Spring 2013 - Prototypes

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Spring 2013 - Prototypes
WELCOME MESSAGE from Prototypes’ President and CEO
Every day, thousands of women in our communities suffer from poverty, domestic violence, drug and
alcohol abuse, and mental health issues – often while pregnant or caring for young children. At Prototypes,
we step in on their behalf, helping them recover from addiction and trauma, teaching them how to be
nurturing mothers, and providing practical tools and skills so they can live fulfilling, independent lives. What distinguishes Prototypes
from other agencies is that we do all this while allowing mothers and their children to remain together. True to our name, our
innovative treatment model serves as a “prototype” for other organizations that are helping women and fragile families everywhere.
Prototypes Post
SUMMER
Inspiring stories and news from Prototypes
2013
I am thrilled to introduce Prototypes’ new print newsletter to our community. The stories within these pages provide more
in-depth coverage on Protoypes’ impact, reflecting the myriad ways in which Prototypes gives so many a second chance. It is
a privilege to share them with you.
See inside to learn how Prototypes
helps its clients to lead fulfilling,
independent lives!
1000 North Alameda Street, Suite 390
Los Angeles, CA 90012
INSIDE
Client Spotlight. . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Cassandra Loch, LCSW, MBA, President and CEO
In alignment
with Prototypes’
mission, ACA will
make insurance more
accessible to women
and their families.
Prototypes Prepares for Healthcare Reform
BEGINNING ON JANUARY 1, 2014 KEY ELEMENTS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
(ACA) WILL BE IMPLEMENTED IN CALIFORNIA, increasing the number of individuals
who have healthcare insurance. Commonly known as healthcare reform, the ACA
will change many aspects of Prototypes’ service delivery. “While this is ultimately a
positive development for the individuals and communities Prototypes serves, in order
to fulfill our mission, we need to make changes to prepare for the new environment,”
says Cassandra Loch, Prototypes’ President and CEO.
Currently, many of Prototypes’ clients do not have healthcare insurance when they
first seek treatment. According to Covered California, California’s state healthcare
exchange, next year over 2 million California residents will qualify for federal financial
assistance and will enroll in a health plan by 2017. Services for substance abuse will
be required as an essential health benefit under the part of the ACA that expands
Medicaid, and the number of addicts who will be eligible for this health insurance will
rise by 150%. Prototypes has begun to build its program and administrative capacities
in order to accept these newly insured individuals.
ACA will also make insurance more accessible to women and their families, a provision
that is in perfect alignment with Prototypes’ mission. Access to preventive care,
continued on page 6
The Community Prisoners
Mother’s Program . . . . . . . . . . 3
Supporter Spotlight . . . . . . . . . 4
Healthy Way L.A.. . . . . . . . . . . .4
4th Annual Golf Tournament. . 5
Prototypes Partners. . . . . . . . . 6
Children’s Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Calendar of Events. . . . . . . . . . 7
LAILA ALI will host
Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity
Golf Tournament on Monday,
October 7th at the Wilshire
Country Club. See page 5
for more information!
Prototypes Post
SUMMER 2013
CHILDREN’S FUND
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ann McClanathan, Chair Person
Vice President, Partner Development, myStrength.com
Seeking treatment for addiction, mental illness and domestic abuse is difficult enough.
Giving up a child in order to make it happen is heartbreaking. It costs $50 per day
Michael Kemp, Vice Chair Person
Founder and Principal, Michael Kemp Architects
to house and provide treatment services for one child at our residential facilities,
which adds up to $2 million annually. This year, we launched the Prototypes
Ron Burkhardt, Secretary
Managing Director, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
Children’s Fund to directly support children’s services.
Amador Sanchez, Jr., Treasurer
Chief Executive Officer, Total Intermodal Service, Inc.
For more than 25 years, Prototypes has pioneered the way we treat addiction and
mental illness by allowing women to stay with their children through recovery. And
research shows our approach works wonders.
Jose Corral, MBA
Sales Director, Aetna
Most treatment centers give many mothers an impossible choice: Give up your
children to a guardian or foster care, or stay with your family and continue to suffer.
Yet studies confirm that a mother’s recovery is more successful when she and her
children are allowed to remain together. This is the heart of Prototypes’ philosophy
and informs all of the work we do.
Margaret Kelly
Regional Vice President
West Government, Education & Labor OptumHealth
Brandon Matloff
Financial Representative, Northwestern Mutual
Karen E. Pointer, Esq.
Partner and Attorney at Law
Lerman Pointer & Spitz LLP
Candice, at left, with Dr. Kim Rioux, Director of Prototypes’ Mother and Child Residential Treatment,
came to Prototypes through the Community Prisoner Mother’s Program; she will graduate in July.
Judith Rogala
President and Chief Executive Officer
The Catapult Factor
CLIENT SPOTLIGHT
Cindy Teti
Vice President, Luminous Capital
Cassandra Loch, LCSW, MBA
President & Chief Executive Officer, Prototypes
prototypes.org
2
Candice grew up in affluent La Jolla, California, where her
parents were respected in the surfside community. Their
money hid things, though, including her mother’s alcoholism.
