Winter 2014 - Prototypes

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Winter 2014 - Prototypes
MESSAGE from Prototypes’ President and CEO
FOR MOST WOMEN, overcoming an addiction while suffering
from mental illness or a history of trauma is the challenge
of a lifetime. Finding treatment that takes into account all
of an individual’s needs, along with those of her family can
sometimes be impossible.
At Prototypes, we’re working to change the way in which
communities approach treatment. We believe that substance use
and mental health disorders should be viewed and treated the same
as any other medical condition, with the same care and concern
that our society and health care systems give to physical ailments.
PROTOTYPES IS A GAME-CHANGER . Not only do we provide treatment to the person who is struggling, we involve her entire
support system – children, partners, friends and other family members – so they understand her challenges and needs as well
as their own. Involving the entire family or support system helps women succeed in their recovery long after they leave Prototypes.
And it enables us to help reduce stigma, increase compassion and make a positive impact for families today and for generations
to come.
During the holiday season, everyone should be able to celebrate and spend time with their loved ones. But we know that this is
not always the case, because many continue to suffer in silence and shame. Thankfully, with the help of our supporters who have
attended an event, given of their time, or who have made a donation to Prototypes this past year, more families are living healthy
lives. Together, we will continue working to create more compassionate communities and help individual families to create new
holiday traditions that will last many lifetimes.
From my family to yours, Happy Holidays!
Cassandra Loch, MBA, LCSW, President and CEO
Prototypes Post
WINTER
2014
Inspiring stories and news from Prototypes
Gamechanger!
PROTOTYPES’
NEW PROGRAM
TAKES FAMILY TREATMENT
TO THE NEXT LEVEL
Patricia and her daughter are proof
that we are saving lives .
Right now there are women who
desperately want and need treatment,
but cannot afford it .
Patricia remains steadfast in her recovery.
She has a new home, a successful career and
a thriving child.
Your life-saving donation will help
provide access to the services they
urgently need . We appreciate your
generosity .
More than 8.3 million children live with at least one parent who abuses or is
dependent on alcohol or illicit drugs. Parental substance use accounts for close
to 80% of substantiated child abuse and neglect cases. Often, though, treatment
programs focus only on the parent’s needs.
Children of Prototypes:
Jacob’s Story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Prototypes Honors the
Black Women Lawyers
Association of Los Angeles . . .4
Prototypes Three-Year
Strategic Growth Plan . . . . . . . . 5
A new demonstration program funded by the Administration on Children and Families
is allowing Prototypes to focus on developing activities and tools to engage a client’s
children and her entire family. This new family-centered treatment program, called
Healthy Children, Strong Families (HCSF), is provided through Prototypes’ residential
facility in Pomona.
continued on page 6
Inspiring Hope, Health and Independence
Ribbon Cutting and
National Recovery Month
Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
The devastating effects of child abuse and neglect very often lead to poor and costly
physical and psychological health outcomes later in life. According to the Centers for
Disease Control, for one year of confirmed cases of child maltreatment, the associated
costs over a lifetime are estimated at approximately $124 billion.
While Prototypes’ residential program has always included mothers and their children,
HCSF provides additional staff and tools to minimize the risk of child abandonment or
placement in foster care and increases the likelihood of positive outcomes for the entire
family when they reenter the community.
Donate online at prototypes.org.
Thank you!
INSIDE
Prototypes Unveils Renovated
Pomona Women’s Center
See page 2 for
more information!
Prototypes Post
WINTER 2014
Prototypes Ribbon-Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ann McClanathan, Chair Person
Vice President of Business Development,
myStrength.com
continued from page 2
Michael Kemp, Vice Chair Person
Founder and Principal, Michael Kemp Architects
Ron Burkhardt, Secretary
Managing Director, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
Jim Quinn, Treasurer
Former Senior Management Executive
Margaret Kelly
Regional Vice President, West Government,
Education & Labor, OptumHealth
Brandon Matloff
Financial Representative, Northwestern Mutual
Karen E . Pointer, Esq .
Partner and Attorney at Law, Lerman Pointer
& Spitz LLP
Cindy Teti
Senior Manager, Capital Group
Cassandra Loch
President and Chief Executive Officer, Prototypes
ABOUT US
Prototypes is a lifeline to women who are
struggling with addiction and other serious
issues such as domestic violence and mental
illness . Many of these women are mothers
who face an impossible choice: give up their
children to foster care or a guardian, or
continue to suffer . Prototypes is a game
changer by allowing women to keep their
children with them during treatment so
they both get the help they need . And, by
combining comprehensive treatment with
practical life-skills training, we prepare
women for long-term success .
