilson of
Cambridge, living for a
time on Colchester Road;
he died in 1926. Between
1926
and
1931,
she
married Sergeant John
250
s
e
t
ra
b
e
l
Ce
years
Drinan, a retired soldier
and they lived on Pearl
Street; he died in 1932.
In 1933, Frederick (Fritz)
Krebser rented rooms from
widow Drinan and they
were married in 1934,
living in her Pearl Street
home; Fritz died in 1952.
Susanna Krebser died at
age 78 (or 79) in Waterbury
State Hospital. She was an
in-patient there, suffering
from dementia.
Nearing the end of
her project, Ms. Goulart
finally
tracked
down
and interviewed SusieÕ s
stepdaughter-in-law,
Gladys Krebser Ð the only
person she encountered
who knew the living Susie
Wilson. Krebser was able
to fill in many blanks about
her husbandÕ s stepmother.
Goulart asked about
the old newspaper article.
Ò Oh, that story,Ó Krebser
replied with not a small
bit of hostility. Ò That
newspaper wrote a terrible
story about Susie. None of
it was a bit true...I called
that paper and told them to
write a new article taking
it all back or weÕ d have
a lawyer call them. And
they did,Ó she concluded
triumphantly. Ò They wrote
a piece apologizing for
what theyÕ d said and that
– See SUSIE on page 10a
Happy
Birthday
Essex!
Happy
250th
Essex!
Stop by the
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for all your fresh
floral needs!
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Adult Clothes $2
Please RSVP by calling Krysta @ 878-8805!
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All T-shirts: 25¢
Jeans, shirts, tops, dresses,
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8 Essex Way, Suite 103C
Essex Junction, VT 05452
802-878-8805
60 Pearl Street Essex Junction | 802.879.7980
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The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
What Might Have Been?
By WILLIAM L. PARKINSON
Our history is composed of an
infinite number of turning points
or crossroads where a decision
was made that shapes our present
situation. It is fun to look back
and imagine how things would be
different today if those decisions
had gone the other way. What would
our country look like if George
Washington had allowed himself
to be declared king in 1783? What
would our world look like today if
the United States had not entered
World War II in 1941? Closer to
home, what would Essex look like if
IBM had not decided to come to our
area in 1957?
Another local decision that might
have had just as big, or perhaps
even a bigger impact, on our area
occurred in 1946. Few people know
about it today, or that it was even
under consideration, but had the
decision gone the other way we
would all know and our area would
be very different.
An invitation booklet dated Jan.
9, 1946 was sent from Mudrock
A. Campbell, Adjutant General of
the State of Vermont to Dr. Stoyan
Gavrilovitch, Chairman of the UNO
Committee in New York City. It is
titled Ò A Modern Adequate Vermont
Village Awaits U. N. O.Ó , United
Nations Organization. The United
Nations was just being formed after
the close of World War II, and their
new quarters being built in New
York City were not ready yet.
The invitation is a detailed
look at Fort Ethan Allen and all
that our area had to offer for the
Organization,
the
ambassadors
and their families and staff. It
proposed turning the 1,203 acres
and 284 modern buildings of the
Fort from military uses to the work
of permanent peace. It promised
that whether the UN were to stay
for months or years the people,
officials and government of Vermont
would stand ready to cooperate and
make their stay a happy one. The
Fort which could be ready almost
We want
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immediately
was
conveniently
located five miles from Burlington,
with an airport three miles away
offering 12 flights a day to and
from either New York or Montreal
and four flights to and from Boston
daily. The average elevation above
sea level was a comfortable 392 feet.
An inventory of the principal
buildings available on the Post in
Essex and Colchester includes: a
church, post office, 19 room club
house, a 153 bed hospital, four
administration buildings good for 20
desks each a 550-seat theatre, post
exchange, 87 dwelling units, nine
apartments, 13 barracks, six mess
halls, one 1,000-man mess hall, and
many other buildings. Over 300,000
square feet of storage warehouse
space, 50-car capacity railroad
sidings off the Central Vermont
Rail Road and five miles to connect
to the Rutland Railroad. A Fire
Department with three fire trucks
– See ESSEX on page 10a
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A picture of the invitation booklet dated Jan. 9, 1946 for Fort
Ethan Allen to host the United Nations Organization.
Photo courtesy of the Fort Ethan Allen Museum
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10a
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
SUSIE
from page 8a
was the end of it.”
Krebser continued to set the record
straight. “Susie owned a house right there
on the corner of the road going up Susie
Wilson Road” (at the corner of Pearl Street
across from Towne Plaza). “There was a
pond behind it...It used to freeze in the
winter and the kids would come and skate.
Susie would make cookies and hot cocoa.
She never had any kids of her own, but
she certainly was good to the children.”
She recalled that the house was torn down
when they put the road through...at which
time Susie was living up the road a bit,
with another stepson.
Goulart asked why Susie had a road
named after her.
“She did catering for the officers’ wives
at the Fort,” Krebser explained, “and she
baby-sat for their children. She met my
father-in-law there. He was a plumber at
the Fort, you see. They raised chickens
and ducks and geese. She used to sell eggs
at the Fort because they always liked fresh
eggs on Officers’ Row. She would bring the
eggs there, so they all knew her. She was
such a pretty lady. She had a heart as big
as all outdoors. She used to say, if she
had some pennies, she always has some
pennies to give.”
With Krebser’s telling of it, there could
not have been a more deserving candidate
for such an honor. “We’re very proud of
that,” Krebser exclaimed.
To the question of who named the road:
“It came to being when the buildings went
up” (the road is now a strip mall). “Everyone
always knew it as Susie Wilson’s Road.”
Goulart spent hours, days and weeks
of research on her project and never found
any evidence supporting the ugly rumors.
She constructed “a portrait of a rather sad
life” and judged Susie “in a favorable light
as an honorable woman,” a farm girl whose
home was the only house on the road at
one time.
nations are quoted with their praises of
Vermont and Vermonters. A map of the
post and a couple of photographs are
included.
Just think of what Essex might look
like today if we had been the home of
the United Nations, even for a bit, or
what if they had liked it so much they
stayed. Instead of one flag flying in the
parade grounds there would be the flags
of 192 countries flying. The cultural
infusion of the Ambassadors and their
staffs and families from all over the
world, the constant media frenzy, the
security issues, transportation issues.
What would our schools be like with
all that diversity, how would even all
our shopping be different as the stores
tried to appeal to all the different tastes
of the foreigners. How would the area
have grown up, ethnic neighborhoods,
huge apartment buildings, huge
shopping malls, another bridge over
the Winooski to directly connect the
airport to the Fort. We will never know,
but there is no question Colchester
would be a very different place today,
if that decision back in 1946 had gone
the other way.
ESSEX
from page 9a
was ready to go, and even three motor
repair shops. There were 19 miles of
good roads within the Fort, 10 of which
were paved. The Fort had its own
water system, was wired for electricity
and telephone, and was all in good
condition. The invitation was sent in
January and they were told they could
start moving in in February.
The invitation even included the
use of the range out in the Underhill/
Jericho/Bolton area, boasting another
11,236 acres with trout brooks and
picnic areas at elevations of 750 to
1,800 feet. Summer camps and winter
Dick Boera was Dean of Business Affairs
skiing could be established here for
at Lyndon State College (1970-1989) and
exclusive use of UNO staffs. Or for
is an Honorary Lifetime Director of the
the skiers 40 miles to the east of the
Lyndon Historical Society. He and his wife
Fort was the longest chair lift in the
Julie moved to Essex in 2010.
world at Stowe. For hiking there was
the Long Trail extending the length of
Editor’s Note:
the state across the Green Mountains.
Jennifer Goulart’s 13-page term paper
Five miles to the west were the sandy
was originally published in full in the
beaches of Lake Champlain. There
Bulletin of the Chittenden County Historical
were still stable facilities at the Fort
Society (Winter 2000-2001, Vol. 34, No.
for any who wished to maintain their
3) and reprinted by the Essex Community
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B Section
The Essex Reporter •
July 18, 2013
Sports
Strengthening Giants
Essex native interns
with the NFL
Q: How did you get interested in
exercise science?
A: I had originally gone into undergrad
at Southern Connecticut State University
not knowing what I wanted to do, so I spent
a good amount of the first semester looking
through different programs. The athletic
training program in the exercise science
major interested me the most because I had
always loved sports (and) figured working
in an athletic field would be the best fit for
me. After my time in the athletic training
program, I grew most of an interest in the
preventative and rehabilitation aspects
of athletic training, which then made me
curious about strength and conditioning... I
went on to pursue a concentration in strength
and conditioning at Springfield College for
my master’s degree and couldn’t be happier
with my choice.
Q: Describe a typical day during your
internship.
A: The Giants internship started out with
setting up the weight room and the field
house for both the strength and conditioning
workouts of the day. Then before the players
• Legal Notices
• Food
• Classifieds
SPORTS
SHORTS
Joe
Gonillo
By KELLY MARCH
The Essex Reporter
Essex native Jason Polakowski has never
rooted for the New York Giants before, but
says he has “gained a lot of respect for the
team and organization” this summer and
“will absolutely be cheering for the Giants in
the upcoming season.”