As a child, Candice was desperate for emotional attachment.
With her mother drunk and her father in denial about the
family’s problems, she felt she had nowhere to turn.
Whether you choose to support a child for a day or a week, please help Prototypes
kids by considering a donation to Prototypes Children’s Fund this year.
Candice fought for her recovery as hard as she fought to reunite with her son, who
joined her at Prototypes when he was five months old. After spending two years in
treatment, Candice is equipped to handle life outside of Prototypes. In July, Candice
and her son Harley will move to Arizona with a fellow
Prototypes’ client and her children. There, they will
continue to support each other in their recovery, share
household duties and expenses and work towards
securing employment. Most importantly, they will
continue to share the friendship they started while
in treatment at Prototypes. “I’m optimistic about my
future and excited to start a new journey.”
“I thank
Prototypes for
helping me
become the person
I am today.”
Findings suggest that women who
participate in substance-abuse treatment
programs with their children are more likely
to remain drug free than are those who
participate without their children.*
More than 87% of the women in Prototypes’
residential treatment have been victims
of sexual and/or physical abuse as well as
domestic violence.*
Research shows that between 30-59% of
women with substance use disorders have
co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder
(PTSD).*
*Source data on file
Candice struggled emotionally through high school. She
began drinking and shopping compulsively – behaviors that Candice describes as
her “ways of filling the void.” These behaviors escalated over the years, fueled by her
deep unhappiness. Candice spiraled into debt and despair. After her mother died seven
years ago, Candice landed in prison twice, both times for writing bad checks for large
sums of money.
The critical difference with her second incarceration, however, was that she was
pregnant. Candice’s son, Harley, was born while she was in prison and placed in
foster care. This was unfathomable to Candice. She frantically sought a way to get
her son back, worried that he would be given up for adoption before she could reunite
with him. Finally, she heard about Prototypes’ Community Prisoner Mother Program;
after several attempts, she was accepted.
prototypes.org
Did you know?
Learn more about these and other upcoming dates at
prototypes.org
July 22-24
7th Annual Addiction Treatment Centers and
Professionals Consortium of California
(Prototypes is attending as a presenter/exhibitor) Santa Barbara, CA
October 7 | Golf on a great course for a great cause.
July 27
Client Graduation
Calendar of Events
ABOUT US
Many mothers seeking treatment for addiction,
mental illness and domestic abuse face a
heartbreaking choice: Give up their children
to a guardian or foster care and get help,
or stay with their families and continue to
suffer. Yet studies show that mothers who
receive family-centered treatment have
increased rates of post-treatment sobriety.
For more than 25 years, Prototypes has
pioneered the way we treat addiction by
allowing mothers to stay with their children
through recovery. Today, Prototypes operates
from 13 sites throughout Southern California,
annually providing 12,000 women, children
and communities with life-saving counseling,
treatment and critical life skills. Together,
we’re transforming communities, one family
at a time.
Candice’s Journey
Instead of sending clients to multiple sources for treatment, Prototypes’ unique
program addresses domestic violence, substance abuse, mental health and medical
concerns all in one place. Prototypes operates from 13 sites throughout Southern
California, annually providing 12,000 women, children and communities with lifesaving counseling, treatment and critical life skills. Together, we’re transforming
communities, one family at a time.
Prototypes residents Katherine and daughter
Emma look forward to moving into transitional
housing.
Prototypes’ Women’s Center in Pomona
September (more details coming soon)
Recovery Month Celebration
Prototypes’ Women’s Center in Pomona
Client artwork
decorates the
outpatient waiting
room at Prototypes’
Pomona location.
September 21-25
National Conference on Addiction Disorders
(Exhibitor) Anaheim, CA
October 7
Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity Golf Tournament
Wilshire Country Club
7
GET INVOLVED! DONATE, VOLUNTEER, ATTEND AN EVENT
ENTIRE COMMUNITIES AND
OTHER WOMEN LIKE MICHELLE
STAND TO BENEFIT.
Prototypes’ Pomona location
PROTOTYPES PARTNERS,
A VOLUNTEER GROUP
DEDICATED TO RAISING
AWARENESS AND FUNDS
FOR PROTOTYPES, gathered
supporters at L’Ermitage
Beverly Hills on May 4th to “Celebrate Mothers” and raise funds for the
Prototypes Children’s Fund. The first-annual event was an inspiration for all
who attended, including Prototypes’ clients. After attending, clients “felt that
they were strong, powerful women who make a difference in the world and to
the people around them,” says Dr. Kim Rioux, Director of Prototypes’ Mother
and Child Residential Treatment in Pomona. The event included a silent auction,
brunch, and presentations from Prototypes supporters and clients, including
a special singing performance by three Prototypes clients.
“Celebrate Mothers” luncheon featured
special performances by Prototypes’ clients.
For more information on Prototypes Partners, please visit
prototypes.org/about-us/partners.
