Field Trip Planner - NC Historic Sites

Comments

Transcription

Field Trip Planner - NC Historic Sites
Field Trip Planner
Dear Educators,
Welcome to North Carolina’s State Historic Sites! Comprising a system of historic places of statewide and
often national significance, these 27 sites are located in all areas of the state from the mountains to the sea
and interpret eight centuries of history. The individual sites range from an American Indian mound and
colonial towns to a gold mine and World War II battleship. Each has an important role in our state’s history
and a unique story to share with visitors.
We invite you, in preparing your plans for the school year, to consider visits to one or more of these unique
sites. These visits allow students to both learn about and actually experience history where it happened and
will complement your classroom curriculum. Most sites offer a variety of educational activities including
tours, exhibits, living history demonstrations, and interactive programs. Subject offerings are as rich and
diverse as the state itself and include such topics as American Indian, African American, agricultural,
cultural, transportation, political, and military history.
We appreciate your efforts in educating and molding our children, who will be the history-makers of
tomorrow, and hope that this brochure may be helpful.
We look forward to hearing from you and seeing you at North Carolina’s Historic Sites!
Sincerely,
Keith A. Hardison
Director
North Carolina Division of State Historic Sites and Properties
2
Scheduling Your Visit
Please contact the historic site you wish to visit by telephone, fax, email, or a written letter. It is
recommended you contact the site at least one month prior to a planned field trip. Consider a visit outside
the busy months of April and May. Please be prepared with the following information when you contact the
respective site:
1. School name
2. Contact person (person to call if there is a change in scheduling)
3. Phone number of school
4. Address of school
5. Date of field trip and arrival time (please have an alternate date and time)
6. Number of students and chaperons
You will receive a confirmation letter and other necessary information once the trip is scheduled. Please
bring this with you on the field trip.
If the trip needs to be rescheduled, please contact the site as soon as possible.
Preparing for Your Visit
Many of the tours, activities, and demonstrations occur outside at historic sites. Please remind students to
dress according to the weather. Unfavorable weather may force cancellation of some activities. Should this
occur, the site may offer alternative activities. Please contact the site for its inclement weather plan.
Groups should be prepared for walking and standing during the visit. We recommend that students and
teachers wear comfortable walking shoes and avoid open-toed footwear.
Picnic areas are available at most sites. They can be used on a first-come, first-served basis.
Rules for a Safe and Enjoyable Visit
For the comfort and safety of all our visitors, and for the protection of our artifacts, we ask that these
guidelines be followed:
1. Groups must stay together unless instructed to do otherwise.
2. Visitors should not touch artifacts.
3. Student behavior is the responsibility of the teachers and chaperons.
4. No gum, candy, food, or open drink containers are allowed inside visitor centers or historic
structures.
5. We request two chaperons for each class of students.
6. Headphones, radios, and compact disc players, and mp3 players distract from our educational
programs and should not be used at historic sites.
Individual historic sites may have site-specific rules. Be sure to ask when scheduling your visit.
3
Hours of Operation
Because hours may change throughout the year and vary from site to site, please call individual sites for
their specific hours and days of operation.
What to Do Before the Visit
Please review these rules and any others provided by specific sites before arrival. It is also helpful to
educate students on the history of the site in advance and what they should expect upon arrival. If the site
has provided any worksheets, videos, or brochures, these will be helpful. Every site also has a website with
additional information. Careful preparation will make your visit more enjoyable and educational for all.
Encourage the children to ask any questions that may have occurred to them prior to the visit or along the
way.
4
North Carolina Historic Sites – West
Thomas Wolfe Memorial
52 N. Market Street
Asheville, NC 28801
(828) 253-8304
Fax number: (828) 252-8171
Website: www.wolfememorial.com
www.nchistoricsites.org/wolfe/
Email address: [email protected]
Many literary greats left their mark on history.
One of those was Thomas Wolfe, whose work
Look Homeward, Angel (1929), quickly
became an American literary classic. Thomas
Wolfe was born in Asheville on October 3,
1900, into a middle-class family. Growing up
in his mother’s boardinghouse influenced Tom’s writing for the rest of his life. Today’s students can step
into Thomas Wolfe’s shoes and write a work while visiting the writer’s boyhood home. On scavenger hunts
through the visitor center exhibits, students learn about the life of this North Carolina novelist. Through fun
and games at the “Old Kentucky Home”, boys and girls experience how children lived in turn-of-thecentury America. A walking tour of Pack Square allows students to see Asheville through Thomas Wolfe’s
eyes. Visitor center exhibits trace the life of one of America’s most powerful 20th century writers.
Facilities
Gift Shop
Rest rooms
Exhibits
Audiovisual program
Nearby restaurants
On-site bus parking
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Handicapped-accessible historic area and
buildings
5
Activities and Tours
Guided costumed tours of historic features,
including the visitor center and Old Kentucky
Home
Activities:
• Thomas Wolfe’s Asheville (walking tour of
Pack Square): grades 4-12
• Scavenger Hunt of exhibits: all grades
• Tools and gadgets at the Old Kentucky
Home: all grades
• Chores at the Old Kentucky Home: all
grades
• Staff-led creative writing: grades 4-12
There is no charge for activities.
A complete tour of the site takes 1½ hours.
Please call the site for availability of the tours and activities above.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
A teachers’ booklet, containing pre- and post-visit classroom activities, is available for
elementary teachers upon request.
Directions to Site
From Interstate 40, take Interstate 240 to Asheville.
From Interstate 240 east, take the Merrimon Avenue
exit (5A). Turn left onto Broadway. At first light turn
left onto Woodfin St. Proceed one block to N. Market
St. Turn Right onto N. Market St, Visitor Center is ½
block on left.
From Interstate 240 west, take the Merrimon Ave. Exit
(5A). Turn left onto Merrimon Avenue. At the light,
turn left onto Woodfin Street. Go one block, and turn
right onto the Market Street. Go 1/2 block; the visitor
center is on the left.
6
Zebulon B. Vance Birthplace
911 Reems Creek Road
Weaverville, NC 28787
(828) 645-6706
Fax number: (828) 645-0936
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/vance/
Email address: [email protected]
facebook: http://www.facebook.com/zebulon.vance and
http://www.facebook.com/pages/Zebulon-Baird-Vance-State-Historic-Site-WeavervilleNC/116179021726568?ref=hl
Teacher Tube:
http://www.teachertube.com/viewProfile.php?user=Tammywalsh&ref=Tammywalsh
On May 13, 1830, Zebulon Baird Vance was born on the family homestead in the Reems Creek
valley of the Blue Ridge Mountains. Zeb was among the third generation of the Vance family to
live on the farm his grandfather, David Vance, acquired in 1795. The family, which included
veterans of the American Revolution and the War of 1812, state representatives, United States
congressmen, physicians, lawyers, merchants, and farmers, raised Zeb to be a resolute, highly
principled leader with a quick wit and sharp tongue. Vance’s rural mountain heritage instilled in
him a belief in self-government, individual liberty, and public service.
Vance served in public office for more than thirty years, holding the positions of state
representative, United States congressman, three-term governor, and United States senator. As
governor during the turbulent Civil War years, Vance was the only governor in any state to
uphold the writ of habeas corpus. He also motivated North Carolina to commit the greatest
contribution of men and spirit to the Southern cause, earning him the title “War Governor of the
7
South.” Students visiting Governor Vance’s home place can experience many of the daily
activities that went on at the family farm, from weaving cloth to cooking over an open fire.
Facilities
Gift shop
Exhibits
On-site bus parking
Rest rooms
Covered picnic area
Audiovisual program
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Limited handicapped-accessibility in historic area and buildings
Civil War Trails Marker
Limited nearby restaurants & lodging
6 miles from the Blue Ridge Parkway
Vance Cemetery located just across the street from the site
Activities and Tours
Guided tour of historic Vance homestead includes 6
outbuildings: corn crib, smokehouse, spring house,
loom house, slave cabin, tool shed
Programs:
• Behind the Big House: grades 4-12
• History Mystery K-12
Activities:
• Weaving demonstration: grades K-12
• Tool demonstration: grades K-12
• Rifle/weapon demonstration: grades K-12 (After
November 1, 2012)
• Spinning demonstration: grades K-12
Tape Loom demonstration: grades K-12
There is no charge for tours, programs or demonstrations.
Historic Crafts: (minimal fee charged per student please call site for details)
• Hand Dipped Candles
• Quill pens and homemade ink
• Mountain Yoyo’s
• Spinning Buttons
A complete tour without activities takes 1 ½ hours. A complete tour with activities takes 3
hours.
8
Traveling Trunks:
• Colonial Clothing Trunk
• Farming Trunk
• History Detective/Mystery Trunk
• Textile Trunk
• Historic Toy Trunk
• Confederate soldiers Trunk – 26th NC/Zebulon Baird Vance
• Union Soldier Trunk – 24th MI
• Rail Road Trunk: All Aboard the Westbound Train
Trunks can be used for one week free of charge and are based on availability. They are on a first come first
serve basis. Reservations are suggested. Pick up on Saturday after 1pm and a drop off the following
Saturday before 12 noon. This allows teachers 1 and ½ days to review contents and work them into their
lesson plans.
A Civil War era lesson plan can be found at http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
The site offers various demonstrations either in classrooms or as part of a heritage day program. We offer
outreach programs to schools biased on travel restrictions. Please call for information and availability.
Directions to Site
From Asheville take US 19/23 north (New I-26 West) to exit
21(New Stock Road). Follow the brown directional signs to
the site
on Reems Creek Road. From the Blue Ridge Parkway take
the exit between mileposts 375 and 376. Follow the brown
directional signs to the site.
From Tennessee Line take US 19/23 south (New I-26 East)
to exit 21 (New Stock Road). Follow the brown directional
signs to the site on Reems Creek Road.
From the Parkway – Turn left 0.3mi onto Elk Mountain
Scenic Highway. Go 4.1 mi and turn right onto Ox Creek Rd.
Go .6mi and turn right onto Reems Creek Road. Go .2 mi
and the site will be on your right hand side.
9
Horne Creek Farm
308 Horne Creek Farm Road
Pinnacle, NC 27043
(336) 325-2298
Fax number: (336) 325-3150
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/horne/
Email address: [email protected]
The land now comprising Horne Creek Living Historical Farm
was
farmed by the Hauser family for nearly 200 years. By 1900,
through good farm management and sheer hard work, the Hauser’s
farm was increased in size to 450 acres. Thomas Hauser, his wife
Charlotte, their family of eleven boys and one girl, and several
hired hands raised crops which had been grown in the region for
decades—fruit, corn, wheat, oats, rye, hay, and vegetables. In
addition, they began growing tobacco, a new cash crop that was
rapidly becoming more and more important to the state’s economy. Today Horne Creek Farm offers
students a glimpse into agricultural life about 1900. Students can cut grass using a scythe or listen as an
elderly member of the community recounts the lives of farmers in earlier times. Boys and girls can shuck
corn, make a scarecrow, preserve fruits and vegetables, or tackle children’s chores of that era.
Facilities
Permanent Visitor Center and Restrooms (handicapped-accessible)
On-site bus parking
Picnic area (not covered)
Vending
Nearby restaurants
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area and buildings
Activities and Tours
Age-appropriate guided tours of historic features, including the farmstead.