Prototypes provides comprehensive,
integrated, and evidence-based services to
10,000 individuals each year at 14 locations
throughout Southern California . Prototypes
is an internationally recognized, CARF
Accredited non-profit organization dedicated
to improving communities impacted by
substance use, mental illness and domestic
violence .
prototypes.org
Prototypes staff and supporters cut the ribbon to commemorate the renovations at the Pomona
Women’s Center. From left: Jay Virbel, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
Associate Director of Female Offender Programs; Christy Beaudin, LCSW, CPHQ, Prototypes VP
of Quality & Safety; April Wilson, Prototypes VP of Mother and Child Residential; California State
Senator Carol Liu; Ann McClanathan, Protoypes Board Chair; Cassandra Loch, Prototypes President
& CEO; Nial Stimson, Prototypes VP of Business Development; California Senator Norma J. Torres;
Levi Martin, Prototypes VP of Finance & Administrative Operations; and Angie Castro, Assistant
Field Director for Supervisor Gloria Molina.
EVENT SPOTLIGHT
Prototypes Ribbon-Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration
PROTOTYPES’ NEWLY RENOVATED POMONA WOMEN’S
CENTER was the scene of celebration as supporters,
Board members, staff and clients joined with elected
officials to celebrate the revamped facility.
The Pomona Women’s Center renovations provides
Prototypes’ staff with a fully equipped facility to
match the high-quality services they deliver each day
to women and their children. The upgrades involved
nearly every room, helping to improve the Center after
nearly 30 years of providing treatment services while
maintaining its warm, home-like feel.
“Because of Prototypes,
thousands of women
with drug addictions
have access to services
when they wouldn’t
have the opportunity
elsewhere.”
SENATOR
NORMA J . TORRES
The celebration was made even more special because it took place during National
Recovery Month. Now in its 25th year, National Recovery Month serves a critical role in
reminding the public that addiction is a disease and, as such, should be afforded the
same research, funding and treatment as any other chronic disease. National Recovery
Month also serves to remind the public of the growing need for programs like Prototypes.
Last year alone, nearly 23 million Americans needed treatment for drug or alcohol use.
Less than 11 percent of that total actually received the treatment they needed to recover.
“As a mom, I could never imagine having to choose between my health and my son,
and no one should have to,” said Prototypes President and CEO Cassandra Loch.
“Prototypes keeps families together and provides everything we can for both moms
and their children,” she said, “making sure the next generation does not suffer from
addiction, incarceration and poverty.”
continued from page 6
HCSF is a game-changer for women who face unimaginable
challenges. Recently, a young women and her two-year-old toddler
came to Prototypes seeking treatment. They had been homeless and
arrived with virtually nothing. Prototypes staff immediately found
space. Desperate and worried about the well-being of her children,
she had left her eight-month old baby in the care of others while she
sought help. Unfortunately, the caretakers for her baby proved
unreliable. During her second week at Prototypes, with no warning,
nine armed police officers arrived to arrest her for child abandonment.
“We were able to have the police sit down with the client and explain
the situation,” said Ms. Poirier. Although police still arrested her,
Prototypes staff assured her that they would assist her through
the process.
The event also honored individuals who have
supported Prototypes’ mission to ensure that the
most vulnerable in our community receive life-saving
treatment. Ms. Loch and April Wilson, BA, RAS, Vice
President of Mother and Child Residential Treatment,
presented the Prototypes Champion Award to two
elected officials for their advocacy and support:
U.S. Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod
and California State Senator Norma Torres. The
Champion Award was also presented to the Black
Women Lawyers Association of Los Angeles for their
many years of support.
California State Senator Carol Liu, who received
Prototypes’ Champion Award in 2013, was also present
to celebrate the renovations. Senator Liu played an
integral role in helping to keep our Community
Prisoner Mother Program open and highlighted why
programs like those at Prototypes are critical for our
communities.
“The way we deal with incarcerated women does not
just affect women. It also has a profound impact on
their children,” Senator Liu stated. “It’s time we treat
addiction as a health issue, not as a crime.”
When a mother is arrested, there is an immediate negative impact
on the child,” said Ms. Child. “HCSF has the capabilities to find
ways to transform how law enforcement and the courts deal with
these situations.”
The HCSF Collaborative Council met and discussed the situation.
A representative from the District Attorney’s office was able to help
Prototypes advocate for the client. To avoid future situations, such
as armed police arriving to arrest a client, Prototypes is currently
working with the police department to train them on better
approaches to working with this population.
“The HCSF program was made for women like this client,”
Ms. Poirier said. “Women who, because of homelessness, trauma
and addiction, have never had the comprehensive support to turn
their lives around.”
Above, the new computer lab provides computer
skills training to help clients prepare for employment.
The new family dormitories provide a warm and
comfortable space for moms and their kids.
continued on page 7
2
Newsletter design by 2B Communications
7
New Program Helps Ensure Healthy Children, Strong Families continued from cover
“Prototypes continues to
break new ground in addressing
the real and complex needs
of women and children.”
You can help other families
like Jacob and his mom .
Donate today at prototypes .org
KATHY JETT, Policy Consultant
California Forward and Former Director of Alcohol and
Drug Programs and Undersecretary of “Adult Programs”
for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
parenting classes at Prototypes doesn’t have to repeat the
process by taking additional parenting classes that may be
required by her social worker.