How did he gain respect for the Giants
during the offseason? By spending the last
three months working with the franchise as
a strength and conditioning intern.
An exercise science and sports studies
major at Springfield College, Polakowski
had worked with high school and college
athletes prior to accepting the internship,
but had “never even dreamed” of coaching
professional athletes.
“Working at the professional level was
completely new to me,” he explained. “The
main focus for the coach of these athletes is
not necessarily to teach the athletes different
drills but (rather to) watch them through
each motion so they can be strong and fast
through the best and safest motion possible.
And these aren’t exactly athletes who you
can push around if some things gets out of
hand…Sometimes you just have to let some
things go.”
Polakowski recently shared his thoughts
about his experience interning with the NFL:
ALSO IN THIS SECTION:
N
ow let’s talk summer. It took until
the middle of July, but give me a hot
summer day to take a dip in the pool
or the lake, turn up the AC at night or just
hit the basement in the evening to relax and
refresh. High school all-star games were the
hit of the weekend, as hockey and basketball
seniors from Vermont and New Hampshire
faced off.
Essex native Jason Polakowski sports two Super Bowl rings during his three-month
strength and conditioning internship with the New York Giants.
Essex native Jason Polakowski looks on as the New York Giants stretch during his threemonth strength and conditioning internship with the organization.
Photos contributed
arrived, the other intern and myself
would distribute waters to each locker
in the locker room to make sure each
athlete was hydrated prior to the
workout. Next the players would
arrive. The strength coaches had
three different time slots throughout
the day for times that the players
could arrive for the workout so we
didn’t have to deal with the whole
team at once. The players would start
in the field house for the warm up and
conditioning and then move into the
weight room for the lifting portion
after. Once we worked through the
three workout times, everything was
cleaned up and set up for the next
day’s workout.
– See GIANTS on page 2b
Young to compete in Junior Olympics
Hockey
The VT-NH all-star hockey games
were played at UVM on Saturday. The
VT girls won 4-0, while the boys fell 4-0.
Essex’s multitalented Taylor Hallowell,
who participated in four varsity sports this
year (field hockey, ice hockey, tennis and
track and field), was the lone Hornet on
the women’s squad. Jack Cabanaw, Justin
Ward, Nate Foice and Steve Jurkiewicz
represented EHS on the guys’ team.
Basketball
The VT-NH all-star basketball game was
played here at the Essex gym. Hornet coach
Jeff Goodrich along with other Vermont
coaches headed up the rebirth of the series.
His organization and attention to detail
were key in the overall success of the game.
The NH ladies staged a furious comeback
to edge VT 61-59, while the VT boys raced
to a big lead then held on for an 89-84 win.
Essex’s Tom Carton played very well in his
final high school basketball game. Fittingly,
his career ended on his home floor. Before
the boys’ game Goodrich and Matt Johnson
of the VT Twin State committee made a
special presentation honoring Enosburg
High School’s Brandon Gleason, who lost
his life in a tragic accident in the spring.
The two coaches presented Gleason’s #11
VT jersey to teammates Wyatt Larose
and Derek Blouin. Each player received
commemorative medals after their games
and a special award was given to the top
players on each team voted on by coaches and
sports’ personnel. Lebonon’s Moriah Morton,
Hartford’s Stephanie Grobe, Conant’s Devin
Springfield and Rice Memorial’s Casey
Tipson were named winners of the Michael
Johnson award so named for the former
BFA-St. Albans player and VT state police
officer who lost his life in 2003. His brothers
Matt (BHS) and Glenn (BFA) both currently
coach high school basketball. The game
switches to NH next summer. Thank you to
officials Chris Macfarlane, Rob Green, Jim
Companion, Michelle Boutin, Dan Pause
and Steve Ward, and to score table workers
Jim Harton, Mike “Detroit” Gilbert and Dan
“EJ Hunter” Couture for their time and
efforts.
TEST
The Town of Essex Swim Team defeated
Middlebury, 296-159, and Burlington
Country Club, 270-225, to maintain its
perfect record this summer.
Results against Middlebury were
as
follows:
Double
Winners—13-14
Boys: Casey Keenan (Fly, Back), Martin
Thomas (Breast, Free); 15-18 Girls: Amanda
Sinkewicz (Fly, Free). Triple Winners—9-10
Girls: Alexa Porter (Fly, Back, Free); 9-10
Boys: Chris Davis (Fly, Back, Free); 11-12
Girls: Lucy Miguel (Fly, Back, Free); 11-12
Boys: Cameron Marcus (Fly, Back, Free); 1314 Girls: Charlotte Brace (Fly, Back, Free).
Results against BCC were as follows:
Triple Winners—9-10 Boys: Chris Davis
(Fly, Breast, Free); 11-12 Girls: Lucy Miguel
(Fly, Back, Free); 11-12 Boys: Cameron
Marcus (Fly, Back, Free); 13-14 Girls:
Charlotte Brace (Fly, Back, Free); 13-14
Boys: Martin Thomas (Fly, Breast, Free).
Those meets were the final home swim
meets of the year, unless a date is finalized
for a special distance meet. The swimmers
and coaches have been working very hard in
and out of the pool, and the results show.
Essex High School field hockey standout Kathleen Young was recently selected to compete in the AAU Junior Olympics at the University of
Michigan from July 31 to August 3. Photo by Susan Teare
By KELLY MARCH
The Essex Reporter
“Kathleen has an intelligence about the game that belies her
age,” USA Field Hockey’s New England Regional Director Lynn
Hoeppner said of Essex High School standout Kathleen Young.
“She plays with vision.”
It is that vision that has landed the rising junior a ticket to the
AAU Junior Olympics at the University of Michigan next week.
Young’s journey to the Junior Olympics began in May, when she
competed in USA Field Hockey’s Futures New England Regional
Tournament at Brown University. While at that tournament, Young
was chosen to advance to the National Futures Championship
in Virginia Beach. And there she was selected to compete in the
Junior Olympics in Ann Arbor, Mich., from July 31 to August 3. “I wasn’t expecting to get to the Futures Championship, so I’m
really excited just to be going (to the Junior Olympics),” Young
reflected. “It’s going to be a great experience and it will be a lot of fun
just to be there.”
Young is hoping to qualify for USA Field Hockey’s Future Elite
program – the top level of the Olympic Development Pipeline – at the
Junior Olympics, but noted that the experience is more important
than the result.
Editor’s note: Young and several other members from the Essex
High School field hockey program are running a weekly development
camp for children ages 7-12. The weekly Fundamentals Field
Hockey sessions began last week and will run through August 14 on
Wednesdays from 6-7:15 p.m. at Maple Street Park. To register, visit
https://register.ejrp.org.
Legion
The Essex Legion Team is on a roll.
I think the team could honestly beat the
Yankees if the two faced off. The boys
swept a doubleheader from Montpelier on
Saturday, 13-2 and 12-4, and fell to KC
SB, 6-1, on Sunday. They also defeated
OEC Kings 10-3; Colchester Cannons 10-5;
Burlington 4-2 and KC SB two other times
earlier in the summer and are now 14-1 and
playing extremely well. Strong pitching and
solid hitting is a sound recipe for success.
Keep it rolling.
Track
Final call for track and field state
– See SHORTS on page 3b
2b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
S ports
TESTing the waters
Lucy Miquel, of the Town of Essex Swim Team, swims to a first place finish in butterfly,
helping her team to victory over Burlington Country Club, 270-225, on Thursday. With the win,
TEST held on to its unblemished record.
Photo by Kevin Macy
Vanzo named NE-10 Academic
All-Conference
Recent St. Michael’s College men’s
lacrosse graduate Marty Vanzo, an
Essex High School alum, was among
92 student-athletes across nine sports
selected for a Northeast-10 Conference
Academic All-Conference honor for the
spring athletic season. Out of the 10 NE10 men’s lacrosse players to draw the
laurel, Vanzo was one of just two who
was also chosen for an all-league accolade
this spring.
Vanzo completed his three-year career
with the Purple Knights this spring as one
of the most prolific attackmen in program
history, placing fourth in school annals
in assists (58), tying for fourth in points
(144) and taking ninth in goals (86). As a
senior, he became just the fourth Purple
Knight to record 60 points in a season,
hitting the figure behind 36 goals and 24
assists, and coming within three points
of a 25-year-old program record. A four-
time NE-10 Commissioner’s Honor Roll
qualifier, Vanzo was second in the league
in points and third in goals.
The NE-10 Academic All-Conference
teams are chosen by a vote of a committee
of athletic administrators and Faculty
Athletic Representatives (FAR). To be
eligible for selection to the Academic AllConference teams, a student-athlete must
have met and/or exceeded the following
minimum requirements: participated in
at least half of the team’s competitions
and be either a starter or significant
contributor; achieved a 3.30 cumulative
grade-point average; and completed at
least one academic year at their current
institution.
Vanzo drew his initial academic honor
after twice being named all-conference
and once landing a New England
Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association
(NEILA) All-New England nod.