Prototypes Prepares for Healthcare Reform continued from cover
coverage for pre-existing conditions for families, and required coverage for pregnant and postpartum women will directly impact
Prototypes’ clients in a positive way. “We are thrilled that the Affordable Care Act will provide better access to these services for
women and children,” says Prototypes’ Vice President, Business Development and Community Outreach, Nial Stimson. “For years,
we have known that physical health and behavioral health go hand in hand. Ensuring that women with substance use disorders
receive access to both is critical to the success of our clients.”
Los Angeles County, where Prototypes has most of its service locations, has the largest percentage of individuals who seek substance abuse treatment through the public health system. It is projected that with the newly insured, the number of addicts in
L.A. County who will get public support will grow from 42,000 to 87,000.
Prototypes is not waiting for public officials to determine funding and has been leading the way in preparation for the new
healthcare landscape. In addition to being a Healthy Way L.A. provider (see article on page 4), Prototypes also recently launched
an organization-wide healthcare reform readiness initiative. “This is an exciting time for Prototypes. In recent years, we have
contracted with insurance companies, centralized our intake staff to ensure immediate access to services for clients and gained
exposure in the community for our cost-effective and successful services,” says Stimson.
In the near future, Prototypes will add the role of a Care Navigator to their staff. This critical position will help clients understand
their options under health care reform and assist them with insurance enrollment through Covered California. Prototypes is also
pursuing Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) accreditation and the implementation of an Electronic
Health Record System (EHRS). These investments will greatly enhance the integration and quality of services throughout all of
Prototypes’ services sites and its partners.
“We are actively staying abreast of the latest developments and shaping our programs and infrastructure in accordance with the
long-term outlook for healthcare reform,” according to Loch. Prototypes is prepared to enter the new health care environment with
increased accessibility and the highest quality of services for those most in need.
6
The Community Prisoner Mother’s Program
at Prototypes
“I don’t know where
I would be if that program
didn’t exist, because the
treatment is not something
I would have ever gotten
in prison,” Michelle says.
“There is no
rehabilitation there.”
Fortunately for women who find
themselves in similar circumstances,
Prototypes’ Community Prisoners
Mother Program still exists. The
program, the only place in California
where women offenders can live with
their young children and receive intensive counseling while serving a state
prison sentence, is open to specific nonviolent offenders with up to two children
under age six. At one time, there were
ten CPMPs operating throughout the
state. Today, Prototypes is the only
program of its kind left in California.
Due to changing legislation called
realignment, which sends many
nonviolent offenders to county jail,
the CPMP has largely been phased
out. Without it, children – including
newborn infants who could have stayed
with their mothers – will be sent to
foster care or relatives.
“Our concern is making sure that
potential participants know about the
program and ensuring that all 24 beds
are full. We know that there are many
more women in state prison who could
benefit,” says April Wilson, Vice President
of Mother and Child Residential
Treatment at Prototypes.
State Senators Carol Liu and Loni Hancock,
along with journalist Lisa Ling, toured Prototypes’
Pomona facility on March 23, 2012.
State Senators Carol Liu (D- La Canada
Flintridge) and Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley)
have both worked with Prototypes to keep
the program going. “In my visits to
Prototypes, I have met mothers and
children whose lives have been transformed there. The supportive staff,
breadth of services, and long-term
strategy to improve outcomes is unmatched; this is an exceptional program,”
says Senator Liu. State studies do show
CPMP participants have a low rate of
recidivism.
Andi Lane, a legislative aide to Senator
Liu, says that legislators and other
officials are collaborating with
Prototypes to get the word out about
the program and to expand the program’s
criteria for eligibility. She adds that
private donors remain vital to the CPMP
equation. “Their money does help this
program continue because we are seeing
a decrease in state funding, just simply
because of the budget.”
“Everyone knows me as the mom
who is involved in everything,” says
Michelle, an energetic volunteer whose
commitments include the PTA, school
booster club, and Girl Scouts. It wasn’t
always this way. Nearly five years ago,
Michelle was in state prison in Chowchilla serving a sentence for fraud.
A second child from an unexpected
pregnancy, money problems at home
and the abuse of alcohol and Vicodin®
had lead her to steal from a company
where she was the longtime office
manager. “I was no longer in my own
head,” she says. While in prison, she
heard about the Community Prisoner
Mother Program (CPMP) at Prototypes
in Pomona. It was an alternative to
serving time in prison, with the bonus
that her younger daughter, by then
three, could stay with her. When she
entered the CPMP, Michelle became
one of the hundreds of women that the
facility has treated since its inception.
At Prototypes, she lived in a dorm
room with her daughter and up to
three other women and their children.
While her daughter went to onsite
day care, Michelle got help. Michelle
credits Prototypes with teaching her
how to negotiate the world. “I make
great connections with people now.
And that is something that the program
taught me: social skills. I did not have
that before. If I did not know you,
I did not want to deal with you.”
Most importantly, “Things are very
different in my parenting than they
were with my older daughter. I am
100% involved in my daughter’s
school. Before, we didn’t go to any
school functions. Now I help run
them,” she explains.