“This project takes family-centered treatment to the next level,”
stated April Wilson, BA, RAS, Prototypes Vice President,
Mother and Child Residential Treatment. “It encompasses the
whole family so clients have a solid support system once they
complete treatment.”
In partnership with Children and Family Futures, Prototypes
launched HCSF in early 2014 along with 11 community-based
partner organizations in the San Gabriel Valley that form the
HCSF Collaborative Council. While Prototypes provides an
innovative, trauma-informed treatment program, this collaboration
is key to having a positive impact on the entire system of care
among providers, public agencies and families. Usually, clients
in substance use treatment programs must meet requirements
for multiple service providers and systems. Unfortunately,
those requirements can often overwhelm clients, or it can
be almost impossible to meet all requirements in the allotted
amount of time.
“Often, clients have to repeat their traumatic histories to each
provider from whom they need to receive services, which isn’t
necessary,” said Holly Child, research associate with Children
and Family Futures. HCSF is an opportunity to improve
communications among service providers, so clients don’t
have to relive their trauma each time they encounter a social
worker, therapist, case manager and others. In addition,
HCSF provides a formal way to track cases, so a client taking
6
Children and Family Futures is a California-based organization
that works to improve collaborative policy and practice across
the substance abuse, child welfare and judicial systems
throughout the country. And the organization is not a typical
evaluator. Rather, it has a vested interest in creating effective
models for families that can be replicated elsewhere. With their
help, the HCSF project is able to use a single resource, the
Family Care Coordination document, to foster collaboration
across providers. This unique tool was developed because,
as Ms. Child noted, “We couldn’t find any current tools that
supported what we needed.”
Another critical resource is a newly created staff position, the
Family Navigator.
“The Family Navigator connects with each person a client
identifies as important in her life,” explained Julia Poirier, LCSW,
Manager I at Prototypes’ Pomona Women’s Center. “We include
children, partners, grandparents or foster parents — and then
reach out and provide them with anything they may need.”
This goes beyond simple referrals to other services or pamphlets
with information. The Family Navigator identifies and addresses
broader family needs. For example, she may meet with a client’s
children who are in kinship care and determine that a child
needs therapy. She will not only find the therapist, she will
make sure an appointment has been made and that the child
actually receives treatment, even if it means locating a therapist
who can come to the child’s school.
“It’s more of a partnership with a family, holding their hand and
walking them through treatment, so they all come out stronger,”
said Ms. Poirier. Prototypes also provides groups and classes for
family members.
CHILDREN OF PROTOTYPES
Jacob’s Story
“Prototypes changed the way I see
my mom. Now she is my role model.”
AS A TRAINED COUNSELOR FOR ADOLESCENTS AT RISK FOR
SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS, Jacob has a special reason for
connecting so well with his clients: He’s been in their shoes.
Growing up, Jacob’s life was anything but stable. His mother,
Sharon, moved often, bringing Jacob and his younger brother
with her from place to place as she struggled with her addiction.
“I didn’t know if I was going to go to school every day,” Jacob
shared recently. “I didn’t know where I was going to sleep or
where I was going to wake up.”
Jacob could tell when his mom was on drugs, and he constantly
feared that the next knock on the door would be from police.
There were times when Sharon would just go away, leaving
him alone to care for his brother.
Then his brother was taken away.
“That really made my mom realize that she had a problem,”
Jacob said.
Sharon sought treatment at Prototypes. There, she got sober
and healthy, and she learned how to be a better parent. She
also gained skills to start a new career helping other struggling
women in circumstances similar to hers.
Jacob knows how important it was for his mom to keep her
children with her during treatment. He understands how
terrifying it is for mothers not to know how their kids are
doing. “It’s motivation for them to keep going,” Jacob said.
In turn, by staying close to their mom, Jacob and his brother
were able to witness her transformation.
You can watch Jacob’s video on our
homepage at prototypes.org.
Sharon has been clean and sober for 10 years, and she
works at Prototypes as a Certified Addiction Treatment
Counselor and vocational coordinator. Jacob and his mom
have a great relationship.
“Prototypes changed the way I see my mom,” Jacob noted.
“Now she is my role model.” Mother and son support each
other professionally, and Jacob’s younger brother is also
doing well.
Jacob is completing his bachelor’s degree in sociology and
plans to pursue a master’s degree in social work. He says his
experience with his mother and Prototypes has inspired him
to help others. He plans to keep helping teens struggling
with addiction so they will never have to hit rock bottom.
“Prototypes,” he said, “has taught me gratitude.”
3
PROTOTYPES
THREE-YEAR STRATEGIC GROWTH PLAN HIGHLIGHTS 2014 – 2017
Prototypes is keenly aware of the importance that strategic growth planning plays in our ability to chart a
successful course for the future . Over the past several months, we’ve engaged in a facilitated process involving
our Board of Directors and key staff . The result: An actionable three-year strategic growth plan that is already
guiding us to new levels of success .