GIANTS
from page 1b
Q: What was the most
challenging part about
the internship?
A: The most challenging
part for me was figuring
out how to work with
these athletes. I had never
worked with professionals
before, so I knew I would
have to change a few
things about my approach
to coaching. At times I had
to find coaching techniques
that worked best for each
individual
because
no
athlete is the same and
some athletes respond to
different cues. Also, I found
out that having confidence
is the best way for these
athletes to gain respect for
me as a person. Showing
that I care, want to help
and know what I’m talking
about made the athletes
more comfortable when
approaching me. Another
thing I had to get over was
the fact that some of these
guys are very famous.
Early on in the internship
I had to say to myself, “So
what if that is Eli Manning
or Justin Tuck. They need
my help and need me to be
a coach for them.
SHORTS
from page 1b
championship
plaques,
jackets, crew or hooded
sweatshirts. If you are
interested please send me
an email before the end of
the week or call me at the
pool 878-2973 M-F 10a.m.5 p.m.
Also, I forgot to thank
snack bar workers for the
VT Hershey T+F State
Meet on July 6. Chris
and Gale DiMambro and
“Early on in the internship I had to say to
myself, “So what if that is Eli Manning or
Justin Tuck. They need my help and need
me to be a coach for them.’”
Jason Polakowski
Q: What are your
professional goals for
the future?
A: In the future I do
hope to coach high level
athletes. I will probably
start at the college level,
hopefully coaching at a
big Division I college.
If
something
at
the
professional level ever does
open up, I will probably
take it because I did have
a great experience with the
Giants.
Q: Do you have any
advice for those who
hope to work with a
professional team in the
future?
Brian and Tracey Douglas
manned the booth with six
or eight athletes and young
but talented daughter,
Katie. The 8:30 a.m. – 4:30
p.m. shift sold out pretty
much all the food stocked
on the shelves and in the
fridge and freezer. Thank
you!
Personal notes
Happy anniversary to
my wife, Tina, who has
spent 24 incredible years
with me as of this coming
Monday. She is my best
Happy
250th
Essex!
A: The important thing
is to know who your school
or institution networks
with. The head strength
and conditioning coach
of the Giants loved the
students from Springfield
College (who interned with
him in the past)…If I was at
any other school I probably
would have lost the
position to a student who
goes to Springfield College,
so networking is very
important. Lastly I would
say always keep learning
and keep practicing your
profession. That can lead
to only better things.
friend and allows me to
coach
until
whenever
during the year as long as I
snowblow the driveway and
cut the lawn.
Also,
anniversary
wishes to my sister/brotherin-law Randy (Structures)
and Dale Lavalley (big-wig
at VT Gas) who celebrate
No. 8 on the very same
day…and a belated 1-year
anniversary to my son and
daughter-in-law, Josh and
Karen. Boy did we have
fun at their wedding last
summer. A proud part of
Essex and
Essex Junction.
Family owned and
operated since
1951
Fresh Seafood
Whole Belly Clams
Homemade Chowder
& Much More!
WELCOMING
LUNCH • DINNER
BULK SEAFOOD
FISH • CHICKEN • LOBSTER
Dr. Mary Kathryn DeLoach
Dine In & Take Out
- Providing Adult
General Dentistry at our
Essex Junction office
- Call 878-8348
RAY’S SEAFOOD MARKET
Open 10 a.m. – 8 p.m. Daily
7 Pinecrest Drive Essex Junction, VT
(802) 879-3611| www.raysseafood.com
Stop by
for a
Creemee!
ANY 2 LARGE
TWO TOPPING PIES
AND 12 WINGS
ONLY
$
99
39
Add a 2
e
liter Cok
1
for $
With this coupon. Pick up only.
Not good with other offers.
Good through 7/24/13
ROCKY’S PIZZA
39 Park St • Essex Jct •
878-4441
3b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
1,000th person trained
in Hands-Only
CPR at Essex CHIPS
Tommy Watson, of Williston, trains his 1,000th student Caleb Jenson, of Williston, at Essex
CHIPS on July 10.
Photo contributed
Williston resident and CPR Advocate
for the American Heart Association,
Tommy Watson, trained his 1,000th
person in Hands-Only CPR. Campers at
the Essex CHIPS Lego robotics summer
camp took a break on July 10 to learn this
life-saving skill from a young advocate
who started with the goal of training 100
people before high school graduation. “When I first started my mission of
just training 100 people in Hands Only
CPR I never would’ve seen this day
coming,” said Watson. “Training 1,000
people was my high school goal, since it
has only been 1 year into my high school
career I’m setting a new goal to train a
total of 3,000 people! It will take a lot of
hard work, but it it is definitely within
reach.”
Watson will be available for free
Hands-Only CPR training at the annual
Heart Walk on Sept. 28 at Oakledge
Park in Burlington. Learn more at www.
vermontheartwalk.org.
Days of undetected blue green
algae blooms are numbered
The days of undetected
blue-green algae blooms
along Lake Champlain
are numbered as more
than 200 trained volunteer
monitors will scan the
waterway
throughout
the summer for signs of
the thick, toxic, scummy
blooms.
Working in partnership
with the Lake Champlain
Committee
and
the
Vermont
Department
of
Environmental
Conservation, the Health
Department has developed
a strong reporting system
from spotters on the
shoreline and upgraded
its online blue green algae
map.
“We have come a
long way since the state
first started tracking the
blooms in the mid-1990s,”
said Andrew Chevrefils,
Health
Department
environmental
health
risk coordinator. “We also
regularly update our bluegreen algae photo gallery
throughout the summer.”
The Lake Champlain
Committee conducts all
the monitor training and,
along with the Department
“We have come
a long way since
the state first
started tracking
the blooms in the
mid-1990s.”
Andrew Chevrefils
Health Department
environmental health
risk
coordinator
of
Environmental
Conservation, assists with
surveillance and sample
collections.
Algae sightings along
four inland lakes with
managed beach areas
(Carmine, Elmore, Iroquois
and Memphremagog) will
also be posted weekly, and
public beaches may be
closed if blue green algae
is visible.
Heat and low winds
encourage blue-green algae
growth and the recent wet,
rainy weather has ensured
an abundance of nutrients
in the water. Peak season
for the blooms is August.
Boaters,
swimmers,
water-skiers,
waders,
parents and pet-owners
should avoid contact with
blue-green algae. Children
are at higher risk because
they are more likely
to drink the water. Do
not allow pets in algaecontaminated
water
because they may also
drink the water and
consume algae when they
lick their fur.
Private
camp
and
homeowners should watch
for algae present near their
water intake, and never
use algae contaminated
water to prepare meals or
brush teeth. Boiling water
will not remove toxins. The state’s interactive
lake status map, developed
with funding from the
Centers
for
Disease
Control’s Environmental
Public Health Tracking
Program, is posted on the
Vermont Department of
Health website.
Rotary meeting
Mike Smith, State President Fairpoint Communications, was the guest
speaker at the Essex Rotary meeting held last Wednesday at The Essex.
Photo courtesy of Finest Image Photography
Proud Part of the
Essex/Essex Jct.
Community
for
Essex!
48 years!
celebrating
250 years
Holly K. Lemieux, Esq., PLLC
I am an attorney located in Essex Vermont. I focus my practice on Elder Law, Drafting Estate Plans
including, Wills & Trusts, Special Needs Planning, Incapacity Planning, Probate Administration &
Trust Administration. I offer a free confidential initial consultation.
Planning goals are different for every family and individual person.
These are some of the topics we may discuss:
• Incapacity or inability to make decisions
(temporary or long term)
• Medical/Financial decisions
• Caring for minor children
• Avoiding the Probate Process
• Tax Planning
• Subsequent Marriages and Blended Families
• Non-Traditional Families
• Providing for an individual with disabilities
• Planning for Aging Parents/Loved Ones
• Asset Protection
• Controlling distributions to minor
children and young adults
• Protecting the beneficiaries from creditors’
claims and bankruptcy
• Protecting the beneficiaries’ share from divorce
• Protecting the beneficiaries’ share from
judgment
21 Carmichael Street, Suite 201, Essex Junction, VT 05452
www.plantogetherlaw.com | [email protected]
802-871-5410 office 802-871-5630 fax
• LIGHT TRUCK & AUTO REPAIR
• TRUCKING & EXCAVATING
• FUEL OIL & KEROSENE DELIVERY
• SELF STORAGE
COME SEE US AT:
Family Owned and Operated since 1965
145 JERICHO RD., RT. 15
ESSEX CENTER
4b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Friday at 5 p.m.
for display ads
CONTACT US
for a free quote or to place an ad
PHONE: 802-878-5282
FAX: 802-651-9635
EMAIL: [email protected]
MAIL: The Essex Reporter
462 Hegeman Avenue, Suite 105
Colchester VT 05446
www.essexreporter.com
SERVICES
LAFAYETTE
PAINTING is ready
to provide you with
top quality interior
painting service.