Hands-on activities include:
• Barnyard animals: grades K-3
• Cider making: grades 4-7
• Natural dyeing: grades K-3
• Farm chores: grades 4-7
• Scavenger hunts: grades K-3
• Scarecrow making contest: grades 4-7
• Straw ticks, mattress making: grades 8-12
• Orchards: grades 8-12
• Drying vegetables: grades 8-12
Activities will vary according to the season.
10
A complete tour of the site (without activities) takes approximately
1 hour. The tour can be abbreviated upon request.
A hands-on program, which includes a tour of the site and 3 hands-on activities, takes 2 hours.
The fee for site tours for school groups is $2.50 per child.
The fee for a hands-on program is $5.00 per child to cover activity materials.
Directions to Site
From Interstate 74/US 52, take the Pinnacle exit (#129).
Follow the signs southwest on Perch Road approximately 4
miles to Hauser Road. Turn right on Hauser Road, and go
approximately 1 ½ miles. Turn left at the next brown-andwhite state historic site sign and go approximately ¼ mile.
Horne Creek Living Historical Farm is on the left.
11
Fort Dobbs State
Historic Site
438 Fort Dobbs Road
Statesville, NC 28625
(704) 873-5882
Fax number: (704)873-5995
Website: www.fortdobbs.org
Website:
www.nchistoricsites.org/dobbs/
Email address: [email protected]
Field trip cost: $2.00 per student (ages
5-18)
The French and Indian War was fought
over nine years and five continents. North Carolina was among the first colonies to contribute troops to the
British cause when the war began in 1754. In 1756, North Carolina Provincial soldiers built Fort Dobbs in
what was then the westernmost part of the colony, and named it after Royal Governor Arthur Dobbs.
Soldiers garrisoned the post until 1758 when they marched to Pennsylvania to take part in a major AngloAmerican offensive to capture the French post at the forks of the Ohio River. After the successful capture
of Fort Duquesne, relations with the local Cherokee deteriorated into all out war. During the Cherokee War
in February of 1760, the fort was attacked by over 60 Cherokees. By 1763 the war was over and Britain
controlled almost all of North America east of the Mississippi River. Today students can learn about the life
of soldiers at a military post in western North Carolina, by seeing muskets fired and learning about the
soldier’s training, food, clothing and equipment.
Facilities
Gift shop
Exhibits
Trails
Restrooms
Covered picnic area
Playground
Visitor center
Handicapped-accessible
Nearby restaurants
Bus parking
Activities and Tours: Please choose one tour theme per field trip.
• Gone for a Soldier: Program looks at the lives of the provincial garrison of the
fort. Activities include a musket demonstration, 1750’s military drill (3rd grade through
high school), and a talk about the soldier’s equipment and diet.
• Entering Upon New Lands: Program looks at the lives of settlers on the NC
frontier. Students learn about period construction techniques (including the chance to
apply mud daubing to a log cabin, weather permitting), clothing, and food ways.
• Archaeologist for a Day: Archaeology is vital to our understanding of Fort Dobbs.
Following a guided tour of the archaeological site, students may engage in a simulated
dig, learning the scientific process of archaeology, while uncovering “artifacts” related to
the habitation of the fort.
12
Classroom Visits
Off-site programming involves a uniformed historical interpreter representing a soldier of the North
Carolina Provincial Troops visiting a classroom, school or group. The interpreter will discuss the origins of
the French and Indian war, North Carolina’s role in the beginning subsequent involvement in the North
American theatre of the war, with an emphasis on the role of Fort Dobbs and the company of men stationed
here.
Emphasis in off-site programming will focus on the material culture of the soldiers at Fort Dobbs, their
uniforms, equipment, weapons and the ability of North Carolina to provide for her soldiers. If the school
or site has the space and desires to, programming involving students learning the rudiments of 18th century
linear warfare may be done. In addition demonstrations of the operation and firing (blank) of a mid-18th
century military musket may be done if the site allows.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Twice yearly Fort Dobbs presents special school day programs, with a variety of historical programming.
Contact site for dates. Reservations are required on first come, first serve basis.
A teacher packet is available with worksheets and background information. The packet includes the North
Carolina standard course of study requirements for 4th and 8th grade NC history. The programming is for
all ages and can meet additional standards.
Directions to Site
From Interstate 40 at Statesville, take US 115 north (exit
150). Turn right on Chipley Ford Rd. (SR 1907) and then
right on Fort Dobbs Rd. Site will be on the left.
From Interstate 77 at Statesville, take US 21 south (exit
54). Turn right on Fort Dobbs Rd. Site will be on the
right.
13
North Carolina Transportation
Museum
411 S. Salisbury Ave.
Spencer, NC 28159
(704) 636-2889 ext. 258
Fax number: (704) 639-1881
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/spencer/
Website: www.nctrans.org
Email address: [email protected]
Smoke and cinders from steam locomotives still hangs in the air around Spencer, NC, though not as thickly
as it did 60 years ago. From 1896 until the late 1950s, hundreds of locomotives crossed the tracks of the
Spencer Shops each day. The shops were the halfway point for trains heading between Washington, DC and
Atlanta on the Southern Railway. Here steam, and later diesel, locomotives were serviced and repaired to
keep Southern’s passenger and freight lines running. By 1953 Southern Railway had retired its last steam
engine; the shops became obsolete, gradually closing down over the next twenty years.
Today the former shop facilities comprise the North Carolina Transportation Museum. The steam and diesel
locomotives that once crisscrossed the South now travel a one-and-one-half-mile track around the museum.
Here students can explore the role transportation has played in North Carolina's history and gain insights
into the science of steam, diesel, and electric power on railroads. The Bumper to Bumper gallery highlights
the history of the automobile in American life over the past century. The Elmer Lam gallery inside the
Roundhouse now houses a replica of the Wright Brothers Flyer and the Piedmont airlines exhibit.
Facilities
Audiovisual program
Gift shop
On-site bus parking
Vending
Exhibits
Restrooms
Covered picnic area
Nearby restaurants
Handicapped-accessible
Activities and Tours
Two types of tours are offered:
• Guided tour (staff member guides students through site)
• Self Guided Tour (Group leader leads students)
Groups must register two weeks in advance to participate in museum learning activities and classroom
programs.
14
Traveling Trunk:
Ages K – 8th grade. Can be taught on site or can be checked out by an educator for 2 weeks. The traveling
trunk covers the changes technology made to railroading from Steam, Electric, and Diesel-Electric
Locomotives.
Guided Site Tour: K, 2nd, 4th, 8th
Covers the development of transportation in the state of North Carolina. Students will learn about dugout
canoes, The great Philadelphia Wagon Road, Wright Brothers, the evolution of automobiles, and railroads in
NC.
Please visit our website for more details www.nctrans.org
Group Rates: (Must have 15 or more people to qualify for the group rate.)
Admission to the Museum:
Child/ Chaperone $2.50
Adults
$5.00
Senior Military
$4.50
Train Ride: (Must purchase admission)
Child/ Chaperone $2.50
Adults
$5.00
Senior Military
$4.50
Turntable Ride: $1.00
A complete tour of the site takes approximately 3 hours.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
December: Jingle Bell Express Train
February: African-Americans in Transportation
March: Women in Transportation
Please call site or e-mail for more information.
15
Directions to Site
From Interstate 85, take exit 79. Turn west toward Spencer,
following the brown museum signs to Salisbury Avenue. Make a
left; the entrance is approximately ½ mile on the left. Travel time
from Charlotte, Greensboro, Winston-Salem, and Statesville is
less than one hour.
From Salisbury: Head North on Main Street. Go through
downtown Spencer.
The museum will be on the right. Pass SunTrust Bank and The
Pantry on the left and the museum entrance will be on the right.
(approximate drive time: 5 minutes)
From Statesville: Take I-40 to I-77 South. Take exit 49-A
which is highway 70. Drive on Highway 70 for 21.5 miles to the
Salisbury Mall. Go straight past the mall and the Rowan
Regional Medical Center. Turn right onto Clubhouse Drive (at
the city park). Follow Clubhouse Drive, veering left until you reach the light at Main St. turn left. Go 2
miles, passing through downtown Spencer. Pass SunTrust Bank and The Pantry on the left. Then museum
entrance will be on the right. (approximate drive time: 45 minutes)
From Winston Salem: 52 South merges with I-85. Take exit 79 and turn right. Turn left at the second stop
light. The museum will be on your left.(approximate drive time: 45 minutes)
From Greensboro: I-85 South to exit 79. Turn right at the exit. Turn left at the second stop light. The
museum will be on your left. (approximate drive time: 45 minutes)
From Charlotte: I-85 North to exit 79. Turn left at the end of the exit ramp. Turn left at the second stop
light. The museum will be on your left. (approximate drive time from North Charlotte: 45 minutes)
From Albemarle: Take 52 North to I-85 North to exit 79. Turn left at the end of the exit ramp. Turn left at
the second stop light. The museum will be on your left. (approximate drive time: 45 minutes)
16
Reed Gold Mine
9621 Reed Mine Rd.
Midland, NC 28107
(704) 721-4653
Fax number: (704) 721-4657
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/reed/
Wmail address: [email protected]
Young Conrad Reed was unaware that the
yellow rock he found in Little Meadow
Creek in 1799 would launch the nation’s
first gold rush. In fact, the rock served as
the family’s doorstop until his father, John
Reed, took it to a Fayetteville jeweler in
1802. The jeweler purchased the rock from
John Reed for $3.50, when in reality it was
worth $3,600. Learning from his mistake,
John Reed began mining for gold on his
Cabarrus County farm. Eventually gold fever spread to other counties and states.
During its peak years, gold mining became second only to farming in the state’s economy. North Carolina
actually led the nation in gold production until California’s gold rush in 1848. On a visit to Reed Gold
Mine, travel back into time and become a gold miner panning for gold. Go on a scavenger hunt and search
for clues to gold history in North Carolina. Take a guided underground tour and see firsthand the working
conditions of the miners. Exhibits and a film also detail the history of Reed Gold Mine and the mining
industry in North Carolina.
Facilities
Gift shop
Picnic areas (not covered)
Limited restaurants nearby
Audiovisual program
Trail
Vending
Rest rooms
On-site bus parking
Exhibits
Handicapped-accessible visitor center, historic area and buildings
Activities and Tours
Guided tours of historic features, including the underground and stamp mill, for all ages
Reservations required for groups of 10 or more.
Activities:
• ¾-mile Talking Rocks Trail
17
•
•
Scavenger hunt: grade 4
Gold panning (in season): grades 3-12
Group rate: $1.50/pan
Individual rate: $2.00/pan
Panning season is April 1 - October 31 (weather permitting).
A complete tour of the site takes 3 ½ hours.
All activities, except panning, are free.
Annual Programs and Additional
Teaching Materials
•
•
Carolina Heritage Festival—two days in
April (please call site for more
information)
Teachers’ packet available on-line with
curriculum in Math, Science, Social
Studies and Language Arts.
Directions to Site
From Charlotte, take US 74 (Independence Blvd.) east to
NC 24/27 (Albemarle Road). Follow NC
24/27 to Reed Mine Road. Turn left on Reed Mine Road,
go approximately 3 miles, and the site will
be on the right.