“A hallmark of our approach to doing business is keeping our fingers on the pulse of what’s
happening in the field and staying ahead of the ‘change’ curve. Our strategic planning
process helps us evaluate our opportunities and create the roadmap that is already taking
us to the next level.” CASSANDRA LOCH, CEO
Cassandra Loch, Prototypes President & CEO,
presented the 2014 Prototypes Champion
Award to Linda Rosborough, Tami Warren and
Karen Pointer from the Black Women Lawyers
Association of Los Angeles.
WHERE WE WANT TO BE IN THREE YEARS
Our plan builds on our strengths, aligns with our mission, leverages our assets, conveys a strong brand,
promotes organizational stability, and fosters growth . It is our roadmap to fulfilling our vision: to consistently
exceed the expectations of our clients, our employees and our funders. Throughout the next three years,
Prototypes’ actions will be guided by a set of core principles and six strategic goals .
SUPPORT HIGHLIGHT
Prototypes Honors the Black Women
Lawyers Association of Los Angeles
MORE THAN 10 YEARS AGO, BOARD MEMBER KAREN POINTER INTRODUCED
PROTOTYPES TO THE BLACK WOMEN LAWYERS ASSOCIATION OF LOS ANGELES
(BWL) . Since then, the annual support of this group has been incredibly important
to Prototypes. To thank BWL for its ongoing support, Prototypes presented the
association with its Champion Award last September during a Ribbon Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration.
CORE PRINCIPLES We believe that in order for Prototypes to thrive we must:
“Prototypes is such an
important force in the
community. It touches
so many lives.”
BWL was founded in 1975 as a support system for black women attorneys and evolved into a premier association
dedicated to giving back to the community. The association encourages young black women to go to law school, and
it provides scholarships to ensure diversity in the profession.
“Our work in the community continues to grow and is a source of great pride for our group,” shared Tami Warren,
outgoing BWL president. “In addition to Prototypes, we participate in service projects and work in high schools in
primarily black neighborhoods.”
A Los Angeles public defender, Ms. Warren’s connection to Prototypes runs deep. The Public Defender’s office
works closely with Prototypes to help women in the criminal justice system gain access to treatment.
“My perspective is unique, since I happen to represent many of the women who end up at Prototypes.” Ms. Warren
said. One of her clients, who had a long history with drugs, was thrilled to get a bed at Prototypes and move away
from addiction and toward independence. She later reached out to Ms. Warren and let her know that the experience
had changed her life.
Now, for more than a decade, the BWL members have donated funds and volunteered their time to ensure that
families at Prototypes have a wonderful Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday.
“It is so amazing to see the light in their eyes when we bring toys and other gifts,” said Ms. Warren.
Linda Rosborough, a deputy district attorney and BWL’s Community Action Chair for the past eight years, is another
powerful advocate for BWL’s continued support of Prototypes.
“Prototypes is such an important force in the community,” Ms. Rosborough said recently. “It touches so many lives.”
4
nBe
a transformational service provider and employer
clinical leaders
nDeliver the highest-quality services
nMaintain a balance between government and private funding
nModel the highest levels of dedication and commitment
nBe externally focused and evolving
nBe
SIX STRATEGIC GOALS
1. Programs and Services: Meet the holistic needs of our clients by delivering a fully integrated continuum of care .
Key Focus Areas: Aligning structure to support expanded, integrated services; centralizing and streamlining
intake and support functions; measuring program effectiveness; expanding residential programs for women .
2. Staffing and Standards: Achieve and maintain a high-quality, interdisciplinary team approach to delivering the
Prototypes evidence-based treatment approaches .
Key Focus Areas: Standardizing evidence-based treatment models agency-wide; recruiting and retaining
top-quality staff; training staff and guiding professional development; maintaining CARF accreditation .
3. Governance and Fundraising Leadership: Build and maintain a diverse, high-performing Board that actively
advances Prototypes’ priorities .
Key Focus Areas: Ensuring strategic Board growth, development and training; operationalizing key principles
of high-performing boards .
4. Communications: Increase Prototypes’ visibility and strengthen our reputation as a leader in the field .
Key Focus Areas: Expanding our clinical leadership role in the field; enhancing relationships with key
stakeholders; serving as an expert resource for policy- makers and the media on issues related to our mission .
5. Infrastructure—Facilities and Technology: Ensure that our facilities and technology reflect our commitment to
quality and enable our evidence-based treatment approaches .
Key Focus Areas: Fully implementing Electronic Health Records integration to improve operations, enhance
clinical collaboration and measure outcomes; proactively ensuring that facilities are equipped to meet
program needs .
6. Fiscal Management and Revenue: Set and maintain a balanced budget through prudent financial discipline and
stringent fiscal control within a diversified revenue model .
Key Focus Areas: Increasing private sector support; expanding outreach capacity to build private pay/managed
care revenue; maximizing service contracts .