“I took full advantage of everything
Prototypes had to offer me,” she says.
“I still use those life skills every day.”
3
GET INVOLVED! DONATE, VOLUNTEER, ATTEND AN EVENT
“Healthy Way L.A. really is a
good representation of what our health care system
is going to look like moving forward.”
Leading the Way
SUPPORTER
SPOTLIGHT
Joel
Riegsecker
PROTOTYPES IS GRATEFUL for all of
the dedicated people who believe in
our mission and are willing to share
their time and talents to help us serve
thousands of families each year. One
such individual is Joel Riegsecker, who
has volunteered his time to help raise
money and awareness for Prototypes.
Joel, a benefits consultant with Stone
Tapert Insurance, was introduced
to Prototypes through a friend, who
invited him to tour our Pomona facility.
What touched Joel the most during
his first visit was how hard Prototypes
works to keep families together.
“Prototypes is a hidden gem, right in
my own community,” he marvels.
Joel is one of the founding members
and the current Chair of Prototypes’
Golf Committee. He is especially
proud that the tournament has been
successful since its first year and has
generated increased participation and
proceeds each successive year.
“We’re working to get more exposure
for the organization, to strengthen relationships with the business community
and to get more people excited about
what can be accomplished,” Riegsecker
explains. “It’s a continual process, but
there are very real opportunities and
we are poised for a great future.”
4
PROTOTYPES IS HAPPY TO
REPORT that it is leading the way
in the transition to healthcare
reform by providing outpatient
mental health care to Healthy Way
L.A. recipients. Patients are seen at
Prototypes’ clinics in Pasadena and
Pomona.
Healthy Way L.A., funded by
Healthy Way Way L.A. patients at Prototypes benefit
L.A. County, is a bridge program
from an integrated care model.
providing health care for lowerincome people who have no private
health insurance, yet do not qualify for Medi-Cal. It exists to provide medical care
(including mental health services) to qualifying patients until the Affordable Care
Act is more fully enacted next year.
“I think that Healthy Way L.A. really is a good representation of what our health care
system is going to look like moving forward,” says Doris Doss, LMFT, who manages
outpatient mental health services at Prototypes in Pasadena. Under the program,
Healthy Way L.A. patients have both primary care physicians and therapists working
together to help solve their problems.
A primary care physician usually refers a patient to Prototypes for counseling services.
Then, patients who need problem-solving therapy to change behavior related to anxiety
or depression are put under the care of a therapist, while patients with severe illnesses,
such as schizophrenia, receive care from both a therapist and a psychiatrist. Doss sees
this “integration of various disciplines and treating the patient holistically” as a model
for the future. Merilla Scott, PhD, Prototypes’ Vice President for Outpatient Behavioral
Health Services, agrees, “This integration of care ultimately benefits the patient and is
one of the best ways to ensure the continued success of our clients.”
Laila Ali
Champions Prototypes
“I can’t wait for October 7th!”
AFTER A TOUR OF PROTOTYPES’ Mother and Child Residential Treatment Center
in Oxnard, Laila Ali was driven to get involved. “I am a mother,” she explained,
“so I know how important our children are to us. If you haven’t done what you
know is right for yourself, you’re going to be motivated to do it for your children.
I feel that a mother should be able to face her struggles and work toward becoming
a stronger person with her children at her side. That is why I support this program.”
The celebrity athlete, television personality and undefeated boxing champion took
time out of her busy schedule for an inspirational talk with clients about setting
goals and aiming high. “I got into trouble when I was young. I don’t hide the fact
that I’m not perfect, because nobody is. The mistakes I have made were a part of
my journey to becoming the woman I am today,” Ali told the group. “We can’t let
our past experiences or other people define who we are. Who we are today is
what counts.”
“No matter what you’ve been through or what you’re going through, you can’t
let society define who you are. Love yourself, understand your past mistakes and
move forward,” she counseled. “This is how I have empowered myself and you
can do the same.”
“These folks may have experienced some type of recent crisis or may be struggling
with symptoms of their depression or their anxiety,” explains Doss. “Usually it’s about
six to ten sessions. It’s a brief therapy model, problem-focused and solution-oriented.”
This whole-person approach to care is designed to improve health, enhance client
care and reduce healthcare costs.
Ali is slated to host Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity Golf Tournament on
Monday, October 7th at the Wilshire Country Club. “The golf tournament is
a great way to show my support for a great cause on a great course,” Ali said.
“I can’t wait for October!”
Since beginning the program in 2011, Prototypes has served 162 patients between the
two locations. “Healthy Way L.A. has really been a good starting point and an example
of what’s to come on a larger scale moving forward in 2014 with the Affordable Care
Act,” says Doss.
prototypes.org/events or call 213.542.3856.
For more information on the Golf Tournament, please visit
Laila Ali visits with Prototypes’
clients, counsels them to “aim high.”
