Keeping Up With Kedron

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Keeping Up With Kedron
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Keeping Up With Kedron
Welcome to another addition of our newsletter which I hope you
find informative and entertaining. I’m really proud to announce a
monumental step in the growth of CPSM Care with the purchase of
our 4th facility, Magnolia Aged Care at Coomera on the 1st of June.
This is a large residence with 117 aged care beds and 48
independent living units (ILUs) that was built about 10 years ago.
CPSM Care will be converting the ILUs into aged care over the next
several months bringing this site to a total of 157 aged care beds.
We are really excited about this acquisition opportunities and the
team of committed staff joining the CPSM team. Below is a photo of
the large internal communal courtyard in the Homestead for the
resident’s enjoyment. The buildings and design has a colonial to
Hampton feel with dormer windows and wood VJ paneling used
extensively throughout the build. Welcome Magnolia Aged Care!
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CONTENTS
Company Director
Report : Cliff Evans
1-3
Director of Nursing
Report: A message from
Sarah
4-5
Care Manager Report:
A message from Leanne
6-7
Leisure and Lifestyle
News: A message from
Fiona
8
Understanding you loved
one’s behaviour when
they suffer from
Dementia
9
A little about me – Tania
18
Gone but not Forgotten
19-20
Planner
The much anticipated 40 bed expansion to Lodges on George (called
Henzell Lodge) is now complete and opened officially on the 23rd of
May. We had an inaugural 15 residents move in from the main
building and will be accepting around 6 residents per week until full.
We are really pleased with the finish of this building, its fittings,
fixtures and furniture. Many have made the comment that it feels
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
FUN FACTS
In the northern hemisphere June is the
beginning of summer.
The name either comes from the
Roman goddess Juno, wife of Jupiter,
or from the word "iuniores", the Latin
word for "younger ones".
In the early Roman calendar June only
had 29 days. It was Julius Caesar who
added the additional day giving June
30 days.
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more like a boutique hotel rather than an aged care
facility which is great feedback. The finishes and
aesthetics of this new building will be mostly
emulated at Aspley Aged Care which we hope will
start construction in September. Below are some
photos of the accommodation.
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
SMILE!
Christine and June
Cliff Evans – Chief Operations Officer /
Vincent enjoying his historic visit
Company Director
Emmerich enjoying the sun
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
BIRTHDAYS:
RESIDENTS BIRTHDAYS JUNE
Vera
8th June
Helga
11th June
Bertha
15th June
Henry
18th June
Valma
22nd June
Tom B
26th June
STAFF BIRTHDAYS IN JUNE:
Ruby
05th June
Annastacia
07th June
Mandie
09th June
Chistene
09th June
Jana
12th June
Lisa
15th June
CELEBRITY BIRTHDAYS IN JUNE:
Marilyn Monroe
01st June
BIRTH STONE AND FLOWER FOR JUNE:
A Message from Sarah:
What is Advocacy?
Advocacy involves representing and working with a
group of people who need support to exercise
their rights and there is an inherent conflict of
interest that prevents service providers from
advocating on behalf of their care recipients.
Kedron Aged Care understands and acknowledges
that we are unable to advocate for the people
living here, however, we strongly support the
actions taken by those people to control their lives.
Older people in our society are vulnerable and
sadly, they need others to represent their
interests. The social values of strength and
liveliness are represented in youth but physical and
mental frailty as we age is seen as weakness or
flawlessness rather than wisdom. The belief that
our personal value is tied to our capacity to
contribute to society and the economy challenges
the input that older persons make to the world.
The negative attitudes of ageism are unmistakable
in our language, for example, phrases like “our
seniors” or ‘the elderly” categorise older people as
objects and not as individuals. Ageism is also
reflected by the extent to which older adults are
visible to society. There is a tendency for people
who live in residential aged care to be invisible to
the rest of society.
The difference in the community at Kedron Aged
Care is the environment we create to foster the
value of older people and react to their needs. We
challenge ageist beliefs and social structures. The
people whom live here are able to exercise their
individual rights and respect the rights of others.
Our social make-up allows individual to make a
contribution to each person to contribute to the
composition that is life.
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Our nursing staff participate in a number
of committees which are held quarterly
and monthly, here at Kedron Aged Care,
to enhance knowledge and share
processes to improve the care recipient’s
community and care needs. We currently
have a medication management, infection
control, work health and safety and care
management committees. To set a goal
of independence for the people who live
at Kedron Aged Care we welcome your
input into these committees and I would
welcome and appreciate any feedback or
ideas you may have for other areas we
should focus on. Should you be interested
in being involved in attending a one of or
joining regularly in any of these existing
committees. Kedron Aged Care invites
you to participate in the process of
organising activities and decision making
for your home and community here.
Sarah Clery – Director of Nursing
MBERS:
The Commissioner for Aged Care –
P: 1800 500 294
The Aged Care Complaints Investigation Scheme
C/- Department of Health & Aging
(1800 550 552)
GPO Box 9848 (In your capital city), or
[email protected]
QLD Aged & Disability Advocacy (QADA)
P: 07 3637 6000
QLD Aged & Disability Advocacy Inc.
121 Copperfield Street
Geebung QLD 4034
Feel free to approach Director of Nursing,
Sarah Clery for further information or guidance.
JUNE HAPPENINGS:
ITALIAN NATIONAL DAY 02nd June
BUS TRIPS 07th and 23rd June
TIARA THEME DAY 06th June
CHURCH SERVICES 10th and 24th June
VERA’S BIRTHDAY MORN TEA 08th June
BBQ FOR STAFF & RESIDENTS 23rd June
NORA LAWRIE 07th June
NATHANIEL FORD 09thJune
ROSLYN 22nd June
ALLIED HEALTH VISITS
Podiatrist - 7th June, 28th June