From North Charlotte/Harrisburg, take I-485 south
toward Matthews, take the Albemarle (NC 24/27) exit, turn
left onto NC 24/27 east to Reed Mine Road. Turn left go
approximately 3 miles and the site will be on the right.
From South Charlotte/Matthews, take I-485 north
toward Harrisburg, take the Albemarle (NC 24/27) exit,
turn left onto NC 24/27 east to Reed Mine Road. Turn left
go approximately 3 miles and the site will be on the right.
From I-85 in Concord, take US 601 south to NC 200. Turn left on NC 200 to Reed Mine Road at
Georgeville. Turn right (south), go approximately 2 miles, and the site will be on the left.
From Monroe, take US 601 north. Follow US 601 to NC 24/27 east. Take NC 24/27 to Reed Mine Road,
turn left. Site will be 3 miles ahead on right.
From Albemarle, take NC 24/27 west through Locust. Turn right on Reed Mine Road and follow signs to
the site 3 ahead on the right.
18
enburg County)
President James K. Polk
Historic Site
12031 Lancaster Highway
Box 475
Pineville, NC 28134
(704) 889-7145
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/polk/
Email address: [email protected]
The nation’s 11th president, James Knox Polk,
was born here in Mecklenburg County in 1795.
Nicknamed “Young Hickory” after his mentor
Andrew Jackson, Polk became the first dark
horse candidate to win the Democratic Party’s
nomination for president. The annexation of Texas and the Oregon boundary dispute became the chief
issues of his 1844 campaign against Whig Party opponent Henry Clay. Polk ran the presidency like a
business, with dedication and an amazing sincerity. He also resolved not to run for a second term. He died in
1849, three months after retiring from the White House.
On a visit to the President James K. Polk State Historic Site, students can learn about the life of young
James Polk, play with period toys and games, and hear the story of the early settlement of Mecklenburg
County. A scavenger hunt of facts about Polk’s life helps students learn of the events that shaped the
character of our 11th president. Exhibits and a film trace the life of this native son.
Facilities
Gift shop
Exhibits
Rest rooms
Audiovisual program
Picnic area (not covered)
Numerous nearby restaurants
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area and
buildings
On-site bus
parking
Activities and Tour
Guided tour of historic features, including reconstructed cabins depicting
James early life
Activities:
• Early toys and games demonstrations: grades K-8
• Museum Scavenger hunt: grade 3-4
• Film on career of James K. Polk: emphasis on
presidential years: grade 8
• Musket demonstration: grades K-8
• School House demonstration K-8
• Cooking demonstrations: grades 3-8
19
Additional activities are included if requested.
Some activities require separate charges, please call to inquire.
A complete tour of the site takes 2 hours.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
A teacher’s packet is available for elementary students.
Directions to Site
From Interstate 77 south of Charlotte, take Interstate 485 east (exit 65 B). Take exit 65B and continue south
through the town of Pineville for about 2½ miles. The President James K. Polk State Historic Site is on the
left.
20
North Carolina Historic Sites – Piedmont
Town Creek Indian
Mound
509 Town Creek Indian Mound Road
Mt. Gilead, NC 27306
(910) 439-6802
Fax number (910) 439-6441
Website:
www.towncreekindianmound.com
Email: [email protected]
Town Creek Indian Mound is one of
only a handful of reconstructed
American Indian historic sites in the
nation. Located on 50 acres at the
junction of Town Creek and Little
River, Town Creek Indian Mound is
dedicated to understanding, teaching, and preserving the rich history of the Pee Dee people who once lived
in villages and farmed across the floodplains of North Carolina’s Pee Dee River system. Since 1937,
archaeologists have studied Town Creek in detail. Today we share the results of their research in hands-on
educational programs taught to age groups ranging from elementary school students to senior citizens.
Visitors can take self-guided tours and students can learn about aspects of American Indian life and how the
science of archaeology reveals it.
Facilities
Audiovisual program
Restrooms
Nature trial
Picnic area
Gift shop
Bus parking
Vending
Handicapped-accessible visitor center and historic
site
21
Activities and Tours
School group tours of the visitor center and
village site take 1½ to 2 hours. Reservations are
required.
Learning Center programs feature hands-on
activities and demonstrations that can be adapted
to age and grade levels; these activities are feebased and must be pre-arranged.
Program options include:
• Pottery making
• Open hearth cooking
• Chunky (Native American game)
• Dugout canoe construction
• Hunting demonstration
• Rope making (cordage)
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Videos: The Mystery of Town Creek
Man of Lightening
Voices in the Wind
Backwoods Survival Skills
Books: Town Creek Indian Mound, A Native American Legacy by Dr. Joffre L Coe
Time Before History, The Archaeology of North Carolina by H. T. Ward &
R. P. S. Davis Jr.
The Archaeology of Town Creek by Edmond A. Boudreaux
Intrigue of the Past, North Carolina’s First Peoples edited by M. Price, P.
Samford, V Steponaitis
Education programs for youth and adults: please contact site for information.
Heritage Festival - an annual event with a Pow Wow atmosphere including dance, drum, song, and vendors
offering American Indian craft items. This event usually takes place on the third weekend of September.
Contact site for dates/details.
Directions to Site
The site is located in Montgomery County, 5½
miles southeast of Mt. Gilead on Town Creek
Mound Road. Signs point the way south from NC
731 and north from NC 73. The site is about 1½
hours from Greensboro and Charlotte and 2 hours
from Raleigh and Durham.
22
House in the Horseshoe
288 Alston House Rd.
Sanford, NC 27330
(910) 947-2051
Fax number: (910) 947-2051
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/horsesho/
Email address: [email protected]
On a rise above a horseshoe-shaped bend of
the Deep River sits the 1772 home of Philip
Alston, known as the House in the Horseshoe.
A colonel in the Patriot forces during the
American Revolution, Alston's men were
camped around the house when it was attacked
by a band of Loyalists led by Colonel David
Fanning. The walls of the house still bear the
scars and bullet holes from that skirmish in the
summer of 1781. Later purchased by Gov. Benjamin Williams, the house was then named “Retreat.”
Williams made it the center of a profitable cotton plantation, enlarging it with two wings. By 1803, fifty
slaves were working his plantation and it was valued at $30,000. The house was later used as a headquarters
for mineral exploration along the southern end of the Deep River Coal Field. On a visit to House in the
Horseshoe, students can learn about how early piedmont settlers lived. Hands-on activities include making
clay marbles and learning about children’s games during the Colonial period. A costumed interpreter
provides demonstrations of the weapons and equipment used by Revolutionary War soldiers.
Facilities
Handicapped accessible
Gift shop
Limited nearby restaurants
Rest rooms
Picnic area (not covered)
Bus parking
Exhibits
23
Activities and Tours
Guided tour of the Alston House and surrounding
buildings
There is a $2.00 per student charge for hands-on
activities.
Activities:
• Making clay marbles: grades 2-8
• Colonial games (no charge): grades 2-8
A complete tour of the site takes approximately 2
hours.
Annual Programs and Additional
Teaching Materials
A teachers’ packet with instructional materials for
grades 4 and 8 is available upon request.
Certified Environmental Educator on staff.
Annual battle reenactment (early August): please call site for more information.
Christmas Open House (December): call for more information.
Directions to Site
From US 1 in Sanford, take NC 42 west for 10 miles to Carbonton. Turn left on State Road 2307. Go 4 ½
miles and turn right onto Alston House Road. The site is at the end of the road.
From US 421, take the Goldston exit at the brown House in the Horseshoe sign. Go west on the GoldstonPittsboro Road to Main Street. Take a left on Main Street, then a right on Colonial Street. Go three-tenths of
a mile and turn left on the Goldston-Carbonton Road for 5 miles. Go straight at the stop sign (across NC 42)
for 4 ½ miles. Turn right on Alston House Road, which ends at the site.
From NC 24/27 in Carthage, turn north onto State Road 1006. Follow this road for 10 miles to Alston
House Road. Turn left, and the site is at the end of the road.
24
Alamance Battleground
5803 South N.C. 62
Burlington, NC 27215
(336) 227-4785
Fax number: (336) 227-4787
Website:
www.nchistoricsites.org/alamance/
Email address: [email protected]
Before the American Revolution,
many North Carolinians became
dissatisfied with provincial and local
government officials abusing their
power. High taxes, illegal fees, and
dishonest leaders plagued the everyday life of colonists in the western counties. The Regulators formed in
1768 to oppose such injustices and tried through peaceful attempts to gain reforms. Such attempts soon gave
way to armed resistance, exploding into the so-called War of the Regulation. The “war” ended with the
Battle of Alamance in May 1771 when Governor Tryon’s militia defeated the Regulators.
At Alamance Battleground students can experience the 18th century and learn about American colonists’
early attempts to free themselves from British oppression. They can connect with the daily lives of
backcountry farmers by watching costumed interpreters load and fire a flintlock weapon, prepare food on
the open hearth, and show how these settlers dressed. Through tours of the visitor center, Allen House, and
battlefield, students will experience inspiring stories of early Americans who united against injustice and
corruption.
Facilities
Vending
On-site bus parking
Audiovisual program
Gift shop
Rest rooms
Picnic area (no shelter)
Exhibits
Limited nearby restaurants
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area and
buildings
25
Activities and Tours
Walking tour of battlefield and the
Allen House
Demonstrations include:
• flintlock weapons
• toys and games
• food preparation and preservation
• historical clothing
• candle making
• woodworking
Activities can be adapted to accommodate
students of all ages.
Donations for activities accepted.
A complete tour of the site will take 1 ½ to 2
hours.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
2nd week in October: “Colonial Living Week.” Teachers call to make reservations
Free teacher packet available at site with materials for grades 1-8
Alamance - a video that tells the history behind the Battle of Alamance: $25.00
Directions to Site
From Interstate 40/85 in Burlington, take NC 62 south
(exit 143). Follow the directional signs on NC 62 for
approximately 6 miles. The site entrance is located on the
right.
26
Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum
6136 Burlington Rd. (Hwy 70)
Sedalia, NC 27342
(336) 449-4846
Fax number: (336) 449-0176
Website:
www.nchistoricsites.org/chb/
Email address: [email protected]
From 1902 until shortly before her
death in 1961, Dr. Charlotte
Hawkins Brown played a key role
in the development of African
American education, interracial
cooperation, and women's rights in
North Carolina and the nation. In 1902 at age 19, she founded the Alice Freeman Palmer Memorial
Institute in Sedalia, NC. Over the next 50 years of her presidency, Dr. Brown raised almost $1.5
million which helped make PMI into one of the most renowned schools for African American
youth in the nation.
PMI and its graduates came to exemplify Dr. Brown's hard work and dedication to African
American achievement. Beginning as a primarily agricultural and industrial school, it evolved into
an elite preparatory school equipping its students with a classical education, discipline, high
standards, poise and ambition. Dr. Brown set an example for her students by being an active,
influential member of many African American and women’s groups throughout North Carolina,
the South and the nation. She became a popular speaker and civic leader, constantly in demand to
deliver speeches on education, racial uplift, and interracial cooperation. The school continued to
operate under three successive principals and closed in 1971.
Located on the former Palmer campus, the Charlotte Hawkins Brown Museum is North Carolina’s
first state historic site to commemorate the achievements of an African American and a woman.