Our multiple,
specialized crews
will have your job
done quickly and
the finished project
is guaranteed to
look great. Call 8635397
HELP WANTED
YRC Freight
is hiring FT
& PT Casual
Combo Drivers/
Dock Workers!
Burlington
location. CDL-A
w/Combo and
Hazmat, 1yr T/T
exp, 21yoa req.
EOE-M/F/D/V.
Able to lift 65 lbs.
req. APPLY: www.
yrcfreight.com/
careers.
FOR RENT
SEASONAL
CAMPSITES AND
Boat Slips @ Keeler
Bay Campground
& Marina in
South Hero,
beautiful lakefront,
bathhouse. $3,000$3,500 camping &
$1,000 boats. www.
keelerbay.com 802395-1113
COLCHESTER
APARTMENT.
2-bed, 1 bath,
garage, basement
with washer/dryer
hookups. Near
bike path and park.
$850 +utilities.
Available August 1.
Contact: 879-3643
or 324-8292
LOST & FOUND
LOST CAT. Longhaired black and
white male, named
Rufus. Lost Friday,
June 28. Iroquois
Ave, Orchard
Terrace, Essex
Junction. Call Fran
Patrick: 878-8653.
GO. LOW PRICES.
LOST IN THE
WATERS of
Mallett’s Bay, two
keys on a white
float. Contact: 6609061
FOR SALE
YARD SALES
ANNUAL
SAYBROOK
NEIGHBORHOOD
YARD SALE in Essex
Junction. July 2021, 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
Don’t miss it!
MOVING SALE. 19
Tanglewood Drive
in Essex. Friday
and Saturday, July
19 and 20 from 9
a.m.-3 p.m. Glassfront hutch, queen
bed, seven-drawer
dresser with mirror,
lazy-boy couch,
office desk, sewing
machine, small
tables, lamps and
chairs, kitchen
supplies and more.
EVERYTHING MUST
TOWN OF ESSEX PLANNING COMMISSION
PUBLIC DISCUSSION/MEETING
JULY 25, 2013 - 6:30 P.M.
INSPIRE M3 HOME
MULTI-GYM with
Leg Press: Includes
abdominal crunch
station, seated leg
curl station, dual
back pad tilt, a
210lb weight stack
and Leg Press.
Photo available.
Asking $3200. Call
802-658-6092
SNOW MACHINE
TRAILER. Hols
Claw 1975. Single
wide with tilt bed.
Recent rims and
tires. Asking $50.
Contact: 802-8797558.
NEW CEILING
FAN. Asking $75.
Contact: 878-0809
MERCHANDISE
APPLIANCES
RELOCATED TO ESSEX
HIGH SCHOOL
AUDITORIUM
2 EDUCATIONAL DRIVE, ESSEX JUNCTION
1. Public discussion regarding Saxon Hill/Resource Preservation
District-Industrial (RPD-I) Zoning District.
2. Minutes (07-11-13)
This meeting will be taped by Channel 17
VERA BRADLEY
BAGS.
Longaberger
Baskets and Boyd
Bears. Excellent
condition. By
Appointment.
Contact: 879-2667.
MICROWAVE,
2006 GOLDSTAR,
goes above the
stove, works great.
Asking $25. 802868-0096
ANTIQUES
EMPIRE STAND,
ANTIQUE, $50.
802-393-5127
END TABLE,
ROUND, antique,
stenciled, four
TOWN OF ESSEX PLANNING COMMISSION
AGENDA-PUBLIC HEARING
AUGUST 8, 2013 - 6:30 P.M.
MUNICIPAL CONFERENCE ROOM, 81 MAIN ST. ESSEX JCT., VT
legged. $75. 802485-8266
BOATS
SUMMER SAIL!
CABIN SAILBOAT
DS 16, on trailer,
1991 Suzuki
8hp motor, fixed
keel, 50 hours.
$1,760. OBO. For
information email:
[email protected]
net.
BOATING
EQUIPMENT/
SUPPLIES
$40. 802-868-0096
NETBOOK 7"
CRAIG, 2011, works
great. Asking $75.
802-868-0096
CHILDREN'S
ITEMS
CRADLES, (2),
HANDMADE,
wooden. For
large doll. Good
condition. $25.
each. 802-868-3691
CRAFTS &
SEWING SUPPLIES
LIFE JACKET,
FOR boy or girl
approximately 1012 years old. Very
good condition.
$15. 802-868-3691
BARKCLOTH,
COUNTRY
DESIGN, great
for drapes or
upholstery. $10. a
yard. 802-485-8266
BUILDING
MATERIALS
QUILTERS GRAIN
BAGS, Vintage
1940's Vermont,
pristine. $20. to $40.
802-485-8266
SINK, BEIGE,
ROUND, for
bathroom. Like
new. $25. Call 802868-3691.
WINDOW,
DOUBLE PANE,
45"w X 55"h, $40.
firm. 802-933-6219
CLOTHING &
ACCESSORIES
MAN'S SHIRT,
WESTERN, and
blouses with pearl
snaps by H bar C,
never worn. $10.
each. 802-485-8266
COMPUTERS/
SUPPLIES
IBM DESKTOP
COMPUTER, works
great, comes with
everything. Asking
ELECTRONICS/
CAMERAS/ETC.
DEADLINES
Friday at 5 p.m. for line ads
to run in the following
Thursday paper
with VCR and
DVD beside it. No
remote control.
$100. or best offer.
802-393-1403
TV, MAGNAVOX,
WITH remote $15.
802-868-3691
TV, SHARP, COLOR,
19" with two wall
TV mounts. $25. for
all. 802-933-4257
ROLLER
SKATES, (2) pair,
professional
Chicago Roller
Skate Co. Like new.
Ladies white size
8, gents black size
10. With carrying
cases. $40. each.
802-527-1421
TONY LITTLE
GAZELLE, Freestyle Elite model.
$100. 802-5249468.
FARM
EQUIPMENT
COLOR TVS, (2),
19" and 20", both
work great. Free.
802-868-0096
FIREARMS,BOWS,
ETC
POLK AUDIO
SPEAKER, great
condition. $150.
802-868-7613
TV, COLOR, 12"
COW NECK
CHAINS, (50), $1.
each. 802-782-5000
357 MAGNUM
RELOADS, 235
rounds, 125 grain
Speer hollow
points. $.50. each.
Call 802-527-0314.
RELOADING
COMPONENTS:
(3) boxes of speer
bullets 100 ea.
22 caliber .224
THEME: NAME THE ACTOR
DOWN
1. “Carmina Burana”
composer, developed
system for teaching music
to kids
2. Lemon quality
3. “Kiss Me, Kiss Me, Kiss
Me” band The ____
4. Come to terms
5. Nursery poems
6. Greenish blue
7. *Sam Seaborn on “The
West Wing”
8. New Mexico’s state
flower
9. Begone!
10. Roger Rabbit, e.g.
11. One third of thrice
12. Light grey
15. Quantum of light
20. #46 Across said,
“_____, Mr. Hand”
22. Ignited
24. Enter uninvited, 2
words
25. *Indiana
26. Reserved
27. Harsh noise
29. Profound
31. “Yes, ___”
32. *He was rebellious
and footloose
33. Found on a map
BED, DOUBLE,
ANTIQUE style
four poster,
box spring and
mattress included.
Hardly used.
Attractive. $100.
802-524-5106
BUREAU,
ANTIQUE, 2 over 2.
$25. 802-393-5127
leave message.
COUCH, STUDIO,
FREE, maroon
upholstery. Fair
condition. You pick
up. 802-868-5606
KITCHEN TABLE,
MAPLE, $10. 802868-5606
SOFA BED, FREE.
Call 802-393-5127
leave message.
SWIVEL
ROCKER, GREEN
upholstered.
Excellent condition.
$30. 802-868-5606
TWIN BED, METAL,
Spend Summer
on the Lake!
The perfect sailboat. Sleeps
up to 4, has sink, stove and
bathroom and separate
V-berth. Comes ready to
cruise with outboard engine,
sails, lifejackets, anchor and
much more. Older boat,
but well maintained. Email
[email protected] for
more info and pictures or call
760-8550.
NOTE:Information and plans regarding these applications are available at the Community
DevelopmentDepartmentintheMunicipalOfficesat81MainStreetinEssexJunctionduring
regularbusinesshours.Anon-lineillustrationoftheproposedprojectmaybeavailableonthe
Townwebsitewww.essex.orgunderMaps/Plans.
44. Ionic and Corinthian
predecessor
46. *He was a dead man
walking
47. Lose coat
48. Phobias
50. A personal view
52. Court divider
53. “Once ___ a time...”
55. Baseball stat
57. Of the essence
61. *A Bond man
65. Flowing tresses
66. Genetic stuff
68. Handy
69. Express a thought
70. H+, e.g.
71. *Ed Sullivan Show
vetriloquist, _____
Wences
72. Post-deductions
amount
73. Armageddon
74. Muse of love poetry
ANTIQUE TABLE,
DUNCAN Phyfe, 2
drop-leafs. $100.
Call 802-393-5127
leave message.