Speech Pathology - 20th June
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Dietician – TBA
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
PHOTOS
A Message from Leanne:
Sharing is not always caring
Esther doing some board games
Crazy Bear always makes us smile
There is nothing like the love of a
dog, Thomas enjoying some
cuddles
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The most common time of the year to contract a
cold or flu virus is in the 6-8 week period across
winter and spring with over 80000 GP visits across
Australia during the year related to cold and flu
like symptoms. Colds and Flus are caused by
different viruses but display similar symptoms
such nasal congestion, coughing and sneezing.
Flu’s symptoms are generally worse and include
fever and chills, muscle aching, nausea and loss of
appetite. The flu can potentially be serious in
vulnerable groups such as young children, the
immunocompromised and the elderly.
The cold and flu viruses are spread by releasing
infective droplets when a person coughs or
sneezes. If not effectively contained the droplets
can be spread onto surfaces and then from person
to person. The most effective way to break this
chain of transmission is handwashing. Hand
hygiene Australia recommend the “5 moment of
hand hygiene” which you may see posters of
around the facility as well as the appropriate use
of alcohol hand rub. Resident’s, family members
and visitors are encouraged to participate in
effective hand hygiene using the hand basins and
hand rub around the facility to prevent cross
infection.
The microorganism that causes cold and flu is a
virus therefore the treatment is limited. Generally
recommended treatment is symptom
management such as maintaining adequate fluid
intake, taking pain relief and anti-pyretic (antifever) medication to reduce temperature.
Antibiotics are not effective in treating viral
infections, however GP advice should be sought.
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Remember sharing is not always caring, if you are
displaying cold and flu symptoms cover your
mouth before coughing and sneezing to catch
droplets and dispose of in the bin, wash your
hands and advise a member of the nursing team.
Visitors and family members requested to not
come into the facility if they are unwell until their
symptoms subside.
Leanne Rose – Care Manager
JUNE INTERNATIONAL
DAYS
05th June World Environment Day
World Environment Day aims to inspire
more people than ever before to take
action to prevent the growing strain on
planet Earth’s natural systems from
reaching the breaking point. The 2016
theme highlights the fight against the
illegal trade in wildlife, which erodes
precious biodiversity and threatens the
survival of elephants, rhinos and tigers,
as well as many other species. It also
undermines our economies,
communities and security. This year’s
slogan "Go Wild for Life" encourages
you to spread the word about wildlife
crime and the damage it does, and to
challenge all those around you to do
what they can to prevent it
15th June World Elder Abuse
Awareness Day
The United Nations General Assembly,
in its resolution 66/127, designated
June 15 as World Elder Abuse
Awareness Day. It represents the one
day in the year when the whole world
voices its opposition to the abuse and
suffering inflicted to some of our older
generations.
20th June World Refugee Day
The UN General Assembly, on 4
December 2000, adopted resolution
55/76 where it noted that 2001 marked
the 50th anniversary of the 1951
Convention relating to the Status of
Refugees, and that the Organization of
African Unity (OAU) had agreed to have
International Refugee Day coincide
with Africa Refugee Day on 20 June.
The General Assembly therefore
decided that 20 June would be
celebrated as World Refugee Day.
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
JUNE FUN FACTS
A Message from Fiona:
June in Other Languages
Leisure and Lifestyle News
Chinese (Mandarin) - liùyuè
Danish – juni
French – juin
Italian - giugno
Latin – Iunius
Spanish – junio
The famous English tennis tournament
Wimbledon is played during the month
of June..
What did we do in May, well we celebrated
Mother’s Day, International Nurses Day, we
hosted a Morning Tea Fundraiser and had an
interesting and nostalgic trip to Newstead House.
We celebrated birthday’s with Emmerich and
Trish, as well as enjoying our always entertaining
performers Nathaniel Ford, Nora and Crazy Bear.
Our exercise Wednesday has proven to be very
successful, enabling those who attend to get the
blood moving and the joints limber. To date it
seems Balloon Tennis is the most favourite of
exercises, as I am asked many times when we will
play it again.
For mother’s day we made some mother’s day
cards, Cheryl was a great help in this activity,
doing all the writing for each card and envelope.
Thanks Cheryl.
Several countries celebrate their flag
days during this month including the
United States, Sweden, Denmark,
Romania, and Argentina.
June was initially named Lunius.
June is a full month also, with Italian National
Day, a bus trip to Samford Museum, Henny Penny
chicks being delivered (we get to see the process
of egg to chick), the Queen’s birthday, Red Nose
Day and much more. We will also be celebrating
a wonderful occasion, one of our residents, Vera,
turns 101  there will be celebrations throughout
the day as well as of course, cake.
June sees a new activity added to the planner,
Men’s Group, which will be held monthly. The
men get to enjoy a card game, a drink and nibbles
and can talk cars and other manly topics.
Please remember if you need to discuss anything
please come and see me my door is always open.
Fiona Dardenne – Leisure and Lifestyle
Coordinator
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Understanding your loved one’s
behaviours when they suffer from
Dementia
Experts say that all types of behaviour are forms
of communication. Your loved one is trying to tell
you something even though the disease has
robbed them of other ways (i.e., talking) of telling
you. Perhaps your loved one is depressed or in
pain and does not know how to express it in
words. Some experts believe that agitation
behaviour is "the inability the deal with stress."
For the caregiver, the key is to identify whether
the behaviour is event-related (a visitor arrives,
dinner is served), sudden (unexpected outburst)
or escalates ("catastrophic" spiral of tension and
outbursts). Organization by the caregiver will help
a great deal in beginning to combat these
behaviours:



Modify the environment to reduce known
stressors (e.g., shadowy lighting, mirrors,
loud noises);
Note patterns of behaviour and subtle
(and not so subtle) clues that tension and
anxiety are increasing (i.e., pacing,
incoherent vocalization);
Dysfunctional behaviour often increases at
the end of the day as stress builds and
your loved one becomes tired.
Certain stressors can trigger agitation behaviours.
While this list is not exclusive, it does provide the
most common triggers and suggestions for
minimizing their occurrence. As the caregiver, you
have to use all of your senses to understand the
environment and your loved one’s behaviours.
This is not easy stuff – and this is not fool-proof.
However, experimenting with these tools can go a
very long way!
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VOLUNTEERS REQUIRED
IF YOU KNOW OF ANYONE WHO
WOULD BE INTERESTED IN
VOLUNTEERING OR YOU
WOULD LIKE TO PLEASE COME
AND SEE ME.
I BELIEVE VOLUNTEERS ARE
INVALUABLE AND I TRULY
APPRECIATE THE HELP AND
ASSISTANCE THEY OFFER.
YOU CAN EMAIL ME ON
[email protected]
CALL ME 33590266 Or just come
to my office.
Fiona Dardenne
Leisure and Lifestyle
Co-ordinator.
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
PHOTOS

Joy at Newstead House
Esther
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Fatigue: If confusion and agitation
increase late in the day, suspect that fatigue
may be a factor. Try to have your loved one rest
or have quiet periods for up to two times a day
at the same time. If they nap, do not get under
the bed covers – rest in an easy chair or on top
of the bed. Physical exercise is appropriate
during the day, but prepare short activities with
calm periods. Caffeine should be avoided. If
your loved one wakes confused at night,
increase (yes, increase) rest during the day.