Watch for
progress updates
on our website:
prototypes.org
5
PROTOTYPES
THREE-YEAR STRATEGIC GROWTH PLAN HIGHLIGHTS 2014 – 2017
Prototypes is keenly aware of the importance that strategic growth planning plays in our ability to chart a
successful course for the future . Over the past several months, we’ve engaged in a facilitated process involving
our Board of Directors and key staff . The result: An actionable three-year strategic growth plan that is already
guiding us to new levels of success .
“A hallmark of our approach to doing business is keeping our fingers on the pulse of what’s
happening in the field and staying ahead of the ‘change’ curve. Our strategic planning
process helps us evaluate our opportunities and create the roadmap that is already taking
us to the next level.” CASSANDRA LOCH, CEO
Cassandra Loch, Prototypes President & CEO,
presented the 2014 Prototypes Champion
Award to Linda Rosborough, Tami Warren and
Karen Pointer from the Black Women Lawyers
Association of Los Angeles.
WHERE WE WANT TO BE IN THREE YEARS
Our plan builds on our strengths, aligns with our mission, leverages our assets, conveys a strong brand,
promotes organizational stability, and fosters growth . It is our roadmap to fulfilling our vision: to consistently
exceed the expectations of our clients, our employees and our funders. Throughout the next three years,
Prototypes’ actions will be guided by a set of core principles and six strategic goals .
SUPPORT HIGHLIGHT
Prototypes Honors the Black Women
Lawyers Association of Los Angeles
MORE THAN 10 YEARS AGO, BOARD MEMBER KAREN POINTER INTRODUCED
PROTOTYPES TO THE BLACK WOMEN LAWYERS ASSOCIATION OF LOS ANGELES
(BWL) . Since then, the annual support of this group has been incredibly important
to Prototypes. To thank BWL for its ongoing support, Prototypes presented the
association with its Champion Award last September during a Ribbon Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration.
CORE PRINCIPLES We believe that in order for Prototypes to thrive we must:
“Prototypes is such an
important force in the
community. It touches
so many lives.”
BWL was founded in 1975 as a support system for black women attorneys and evolved into a premier association
dedicated to giving back to the community. The association encourages young black women to go to law school, and
it provides scholarships to ensure diversity in the profession.
“Our work in the community continues to grow and is a source of great pride for our group,” shared Tami Warren,
outgoing BWL president. “In addition to Prototypes, we participate in service projects and work in high schools in
primarily black neighborhoods.”
A Los Angeles public defender, Ms. Warren’s connection to Prototypes runs deep. The Public Defender’s office
works closely with Prototypes to help women in the criminal justice system gain access to treatment.
“My perspective is unique, since I happen to represent many of the women who end up at Prototypes.” Ms. Warren
said. One of her clients, who had a long history with drugs, was thrilled to get a bed at Prototypes and move away
from addiction and toward independence. She later reached out to Ms. Warren and let her know that the experience
had changed her life.
Now, for more than a decade, the BWL members have donated funds and volunteered their time to ensure that
families at Prototypes have a wonderful Thanksgiving and Christmas holiday.
“It is so amazing to see the light in their eyes when we bring toys and other gifts,” said Ms. Warren.
Linda Rosborough, a deputy district attorney and BWL’s Community Action Chair for the past eight years, is another
powerful advocate for BWL’s continued support of Prototypes.
“Prototypes is such an important force in the community,” Ms. Rosborough said recently. “It touches so many lives.”
4
nBe
a transformational service provider and employer
clinical leaders
nDeliver the highest-quality services
nMaintain a balance between government and private funding
nModel the highest levels of dedication and commitment
nBe externally focused and evolving
nBe
SIX STRATEGIC GOALS
1. Programs and Services: Meet the holistic needs of our clients by delivering a fully integrated continuum of care .
Key Focus Areas: Aligning structure to support expanded, integrated services; centralizing and streamlining
intake and support functions; measuring program effectiveness; expanding residential programs for women .
2. Staffing and Standards: Achieve and maintain a high-quality, interdisciplinary team approach to delivering the
Prototypes evidence-based treatment approaches .
Key Focus Areas: Standardizing evidence-based treatment models agency-wide; recruiting and retaining
top-quality staff; training staff and guiding professional development; maintaining CARF accreditation .
3. Governance and Fundraising Leadership: Build and maintain a diverse, high-performing Board that actively
advances Prototypes’ priorities .
Key Focus Areas: Ensuring strategic Board growth, development and training; operationalizing key principles
of high-performing boards .
4. Communications: Increase Prototypes’ visibility and strengthen our reputation as a leader in the field .
Key Focus Areas: Expanding our clinical leadership role in the field; enhancing relationships with key
stakeholders; serving as an expert resource for policy- makers and the media on issues related to our mission .
5. Infrastructure—Facilities and Technology: Ensure that our facilities and technology reflect our commitment to
quality and enable our evidence-based treatment approaches .
Key Focus Areas: Fully implementing Electronic Health Records integration to improve operations, enhance
clinical collaboration and measure outcomes; proactively ensuring that facilities are equipped to meet
program needs .