5
GET INVOLVED! DONATE, VOLUNTEER, ATTEND AN EVENT
“Healthy Way L.A. really is a
good representation of what our health care system
is going to look like moving forward.”
Leading the Way
SUPPORTER
SPOTLIGHT
Joel
Riegsecker
PROTOTYPES IS GRATEFUL for all of
the dedicated people who believe in
our mission and are willing to share
their time and talents to help us serve
thousands of families each year. One
such individual is Joel Riegsecker, who
has volunteered his time to help raise
money and awareness for Prototypes.
Joel, a benefits consultant with Stone
Tapert Insurance, was introduced
to Prototypes through a friend, who
invited him to tour our Pomona facility.
What touched Joel the most during
his first visit was how hard Prototypes
works to keep families together.
“Prototypes is a hidden gem, right in
my own community,” he marvels.
Joel is one of the founding members
and the current Chair of Prototypes’
Golf Committee. He is especially
proud that the tournament has been
successful since its first year and has
generated increased participation and
proceeds each successive year.
“We’re working to get more exposure
for the organization, to strengthen relationships with the business community
and to get more people excited about
what can be accomplished,” Riegsecker
explains. “It’s a continual process, but
there are very real opportunities and
we are poised for a great future.”
4
PROTOTYPES IS HAPPY TO
REPORT that it is leading the way
in the transition to healthcare
reform by providing outpatient
mental health care to Healthy Way
L.A. recipients. Patients are seen at
Prototypes’ clinics in Pasadena and
Pomona.
Healthy Way L.A., funded by
Healthy Way Way L.A. patients at Prototypes benefit
L.A. County, is a bridge program
from an integrated care model.
providing health care for lowerincome people who have no private
health insurance, yet do not qualify for Medi-Cal. It exists to provide medical care
(including mental health services) to qualifying patients until the Affordable Care
Act is more fully enacted next year.
“I think that Healthy Way L.A. really is a good representation of what our health care
system is going to look like moving forward,” says Doris Doss, LMFT, who manages
outpatient mental health services at Prototypes in Pasadena. Under the program,
Healthy Way L.A. patients have both primary care physicians and therapists working
together to help solve their problems.
A primary care physician usually refers a patient to Prototypes for counseling services.
Then, patients who need problem-solving therapy to change behavior related to anxiety
or depression are put under the care of a therapist, while patients with severe illnesses,
such as schizophrenia, receive care from both a therapist and a psychiatrist. Doss sees
this “integration of various disciplines and treating the patient holistically” as a model
for the future. Merilla Scott, PhD, Prototypes’ Vice President for Outpatient Behavioral
Health Services, agrees, “This integration of care ultimately benefits the patient and is
one of the best ways to ensure the continued success of our clients.”
Laila Ali
Champions Prototypes
“I can’t wait for October 7th!”
AFTER A TOUR OF PROTOTYPES’ Mother and Child Residential Treatment Center
in Oxnard, Laila Ali was driven to get involved. “I am a mother,” she explained,
“so I know how important our children are to us. If you haven’t done what you
know is right for yourself, you’re going to be motivated to do it for your children.
I feel that a mother should be able to face her struggles and work toward becoming
a stronger person with her children at her side. That is why I support this program.”
The celebrity athlete, television personality and undefeated boxing champion took
time out of her busy schedule for an inspirational talk with clients about setting
goals and aiming high. “I got into trouble when I was young. I don’t hide the fact
that I’m not perfect, because nobody is. The mistakes I have made were a part of
my journey to becoming the woman I am today,” Ali told the group. “We can’t let
our past experiences or other people define who we are. Who we are today is
what counts.”
“No matter what you’ve been through or what you’re going through, you can’t
let society define who you are. Love yourself, understand your past mistakes and
move forward,” she counseled. “This is how I have empowered myself and you
can do the same.”
“These folks may have experienced some type of recent crisis or may be struggling
with symptoms of their depression or their anxiety,” explains Doss. “Usually it’s about
six to ten sessions. It’s a brief therapy model, problem-focused and solution-oriented.”
This whole-person approach to care is designed to improve health, enhance client
care and reduce healthcare costs.
Ali is slated to host Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity Golf Tournament on
Monday, October 7th at the Wilshire Country Club. “The golf tournament is
a great way to show my support for a great cause on a great course,” Ali said.
“I can’t wait for October!”
Since beginning the program in 2011, Prototypes has served 162 patients between the
two locations. “Healthy Way L.A. has really been a good starting point and an example
of what’s to come on a larger scale moving forward in 2014 with the Affordable Care
Act,” says Doss.
prototypes.org/events or call 213.542.3856.
For more information on the Golf Tournament, please visit
Laila Ali visits with Prototypes’
clients, counsels them to “aim high.”
5
GET INVOLVED! DONATE, VOLUNTEER, ATTEND AN EVENT
ENTIRE COMMUNITIES AND
OTHER WOMEN LIKE MICHELLE
STAND TO BENEFIT.