For Sale: 26’ Pearson Sailboat $5,500
1.PublicComments
2.
CONSENT AGENDA:
•Ehlerville,LLC&John&SheilaStawinski,d/b/aInjurytoExcellence-
SITE PLAN AMENDMENT-Proposaltoaddanoutdoorrecreationarea
locatedat74UpperMainStintheMXD-PUD(B1)&B-DCZone.Tax
Map6,Parcel22.
•ArmandLeClerc-SITE PLAN AMENDMENT-Requesttorelocatethe
residentialbuildingenvelopelocatedat43DiscoveryRd(Lot19)inthe
ARZone.TaxMap73,Parcel1-19.
3.
ArmandLeClerc-FINAL PLAN AMENDMENT-PUBLIC HEARING-
Proposalforthedevelopmentofasinglefamilydwellingonthe
remaininglandslocatedat35DiscoveryRdincludinganaccess
waiverfromtheexistingprivatedrivelocatedat33DiscoveryRdinthe
ARZone.TaxMap73,Parcel1.
4.
MansfieldIndustrialAssociates,LLC&BlackrockConstruction,LLC-
CONCEPTUAL PLAN-Proposedmemorycarefacilitylocatedat1Allen
MartinDrintheRPD-IZone.TaxMap71,Parcel2.
5.
Minutes(07-25-13)
6.
OtherBusiness
•PCFileFolders
ACROSS
1. Half of the Odd Couple
6. “___, the Beloved
Country”
9. Greek portico
13. Just outside a fairway
14. Thou, today
15. Sound units
16. Covered with hair
17. 2, on a telephone dial
18. Moonshine
19. *He drove Miss Daisy
21. *Played TV doc before
becoming movie star
23. Water snake
24. Nightcrawler
25. Michigan’s “___ Five”
28. Kind of jerk
30. King Tut’s and
Napoleon’s hangouts, e.g.
34. Paella pot
36. *Without Tijuana
Brass, this Alpert
appeared in “The Ten
Commandments”
38. Civil rights org.
40. Sound of pride
41. Breastplate
43. Smoothie berry
FURNITURE
EXERCISE/
SPORTING
EQUIPMENT
COLOR TV, 13",
RCA, has converter
box built in, with
remote. Works
great. Asking $40.
802-868-0096
HOUSE SPEAKERS
(2), good condition.
$25. 802-868-7613
diameter 52 grain
hollow points.
(1) box of speer
bullets 100 ea.
22 caliber .224
diameter 52 grain
hollow point boat
tail match. (1) box
of speer bullets
100 ea. 38 caliber
125 grain .357
diameter hollow
points. $20. a box.
Call 802-527-0314.
CROSSWORDS 35. “Mi chiamano Mimi,”
e.g.
37. Tough spot
39. *He stole from Louise
and spent seven years in
Tibet
42. Contemptuous look
45. *He had Zellweger at
‘’Hello”
49. Kind of resort
51. Excite
54. “An _____ but a
goodie”
56. Daisylike bloom
57. Hurry up
58. Bright yellow flower,
___seed, known for its oil
59. U in I.C.U.
60. *Rapper 50 ____,
acted with De Niro and
Pacino in “Righteous Kill”
61. Boston or Chicago,
e.g.
62. Columbus’ vessel
63. Loads
64. “I, Claudius” role
67. Negation of a word
good for child or
adult. $25. Call 802393-5127 leave
message.
GARAGE SALES
GARAGE SALE
Sat., 7/20 & Sun.,
7/21
and
Sat., 7/27 & Sun.,
7/28
8:00am-5:00pm
Hunting
equipment, tools,
household items,
etc.
778 Will George
Road
Fletcher
Brian, 802-8492940
HEALTH SUPPLIES
LIFT CHAIRS (2),
1 leather, 1 cloth,
used very little,
good condition.
$400. for both.
Hoveround, $400.
802-524-9404 after
6pm.
HORSES/PONIES
COB SIZE PONY,
free to good home.
21 years. Will do
light riding and
driving. Call Marie
at 802-285-2270.
EASY ENTRY
CART, fits cob
size pony. Good
condition.
Leather cob
size harness.
16" Abetta
Endurance
saddle, excellent
condition. Other
misc. horse items.
Call Marie at 802285-2270.
LAWN/GARDEN
GARDEN
HELPER CART,
metal on four
rubber tires,
drum for hose
and baskets for
all garden tools.
Excellent condition.
$130. 802-4858266
PUSH
LAWNMOWER,
runs excellent. $50.
802-868-4471
OUTDOOR
FURNISHINGS
PATIO CHAIRS
(4), folding, white
metal, with padded
seats and backs.
$30. for set. 802868-5606
MISCELLANEOUS
COOLERS,
RUBBERMAID, (3),
for picnics. Good
condition. $8., $12.
and $20. Call 802868-3691.
©StatePoint Media
Every Friday
5b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Reporter
THE ESSEX
NEWSPAPER
READERS NEEDED
to participate
in a PAID focus
group. We are
holding focus
group interviews
in August to
learn readers'
views about
which qualities
separate the good
newspapers from
the great ones. If
you read a daily or
weekly newspaper
on a regular basis
you are invited
to participate. If
selected, you'll
receive $100 for
sharing your time
and opinions at a
3-hour meeting
in Dedham,
Massachusetts. If
you are interested,
please call 781320-8041 or email
[email protected]
com for more
information.
MUSICAL ITEMS
CD'S, (15),
COUNTRY music.
$1. each. 802-3931403
MOVIES/CDS/
TAPES/ETC.
ELVIS PRESLEY,
RCA Victor LP 33,
Elvis For Everyone,
never used. $50.
802-485-8266
KITTENS, FREE,
(5), 3 black, 1 male
and 2 females, and
2 black with white
paws and bib, 1
female and 1 male.
6 weeks old. Call
Patti Day at 802782-8437.
PETS
BICHON FRISE,
PUREBRED, 6
years, male, sweet,
mellow lap dog.
Neutered, shots
done July 2013.
Loving home only.
$150. 802-8682408
PET DOVE, WHITE,
ring-neck, free, with
cage and food.
802-393-5127
PUPPIES, (2), 7
week old females
CATS, (4), FREE,
young, indoors
only. 1-2 years old.
Two males, two
females, spayed
and neutered.
Shots up to date. To
good homes only!
802-782-6448
ready to meet their
new families. They
have been vet
checked, first shots
and dewormed.
They are 1/2 Min
Pin and
1/2 Chihuahua.
$300. each. Please
feel free to call or
text me at 802-3706011 if interested
or want pics.
POOLS/SPAS
POOL VACUUM
HOSES, 40 ft., 1.5",
brand new. Paid
$72. Asking $50. 50
ft., 1 1/2", $30. 802848-7653
TOOLS
EXTENSION
LADDER, 12 ft. 802524-3686
FLEX-DRIVE
TABLE SAW, 10"
Craftsman, cast
iron bed, works
fine. $75. 802-527-
1213
SET OF
CHAINSAWS,
excellent condition.
$150. 802-5245070
TRAILERS
UTILITY TRAILER,
52 wide, 8'8" long,
has loading ramp,
12" tires. $450. 802524-4383
LOST & FOUND
FOUND:
BLACK
CAT with yellow
markings, July 4th
on Samson Pt.
Road/Shantee Pt.
Friendly. Call 802528-8490 or 802524-5290.
FOUND: CAT,
FEMALE, all white,
wearing hot pink
collar. Found in
vicinity of Upper
Welden Street in St.
Essex Police Report
Emergency 911 • Non-emergency 878-8331
81 Main Street, Essex Jct., VT 05452 • www.epdvt.org
July 8-14, 2013
CATS, FREE, (2),
black and white
males, one is 5
years old, fixed
and has shots, the
other is 1 year
old, not fixed, no
shots. Very lovable.
Moving, can't have.
Highgate. 802-3092936
Monday, July 8
0001 Suspicious Person on
Valleyview Dr
0113 Suspicious Vehicle on
Frederick Rd
0346 Domestic Assault Carmichael
St
0544 Alarm on Carmichael St
0706 Alarm on Thompson Dr
0911 Motor Vehicle Complaint on
Cushing Dr
0925 Barking Dog on Weathersfield
Bow
1004 VIN Verification Mansfield Ave
1152 Accident on Pearl St
1403 Agency Assist Lost Nation Rd
1409 Agency Assist Rosewood Ln
1448 Juvenile Problem on Beech St
1456 Agency Assist on North St
1506 Animal Problem Market Pl
1603 Fraud on Main St
1654 Suspicious Vehicle Curtis Ave
1800 911 Hang-up on Gauthier Dr
2142 Robbery on Colchester Rd
KITTENS, FREE, (4),
cuddly, grey tones,
about 7 weeks old.