Today’s students can explore and learn about a unique environment where many African American
boys and girls lived and learned during the greater part of the twentieth century. Visitor center
exhibits tell the story of this remarkable woman and North Carolina’s African American
educational heritage. Tours of Dr. Brown’s residence and guided walking tours of campus and its
wayside exhibits highlight the history of the site.
27
Facilities
Gift shop
Exhibits
Handicapped accessible
Picnic shelter (partially covered)
Audiovisual program
Limited nearby restaurants
Rest rooms
Bus parking
Activities and Tours
Guided tour of historic features, including Canary Cottage (Dr. Brown’s home) and campus
Self-tour of Visitor Center and Museum available
Orientation video, lasts 13 minutes
A complete tour of the site takes 1½ hours, but can be tailored to fit the visitor’s schedule.
Group scavenger hunt utilizing wayside and museum exhibits
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
African American History Month (February) and Women’s History Month (March): special
programs. Call site for more information
Christmas Open House (December). Call site for more information.
Books: The Correct Thing: To Do, To Say, To Wear, middle grades and high school. $16.95.
Charlotte Hawkins Brown and Palmer Memorial Institute: What One Young Black Woman
Could Do, teacher resource. $16.95
Charlotte Hawkins Brown: One Woman’s Dream, elementary through high school. $12.95
Teacher Resource Packet with historical information and class projects (all grades) is
downloadable from the web site www.nchistoricsites.org/chb/
28
Directions to Site
From Interstate 40/85, exit on Rock Creek Dairy
Road (exit 135) between Burlington and
Greensboro. Follow the directional signs north on
Rock Creek Dairy Road to US 70. Turn left on US
70 and travel approximately 1 ½ miles. The site is
on the left. Rest stop located 3.85 miles east on I85 near Whitsett.
29
Bennett Place
4409 Bennett Memorial Road
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 383-4345
Website:
http://www.bennettplacehistoricsite.com/
http://www.nchistoricsites.org/bennett/benn
ett.htm
Email address: [email protected]
The largest surrender of the American Civil
War took place in the home of James and
Nancy Bennett on April 26, 1865. Three
times General William Tecumseh Sherman
and General Joseph Eggleston Johnston
met inside the Bennett home before they
reached an agreement, which surrendered
89,270 Confederate soldiers still fighting in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Florida.
The significance of Bennett Place in the history of the United States rests solely on the event which
took place inside this home on April 17, 18 and 26, 1865. Today, visitors can walk along the
Hillsborough Road the actual grounds where two of the most prominent generals of the Civil War
met to put an end to the four years of war, which cost this nation more than 600,000 American
lives.
Reconstructions of the main house, kitchen house, smokehouse, and vegetable and herb garden are
all available for guided or self-guided tours.
Facilities
Visitor Center
Nature Trails and Picnic Area (Not Covered)
Public Restrooms (Handicapped Accessible)
Soda and Water Vending Machine
Museum Gallery
Onsite Bus Parking
Everett-Thissen Research Library
Nearby Restaurants within 2 miles
Gift Shop
Orientation Film- Dawn of Peace (suited for eighth grade and above)
Orientation Film- Sarah’s Farm (suited for kindergarten and elementary students)
30
Activities and Tours
•
A Soldier’s Life: Join a Civil War
“soldier” interpreter as he leads the
students in an exploration into the life of
the common Civil War soldier. Students
will learn about the clothing soldiers wore,
the food they ate, the discipline it took to
create the armies, and the cost the war had
on the United States. A musket firing
demonstration concludes the program.
(Program Time: 1-1 ½ hours). Reservations
are required; contact the Bennett Place
Staff for more information.
•
On the Homefront: A civilian interpreter of
the 19th century will introduce students to
what life was like on the homefront during the time of the American Civil War. They will learn
how civilians in Piedmont North Carolina had to be resourceful to survive, and how they
helped support the war effort from the homefront. (Program Time: 1-1 ½ hours) Reservations
are required; contact the Bennett Place Staff for more information.
•
Civil War Soldier Scavenger Hunt: Go on a search for the history of the Bennett Family and the
Civil War soldiers who met at their farm. The answers are located throughout the museum and
the historic grounds. You might even ask a site staff member if you get stumped. Answer at
least 20 out of 25 questions and receive an official Bennett Place State Historic Site patch!
(Activity Time: 30 minutes)
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Dawn of Peace (DVD) - Call for current price information.
This film depicts the historical events of and around Bennett Place. (17 minutes)
Sarah’s Farm (DVD) - Call for current price information.
This film tells the story of a young girl growing up on a Piedmont North Carolina farm.
(15 minutes)
Twilight of Sabers (DVD) - Call for current price information
This film depicts the events and activities surrounding the last cavalry engagement of the war.
(20 minutes)
Traveling History Trunk $75.00 (refundable Deposit), (2 week rental). This trunk of history is
designed to be a mobile, hands-on learning experience for classrooms which do not have the
opportunity to visit Bennett Place firsthand. Teachers and students will find a variety of 19th century
daily items including Civil War soldier equipment, Civilian clothing, toys, letters, and, as well as a
teacher’s manual with a number of suggested activities to be used by classes while they have the trunk.
Included in the trunk are 2 DVDs (Dawn of Peace and Sarah’s Farm) along with music CDs. The
themes of the trunk are life of the common Civil War soldier along with rural farm life in North
Carolina during the Civil War era. Please contact the Bennett Place staff to reserve the History Trunk.
31
Outreach programs – Both the “Life of the Soldier” and “Life on the Home Front” programs can be
brought to the classroom. Please contact the Bennett Place Staff for more information and to make
reservation.
Special Events
Living History Programs throughout the Year (Information listed on the website)
Lecture Series through the Civil War Roundtable available Jan-May and Sept-Nov
Lesson plans can be found at: http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From Raleigh and I-40: From I-40 take
EXIT #279 B (Durham Freeway/NC 147
North) From NC 147 (Durham Freeway)
take Exit 16A (I -85 N/US 15-501 N
Bypass) and immediately onto the
Hillsborough Road EXIT #108D.
Follow the brown state markers
immediately veering LEFT onto Neal
Road and underneath railroad trestle and
to the first stop sign. Turn RIGHT onto
Neal Road and travel approximately 2
miles crossing Railroad Tracks. Turn
LEFT onto Bennett Memorial Road. Turn
LEFT into Bennett Place State Historic
Site.
From Petersburg, VA: From I-85
SOUTH take the Cole Mill Road EXIT # 173. Turn LEFT onto Cole Mill Road Traveling SOUTH
underneath I-85. Travel to the first traffic light. Turn RIGHT onto to Hillsborough Road. Follow the
brown state markers immediately veering LEFT onto Neal Road and underneath railroad trestle and to
the first stop sign. Turn RIGHT onto Neal Road and travel approximately 2 miles crossing Railroad
Tracks. Turn LEFT onto Bennett Memorial Road. Turn LEFT into Bennett Place State Historic Site.
From Hillsborough: From I-85 Heading NORTH take the HWY 70/Hillsborough Road EXIT #170.
Turn RIGHT onto to Hillsborough Road. Travel approximately 1-1 ½ miles on Hillsborough Road
following the brown state historic signs to Bennett Memorial Road veering RIGHT to Bennett
Memorial Road. Travel approximately ½ mile and Bennett Place State Historic Site will be on your
RIGHT.
From Chapel Hill: From US 15-501 Travel on 15-501 BYPASS NORTH take the Moreene Road Exit
and turn LEFT at the top of the ramp. Follow the road approximately 2 miles. Turn LEFT onto
Bennett Memorial Road and Bennett Place is on the LEFT.
32
Historic Stagville
5828 Old Oxford Highway
Durham, NC 27712
(919) 620-0120
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/stagville/
Email: [email protected]
Historic Stagville features the Bennehan-Cameron House
(circa 1787, 1799), four surviving slave houses (circa
1850), and the Great Barn (circa 1860). Richard Bennehan
started this plantation in 1787, and by the time of the Civil
War, Stagville lay at the center of North Carolina’s largest
plantation complex, a 30,000 acres spread worked by over
900 enslaved people. Stagville’s Horton Grove area
contains several surviving slave houses. These two-story,
four-room timber-frame quarters are rare examples of an
unusual style of slave house. Typical slave quarters were
one-room, one-story structures. The Great Barn is one of the last structures built at Stagville with
enslaved craftsman labor and at the time of its construction, it was one of the largest agricultural
structures in the state. Today at Historic Stagville students can travel back in time when touring the
site. All ages are offered tours of the Bennehan-Cameron House, Horton Grove (the slave cabins), and
the Great Barn. Other activities give children the opportunity to learn more about life on a pre-Civil
War plantation.
Facilities
Rest rooms
Nearby restaurants
Picnic tables
Bus parking
Gift shop
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Activities and Tours
Tours:
Bennehan-Cameron House
Horton Grove (slave cabins)
Great Barn
Activities:
Freedom Quilt program
Games activity, featuring one African and one European game
African American music activity
Slave narratives activity
Portraits of slavery PowerPoint activity
Voices from the Past: Unchained Memories DVD activity
33
Activities are constantly changing. For a complete list of activities for school groups, please call the
site.
Please call if you desire a specific
activity or if you would like the tour
to cover a certain topic. All attempts
will be made to accommodate
requests.
No charge unless an activity is
requested that requires supplies. In
that instance, there will be an
activity charge of $1.00 per child.
Reservation Requirements: There
is a fully refundable reservation fee
of $1.00 per student paid at the time
the reservation is made. This fee
will assure that the day and time you
have requested are reserved and will
be refunded upon your arrival to the site. We must receive your reservation fee at least one week
before your scheduled trip
Tour of entire site takes about 1 ½ - 2 hours, plus an estimate of 30 minutes per activity chosen.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Pre- and post-visit materials can be provided.
February: Black History Month (call site for details)
Lesson Plan on Slave Narratives can be found at http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/stagville/lessonplan_stagville.pdf
Directions to Site
From Raleigh/I-40 westbound. On I-40 southeast of
Durham, take Exit 279B to Durham (Durham Freeway
North). Get off at Exit 173 (Duke Street). Continue
north on Duke St. across I-85 to Murray Avenue. Turn
right on Murray Ave. about 1 mile to Roxboro Road,
then left briefly on Roxboro Rd. and then right onto
Old Oxford Highway. Follow Old Oxford
approximately 6.8 miles; Stagville is on the right.
34
Duke Homestead
2828 Duke Homestead Rd.
Durham, NC 27705
(919) 477-5498
Fax number: (919) 479-7092
Website:
dukehomestead.yolasite.com
Email address: [email protected]
The American Tobacco Company,
at one time the largest tobacco
product manufacturer in the world,
had its roots on a small farm in what
was then Orange County.
Confederate veteran Washington
Duke returned to his farm after the Civil War to discover Federal troops had helped themselves to his
store of cured tobacco. Demand for this brightleaf tobacco grew quickly and hardworking Duke and
his sons were soon peddling their Pro Bono Publico brand of smoking tobacco across much of the
state. The Duke family was soon on the road to building a fortune that would change their lives and
the lives of many others, some of whom later benefited from the Dukes philanthropic ventures. Today,
Duke Homestead is a place where students can experience the daily lives of 19th century small farmers
and businessmen. Through interactive exhibits, a film, and hands-on activities, school children will
discover and learn about the social and economic history of tobacco.