Prototypes’ Pomona location
PROTOTYPES PARTNERS,
A VOLUNTEER GROUP
DEDICATED TO RAISING
AWARENESS AND FUNDS
FOR PROTOTYPES, gathered
supporters at L’Ermitage
Beverly Hills on May 4th to “Celebrate Mothers” and raise funds for the
Prototypes Children’s Fund. The first-annual event was an inspiration for all
who attended, including Prototypes’ clients. After attending, clients “felt that
they were strong, powerful women who make a difference in the world and to
the people around them,” says Dr. Kim Rioux, Director of Prototypes’ Mother
and Child Residential Treatment in Pomona. The event included a silent auction,
brunch, and presentations from Prototypes supporters and clients, including
a special singing performance by three Prototypes clients.
“Celebrate Mothers” luncheon featured
special performances by Prototypes’ clients.
For more information on Prototypes Partners, please visit
prototypes.org/about-us/partners.
Prototypes Prepares for Healthcare Reform continued from cover
coverage for pre-existing conditions for families, and required coverage for pregnant and postpartum women will directly impact
Prototypes’ clients in a positive way. “We are thrilled that the Affordable Care Act will provide better access to these services for
women and children,” says Prototypes’ Vice President, Business Development and Community Outreach, Nial Stimson. “For years,
we have known that physical health and behavioral health go hand in hand. Ensuring that women with substance use disorders
receive access to both is critical to the success of our clients.”
Los Angeles County, where Prototypes has most of its service locations, has the largest percentage of individuals who seek substance abuse treatment through the public health system. It is projected that with the newly insured, the number of addicts in
L.A. County who will get public support will grow from 42,000 to 87,000.
Prototypes is not waiting for public officials to determine funding and has been leading the way in preparation for the new
healthcare landscape. In addition to being a Healthy Way L.A. provider (see article on page 4), Prototypes also recently launched
an organization-wide healthcare reform readiness initiative. “This is an exciting time for Prototypes. In recent years, we have
contracted with insurance companies, centralized our intake staff to ensure immediate access to services for clients and gained
exposure in the community for our cost-effective and successful services,” says Stimson.
In the near future, Prototypes will add the role of a Care Navigator to their staff. This critical position will help clients understand
their options under health care reform and assist them with insurance enrollment through Covered California. Prototypes is also
pursuing Commission on Accreditation for Rehabilitation Facilities (CARF) accreditation and the implementation of an Electronic
Health Record System (EHRS). These investments will greatly enhance the integration and quality of services throughout all of
Prototypes’ services sites and its partners.
“We are actively staying abreast of the latest developments and shaping our programs and infrastructure in accordance with the
long-term outlook for healthcare reform,” according to Loch. Prototypes is prepared to enter the new health care environment with
increased accessibility and the highest quality of services for those most in need.
6
The Community Prisoner Mother’s Program
at Prototypes
“I don’t know where
I would be if that program
didn’t exist, because the
treatment is not something
I would have ever gotten
in prison,” Michelle says.
“There is no
rehabilitation there.”
Fortunately for women who find
themselves in similar circumstances,
Prototypes’ Community Prisoners
Mother Program still exists. The
program, the only place in California
where women offenders can live with
their young children and receive intensive counseling while serving a state
prison sentence, is open to specific nonviolent offenders with up to two children
under age six. At one time, there were
ten CPMPs operating throughout the
state. Today, Prototypes is the only
program of its kind left in California.
Due to changing legislation called
realignment, which sends many
nonviolent offenders to county jail,
the CPMP has largely been phased
out. Without it, children – including
newborn infants who could have stayed
with their mothers – will be sent to
foster care or relatives.
“Our concern is making sure that
potential participants know about the
program and ensuring that all 24 beds
are full. We know that there are many
more women in state prison who could
benefit,” says April Wilson, Vice President
of Mother and Child Residential
Treatment at Prototypes.
State Senators Carol Liu and Loni Hancock,
along with journalist Lisa Ling, toured Prototypes’
Pomona facility on March 23, 2012.
State Senators Carol Liu (D- La Canada
Flintridge) and Loni Hancock (D-Berkeley)
have both worked with Prototypes to keep
the program going. “In my visits to
Prototypes, I have met mothers and
children whose lives have been transformed there. The supportive staff,
breadth of services, and long-term
strategy to improve outcomes is unmatched; this is an exceptional program,”
says Senator Liu. State studies do show
CPMP participants have a low rate of
recidivism.
Andi Lane, a legislative aide to Senator
Liu, says that legislators and other
officials are collaborating with
Prototypes to get the word out about
the program and to expand the program’s
criteria for eligibility. She adds that
private donors remain vital to the CPMP
equation. “Their money does help this
program continue because we are seeing
a decrease in state funding, just simply
because of the budget.”
“Everyone knows me as the mom
who is involved in everything,” says
Michelle, an energetic volunteer whose
commitments include the PTA, school
booster club, and Girl Scouts. It wasn’t
always this way. Nearly five years ago,
Michelle was in state prison in Chowchilla serving a sentence for fraud.