802-868-2285
SOLUTION
Tuesday, July 9
0853 Family Fight on South St
0952 Alarm on Colchester Rd
1227 Loose Dog on Hampshire Ct
1249 Illegal Burning on Pearl St
1413 Citizens Assist Indian Brook
1529 Citizens Assist on Osgood
Hill Rd
1628 Citizens Assist Greenbiar Dr
1650 Theft on Upper Main St
1657 Citizens Assist on Gero Ct
1701 Citizens Assist on Foster Rd
1705 Suspicious Circumstance on
West St
1706 Disabled Vehicle Pinecrest Dr
1726 Motor Veh Complaint on
Maple St
1731 Threatening on Sand Hill Rd
1809 Theft on Center Rd
1820 Welfare Check on River Rd
1948 Citizens Assist on Pearl St
2032 Burglary on Fuller Pl
2207 Agency Assist in Colchester
2245 Animal Problem on Greenbriar
Dr
Wednesday, July 10
0026 Juvenile Problem Center Rd
0129 Traffic Stop Sand Hill Rd.
Consent Search. Small amount of
Marijuana & Ecstasy recovered
0417 Suspicious Circumstance on
Susie Wilson Rd
0831 Theft on Main St
0901 VIN Verification on Pearl St
1032 911 Hang Up On Briar Ln
1048 Assisted Rescue on West St
1118 Juvenile Problem Maple St
1249 Welfare Check on Maple St
1329 Theft on Center Rd
1614 Motor Veh Complaint on
Foster Rd
1804 Susp Circumstance Summit St
1903 Family Fight on Jericho Rd
2046 Motor Veh Complaint on
Jericho Rd
2048 Family Fight on West St
2136 Motor Veh Complaint on
Jericho Rd
2301 Noise Complaint Railroad St
Thursday, July 11
0122 Citizens Assist on Park St
0253 Traffic Hazard on Pioneer St
0314 Alarm on Hiawatha Ave
0719 Violation of Conditions of
Release & Stalking order Thomas
Ln
0750 Accident on River St
1019 Barking Dog Weathersfield
Bow
1038 Citizens Assist Sugar Tree Ln
1113 Susp Circumstance Beech St
1129 Violation of Abuse Prevention
Order on Pearl St
1251 Alarm on Alderbrook Rd
1303 Citizens Assist on Thasha Ln
1345 Fraud on Carmichael St
1405 Agency Assist on Main St
1423 VIN Verification on Weed Rd
1548 Fraud on Old Stage Rd
1606 Theft on East St
1645 Motor Veh Complaint on
Center Rd
1707 Citizens Assist on Main St
1730 Accident on Main St
1754 Theft on Thompson Dr
1832 Motor Vehicle Complaint on
Fort Parkway
2013 Alarm on Pearl St
2052 Theft on Pearl St
2108 Animal Problem Jericho Rd
2112 Runaway on Joseph Ln –
Albans. Very
friendly. Has been
brought to the
Franklin County
Humane Society.
LOST: CAT, SMALL,
white with orange
spots, tail has
different color
located
2138 Juvenile Problem Brickyard Rd
2206 Noise Complaint on Saxon
Hill Rd
2249 Alarm on Founders Rd
Friday, July 12
0031 Traffic Offense on Pearl St
0133 Traffic Offense on Maple St
0738 Welfare Check on Browns
River Rd
0803 Disabled Vehicle Center Rd
0831 Accident on River Rd
0929 Traffic Hazard on Fort
Parkway
0944 Susp Vehicle Woods End Dr
1027 Threatening on Kellogg Rd
1028 Trespass notice request on
Central St
1103 Property Damage on Old
Stage Rd
1208 Theft on Essex Way
1354 Trespass request Railroad St
1536 Missing Person on Hawthorn
Circle – located
1548 Attempted Shoplifting on
Essex Way
1625 Accident on West St
1700 Citizens Assist on Laurel Dr
1738 Fraud on Sunset Dr
1917 Missing Person Clover Dr –
located
1936 Citizens Assist on Main St
2027 Citizens Assist on Browns
River Rd
2042 Citizens Assist on Main St
2146 Noise Complaint Laurel Dr
2238 Motor Vehicle Complaint on
Sand Hill Rd
2327 Theft from Motor Veh on
Pearl St
Saturday, July 13
0014 Intoxication on Park St
0035 DUI on Main St
0137 Intoxication Carmichael St
0229 Agency Assist on Fuller Pl
1104 Accident on Kellogg Rd
stripes. Lost in
Swanton area
between
Jewett and Blake
Streets. 802-8687670
1111 Found Property Jericho Rd
1152 Citizens Assist Valley View Dr
1220 Disabled Vehicle Center Rd
1241 Traffic Hazard on I289
1648 Animal Problem on Villa Dr
1740 Traffic Offense on College
Parkway, Colchester
1844 Juvenile Problem Jericho Rd
1920 Theft on Greenfield Rd
2131 Trespassing on Railroad Ave
2137 Fireworks on Center Rd
2249 Assault on Woodside Dr
2315 Theft on Upper Main St
2355 Suspicious Person Railroad
Ave
2359 Alarm on Pearl St
Sunday, July 14
0136 Suspicious Circumstance on
Frederick Rd
0219 Assisted Rescue on Pearl St
0321 Agency Assist in Williston
0820 Found Property on Main St
0921 Suspicious Vehicle Lincoln St
1024 Vandalism on Lost Nation Rd
1029 Loose Dog on Sand Hill Rd
1154 Alarm on Pleasant St
1230 Animal Problem on East St
1322 Motor Veh Complaint on
Main St
1331 Citizens Dispute on Essex Way
1343 Alarm on Educational Dr
1406 Agency Assist on Central St
1424 Alarm on Andrew Ave
1535 Found Property on South St
1553 Accident on Center Rd
1611 911 Hang-up on Maple St
1637 911 Hang-up on Maple St
1649 Fireworks on Maplewood Ln
1942 Agency Assist Greenbriar Dr
1953 Accident on Indian Brook Rd
2026 Intoxication on Kellogg Rd
2038 Citizens Assist Susie Wilson
Rd
Traffic Tickets Issued: 26
Warnings Issued: 60
Fire/EMS Calls Dispatched: 41
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Tues. - Fri 8 to 5:30, Sat 8 to 5
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6b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Current
Exhibits
September
ESSEX ART LEAGUE EXHIBIT. Original
paintings, photography, and mixed media artwork — all for sale. Through Aug. 1.
Old Mill Craft Shop, Jericho. Contact: 8492172.
Spotlight on The Jericho Plein Air Festival
En plein air: in the full, open air
BY SUSAN BONDARYK
The Essex Reporter
Air Festival was so eagerly accepted and why
now, three years later, it has grown to be an
annual success for artists and visitors alike; the
It began with a seed of an idea.
event, like it’s creators, are just plain fun.
About five years ago, Jericho oil painter
“We envisioned a day for artists created
Jane Morgan approached Emile A. Gruppe
completely for them, with no pressure,” Greene
gallery owner, Emilie Alexander with a
expressed.
proposition. Morgan was one of a group
“Many artists work in studios,” said
of local artists that had been looking for a
Morgan. “The festival crosses that bridge for
beautiful place to try painting outdoors — en
those who want to explore. Like much of the
(From L to R): Festival creators and organizers
plein air. Would the gallery be interested in
general public, a lot of artists don’t know what
Emilie Alexander, left, Barbara L. Greene, center,
hosting them?
‘plein air’ is yet.”
and Jane Morgan, right, stand together before
For Alexander, whose father is the famous
For curious visitors, watching a painting
this year's event. Photo by Susan Bondaryk
impressionist painter Emile A. Gruppe, the
progress to its completion is not
decision was easy.
only live entertainment, but a
“I grew up around painters in the
teachable moment.
outdoors,” she said. Quickly, the gallery gained
“It’s an opportunity for the
a reputation as a local hangout for artists.
public to ask questions and to
And because of this, it didn’t take long for
learn,” explained Greene, who is
Underhill artist Barbara L. Greene, who was
excited to be painting alongside
then living in Burlington, to meet Alexander
other plein air artists this year.
and Morgan one afternoon at the gallery.
“Interaction between artists and
The trio became fast friends and embarked
the public is special. We had one
on a mission to create more opportunities for
4-year-old last year watch an
artists in their area. But where to begin?
artist complete a piece. Afterward,
"We tried to figure out something to do for
the child told the artist that she
the artists," explained Greene. An oil painter
‘appreciated her values.’ During
herself, Greene has always enjoyed painting
this event, everybody shares the
outside and more importantly – with other
experience.”
artists. A plein air festival, then, seemed like
Morgan, Greene and Alexander
the perfect and most natural step toward
relish every opportunity to
achieving their goal.
annually improve upon the event
Most plein air festivals, the women
to make it even more enjoyable for
realized, were held in the western and
visitors and artists alike.
Onlookers observe a work in progress from an artist painting
southwestern United States and almost all
This year, The Emile A. Gruppe
en plein air during last year’s festival.
were competitive. They were pricey, often
gallery will host over 80 artists for the Photo courtesy of Michael Marraffino
impersonal and very commercialized. Greene,
festival and the event will occur rain
that day will be for sale and included in a
Morgan and Alexander decided to spin this
or shine.
three-week exhibit at The Emile A. Gruppe
idea on its head and present something
There will be an early breakfast and
Gallery that will run through Aug. 11.
completely fresh.
registration for artists at the gallery followed
For more information, contact Emilie
And three years ago, the Jericho Plein Air
by a full day of outdoor painting at designated
Alexander:
899-3211 or visit www.