Facilities
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Gift shop
Exhibits
Audiovisual program
Picnic tables (not covered)
Restrooms
Bus parking
Vending
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area and buildings
Nearby restaurants
35
Activities and Tours
Guided Tours -- Offered year round. All age levels.
During this hour and a half visit, students view the
17-minute orientation film Legacy of the Golden
Leaf, then tour the 1852 Duke home and the tobacco
history museum. Groups may also reserve the picnic
area for lunch. Limit of three classes or 75 students
per day.
Annual Programs :
• Life on a Farm --- Offered year round. Kindergarten and 1st Grade
During this one-hour visit, students will talk about the animals and crops raised on a farm in the
1800s, will have The Little Red Hen read aloud to them, and tour the Duke family's 1852 home,
where they can compare their home to the Duke family's farmhouse.
•
Living History Program --- Offered year round. Program is geared toward 2nd through 5th
graders
The program begins with the film Sarah's Farm to orient the students to the site and illustrate
what a child's life was like in the 19th century. This includes a discussion where students
compare how their lives are both similar to and different from Sarah’s life.
Students can then participate in 2-3 of the following hands-on activities:
• House Tour – a tour of the Duke’s Historic Home discussing their lives and the lives of North
Carolinians during the mid-19th century
• Town Ball – students will learn and play this game which was a precursor to baseball
• Fashion Show – students will learn about and try on costumes from the mid-19th century.
• Archaeology – an introduction to what Archaeology is and what Archaeologists do, students
will pair up to learn how to excavate and document artifacts.
• Music – the students will learn about and sing children’s songs from the 19th century.
Each activity takes thirty minutes. Groups may also reserve the picnic area for lunch. Groups may
want to spend time exploring the museum on their own after the programming has ended. Limit of
four classes or 100 students per day; the maximum number of activities, including the orientation film,
is four.
•
North Carolina Legends and Victorian Ghost Stories --- Offered October. Kindergarten and up.
During the month of October school and children’s groups can add this as one of their 30
minute activities. Interpreters will tell Victorian ghost stories as well as popular North Carolina
mysteries and legends.
36
•
Christmas Traditions and Celebrations --- Offered the first two weeks in December. Preschool
through 2nd grade. A one-hour tour of the Homestead detailing the celebration of Christmas in
1870 Piedmont North Carolina is provided for the students. Costumed interpreters explain the
decorations, food, and gifts typically shared during the season. Children may sample
homemade gingerbread and popcorn popped over the fire and may make an ornament to take
home. Limit of two classes or 50 students per hour.
Directions to Site
From Interstate 85 in Durham, exit on Guess Road (exit 175). Follow the signs north on Guess Road
approximately ½ mile to Duke Homestead Road. Turn right on Duke Homestead and go ½ mile. The
site is on the right.
37
North Carolina State Capitol
1 E. Edenton St.
Raleigh, NC 27601
(919) 733-4994
Fax: (919) 715-4014
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/capitol/
Email address: [email protected]
*scheduling is done through the Capitol
Area Visitor Center: (919) 807-7950 or toll
free (866) 724-8687
The North Carolina State Capitol,
completed in 1840, is one of the finest and
best-preserved examples of a major civic
building in the Greek Revival style of
architecture and serves as the symbol of
North Carolina government. From 18401888, the Capitol housed all three branches of the state’s government, including offices of the secretary
of state, auditor, treasurer, comptroller, and Supreme Court. From 1840 until 1961, the state legislature
met and passed laws in the second-floor chambers. Many important decisions were made in the
chambers, including North Carolina’s decision to enter the Civil War on May 20, 1861, when elected
delegates signed the Ordinance of Secession in the House of Commons chamber. The legislative
chambers also were used for state constitutional conventions and served as a 19th century “civic
center” for Raleigh’s citizens. Today the governor maintains her principal office the Capitol’s first
floor while the second and third floors have been restored to their 1840s to 1850s appearances.
Today the Capitol is still used for many events including bill signings, swearing-in ceremonies, press
conferences, living history programs, and other events related to the history of the Capitol and the
functions of state government. Tours include information about the development of Raleigh as the
state’s capital; the history of the state house, which sat on Capitol Square from 1794 to 1831;
construction of the current Capitol; historical significance of the Capitol; and the legislative process.
Facilities
Exhibits
Nearby restaurants
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Bus parking (remote location, student drop off
area provided near Capitol)
Picnic area (remote location)
38
Activities and Tours
Guided 30-minute tours of first and second floors are available for groups of 10 or more. Guides will
tailor tours to grade level and interest, including tours with a focus on the Civil War, legislative
process, architecture, and Capitol Square statuary. A guide for a teacher-led outdoor statuary tour is
available upon request.
Tours are free.
Groups are pre-scheduled for 30-minute tours.
Annual Programs and Additional
Teaching Materials
•
•
•
Pre- and post-visit classroom activities that
meet 4th and 8th grade curriculum goals are
available online at
http://www.nchistoricsites.org/capitol/edu/d
efault.htm.
A video, The North Carolina State Capitol,
may be borrowed from the NC Museum of
History. Call 919/715-0200; borrowers pay
return postage. Additionally, 8th grade teachers may access Civil War lesson plans and postvisit activities online: http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/capitol/default.htm
Civil War lesson plans can be found at http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From I-40 in southern Raleigh, take the Person
Street exit 291 north to Edenton Street. Turn left
and proceed 2 blocks to the visitor parking lot on
the right. The cost of parking is $2.00/hour. The
site is located to the left in the next block.
From I-440 in western Raleigh, exit east on Wade
Avenue and merge onto Capital Boulevard South
(toward downtown). Turn left on Morgan Street
and after three blocks, the site is on the left.
Immediately past the capitol, turn left on
Wilmington Street, go 2 blocks, and turn right on
Jones Street to visitor parking lot with entry on
right. The parking fee is $2.00/hour.
US 1 north of Raleigh becomes Capital
Boulevard. Drive downtown. Turn left on Morgan
Street and after three blocks, the site is on the left.
Immediately past the capitol, turn left on
Wilmington Street, go 2 blocks, and turn right on Jones Street to visitor parking lot (fee) entry on the
right.
US 64 in eastern Raleigh (New Bern Avenue) becomes Edenton Street. Travel downtown and after
the Blount Street intersection, the visitor parking lot (fee) is on the right and the site is located to the
left in the next block.
39
North Carolina Historic Sites – East
Historic Halifax
P.O. Box 406
Halifax, NC 27839
(252) 583-7191
Fax number: (252) 583-9421
Website: www.nchistoricsites.org/halifax/
Email address: [email protected]
The colonial river port town of Halifax,
founded in 1760 along the banks of the
Roanoke River, quickly grew into a social
and political hub. It was here on April 12,
1776, that 83 delegates to the Fourth
Provincial Congress, representing virtually
all of North Carolina, risked their fortunes,
reputations, and indeed, their lives by
adopting the Halifax Resolves, which made
North Carolina the first colony to officially
call for independence from Great Britain. Halifax’s golden age followed the American Revolution as
the small town became wealthy and influential. Halifax emerged as a hub of Underground Railroad
activity where escaping slaves could blend into the county’s large slave and free African American
community. Halifax continued to flourish until a new railroad, one of the first built in the state,
bypassed the town in the late 1830s. Exhibits in the visitor center reflect the town’s rich history. Tours
of the site can be tailored to meet specific needs of groups.
Facilities
Handicapped accessible visitor center
Exhibits
Orientation Film
Gift shop
Rest rooms
Vending
Picnic tables (not covered)
On-site bus parking
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Activities and Tours
Guided tours of historic structures
Choose from the five guided tours below:
• Owens House (circa1760) – home of a prosperous colonial merchant
• Colonial Taverns Tour – covers a restored tavern and a tavern museum
• Middle of Town Tour – covers several buildings in the site’s historic area
• Sally-Billy Plantation House (circa 1808) – an antebellum plantation home
40
•
Underground Railroad Tour-discusses enslaved African Americans’ attempts to escape
bondage in18th & 19th century North Carolina
Tours can be adjusted to groups’ schedules.
Activities:
• Period toys and games: grades 2-8
• Quill writing: all grades
• Whirligigs: grades 4-8
• Hands-on colonial tavern: all grades
•
Other historic activities may be available; call in advance for details. Fees may apply.
All activities are subject to availability and may change
without prior notice.
Organized groups must schedule in advance.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching
Materials
•
•
•
Halifax Day – April 12
Teacher’s packets – available in the media
centers of area elementary and middle
schools or upon request
13-minute orientation film available for
loan
Directions to Site
From Interstate 95, take exit 168.
the signs south on NC 903 to the town
Halifax. Directional signs will guide
the site located on Business US 301 at
corner of St. David and Dobbs Streets.
Follow
of
you to
the
41
Historic Edenton
108 North Broad Street
Edenton, NC 27932
(252) 482-2637 Fax number: (252) 4823499
Website: www.edenton.nchistoricsites.org
Email: [email protected]
Revolutionary War events and politically
influential people have woven a colorful
history for Edenton, North Carolina’s first
colonial capital. Also North Carolina’s
second oldest incorporated town (1722),
Edenton was the home of such remarkable
leaders as governor and U.S. Senator
Samuel Johnston; U.S. Supreme Court
Justice James Iredell; Justice Iredell’s son, James Iredell Jr., a North Carolina governor; Joseph Hewes,
a signer of the Declaration of Independence; and Hugh Williamson, a signer of the United States
Constitution. In 1774 Penelope Barker led 51 Edenton women in demonstrating their opinion of the
patriot cause with a political statement supporting the Provincial Assembly. Later, known as the
Edenton Tea Party, this declaration is believed to be the first political activity by women in the
American colonies. Born into slavery, Harriet Jacobs hid in and then escaped from Edenton to
freedom, and became a writer, abolitionist, and educator, publishing her autobiography in 1861. In
1998 a North Carolina historical highway marker was erected here honoring her.
Facilities
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Exhibits
Audiovisual program
Gift shop
Bus parking
Rest rooms
Nearby picnic area (not covered)
Nearby restaurants
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Activities and Tours
•
•
Guided walking tours of the historic district and waterfront can include the following sites:
1736 Saint Paul’s Episcopal Church, 1758 Cupola House, circa 1782 Barker House, 1767
Chowan County Courthouse, and circa 1825 Jail, and the 1800/1827 James Iredell House and
Dependencies.
Guided riding trolley tours of the Edenton Historic District, including the Historic Cotton Mill
Village and Harriet Jacobs Student Bus Tour
42
•
Colonial crafts activities with costumed interpreters:
Grades 2-8
Grades 3-8
Grades 4-8
Quill writing
Rope making
Quoits (a game resembling horseshoes)
Colonial games
Candle making
Crosscut sawing
Butter churning
Corn shuck dolls
Clay marbles
Admission prices and tour length vary depending on tour and activity selected. Admission $.25 to
$3.50.
Tour length 1 - 3 ½ hours
Annual Programs and Additional
Teaching Materials
•
•
•
•
•
Colonial Living History
Days (October): grades 4-8
Civil War Living History
Day (October 2011 – 2015
4th grade)
Natural egg dying (before
Easter): grades 2-3
Easter egg hunts: grades K-1
Period Christmas decoration
workshops: grades 2 – 4
Please call the site for more information or
to schedule your groups for these
programs.