A second child from an unexpected
pregnancy, money problems at home
and the abuse of alcohol and Vicodin®
had lead her to steal from a company
where she was the longtime office
manager. “I was no longer in my own
head,” she says. While in prison, she
heard about the Community Prisoner
Mother Program (CPMP) at Prototypes
in Pomona. It was an alternative to
serving time in prison, with the bonus
that her younger daughter, by then
three, could stay with her. When she
entered the CPMP, Michelle became
one of the hundreds of women that the
facility has treated since its inception.
At Prototypes, she lived in a dorm
room with her daughter and up to
three other women and their children.
While her daughter went to onsite
day care, Michelle got help. Michelle
credits Prototypes with teaching her
how to negotiate the world. “I make
great connections with people now.
And that is something that the program
taught me: social skills. I did not have
that before. If I did not know you,
I did not want to deal with you.”
Most importantly, “Things are very
different in my parenting than they
were with my older daughter. I am
100% involved in my daughter’s
school. Before, we didn’t go to any
school functions. Now I help run
them,” she explains.
“I took full advantage of everything
Prototypes had to offer me,” she says.
“I still use those life skills every day.”
3
Prototypes Post
SUMMER 2013
CHILDREN’S FUND
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ann McClanathan, Chair Person
Vice President, Partner Development, myStrength.com
Seeking treatment for addiction, mental illness and domestic abuse is difficult enough.
Giving up a child in order to make it happen is heartbreaking. It costs $50 per day
Michael Kemp, Vice Chair Person
Founder and Principal, Michael Kemp Architects
to house and provide treatment services for one child at our residential facilities,
which adds up to $2 million annually. This year, we launched the Prototypes
Ron Burkhardt, Secretary
Managing Director, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
Children’s Fund to directly support children’s services.
Amador Sanchez, Jr., Treasurer
Chief Executive Officer, Total Intermodal Service, Inc.
For more than 25 years, Prototypes has pioneered the way we treat addiction and
mental illness by allowing women to stay with their children through recovery. And
research shows our approach works wonders.
Jose Corral, MBA
Sales Director, Aetna
Most treatment centers give many mothers an impossible choice: Give up your
children to a guardian or foster care, or stay with your family and continue to suffer.
Yet studies confirm that a mother’s recovery is more successful when she and her
children are allowed to remain together. This is the heart of Prototypes’ philosophy
and informs all of the work we do.
Margaret Kelly
Regional Vice President
West Government, Education & Labor OptumHealth
Brandon Matloff
Financial Representative, Northwestern Mutual
Karen E. Pointer, Esq.
Partner and Attorney at Law
Lerman Pointer & Spitz LLP
Candice, at left, with Dr. Kim Rioux, Director of Prototypes’ Mother and Child Residential Treatment,
came to Prototypes through the Community Prisoner Mother’s Program; she will graduate in July.
Judith Rogala
President and Chief Executive Officer
The Catapult Factor
CLIENT SPOTLIGHT
Cindy Teti
Vice President, Luminous Capital
Cassandra Loch, LCSW, MBA
President & Chief Executive Officer, Prototypes
prototypes.org
2
Candice grew up in affluent La Jolla, California, where her
parents were respected in the surfside community. Their
money hid things, though, including her mother’s alcoholism.
As a child, Candice was desperate for emotional attachment.
With her mother drunk and her father in denial about the
family’s problems, she felt she had nowhere to turn.
Whether you choose to support a child for a day or a week, please help Prototypes
kids by considering a donation to Prototypes Children’s Fund this year.
Candice fought for her recovery as hard as she fought to reunite with her son, who
joined her at Prototypes when he was five months old. After spending two years in
treatment, Candice is equipped to handle life outside of Prototypes. In July, Candice
and her son Harley will move to Arizona with a fellow
Prototypes’ client and her children. There, they will
continue to support each other in their recovery, share
household duties and expenses and work towards
securing employment. Most importantly, they will
continue to share the friendship they started while
in treatment at Prototypes. “I’m optimistic about my
future and excited to start a new journey.”
“I thank
Prototypes for
helping me
become the person
I am today.”
Findings suggest that women who
participate in substance-abuse treatment
programs with their children are more likely
to remain drug free than are those who
participate without their children.*
More than 87% of the women in Prototypes’
residential treatment have been victims
of sexual and/or physical abuse as well as
domestic violence.*
Research shows that between 30-59% of
women with substance use disorders have
co-occurring posttraumatic stress disorder
(PTSD).*
*Source data on file
Candice struggled emotionally through high school. She
began drinking and shopping compulsively – behaviors that Candice describes as
her “ways of filling the void.” These behaviors escalated over the years, fueled by her
deep unhappiness. Candice spiraled into debt and despair. After her mother died seven
years ago, Candice landed in prison twice, both times for writing bad checks for large
sums of money.
The critical difference with her second incarceration, however, was that she was
pregnant. Candice’s son, Harley, was born while she was in prison and placed in
foster care. This was unfathomable to Candice. She frantically sought a way to get
her son back, worried that he would be given up for adoption before she could reunite
with him. Finally, she heard about Prototypes’ Community Prisoner Mother Program;
after several attempts, she was accepted.
prototypes.org
Did you know?