6. Fiscal Management and Revenue: Set and maintain a balanced budget through prudent financial discipline and
stringent fiscal control within a diversified revenue model .
Key Focus Areas: Increasing private sector support; expanding outreach capacity to build private pay/managed
care revenue; maximizing service contracts .
Watch for
progress updates
on our website:
prototypes.org
5
New Program Helps Ensure Healthy Children, Strong Families continued from cover
“Prototypes continues to
break new ground in addressing
the real and complex needs
of women and children.”
You can help other families
like Jacob and his mom .
Donate today at prototypes .org
KATHY JETT, Policy Consultant
California Forward and Former Director of Alcohol and
Drug Programs and Undersecretary of “Adult Programs”
for the Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
parenting classes at Prototypes doesn’t have to repeat the
process by taking additional parenting classes that may be
required by her social worker.
“This project takes family-centered treatment to the next level,”
stated April Wilson, BA, RAS, Prototypes Vice President,
Mother and Child Residential Treatment. “It encompasses the
whole family so clients have a solid support system once they
complete treatment.”
In partnership with Children and Family Futures, Prototypes
launched HCSF in early 2014 along with 11 community-based
partner organizations in the San Gabriel Valley that form the
HCSF Collaborative Council. While Prototypes provides an
innovative, trauma-informed treatment program, this collaboration
is key to having a positive impact on the entire system of care
among providers, public agencies and families. Usually, clients
in substance use treatment programs must meet requirements
for multiple service providers and systems. Unfortunately,
those requirements can often overwhelm clients, or it can
be almost impossible to meet all requirements in the allotted
amount of time.
“Often, clients have to repeat their traumatic histories to each
provider from whom they need to receive services, which isn’t
necessary,” said Holly Child, research associate with Children
and Family Futures. HCSF is an opportunity to improve
communications among service providers, so clients don’t
have to relive their trauma each time they encounter a social
worker, therapist, case manager and others. In addition,
HCSF provides a formal way to track cases, so a client taking
6
Children and Family Futures is a California-based organization
that works to improve collaborative policy and practice across
the substance abuse, child welfare and judicial systems
throughout the country. And the organization is not a typical
evaluator. Rather, it has a vested interest in creating effective
models for families that can be replicated elsewhere. With their
help, the HCSF project is able to use a single resource, the
Family Care Coordination document, to foster collaboration
across providers. This unique tool was developed because,
as Ms. Child noted, “We couldn’t find any current tools that
supported what we needed.”
Another critical resource is a newly created staff position, the
Family Navigator.
“The Family Navigator connects with each person a client
identifies as important in her life,” explained Julia Poirier, LCSW,
Manager I at Prototypes’ Pomona Women’s Center. “We include
children, partners, grandparents or foster parents — and then
reach out and provide them with anything they may need.”
This goes beyond simple referrals to other services or pamphlets
with information. The Family Navigator identifies and addresses
broader family needs. For example, she may meet with a client’s
children who are in kinship care and determine that a child
needs therapy. She will not only find the therapist, she will
make sure an appointment has been made and that the child
actually receives treatment, even if it means locating a therapist
who can come to the child’s school.
“It’s more of a partnership with a family, holding their hand and
walking them through treatment, so they all come out stronger,”
said Ms. Poirier. Prototypes also provides groups and classes for
family members.
CHILDREN OF PROTOTYPES
Jacob’s Story
“Prototypes changed the way I see
my mom. Now she is my role model.”
AS A TRAINED COUNSELOR FOR ADOLESCENTS AT RISK FOR
SUBSTANCE USE DISORDERS, Jacob has a special reason for
connecting so well with his clients: He’s been in their shoes.
Growing up, Jacob’s life was anything but stable. His mother,
Sharon, moved often, bringing Jacob and his younger brother
with her from place to place as she struggled with her addiction.
“I didn’t know if I was going to go to school every day,” Jacob
shared recently. “I didn’t know where I was going to sleep or
where I was going to wake up.”
Jacob could tell when his mom was on drugs, and he constantly
feared that the next knock on the door would be from police.
There were times when Sharon would just go away, leaving
him alone to care for his brother.
Then his brother was taken away.
“That really made my mom realize that she had a problem,”
Jacob said.
Sharon sought treatment at Prototypes. There, she got sober
and healthy, and she learned how to be a better parent. She
also gained skills to start a new career helping other struggling
women in circumstances similar to hers.
Jacob knows how important it was for his mom to keep her
children with her during treatment. He understands how
terrifying it is for mothers not to know how their kids are
doing. “It’s motivation for them to keep going,” Jacob said.
In turn, by staying close to their mom, Jacob and his brother
were able to witness her transformation.
You can watch Jacob’s video on our
homepage at prototypes.org.
Sharon has been clean and sober for 10 years, and she
works at Prototypes as a Certified Addiction Treatment
Counselor and vocational coordinator. Jacob and his mom
have a great relationship.
“Prototypes changed the way I see my mom,” Jacob noted.