Additional lesson plans and educational materials can be found at: www.harrietjacobs.org and
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From US 17 traveling north, take Queen Street (Business
17), exit 224, into town. Turn left onto Broad Street. The
visitor center is 2 blocks on the right.
Traveling south on US 17, take exit 227. Turn left onto
NC 32, follow NC 32 South to East Gale Street, the
Visitor Center is on the left. The Historic Edenton Visitor
Center is located at 108 N. Broad Street on US 17
Business and NC 32 in Edenton. Bus parking is on the
East Gale Street side of the building. The parking lot is
behind the visitor center.
43
Somerset Place
2572 Lake Shore Road
Creswell, NC 27928
(252) 797-4560
Fax number: (252) 797-4171
www.nchistoricsites.org/somerset/
Email address: [email protected]
This historic site offers a realistic view of
19th-century life on a large-scale North
Carolina plantation. In 1785, Somerset
Place became an active plantation and
remained active until 1865, when the
institution of slavery was ended in the
United States. Most programs and exhibits
at the site evoke life there in 1843.
Originally, the Collins family plantation encompassed more than 100,000 densely wooded and
predominantly swampy acres. An enslaved labor force converted swampland into cultivated fields by
digging six large irrigation, drainage, and transportation canals and miles of intersecting cross ditches.
The plantation’s major cash crops included rice, corn, wheat, and lumber. By 1860, Somerset Place
was one of only four North Carolina plantations with over three hundred enslaved people on one
property. Today this unique historical attraction is one of only a few former plantations in the state
preserved as a historic site.
Students can learn valuable lessons from the lives of both the free and enslaved inhabitants of
Somerset through exhibits and tours of buildings in the slave community and owner’s compound. They
also can experience antebellum domestic chores by ginning cotton, dipping candles, and making sedge
brooms.
Facilities
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area and buildings
Exhibits
Museum Store
Handicapped-accessible restrooms
Motorcoach /Bus Parking
Vending
Recreational Trails and Picnic Area (Pettigrew State Park adjacent to site)
44
Activities and Tours
Guided tour of historic features, including the buildings
and grounds.
Hands-On Activities:
Rope making
Ginning cotton
Open hearth cooking Basket making
Candle dipping
Broom making
Call the site to determine which activities are
appropriate for your grade level. Each student will make
a traditional craft to take home.
Cost of hands-on program is $1.00 per participant to
defray the cost of the materials.
A complete tour of the site without activities takes 1 ½ hour.
A complete tour of the site with activities takes 2 ½ hours.
Additional Teaching Materials
•
•
•
Study guide with pre- and post-visit classroom activities.
Made from off the Land Exhibit
American Civil War Lesson Plans can be found at
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/somerset/pre-visit.htm
Directions to Site
From US 64 in Creswell, Take Exit 558
and follow the brown signs south through
downtown Creswell. Turn right on Thirty-Foot
Canal Road. Proceed for approximately 5 miles,
and turn left on Lake Shore Road. Somerset Place
is on the right approximately 1/2 mile past the
Pettigrew State Park headquarters.
Site GPS Coordinates = N 36.0745240º W 76.6110380º
45
Roanoke Island Festival Park
One Festival Park
Manteo, NC 27954
(252)475-1500, ext 253
24-hour events line (252) 4751506
Fax number (252) 475-1507
www.roanokeisland.com
www.nchistoricsites.org/rifp/
Email address:
[email protected]
r.gov
Roanoke Island Festival Park
celebrates England’s first
attempts to colonize North
America in the 1580s and
offers school programs that engage curriculum standards focusing on North Carolina colonization,
cultural influences, and economy. Students climb aboard the Elizabeth II to learn what life was like as
a sailor. They learn woodworking, games, and blacksmithing in the Settlement Site from soldiers and
craftsmen. Students also explore the American Indian Town, which features opportunities for students
to learn about the vital and vibrant culture, heritage, and traditions of North Carolina Coastal
Algonquian Indians, and explore Roanoke Island history through the hands-on Adventure Museum.
Facilities
25 acre island
Limited handicap-accessible
Visitor Center
Exhibits
Audio/Visual presentations
Museum store
Free parking
Motor coach parking
Recreational trails
Picnic facilities
Vending
Public restrooms
46
Activities and Tours
Roanoke Island Festival
Park offers school tours
based on North Carolina
Standard Course of Study.
Tours include hands-on
activities, interaction with
costumed interpreters, and
exploration of park exhibits.
To book a tour, please call the park to
secure a day and time slot and to identify
which exhibits/activities you wish to
explore.
The site also offers off-site/outreach activities
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
•
•
•
•
Field Trip Guide with pre and post visit classroom material (available via e-mail or snail mail)
Don’t miss the Roanoke Island Maritime Museum, just a block away, featuring a working
boathouse and the Roanoke Marshes Lighthouse. This screw-pile lighthouse is a reproduction
of one that stood near the site.
The Outer Banks History Center is located on the site of Roanoke Island Festival Park and
offers a reading room/research library and changing exhibits
Civil War era lesson plan can be found at http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Roanoke Island Festival Park
Follow US 64 bypass East to Manteo on US 64.
Once in town, turn right on Budleigh Street. At stop
sign, turn left. When road ends at Tranquil House
Inn, turn right and cross short bridge to Roanoke
Island Festival Park.
47
Historic Bath
Box 148
Bath, NC 27808
(252) 923-3971 fax number: (252) 923-0174
www.nchistoricsites.org/bath/
Email address: [email protected]
The village of Bath provides modern-day travelers
with a glimpse of the early days in a colonial
community. North Carolina’s first town, Bath was
incorporated in 1705. During the Tuscarora War, Bath
was a refuge for settlers caught in the turmoil. The
town also became a safe haven for the notorious pirate,
Blackbeard. At Historic Bath, visitors may tour the
1734 St. Thomas Church; the state’s oldest church in
continuous use, as well as the 1751 Palmer-Marsh
House and the 1830 Bonner House. These buildings
represent nearly a century of colonial and early
national life in coastal North Carolina. Students can
learn skills from interpreters such as rope making and candle making, as well as some of the leisure
activities of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. The visitor center and Van Der Veer house also
offer exhibits tracing the history of Bath Town.
Facilities
The Visitor Center, Van Der Veer House and
St. Thomas Church are handicapped-accessible
Audiovisual program
Exhibits
Gift shop
Picnic areas (not covered)
Rest rooms
On-site bus parking
Limited nearby restaurants
48
Activities and Tours
Guided tours of the PalmerMarsh House and the Bonner
House.
Admission is $1.00 to $4.00
depending on activities chosen.
Teachers and bus drivers free.
Activities will be adapted to fit
grade level and size of group.
These include:
Quill writing
Rope making
Colonial Toys
Candle making
Crosscut sawing
These activities must be scheduled in advance.
A complete tour of the site will take 2 to 2 ½ hours.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Living history demonstrations are available to groups throughout the year by calling the site and
setting up your scheduled visit.
Guidebook of Bath - $.50
Directions to Site
From the town of Washington, take US 264
east. Approximately ten miles east of
Washington, bear right on NC 92 to the town of
Bath. Once in Bath you will find the visitor center
on the right of NC 92 (Carteret Street).
From the North Carolina Outer Banks, take
US 64 west from Manteo. In Manns Harbor take
US 264 west. At Belhaven take NC 99 south to
NC 92 west. This road becomes Carteret Street in
Bath. The visitor center will be on your left
49
Governor Charles B. Aycock Birthplace
264 Governor Aycock Rd.
Fremont, NC 27830
(919) 242-5581
Fax number: ( 919) 242-6668
www.nchistoricsites.org/aycock/
Email address: [email protected]
Life for Charles Brantley Aycock began on
his family’s farm in rural Wayne County on
November 1, 1859. Shaped by his family’s
values of hard work, education, and his
father’s interest in local politics, Charles
grew to become a skilled orator, lawyer, and
leader in the Democratic Party. Elected
governor of North Carolina in 1900 in an
election involving both white supremacy and
“universal education” issues, Aycock served
until 1905. He earned a reputation as the
state’s “Education Governor” because of his
relentless championing of better school
facilities and increased training and pay for
teachers. Today’s students can experience farm life as it was for young Charles by dipping candles,
churning butter, and observing costumed interpreters performing daily chores. Visitor center exhibits
trace Aycock’s life and political career.
Facilities
Gift shop
Handicapped accessible visitor center
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Audiovisual program
Rest rooms
Exhibits
On-site bus parking
Picnic area (covered)
Vending
Limited nearby restaurants
Activities and Tours
Guided tour of historic features including period
schoolhouse and homestead
Activities:
Candle making: grades K-8
Whizzer toy making: grades 3-8
Butter making: grades K-8
Fee for hands-on activities - $2.00/student. Please
collect money from students prior to visit.
50
Hands-on activities are limited to groups of ten or more.
A complete tour of the site will take 2 ½ hours.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
•
•
•
Living History Wednesdays in April, May, October, and November. Schools should register to
attend.
Teacher packet (on CD) with coloring pictures, games, and puzzles for grades K to 5 available
for $6.95.
Aycock Birthplace orientation video (grade 4 to adults). Available for loan at cost of postage.
Directions to Site
From I-795 take exit 14. If coming from Goldsboro, turn right at the end of the exit ramp onto NC
222 East.
From Wilson, turn left at the end of the exit ramp onto NC 222 East. Go to Fremont and turn right
onto US 117 Business. Go 2 miles and turn left on Governor Aycock Road. The site is ½ mile on the
right.
From Interstate 95 take the US 301 exit at Kenly. Take NC 222 east for 10 miles to Fremont. Turn
right (south) on US 117 Business. Go two miles and turn left on Governor Aycock Road. The site is ½
mile on the right.
51
Bentonville Battlefield
5466 Harper House Rd.
Four Oaks, NC 27524
(910) 594-0789
Fax number: (910) 594-0070
www.nchistoricsites.org/bentonvi/
Email address: [email protected]
Hoping to stop the rampage of Union Gen. William T. Sherman’s army through the South in March
1865, the Confederacy made one last attempt to halt his advance. The Battle of Bentonville took place
March 19-21, 1865 here in rural Johnston County. Union troops fought outnumbered Confederate
forces under Gen. Joseph E. Johnston. After three days of intense fighting, the Confederates retreated
and Sherman’s army moved to Goldsboro to be re-supplied. During the battle, the Union army
transformed the home of John and Amy Harper into a field hospital, where more than five hundred
wounded soldiers were treated. On a visit to this historic site, students can tour the Harper House and
experience firsthand a Civil War field hospital, the monument area, the Harper family cemetery, and
reconstructed field fortifications. Visitor center exhibits tell the story of the battle with displays of
artifacts from the struggle.
Facilities
Handicapped-accessible visitor center
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Exhibits – Fiber optic battlefield map
Audiovisual program
Gift Shop
Vending
Picnic area (covered)
Rest rooms
Limited nearby restaurants
On-site bus parking
52
Activities and Tours
Guided tours include the Harper House and
outbuildings.
Demonstrations of Civil War uniforms,
equipment, and weapons: grades K-12 (call
for availability)
No charge for activities
A complete tour of the site takes 2 hours.