Learn more about these and other upcoming dates at
prototypes.org
July 22-24
7th Annual Addiction Treatment Centers and
Professionals Consortium of California
(Prototypes is attending as a presenter/exhibitor) Santa Barbara, CA
October 7 | Golf on a great course for a great cause.
July 27
Client Graduation
Calendar of Events
ABOUT US
Many mothers seeking treatment for addiction,
mental illness and domestic abuse face a
heartbreaking choice: Give up their children
to a guardian or foster care and get help,
or stay with their families and continue to
suffer. Yet studies show that mothers who
receive family-centered treatment have
increased rates of post-treatment sobriety.
For more than 25 years, Prototypes has
pioneered the way we treat addiction by
allowing mothers to stay with their children
through recovery. Today, Prototypes operates
from 13 sites throughout Southern California,
annually providing 12,000 women, children
and communities with life-saving counseling,
treatment and critical life skills. Together,
we’re transforming communities, one family
at a time.
Candice’s Journey
Instead of sending clients to multiple sources for treatment, Prototypes’ unique
program addresses domestic violence, substance abuse, mental health and medical
concerns all in one place. Prototypes operates from 13 sites throughout Southern
California, annually providing 12,000 women, children and communities with lifesaving counseling, treatment and critical life skills. Together, we’re transforming
communities, one family at a time.
Prototypes residents Katherine and daughter
Emma look forward to moving into transitional
housing.
Prototypes’ Women’s Center in Pomona
September (more details coming soon)
Recovery Month Celebration
Prototypes’ Women’s Center in Pomona
Client artwork
decorates the
outpatient waiting
room at Prototypes’
Pomona location.
September 21-25
National Conference on Addiction Disorders
(Exhibitor) Anaheim, CA
October 7
Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity Golf Tournament
Wilshire Country Club
7
WELCOME MESSAGE from Prototypes’ President and CEO
Every day, thousands of women in our communities suffer from poverty, domestic violence, drug and
alcohol abuse, and mental health issues – often while pregnant or caring for young children. At Prototypes,
we step in on their behalf, helping them recover from addiction and trauma, teaching them how to be
nurturing mothers, and providing practical tools and skills so they can live fulfilling, independent lives. What distinguishes Prototypes
from other agencies is that we do all this while allowing mothers and their children to remain together. True to our name, our
innovative treatment model serves as a “prototype” for other organizations that are helping women and fragile families everywhere.
Prototypes Post
SUMMER
Inspiring stories and news from Prototypes
2013
I am thrilled to introduce Prototypes’ new print newsletter to our community. The stories within these pages provide more
in-depth coverage on Protoypes’ impact, reflecting the myriad ways in which Prototypes gives so many a second chance. It is
a privilege to share them with you.
See inside to learn how Prototypes
helps its clients to lead fulfilling,
independent lives!
1000 North Alameda Street, Suite 390
Los Angeles, CA 90012
INSIDE
Client Spotlight. . . . . . . . . . . . .2
Cassandra Loch, LCSW, MBA, President and CEO
In alignment
with Prototypes’
mission, ACA will
make insurance more
accessible to women
and their families.
Prototypes Prepares for Healthcare Reform
BEGINNING ON JANUARY 1, 2014 KEY ELEMENTS OF THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT
(ACA) WILL BE IMPLEMENTED IN CALIFORNIA, increasing the number of individuals
who have healthcare insurance. Commonly known as healthcare reform, the ACA
will change many aspects of Prototypes’ service delivery. “While this is ultimately a
positive development for the individuals and communities Prototypes serves, in order
to fulfill our mission, we need to make changes to prepare for the new environment,”
says Cassandra Loch, Prototypes’ President and CEO.
Currently, many of Prototypes’ clients do not have healthcare insurance when they
first seek treatment. According to Covered California, California’s state healthcare
exchange, next year over 2 million California residents will qualify for federal financial
assistance and will enroll in a health plan by 2017. Services for substance abuse will
be required as an essential health benefit under the part of the ACA that expands
Medicaid, and the number of addicts who will be eligible for this health insurance will
rise by 150%. Prototypes has begun to build its program and administrative capacities
in order to accept these newly insured individuals.
ACA will also make insurance more accessible to women and their families, a provision
that is in perfect alignment with Prototypes’ mission. Access to preventive care,
continued on page 6
The Community Prisoners
Mother’s Program . . . . . . . . . . 3
Supporter Spotlight . . . . . . . . . 4
Healthy Way L.A.. . . . . . . . . . . .4
4th Annual Golf Tournament. . 5
Prototypes Partners. . . . . . . . . 6
Children’s Fund . . . . . . . . . . . . 7
Calendar of Events. . . . . . . . . . 7
LAILA ALI will host
Prototypes’ 4th Annual Charity
Golf Tournament on Monday,
October 7th at the Wilshire
Country Club. See page 5
for more information!

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