“Now she is my role model.” Mother and son support each
other professionally, and Jacob’s younger brother is also
doing well.
Jacob is completing his bachelor’s degree in sociology and
plans to pursue a master’s degree in social work. He says his
experience with his mother and Prototypes has inspired him
to help others. He plans to keep helping teens struggling
with addiction so they will never have to hit rock bottom.
“Prototypes,” he said, “has taught me gratitude.”
3
Prototypes Post
WINTER 2014
Prototypes Ribbon-Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Ann McClanathan, Chair Person
Vice President of Business Development,
myStrength.com
continued from page 2
Michael Kemp, Vice Chair Person
Founder and Principal, Michael Kemp Architects
Ron Burkhardt, Secretary
Managing Director, Newmark Grubb Knight Frank
Jim Quinn, Treasurer
Former Senior Management Executive
Margaret Kelly
Regional Vice President, West Government,
Education & Labor, OptumHealth
Brandon Matloff
Financial Representative, Northwestern Mutual
Karen E . Pointer, Esq .
Partner and Attorney at Law, Lerman Pointer
& Spitz LLP
Cindy Teti
Senior Manager, Capital Group
Cassandra Loch
President and Chief Executive Officer, Prototypes
ABOUT US
Prototypes is a lifeline to women who are
struggling with addiction and other serious
issues such as domestic violence and mental
illness . Many of these women are mothers
who face an impossible choice: give up their
children to foster care or a guardian, or
continue to suffer . Prototypes is a game
changer by allowing women to keep their
children with them during treatment so
they both get the help they need . And, by
combining comprehensive treatment with
practical life-skills training, we prepare
women for long-term success .
Prototypes provides comprehensive,
integrated, and evidence-based services to
10,000 individuals each year at 14 locations
throughout Southern California . Prototypes
is an internationally recognized, CARF
Accredited non-profit organization dedicated
to improving communities impacted by
substance use, mental illness and domestic
violence .
prototypes.org
Prototypes staff and supporters cut the ribbon to commemorate the renovations at the Pomona
Women’s Center. From left: Jay Virbel, California Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation
Associate Director of Female Offender Programs; Christy Beaudin, LCSW, CPHQ, Prototypes VP
of Quality & Safety; April Wilson, Prototypes VP of Mother and Child Residential; California State
Senator Carol Liu; Ann McClanathan, Protoypes Board Chair; Cassandra Loch, Prototypes President
& CEO; Nial Stimson, Prototypes VP of Business Development; California Senator Norma J. Torres;
Levi Martin, Prototypes VP of Finance & Administrative Operations; and Angie Castro, Assistant
Field Director for Supervisor Gloria Molina.
EVENT SPOTLIGHT
Prototypes Ribbon-Cutting and
National Recovery Month Celebration
PROTOTYPES’ NEWLY RENOVATED POMONA WOMEN’S
CENTER was the scene of celebration as supporters,
Board members, staff and clients joined with elected
officials to celebrate the revamped facility.
The Pomona Women’s Center renovations provides
Prototypes’ staff with a fully equipped facility to
match the high-quality services they deliver each day
to women and their children. The upgrades involved
nearly every room, helping to improve the Center after
nearly 30 years of providing treatment services while
maintaining its warm, home-like feel.
“Because of Prototypes,
thousands of women
with drug addictions
have access to services
when they wouldn’t
have the opportunity
elsewhere.”
SENATOR
NORMA J . TORRES
The celebration was made even more special because it took place during National
Recovery Month. Now in its 25th year, National Recovery Month serves a critical role in
reminding the public that addiction is a disease and, as such, should be afforded the
same research, funding and treatment as any other chronic disease. National Recovery
Month also serves to remind the public of the growing need for programs like Prototypes.
Last year alone, nearly 23 million Americans needed treatment for drug or alcohol use.
Less than 11 percent of that total actually received the treatment they needed to recover.
“As a mom, I could never imagine having to choose between my health and my son,
and no one should have to,” said Prototypes President and CEO Cassandra Loch.
“Prototypes keeps families together and provides everything we can for both moms
and their children,” she said, “making sure the next generation does not suffer from
addiction, incarceration and poverty.”
continued from page 6
HCSF is a game-changer for women who face unimaginable
challenges. Recently, a young women and her two-year-old toddler
came to Prototypes seeking treatment. They had been homeless and
arrived with virtually nothing. Prototypes staff immediately found
space. Desperate and worried about the well-being of her children,
she had left her eight-month old baby in the care of others while she
sought help. Unfortunately, the caretakers for her baby proved
unreliable. During her second week at Prototypes, with no warning,
nine armed police officers arrived to arrest her for child abandonment.
“We were able to have the police sit down with the client and explain
the situation,” said Ms. Poirier. Although police still arrested her,
Prototypes staff assured her that they would assist her through
the process.