Additional Teaching Materials
Lesson plans can be found at:
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From Interstate 95 in Smithfield, exit onto US
701 (exit 90). Follow the signs south on
US701 approximately fifteen miles to Harper
House Road (State Road 1008). Turn left and
go 2 ½ miles; the battleground is on the left.
From Interstate 40, exit onto US 701 (exit
343). Follow the signs north on US 701 to
Newton Grove. At the traffic circle in Newton
Grove, continue north on US 701 for
approximately 3 miles. Turn right on Harper
House Road (State Road 1008). Go 2 ½ miles,
and the site is on the left.
Governor Richard Caswell
Memorial
PO Box 3043
2612 W. Vernon Avenue
Kinston, NC 28502
(252) 522-2091
Fax number: (252)527-7036
www.nchistoricsites.org/neuse/
Email address: [email protected]
This historic site honors Richard Caswell,
the first governor of the independent state
of North Carolina. Caswell served as a
member of the Colonial Assembly and
commanded the militia against the
backwoods Regulators during the Battle
of Alamance in 1771. Five years later he
again found himself in command of the
militia but this time he led Patriot forces
against the British Loyalist at the Battle
of Moore’s Creek Bridge. Later that
same year, in November of 1776, Caswell
became governor and led the state through the
Revolutionary War period. He eventually
served six one-year terms as North Carolina’s
chief executive.
Facilities at the Caswell Memorial
Caswell Memorial Visitor center (handicappedaccessible)
Exhibits
Gift shop
Rest rooms
Picnic area (partially covered)
Numerous nearby restaurants
On-site bus parking
Activities and Tours
Activities can be adapted to fit any age level:
• 18th Century Weapons demonstrations
• 18th Century Uniform and Equipment talks
• Historic toys and games
• Yarn spinning and dyeing demonstrations
A complete tour of the site takes approximately 45 minutes to 1hour with activities.
54
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
A teachers’ packet is available for elementary grades at no cost.
Revolutionary War Living History – September (call site for more information)
Directions to Site
From US 70 west of downtown Kinston, exit US 70 Business east (West Vernon Avenue). The site is
located approximately 1/2 mile on the right.
CSS Neuse Interpretive Center –
Located in the new CSS Neuse Interpretive Center in downtown Kinston, are the remains of the Civil
War ironclad CSS Neuse. The Neuse was one of 26 ironclad ships commissioned by the Confederacy.
During a Union advance on the town of Kinston in 1865, its commander was forced to scuttle the
vessel. For nearly a hundred years, the Neuse rested on the river bottom before being raised from its
watery grave. When this building is completed, on a visit to this historic site, students can listen to a
Confederate soldier talk about his uniform and equipment including black powder weapons. Students
also can fashion rope as it was done over a century ago. Exhibits will tell the story of the ship and the
men who served aboard her. While the interpretive center is undergoing construction and exhibits are
limited, school groups are invited to call or email to determine availability of activities.
55
Facilities at the CSS Neuse Interpretive Center (email [email protected] to check on
status of the building and activities)
Visitor center (handicapped-accessible)
Exhibits
Gift shop
Rest rooms
AV Program
Activities and Tours
Tours of the CSS Neuse
Confederate sailor uniform and weapons talk
Rope-making demonstrations
Civilian Life talks and Homefront demonstrations
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
•
•
•
•
A teachers’ packet is available for elementary grades at no cost.
Life Onboard an Ironclad lesson plan available at
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/neuse/neuse.htm
Off-site programs: a teaching collection comprised of historic items the students can touch is
available for use in the classroom.
Civil War Living History – November (call site for more information)
Directions to Site
The CSS Neuse Interpretive Center is located at 100 N. Queen Street in downtown Kinston. From
Hwy 70 By-pass take US 11 North which becomes King Street. Turn left onto Herritage Street just
after crossing the Neuse River. Buses may park in the municipal parking lots on the corner of
Herritage and Caswell Street. The CSS Neuse Interpretive Center is located on the corner of Caswell
and Queen Streets.
See map above
56
Tryon Palace
529 South Front Street
New Bern, NC 28562
(252) 639-3500
Toll free number: 1-800-767-1560
Fax number: (252) 514-4876
www.tryonpalace.org/
http://www.nchistoricsites.org/tryon/tryon.htm
Email address: [email protected]
Come visit the place where governors ruled, legislators debated, patriots gathered, and George
Washington danced. The history of North Carolina awaits you – with tales of servants both enslaved
and free; craftspeople and apprentices; and men, women, and children who created the North Carolina
we know today.
At Tryon Palace, you can participate in a living history experience like no other — one that uniquely
blends cutting-edge technology with the events, stories, and people of centuries past. Immersive
encounters and learning adventures abound for the whole class or family. Interactive, multiperson
games and hands-on exhibits delight visitors young and old at the North Carolina History Center, while
guided tours, trade demonstrations, and conversations with costumed interpreters bring history to life
in vivid detail at the Governor’s Palace, Gardens, and Historic Homes. Whether you’re exploring one
of our riverside gardens or sharpening your skills as a quilter, shopkeeper, ship’s captain, or cook,
there are endless opportunities for making cherished memories at Tryon Palace.
Facilities
Rest Rooms
Partially handicapped-accessible historic area
and buildings
Visitor Center
Exhibits
Audio/visual presentations
Museum Store
Free parking
On-site bus parking
Garden/walking trails
Vending machines
Activities and Tours
•
•
•
•
North Carolina Begins Here tour (guided/self-paced): grades 1-12, 2-3 hours ($3 per student/$6
per adult*) Available January - November
A Day in the Life: 19th-century New Bern (guided/self-paced): grades 1-12, 3½-4 hours ($6
per student/$15 per adult*) Available March – November at 9:30 a.m.
Life in an Occupied Town (guided): grades 8 (Please inquire on other grades), 2 hours, ($3 per
student/$6 per adult*) Available Wednesdays in March and October only.
Young Sprouts (guided): grades 2-3, 1 1/2 hours ($3 per student/$6 per adult*) Available
March-May and September-November at 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
57
•
•
•
•
•
Time Traveling Tots (guided): ages 3-5, 1 hour ($30 flat materials fee plus $6 per chaperone)
Available January - November at 9:00 a.m. and 10:30 a.m.
Architectural Downtown Walking Tour (guided): all ages, 1½ hours, ($3 per student/$6 per
adult*) Available March-June, September-November
Tryon Palace Theater (guided): all ages, ½ hour, ($3 per student/$6 per adult*) Available
January - November
One Day Pass (guided/self-paced): all ages, 3-4 hours ($6 per student/$15 per adult*)
Available year-round
Galleries Pass (self-paced): all ages, 2-4 hours ($4 per student/$12 per adult*) Available yearround
* = 1 complimentary adult ticket given per 10 student tickets
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching
Materials
• Candlelight Holiday Tours (Second and third
Saturdays in December): all ages, 2 ½ - 4 hours ($10 per
student/$20 per adult)
• Home School Day (spring): grades pre-K-12 ($12 per
student/$15 per adult)
Girl Scout Day (spring): grades pre-K-12 ($12 per
student/$15 per adult)
• History Summer Day Camp (summer): grades
3-5 ($100 per student)
Educational resources available on website
Twice yearly classroom publication The Living History
Classroom. Available online at
http://www.tryonpalace.org/publications.php
Civil War era lesson plan can be found at
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to the Site
From the South (Wilmington, Jacksonville): Take Highway 17 North into New Bern. Stay on same
road (also called ML King Blvd.) and pass Twin Rivers Mall. Go under Route 70 overpass (Hwy 17
becomes Business 17) - stay in middle lane. Road will veer right at Palace Motel and name will change
to Neuse Blvd. Shortly after fire station name will change again to Broad Street. Continue on Broad
Street to Hancock Street. Turn right on Hancock Street. Cross Pollock Street. Make a right onto Front
Street. The North Carolina History Center will be immediately on your left.
From the Southwest (Fayetteville): Take I-95 North to Highway 70 East to New Bern. Take the Trent
Road/Pembroke exit and turn left at the light. Turn right at the third light (Broad Street), and then turn
58
right on Hancock Street. Cross Pollock Street. Make a right onto Front Street. The North Carolina
History Center will be immediately on your left.
From the Northwest (Raleigh, Goldsboro): Take Highway 70 East to New Bern. Take the Trent
Road/Pembroke exit and turn left at the light. Turn right at the third light (Broad Street), and then turn
right on Hancock Street. Cross Pollock Street. Make a right onto Front Street. The North Carolina
History Center will be immediately on your left.
From the North (Greenville): Take Highway 17 South from Washington, NC. Cross the Neuse River
Bridge, take the ramp straight to US 70 and cross the Freedom Memorial Bridge. Take the Trent
Road/Pembroke exit and turn right at the light. Turn right at the third light (Broad Street) then turn
right on Hancock Street. Cross Pollock Street. Make a right onto Front Street. The North Carolina
History Center will be immediately on your left.
59
USS North Carolina Battleship Memorial
#1 Battleship Road
P.O. Box 480
Wilmington, NC 28402-0480
(910) 251-5797 (ext. 3001 for school reservations)
Fax number: (910) 251-5807
Website: www.battleshipnc.com
www.nchistoricsites.org/battleship/
Email: [email protected]
The USS North Carolina Battleship was the first of ten
fast battleships built by the United States for service in
World War II. When commissioned in April 1941, she
was considered the world’s greatest sea weapon. Her
imposing size and heavy armament made her a floating
fortress with a crew of 2,339, she literally was a city at sea as well. The battleship participated in
every major naval offensive in the Pacific theatre and earned 15 battle stars, making the North Carolina
the most decorated U.S. battleship of World War II. The surrender of the Japanese on September 2,
1945 ended World War II and cut short the battleship’s service to our country. She was
decommissioned in October 1947 and placed in the reserve fleet in Bayonne, N.J. for the next 14 years.
When the Navy announced its intentions to scrap the North Carolina in 1959, the state’s citizens
mounted a successful campaign to raise the money to bring the Battleship back to North Carolina. The
campaign included asking the state’s school children to give 10 cents each to save the ship. If a school
had 100 percent participation, then each student received a free admission ticket and the school’s name
would appear on a special plaque on board the ship. By the campaign’s end, 700,000 school children
had contributed to make sure everyone would be able to visit and learn about life aboard the North
Carolina. The ship also serves as the state’s memorial to the more than 10,000 North Carolinians from
all branches of the armed services who gave their lives in WWII. Open to the public since October
1961, the proud North Carolina is an authentically restored World War II battleship and a National
Historic Landmark.
Facilities
Visitor’s Center & part of the main deck are
handicap accessible
Audiovisual program
Gift shop
Auditorium
Bus parking
Vending
Rest rooms
Picnic area (covered and not covered)
60
Activities and Tours
School Groups (Regardless of group size. Includes home schools. All homeschools must have a
reservation prior to visiting in order to receive the school discount.)
Student K-6th: $ 3.00 Student 7th-12th: $ 6.00
Preschool: FREE
One chaperone per every 10 students: Free.
Additional adults with school groups: $10.00 each
Any adults not paying through the school: $12.00 each
We have several events each year and all are kid friendly. The most updated calendar is on our
website. http://www.battleshipnc.com/Events/EventCalendar.aspx You are always welcome to call
us for additional events that may have been added.