Festival was born.
sites around Jericho.
emilegruppegallery.com.
* * * *
The event opens to the public at 9 a.m.
I met with Morgan, Alexander and Greene
Pick up a festival map at the Emile A. Gruppe
a couple of weeks ago and caught the nowGallery at 22 Barber Farm Road in Jericho.
seasoned triumvirate in complete pre-festivalAsk Alexander, who will be “manning the
planning-mode.
ship,” for help if needed. Otherwise, signs will
Jericho Plein Air Festival
As we sat around a table in the Emile A.
mark designated sites.
Gruppe Gallery – the festival's main hub – all
July 20
Make sure to catch Essex Junction resident
three emitted excitement about the upcoming
artists Marilyn James, Hunter Eddy, Sally
Free and open to the public
artist's event on July 20. Sometimes, when
Duval, Mary Krause, Abbie Bowker, Nancy
9 a.m.-4 p.m.
You’re
Invited
one
woman
spoke, another would respectfully
www.edwardjones.com
Teachout and Cilla Kimberly — who will all be
interrupt – bubbling over with another idea
painting during this year’s event.
Headquarters:
for the festival. Frequently, they finished each
Later that day, the public is invited to join
other's
sentences.
And
with
a
mere
glance
at
You’re Invited
www.edwardjones.com
the artists for a reception at the gallery from
Emile A. Gruppe Gallery, 22
each other, all three would suddenly break into
2-4 p.m. Watch as artists return with finished
Barber Farm Road, Jericho
laughter.
pieces to prepare for exhibition.
And I realized exactly why the Jericho Plein
All paintings framed and gallery wrapped
Do You Have Social
Security Questions?
Do You Have Social
Join us for our presentation Social Security:
Security
Questions?
Your Questions Answered.
We’ll discuss:
You’re
Invited
“THE HOWARD CENTER ARTS COLLECTIVE.” Runs through July 31. The Howard
Center MH/SA Art’s Collective is a client
focused art collaboration encouraging the
exploration of the performing and visual
arts. By displaying client and employee art
we hope to share with the local community the unique creativity that exists within
the MH/SA Howard Center community.
Fletcher Free Library, 235 College Street,
Burlington. Contact: 865-7211.
“THE BREEDING BIRD ATLAS: SCIENCE
AND ART.” Through Oct. Fourteen artists
and photographers highlight eight birds
in collaboration with the Vermont Center
for Ecostudies. Free with admission. Birds
of Vermont Museum, 900 Sherman Hollow
Road, Huntington. Contact: 434-2167.
CONTEMPORARY EXHIBITS. Los Angeles based visual artist Sam Falls, and Vermont based Sarah O Donnell. Video and
sculpture from Falls mixes with light and
video installations from O Donnell. Runs
through Sept. 21. The BCA Center, Burlington.
TAKE A SEAT IN THE ISLANDS. Seventeen hardwood benches painted by professional artists are now scattered around
the Champlain Islands. This community
art project will be on display throughout
the Islands through Aug. 15. Contact: 3728400 or (800) 262-5226.
“CITY.” Photographs depicting uptown,
downtown, urban spaces, public places
and the life that inhabits them. Runs July
25-Aug. 18. Darkroom Gallery, 12 Main
Street, Essex Junction.
Upcoming Events
7/19 – FRIDAY EVENING AT THE BRYAN.
Free. Bryan Memorial Gallery, 180 Main
Street, Jeffersonville, 5-7 p.m. Contact: 6445100.
7/20 — CELEBRATE COLCHESTER ARTISANS’ SAMPLER. Colchester Middle
School Gym, Blakely Road, Colchester, 9:30
a.m.-4 p.m.
7/20 — “SPREADING LIGHT” MUSIC FESTIVAL. Battery Park, Burlington, 1:30-5 p.m.
Contact John: 202-531-5605.
7/21 — CONCERT. ROCK GROUP “NO
LEFT TURN” PERFORMS. Westford Common, 7-8 p.m. Contact Andy: 879-3749.
7/21 — CONCERT. The Vermont Jazz Ensemble performs music in big band style.
Tickets: $25 at the door or $20 in advance.
Grand Isle Lake House, Grand Isle, 6:30 p.m.
Contact Flynn for tickets: 863-5966. For
info: 372-8889.
7/21 — CONCERT. “Full Circle.” Fisk Farm,
3849 West Shore Road, Isle La Motte, 2-4
p.m. Contact: 928-3364
www.edwardjones.com
• How does Social Security fit into my retirement
Join us for our presentation Social Security:
income plan?
Your Questions Answered. We’ll discuss:
• When should I start taking benefits?
• How does Social Security fit into my retirement
• What
about
income
plan?taxes?
Do You Have Social
Security Questions?
• When should I start taking benefits?
Join
us for
ourtaxes?
presentation Social Security:
• What
about
Your Questions Answered. We’ll discuss:
•
How does Social Security fit into my retirement
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax
or income
legal advice.
Please consult your attorney or qualified tax advisor
plan?
regarding your situation.
• When should I start taking benefits?
Edward Jones, its employees and financial advisors cannot provide tax
•
about
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or What
legal advice.
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Tuesdays
4:15 -your
4:45
When:
regarding your situation.
Now open!
Vermont Aquatics
We specialize in fish, corals and aquarium supplies
to keep your salt water aquarium looking great
and functioning properly.
34 Park Street, Essex Jct. 802-585-2638
www.vtaqua.com
Tues. - Fri. 5pm-9pm Sat. & Sun. noon-8pm
Where: Edward Jones
4:15 - 4:45
When: Tuesdays
20 SUsie Wilson
Rd
Enjoy Freshly
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Specials
Gyros
Salads
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Calamari Greek Salad $9.99
17 Park St., Five Corners, Essex Jct
Catering Available
878.9333
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Parties Welcome!
Calamari
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Edward
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Where:
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20 Please
SUsieconsult
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Essex Jct VT
Call Melanie at 802-878-8002 by Tuesday
morning to reserve your seat for this
When: Tuesdays 4:15 - 4:45
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Edward
Jones your seat for this
morning
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Where:
event. 20 SUsie Wilson Rd
Essex Jct VT
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Joe Malboeuf,
morning to reserve your
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Essex
Junction, VT
05452
802-878-8002
Financial Advisor
879-8800
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Essex Junction, VT 05452
802-878-8002
Joe Malboeuf, AAMS®
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Williston, VT 05495
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Essex Junction, VT 05452
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7b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
F ood / H ealth
Pump up your knowledge
of strength training
Bean and
Tomato Salad
With Honey
Vinaigrette
Ingredients:
30 ounces beans, white, 2 15-ounce cans, rinsed,
or 1 1/4 cups dried beans
1 tsp salt, divided
1/2 cup red onions, minced
1/4 cup cider vinegar
4 tsp honey
1 tsp oil, peanut or canola oil
1/2 tsp black pepper, ground
8 ounces green beans, trimmed and cut into 2-inch pieces
1 pint cherry tomatoes, halved or quartered
1/2 cup fresh basil, thinly sliced
1 pound tomatoes, sliced
Dr. Lewis First
By DR. LEWIS FIRST
For The Essex Reporter
Parents
have
been
pressing me recently to
comment on whether I
think it is safe for older
children and teenagers to
do strength training. Well,
let me see if I can raise a
few points about this issue.
Strength
training
increases the amount of
muscle mass in the body
by making muscles work
harder than they’re used to.
It can result in increased
endurance and strength for
sports and reduce injury
risk from sports by half.
It has also been shown to
improve cardiac health,
lean body mass, bone
mineral density and reduce
cholesterol levels.
Is strength training
safe?
Generally,
yes.
The American Academy
of
Pediatrics
endorses
strength
training
for
children and teens who are
old enough to participate
in organized sports, as long
as the training is properly
designed and supervised.
What does “properly
designed and supervised”
mean? After a pre-training
physical, a trainer, coach
or
physical
education
instructor can help your
child or teen create a
gradually
progressive,
age-appropriate
routine
that strengthens all major
muscle groups. It is best
for children to use low
amounts of weight and
more frequent repetitions
of lifting exercises, instead
of heavy load lifting and a
short amount of repetitions.
A warm up with stretching
should be performed before
strength training and a
cool down stretching period
should follow.
Your teenager should
never lift weights without
supervision or someone
nearby to serve as a spotter.
That person can prevent
your child or teen from
dropping a barbell on their
chest should they become
unexpectedly exhausted.
It should be noted that
weightlifting, bodybuilding
and powerlifting are not
recommended for children
since these are designed
to push maximal amounts
of weight and can injure
growing bones, muscles
Call for Delivery 802-324-1955
Lewis
First,
M.D.,
is chief of Pediatrics
at
Vermont
Children’s
Hospital at Fletcher Allen
Health Care and chair of the
Department of Pediatrics at
the University of Vermont
College of Medicine.