Change of Environment, Routine or
Caregiver: Sameness and routine help to
minimize stress in the patient with Alzheimer’s
disease. So if your loved one is in a facility it is
best to have a routine and few environmental
changes (e.g., no extensive holiday decorations).
Some nursing homes discourage family visits for
a period after admission or even for longer –
this is never appropriate. Visit as often as you
can! For a loved one living at home, it is best to
schedule day care for at least three days a week
so that your loved one will adapt it into his/her
routine.

Affective Responses to Perception of
Loss: (Huh?) This means that persons with
Alzheimer’s disease still have memories and
perceptions of activities that they used to enjoy.
They miss being able to drive a car, cook or care
for children. Whether at home or in a facility,
safe activities should be substituted that satisfy
your loved one. Depression should be treated.

Responses to Overwhelming or
Misleading Stimuli: Excessive, noise, commotion
or people can trigger agitation behaviour.
Researchers have found that more than 23
people in a group (e.g., dining room or holiday
party) can cause undue stress in a person with
Alzheimer’s disease. The television, mirror
image, dolls or figurines may represent extra
people in the environment. Before medicating
with anti-psychotic drugs, the family member
and health care team should consider these
environmental factors.

Excessive Demand: Caregivers and
families must accept that your loved one has
lost (and continues to lose) mental functions.
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016

No amount of quizzing, reality
orientation, "brain exercises,"
retraining or pushing them to try
harder will improve their mental
capabilities. Indeed, it can cause stress
and a sense of futility. The best a
caregiver can do is provide positive
support and understanding, encourage
independence and assist your loved
one when they are unable to perform a
task.
Delirium: Illnesses such as infections,
pain, constipation, trauma or drug
interactions may cause dementia-like
symptoms. Preventive measures such
as good oral care, nutrition, simplified
medication regimens and adequate
fluid intake play an important role in a
loved one’s well-being.
When we reminisce we feel the joy again, the
emotion of the time and this is very healing.
We don’t all have fond memories but even the
not so happy ones are a point of life lessons
learned and can be viewed as wisdom.
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LAUGHTER IS THE BEST
MEDICINE
Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
What is QADA?
Queensland Aged and Disability Advocacy (QADA Inc) is a not-for-profit, independent,
community based advocacy service. The service has over 20 years’ experience in
supporting and improving the wellbeing of older people and people with a disability in
Queensland. You can view recent updates and their publications online at www.qada.org.au
QADA provides an advocacy service to support people to resolve issues related to their aged
care or community care service provision or care. QADA’s free, confidential and client
directed advocacy support is available for people who are:




living in residential aged care facilities
receiving community care services
receiving Australian Government aged care services
carers or representatives of clients of the above services
QADA’s vision is to give vulnerable people a voice through information, education and
support. QADA can be contacted by telephoning 1800 818 338.
OUR BUS TRIP PHOTOS
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
We went to the Newstead House
We all enjoyed sunshine and beautiful surroundings
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
SPECIAL EVENTS
Mother’s Day
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
We enjoyed a high tea for Mother’s Day
Happy Hour is still a wonderful get together with food, drinks and conversation. All a welcome to
attend, family and friends included.
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
ANIMAL THERAPY
Thank you Fran for coming in with your beautiful puppy. The residents loved him.
THANK YOU MATILDA AND GELEK
Clowning around after a hard day of gardening  I think they are trying to be monkeys.
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
SOME OF OUR KAC TEAM
Our little family in the front of the building 
Back: Mandie, Leanne, Sarah, Tania, Tomo, Sam, Kim, Mitchell, Robert
Front: Arturo, Aira, Allen, Judee, Edith
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
A LITTLE ABOUT ME: Tania
Time at Kedron Aged Care: 3 weeks
Place of Birth: Auckland, NZ
What is your job at Kedron Aged Care? Administration
What was your first job? Checkout chick at Woolies
Do you have a middle name? Tania (my first name is Denise)
Do you have any pets? What type? no
Do you have a family? Yes I have two children, 8yrs and 6yrs old
What is your favourite food? Thai
What is your star sign: Taurus
What are your hobbies? Netball, Camping
Have you ever been mentioned in a newspaper? Yes when I was 11 yrs old, it
was a photo of my grandmother and I dancing at my school.
Where was your last holiday destination? Malaysia
Where would you like to be in 5 years time? Happy and Healthy
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
What’s something not many people know about you? I’m the second oldest
of 8 siblings who all still live in NZ.
Daphne we will remember you 
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Ray you were a top bloke 
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Kedron Aged Care Newsletter – Edition 10, June 2016
Joyce we will miss that beautiful smile
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