A complete tour will take approximately 2 ½ hours, so plan
enough time.
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
Lesson plans designed for grades K-12 can be found on the
website. These lesson plans are listed by discipline: language arts,
mathematics, sciences, and social studies.
http://www.battleshipnc.com/Education.aspx
We can also provide printed material about the North Carolina to
enhance and help prepare for your field trip experience.
Reserve an interactive hands-on program exploring the ship as a
floating city via games and discussion using historic photographs,
blueprints, and artifacts. Students learn to salute, ask permission to
come aboard, try on clothing, pass around artifacts, and try their
hands at using semaphore flags! The program is presented
onboard the ship prior to your tour. Call Kim Sincox, Museum Services Director, 910-251-5797 Ext.
3006, to reserve a 30-60-minute program. The program is limited to 30 students at a time and is
designed for elementary and middle school students.
Directions to the Battleship
From the West on I-40 via Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway (Raleigh-125 miles):
When I-40 ends at Wilmington and becomes NC 132/College Road at Exit 420, continue straight for
approximately ½ mile. Turn right onto Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway or US 74 West towards the
airport and downtown Wilmington. Follow US 74 West for approximately 7 miles towards Whiteville.
At the end of the Parkway, follow the signs for US 74 West and NC 133 South to Whiteville. Cross
the Isabella Stallings Holmes Drawbridge. Turn left at the end of the bridge at the light. Cross another
bridge. Stay in the left hand lane. Turn left at the sign “Battleship Memorial”.
From I-40 west via I-140 Bypass (Raleigh-125 miles):
As you approach Wilmington (6 miles out), take exit 416 A (I-140/US 17 West) towards Myrtle
Beach. At 7 miles you will cross the Dan Cameron Bridge with the temporary end of the highway in
sight. Take the Battleship Memorial/ Wilmington exit, at the end of the off ramp, bear right onto US
61
421 South. Continue approximately 3 miles, passing thru the stop light and follow the Battleship
Memorial sign. Proceed approximately 1 mile crossing over the S. Thomas Rhodes Bridge. Turn left
at the sign “Battleship Memorial”.
From the South on 1-95 North After you cross the border from South Carolina into North Carolina,
go approximately 14 miles. Take Exit 14 onto US 74 East towards Wilmington. After approximately
26 miles, US 76 merges with US 74. Continue to travel approximately 52 miles to Wilmington. When
approaching Wilmington follow the signs to the Battleship Memorial and US 421 North.
(US76 East out of Florence SC may seem quicker but it is 2 lanes and US 74 East is 4 lanes and it is
actually a quicker route to Wilmington & the Battleship.)
From the North on I-95 As you approach Benson NC, exit east on I-40 to Wilmington. Then follow
the directions below, “From the West on I-40”.
From the South on US 17 North (Myrtle Beach SC-60 miles, Shallotte-33 miles, Brunswick Co.
Beaches): When outside of Wilmington, US17 North will merge with US74/76 East. Follow the signs
for the Battleship Memorial and US 421 North.
From the North on US 17 South via Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway
(New Bern-87 miles, Jacksonville-51 miles, Topsail Island-33 miles): Follow US 17 South into
Wilmington. Turn right onto Martin Luther King Jr. Parkway or US 74 West towards the airport and
downtown Wilmington. You will cross NC 132/College Road. Follow US 74 West for approximately
7 miles towards Whiteville. At the end of the Parkway, follow the signs for US 74 West and NC 133
South to Whiteville. Cross the Isabella Stallings Holmes Drawbridge. Turn left at the end of the
bridge at the light. Cross the S. Thomas Rhodes Bridge. Stay in the left hand lane. Turn left at the
sign “Battleship Memorial”.
From US 17 North via I-140 Bypass
Approximately 9 miles before Wilmington the highway will split. Stay to the left, take I-40, I-140, and
US 17 towards Myrtle Beach. Do not take Business US 17. After approximately 10 miles you will
cross over the Dan Cameron Bridge with the
temporary end of the highway in sight. Take the
Battleship Memorial/ Wilmington exit. At the end
of the off ramp, bear onto US 421 South. Continue
approximately 3 miles, passing thru the stop light
and follow the Battleship Memorial sign. Proceed
approximately 1 mile crossing over the S. Thomas
Rhodes Bridge. Turn left at the sign “Battleship
Memorial”.
From the West on 74 East (Charlotte-157 miles,
Whiteville-43 miles): When approaching
Wilmington, US 74 will merge with US 76.
Continue to travel approximately 52 miles to
Wilmington. When approaching Wilmington
follow the signs to the Battleship Memorial and US
421 North.
62
Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson
8884 St. Philips Rd. S.E.
Winnabow, NC 28479
(910) 371-6613
Fax number: (910) 383-3806
www.nchistoricsites.org/brunswic/
Email [email protected]
A quiet embankment along the
lower Cape Fear River holds many
secrets, including the remains of
both a colonial town and Civil War
fortification. Here under mosscovered branches once stood a
lively port town. Brunswick, a
bustling community, was home to
royal governors and influential
colonial citizens. Burned by the
British in 1776, Brunswick faded
into obscurity. During the Civil
War, the Confederacy built Fort
Anderson on the remains of the colonial town as part of the Lower Cape Fear defense system. Union
troops attacked the fort in February 1865 and the Confederates abandoned it under the cloak of night.
Today visitors can visit the site of these two conflicts as well as the visitor center exhibits detailing
their history. Tours of the site highlighting such 18th century and Civil War themes are available to
students.
Facilities
Visitor Center/Museum
Wayside Exhibits
Audiovisual program
Gift shop
Fully handicapped-accessible site
Restrooms
Picnic tables (shaded)
On-site bus parking
Limited restaurants nearby
63
Activities and Tours
Teachers can request special tour themes
(18th century life, colonial militia, Civil
War uniforms and equipment).
Site tours may vary in length from 20
minutes to 1 ½ hours, depending on era of
time selected.
Annual Programs and Additional
Teaching Materials
Civil War themed lesson plans can be
found at:
http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From I-40 at Wilmington. I-40 ends; stay on NC
132 (College Road) south. Take US 17/74 west
and south through Wilmington and across the
river. Remain on highway to the Southport exit.
Take this exit and follow NC 133 south. Go about
16 miles and follow signs to Brunswick Town.
From Southport, take NC 133 north
approximately 12 miles to the site.
64
Fort Fisher
PO Box 169
Kure Beach, NC 28449
(910) 458-5538
Fax number: (910) 458-0477
www.nchistoricsites.org/fisher/
www.friendsofforttisher.com
Email: [email protected]
Site Hours:
Memorial Day through Labor Day
Tuesday-Saturday 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Sunday
1-5 p.m.
Closed Monday.
Off Season
Tuesday through Saturday 9 a.m. - 5 p.m.
Closed Sunday and Monday and most major state holidays.
In the Civil War, the agricultural South depended on Europe for manufactured goods and war
materials. To stop the importation of these items, President Abraham Lincoln declared a naval
blockade of Confederate ports. Wilmington’s proximity to Bermuda and the Bahamas added to
the rail connections to Virginia made it the lifeline of the Confederacy.
Nicknamed “the Gibraltar of America,” Fort Fisher’s massive earthen walls stretched almost a
mile and a half and averaged 30 feet high. The fort also had 30 underground bombproofs and
magazines. Under the protection of Fort Fisher’s 44 big guns, 4 field pieces, and 3 mortars, tens
of millions of dollars worth of goods and war materiel came into the Confederacy.
After two attacks, Fort Fisher was finally captured in January 1865. The Confederacy’s main
supply line was severed. Three months later, out of supplies and hope, the Confederacy
surrendered and the Civil War ended. The fighting at Fort Fisher would be the largest operation
undertaken by the US Army and Navy of the Civil War and wouldn’t be surpassed until June 6,
1944. It also was the largest collection of warships in one place until the Battle of Jutland in
1914 and included the largest naval bombardment in the world up to World War I!
Facilities
Handicapped-accessible visitor center and ¼
mile tour trail
Museum Store
Audiovisual program (10 minutes)
Fiber-optic map depicting the second battle
(10 minutes)
Civil War Museum/Exhibit Hall
Rest rooms
Drink Machines
On-site bus parking
Tour trail markers
65
Activities and Tours
•
•
•
•
Self-Guided Tour: You can walk the ¼ mile tour trail on your own while reading about
the history of the site on fourteen wayside exhibits. The handicapped accessible trail
winds around the remaining earthworks. 30 minutes, suitable for all ages, no limit on
participation.
Basic tour: The general tour explaining the first and second battles at Fort Fisher, as well
as a discussion of the importance of blockade running and the Wilmington port. 45
minutes, suitable for all ages, no limit on participation.
Battle walk: Mainly for military organizations with the tour themed around troop
movements of the second (final) battle, including the naval assault. 1 hour, suitable for
military personnel, no limit on participation.
BSA youth walking tour: A tour created by Eagle Scout Brendan Carr, this self-guided
worksheet can be completed as your troop or scout walks around the fort. On completion,
patches are available at the Wilmington scout store.
• “Ready, Aim, Fire!”: Learn about Civil War small
arms, including those brought in through the blockade, with a
costumed interpreter. The demonstration will conclude with a
firing of a reproduction 1853 Enfield Riffle. 15 minutes, 1st
grade and up, maximum of 75 people (including chaperones).
• “Cannoneers, Attention!”: using the site’s reproduction
12 lb bronze Napoleon field piece, visitors will learn about
Civil War artillery and have a chance to practice period field
artillery drill under the command of a costumed interpreter.
Available only on non-rainy days and subject to staffing
availability. 30 minutes, 4th grade and up, maximum of 30
participants.
A complete visit to the site takes at least 1½ hours. Guided tours take approximately 45 minutes,
but can vary by age group and group number, excluding any special demonstrations. Thematic
tours and activities are done on a limited basis and are subject to staff availability. There is no
charge for activities; however, a small donation is required for artillery firings to offset the cost
of powder.
66
Annual Programs and Additional Teaching Materials
•
•
•
A Teachers’ Packet containing information on Fort Fisher, activities geared towards
elementary or middle school students, and a suggested bibliography can be mailed or
emailed on request.
Additional information can be found on the Fort Fisher State Historic Site webpage
(http://www.nchistoricsites.org/fisher/fisher.htm ). Included on the website is detailed
information on the first and second battles at Fort Fisher, maps of the fort and battles, the
O’Sullivan images, and discussions on blockade running, Wilmington, Fort Fisher and
WWII, and African American troops at Fort Fisher.
Civil War era lesson plans can be found at http://civilwarexperience.ncdcr.gov/
Directions to Site
From Interstate 40, take College Road (NC 132) south through Wilmington to US 421. Stay on
US 421 south for about twenty miles through Carolina Beach and Kure Beach. Fort Fisher is on
the right just south of Kure Beach.
From US 17 (South Carolina) take US 17 North to Supply, NC. Turn east on NC Hwy 211 and
drive to Southport, NC. Take the Southport to Fort Fisher Ferry (call 1 (800) BY FERRY or
(910) 458-3329 for ferry schedule. It is subject to change so call ahead to verify times. From the
ferry dock on Fort Fisher side take US Hwy 421 North for 2 miles. The historic site is on the
left.
67