COME PICK YOUR
OWN RASPBERRIES &
BLUEBERRIES
OUR OWN
SWEET
CORN!
IT’S YOUR TIME FOR A BEAUTIFUL SMILE
Treating Adults of All Ages
Call today for a complementary exam.
Associates
in
Orthodontics
Cota’s Propane
Firewood, Propane for
Wood Pellets BBQ and
Cord or Ton Forklift Tanks
and joints.
Teenagers should also
avoid the use of anabolic
steroids or performanceenhancing drugs that are
supposed to further help
muscles develop. These
drugs can cause mood
changes, severe acne, heart
disease, sterility, and even
cancer — so they should not
be used at all in teenagers
or adults.
Hopefully
tips
like
this will raise the bar, or
is it the barbell, when it
comes to strengthening
your knowledge of what a
healthy strength-training
program is all about.
Preparation:
If using canned beans, skip to Step 3. If using dried beans, rinse
and pick over for any stones, then place in a large bowl, cover with
3 inches of cold water and soak at room temperature for at least 6
hours or overnight.
Drain the soaked beans, rinse and transfer to a large saucepan.
Add 6 cups cold water. Bring to a simmer, partially cover, and
simmer gently, stirring once or twice, until tender but not mushy, 20
minutes to 1 hour, depending on the freshness of the dried beans. (If
you’re using heirloom beans, be sure to check them after 20 minutesthey tend to cook more quickly than conventional beans.) If at any
time the liquid level drops below the beans, add 1 cup water. When
the beans are about three-fourths done, season with 1/2 teaspoon
salt. When the beans are tender, remove from the heat and drain.
Combine the beans (cooked or canned), the remaining 1/2 teaspoon
salt, onion, vinegar, honey, oil and pepper in a large bowl. Stir, cover
and refrigerate to marinate for at least 1 hour or overnight.
Cook green beans in a large pot of boiling water until crisptender, about 5 minutes. Drain, rinse with cold water and drain again. Pat dry and add to
the marinated beans. Stir in cherry (or grape) tomatoes and basil.
Season with pepper.
To serve, arrange tomato slices around the edge of a serving
platter or shallow salad bowl and spoon the bean salad into the
center.
Drs. Angus, Librizzi & Blasius
137 Iroquois Ave.
Essex Jct, VT
879-6464
WWW.VTBRACES.COM
“I hope that while so many people are
out smelling the flowers, someone is
taking the time to plant some.”
- Herbert Rappaport
Plant of the Week
Astilbe
50% off
Watch for a different plant each week!
Come spend a few hours browsing our huge
collection of perennials - we have hundreds
of varieties, from old farmhouse favorites to
unusual specimen plants. They’re hardy,
sustainably grown in Vermont and ready to
move to your home!
Need some fast color while you’re waiting for
your perennials to fill in? Come see our beautiful
annuals.
Gardeners love to share, that’s
why we enjoy sharing the
benefits of our low overhead
with you.
68 Brigham Hill Rd., Essex Jct.
off Old Stage Rd. 879-1919
Tues-Sat 9-5 Sun 10-4 closed Mon
Other times by chance or appointment
1 Kennedy Drive
So. Burlington, VT
862-7569
Now at both
locations!
Go to
paulmazzas.com
to see what else is in
season and what is
coming up!
Visit us on
Facebook
PENNSYLVANIA
PEACHES!
Also in season:
Summer Squash, Zucchini,
Beet Greens and Peas
Paul Mazza's Fruit & Vegetable Stand
182 River Rd., Essex 135 Poor Farm Rd., Colchester
879-3760 7 am - 8:00 pm 879-0102 7 am - 8:00 pm
8b
The Essex Reporter • July 18, 2013
Births
Paige Louise Bero
was born on June 5, 2013 at
Fletcher Allen Health Care to
parents Mindy Higgins Bero
and Peter Bero of Essex.
Brandon Alan Kinney
was born on June 17, 2013 at
Fletcher Allen Health Care to
parents Beth Walbert Kinney
and Alan Kinney III of Essex
Junction.
Grayson
Andrew
Morgan was born on June
29, 2013 at Fletcher Allen
Health Care to parents
Ashley Gingras Morgan
and Paul Morgan of Essex
Junction.
James Ole Hoy was
born on June 5, 2013 at
Fletcher Allen Health Care to
parents Sarah Stone Hoy and
Robert Wallace Hoy of Essex
Junction.
Sadie
Daniela
Plimpton was born on June
30, 2013 at Fletcher Allen
Health Care to parents
Jessica Curtin Plimpton and
Daniel Plimpton of Essex.
Engagements
Judith
Jamieson,
of Essex, and James F
Kissane, of Steamboat,
Colo.,
announce
the
engagement
of
their
daughter Katie Kissane
to Dustin Fisher, son
of Rhonda Sandquist and
Jack Fisher, of Windsor,
Colo. Katie graduated
Essex High School in
2001 and works as a
Nutritionist/Registered
Dietitian.
The couple currently
resides in Windsor, Colo.,
and is planning an October
2014 wedding in Colorado.
Annual Lake Champlain
Dragon Boat Festival and Race
comes to Burlington waterfront
Team registration is
open for the 8th Annual
Lake Champlain Dragon
Boat Festival and Races
Aug. 4 at Burlington’s
Waterfront Park. Festival
organizers
encourage
co-workers, friends and
family to form a team.
Each of the 56 teams is
comprised of 21 paddlers
who race head to head in
41-foot long dragon boats
over a 200-meter course.
No paddling experience
is required and every
team gets a free one-hour
practice session in July.
It’s all for fun, friendly
competition and to raise
money for Dragonheart
Vermont
and
the
Survivorship
NOW,
cancer wellness program.
For
complete
information and online
registration, visit www.
ridethedragon.org. There
are a few slots open
so organize your team
right away. It’s a perfect
team-building event for
businesses and groups who
want to paddle together
for charity and bring home
medals and trophies.
The
festival
has
become one of Vermont’s
most popular summer
events
with
over
20,000
paddlers
and
spectators
annually.
Admission to
the
festival
is
free.
There’s
music,
entertainment, food
vendors,
a
silent
auction, raffles and
more.
The
core
of
Dragonheart
Vermont’s
mission
“Our Dragonheart organization is excited
about putting our efforts toward helping to
promote more opportunities for wellness
for cancer survivors in our community.
As a breast cancer survivor and supporter
organization, we have seen firsthand
how valuable fitness, camaraderie, and
connection can be. Our hope is that all
cancer survivors in our community will
have the chance to get the programs
needed to live each day to the fullest.”
Linda Dyer
Dragonheart Vermont, Executive Director
is to give back to the
community
and
over
the last seven years the
Lake Champlain Dragon
Boat Festival has raised
over $655,000 to support
critical cancer programs in
Vermont
This
year,
festival
proceeds will support
Survivorship NOW, the
Network on Wellness,
helps to bridge the gap
cancer survivors face
between treatment
and
recovery.
Survivorship
NOW promotes
free opportunities
for
therapeutic
programs,
exercise
classes,
education,
and networking to
help cancer survivors
be healthier and
live well after their
cancer diagnosis. These
empowering classes have
the strong endorsement of
cancer survivors, doctors,
and health care institutions
in our area. Visit www.
survivorshipnowvt.org
for
complete
program
information.
Mr. and Mrs. Daryl Santerre, of Essex
Junction, announce the engagement of
their daughter, Sarah Ann Santerre to
Ryan Taylor Lantz, son of Keith Lantz
and Susan Pettyjohn of Harrisonburg, Va.
Sarah graduated from Essex High
School in 2001 and received a Bachelor
of Science degree in Business from
Champlain College in 2005.
She is
employed as a Passport Specialist for the
Department of State.
Ryan graduated from Ft. Defiance
High School in 2000 and received a
Bachelor of Science degree in Public
Administration from James Madison
University in 2004. He is employed by
the Federal Law Enforcement Training
Center of Charleston, S.C.
A June 2014 wedding is planned and
the couple will reside in Charleston, S.C.
Special event
coming up?
Tell Susan
[email protected]
Summer
Clearance Sale!
®
50% off
All clothing, shoes and
accessories
$10 OFF
Oil Change
Most vehicles. One coupon per customer. Not valid
with any other offers, coupons, promotions or warranty
work. Must present coupon. Only good at EssexVianor. Expires 8/31/2013
50% off
All costume jewelry
20% off
All gold & silver jewelry
Saturday, July 20th
Starts at 8 a.m. - ONE DAY ONLY
MULTI FAMILY YARD SALE
Stop by our on your way to the Block Party!
Wise Buys!
ESSEX
4 David Drive
Essex Junction | 802-878-TIRE (8473)
24 Pinecrest Drive Essex Jct., VT • 802-316-4199
Open 9:30 - 6:00 • Tues-Sat • www.wisebuysvt.net
Earn a Master’s Online in
MEDIATION AND APPLIED
CONFLICT STUDIES
news (n) –
information about
recent and
important events
http://wordnetweb.princeton.edu
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