The event also honored individuals who have
supported Prototypes’ mission to ensure that the
most vulnerable in our community receive life-saving
treatment. Ms. Loch and April Wilson, BA, RAS, Vice
President of Mother and Child Residential Treatment,
presented the Prototypes Champion Award to two
elected officials for their advocacy and support:
U.S. Congresswoman Gloria Negrete McLeod
and California State Senator Norma Torres. The
Champion Award was also presented to the Black
Women Lawyers Association of Los Angeles for their
many years of support.
California State Senator Carol Liu, who received
Prototypes’ Champion Award in 2013, was also present
to celebrate the renovations. Senator Liu played an
integral role in helping to keep our Community
Prisoner Mother Program open and highlighted why
programs like those at Prototypes are critical for our
communities.
“The way we deal with incarcerated women does not
just affect women. It also has a profound impact on
their children,” Senator Liu stated. “It’s time we treat
addiction as a health issue, not as a crime.”
When a mother is arrested, there is an immediate negative impact
on the child,” said Ms. Child. “HCSF has the capabilities to find
ways to transform how law enforcement and the courts deal with
these situations.”
The HCSF Collaborative Council met and discussed the situation.
A representative from the District Attorney’s office was able to help
Prototypes advocate for the client. To avoid future situations, such
as armed police arriving to arrest a client, Prototypes is currently
working with the police department to train them on better
approaches to working with this population.
“The HCSF program was made for women like this client,”
Ms. Poirier said. “Women who, because of homelessness, trauma
and addiction, have never had the comprehensive support to turn
their lives around.”
Above, the new computer lab provides computer
skills training to help clients prepare for employment.
The new family dormitories provide a warm and
comfortable space for moms and their kids.
continued on page 7
2
Newsletter design by 2B Communications
7
MESSAGE from Prototypes’ President and CEO
FOR MOST WOMEN, overcoming an addiction while suffering
from mental illness or a history of trauma is the challenge
of a lifetime. Finding treatment that takes into account all
of an individual’s needs, along with those of her family can
sometimes be impossible.
At Prototypes, we’re working to change the way in which
communities approach treatment. We believe that substance use
and mental health disorders should be viewed and treated the same
as any other medical condition, with the same care and concern
that our society and health care systems give to physical ailments.
PROTOTYPES IS A GAME-CHANGER . Not only do we provide treatment to the person who is struggling, we involve her entire
support system – children, partners, friends and other family members – so they understand her challenges and needs as well
as their own. Involving the entire family or support system helps women succeed in their recovery long after they leave Prototypes.
And it enables us to help reduce stigma, increase compassion and make a positive impact for families today and for generations
to come.
During the holiday season, everyone should be able to celebrate and spend time with their loved ones. But we know that this is
not always the case, because many continue to suffer in silence and shame. Thankfully, with the help of our supporters who have
attended an event, given of their time, or who have made a donation to Prototypes this past year, more families are living healthy
lives. Together, we will continue working to create more compassionate communities and help individual families to create new
holiday traditions that will last many lifetimes.
From my family to yours, Happy Holidays!
Cassandra Loch, MBA, LCSW, President and CEO
Prototypes Post
WINTER
2014
Inspiring stories and news from Prototypes
Gamechanger!
PROTOTYPES’
NEW PROGRAM
TAKES FAMILY TREATMENT
TO THE NEXT LEVEL
Patricia and her daughter are proof
that we are saving lives .
Right now there are women who
desperately want and need treatment,
but cannot afford it .
Patricia remains steadfast in her recovery.
She has a new home, a successful career and
a thriving child.
Your life-saving donation will help
provide access to the services they
urgently need . We appreciate your
generosity .
More than 8.3 million children live with at least one parent who abuses or is
dependent on alcohol or illicit drugs. Parental substance use accounts for close
to 80% of substantiated child abuse and neglect cases. Often, though, treatment
programs focus only on the parent’s needs.
Children of Prototypes:
Jacob’s Story . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3
Prototypes Honors the
Black Women Lawyers
Association of Los Angeles . . .4
Prototypes Three-Year
Strategic Growth Plan . . . . . . . . 5
A new demonstration program funded by the Administration on Children and Families
is allowing Prototypes to focus on developing activities and tools to engage a client’s
children and her entire family. This new family-centered treatment program, called
Healthy Children, Strong Families (HCSF), is provided through Prototypes’ residential
facility in Pomona.
continued on page 6
Inspiring Hope, Health and Independence
Ribbon Cutting and
National Recovery Month
Celebration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2
The devastating effects of child abuse and neglect very often lead to poor and costly
physical and psychological health outcomes later in life. According to the Centers for
Disease Control, for one year of confirmed cases of child maltreatment, the associated
costs over a lifetime are estimated at approximately $124 billion.
While Prototypes’ residential program has always included mothers and their children,
HCSF provides additional staff and tools to minimize the risk of child abandonment or
placement in foster care and increases the likelihood of positive outcomes for the entire
family when they reenter the community.
Donate online at prototypes.org.
Thank you!
INSIDE
Prototypes Unveils Renovated
Pomona Women’s Center
See page 2 for
more information!

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