Rancho Sienna Landscape Guidelines - 1

Comments

Transcription

Rancho Sienna Landscape Guidelines - 1
RANCHO SIENNA
COMMUNITY
DESIGN
GUIDELINES-LANDSCAPE
Rancho Sienna Community Association
404 Via de Sienna Blvd.
Georgetown, TX 78628
June 2014
TABLE OF CONTENTS
Landscape: Landscape Design Guidelines
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
10
11
12
13
14
15
Why Native Landscapes?
Habitat
Creating a Native Landscape
a. Soil
b. Edging and Raised Plant Beds
c. Mulch
Plants
a. Plant Selection and Placing
b. Lawn Care
How to Plant
Landscape Design
a. Drainage Swales and Rain Gardens
b. Hardscape
c. Habitat
Irrigation
a. Efficiency
b. Irrigation System Types
c. Rainwater Harvesting
Residential Landscape Requirements Design Intent
Landscape Requirements
Irrigation Requirements
Suggested Landscaping Plan List Notes
Suggested Plant List
Do Not Plant List
Landscape Design Review Process
Resources
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE2014
4
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
1 Why Native Landscapes?
Central Texas Character:
Rancho Sienna is situated on the eastern edge of the Texas Hill Country, a region featuring
rugged hills consisting of thin layers of soil atop limestone or granite which contributes
to its unparalleled diversity and beauty. In the spring, roadsides and fields are splashed
with colorful wildflowers. Autumn brings vibrant reds, oranges and yellows as the
vegetation announces a new season. Although winters are usually mild with few hard
freezes, summers usually mean drought and extreme heat. The native plants of the area
are those that can survive and thrive in these extreme conditions. It is difficult for most
non-native plants to survive without a lot of supplemental water and soil improvements and
fertilizers.
Much of Central Texas’s foundation is caliche, is a sedimentary rock that is a hardened
deposit of calcium carbonate. Thin clay soil barely covering caliche and large rocks
doesn’t seem like a good start for most plants but many plants thrive under these
conditions. In fact, there are trees found only here including the sycamore-leaf styrax and
the Anacacho orchid tree. Selecting plants that are native and/or well adapted to the area
preserves the unique beauty of Central Texas and provides a wide range of plant materials
to select from that will be able to endure the region’s extreme conditions.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
5
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
?
Did you know...
Garden pests
account for a
mere 1% of all insects
in a typical garden.
Beneficial insects are
nature’s pest control but
pesticides kill both pests
and beneficial insects
alike.
2 Habitat
The Hill Country is home to large and small mammals, birds,
lizards, and insects. They live in and off of the grasses,
wildflowers and trees. Integrating native plants into private
yards not only will allow birds and butterflies to pollinate other
gardens, but creates a larger network of habitats and havens
for many species of wildlife including songbirds and beneficial
insects. Enjoy the sights and sounds of nature in your front and
back yard.
Songbirds and butterflies are welcome visitors, but don’t forget
about the insects. Insects are not just food for the birds, they
help protect your garden. Beneficial, predator insects keep garden pests away and
eliminate the need for toxic
chemicals.
Water Conservation:
While creating habitats and
maintaining the natural
characteristics of the region
are important, the most
compelling
reason
to
use native plants is water
conservation. Plants that
are native to where you live
have been growing there
successfully for millennia
and are well-adapted to the
http://www.cals.ncsu.edu/course/ent010/
soils, temperatures, and annual rainfall. Natives can
exist on rainfall alone.
Rancho Sienna is interested in encouraging water conservation and also educating
residents on how to create water-efficient, beautiful landscapes. By using native plants
that require less water, you will help conserve this precious resource while saving you
time from hand watering during times of water restriction and saving money on your water
bills.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
6
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
3 Creating a Native Landscape
The challenges of gardening in Central Texas are thin soils, hot weather, droughts, and
torrential downpours. FOUR MAIN ISSUES to address in creating a healthy, attractive,
and easy to maintain landscape are soils, plant selection, landscape design, and efficient
irrigation and drainage.
3.a. Soil
Good soil is the foundation of a healthy, drought tolerant landscape. Six to eight inches
of compost-amended soil improves plant health, increases a yard’s ability to stay healthy
through dry periods by retaining water, and decreases runoff by allowing water to filter
through the layers of soil and rock.
Soil Amendment:
• Reuse native soils whenever possible.
• Topsoil shall contain a minimum 20% organic material or compost blended
with sand and loam at approximately 10% sand and 65% loam. Caliche, the
sedentary rock just below the soil, is not considered topsoil.
• Turf grass areas shall have at least six inches (6”) of topsoil.
• Planting beds shall have at least six inches (6”) of topsoil.
• All soil shall be free of debris and rocks greater than one inch (1”) in
diameter.
• In order to achieve sufficient soil depth, you may need to add soil. When
adding topsoil, combine existing soil with new soil two to three inches (2” -3”)
deep to encourage water filtration through layers of soil.
3.b. Edging and Raised Plant Beds:
Edging creates clean, visible edges to plant beds. Spaded, or shoveled, edges may be
used or the homeowner may want to consider using a structural edge. These materials
serve several practical purposes. They allow you to retain more soil to maintain a sufficient
base for plants. Edging can also facilitate maintenance.
• Small shrubs, ground covers, and perennials require a minimum of six inches
(6”) of soil to be well-rooted. Soil depth should be increased for plants with
larger root balls such as large shrubs and trees. Consider raised beds, berms,
or terraces in locations where soil is thin.
• Landscape beds may be bordered with an acceptable edging material.
Edging shall not be installed along sidewalks.
• Acceptable Edging Materials: Stone, Steel, Concrete (poured in-place)
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
7
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
• Unacceptable Edging Materials: Plastic Products, Wood Posts, Landscape Timbers,
Rail Road Ties, Scalloped Precast Concrete Edging.
• Where steel edging is used, the top of the edging shall be a maximum of one inch
(1”) above finish grade of adjacent lawn areas. The top of the edging should be
flush with paving where it meets sidewalks or hardscape features.
• Add interest to plant beds and edging by adding landscape boulders. Boulders
benefit plants by providing shade for roots.
Stone
Steel
•
Concrete
Landscape boulders
Soil depth and quality is important for plants to grow and thrive. This can be achieved by
creating raised plant beds.
• Raised beds, terraces, or decorative walls must be made of or faced (veneered)
with masonry (stone, stucco, or approved equal). Do not use standard concrete
blocks, plain or painted. These will help to relate the landscape to the house if
constructed of the same material (or complementary in finish and style).
• Cut or fill slopes along the exterior of the wall shall be smooth and taper
gradually to match existing grades.
• Maximum height of decorative walls should be measured from the finished
ground elevation on the highest side of the wall and shall not exceed three feet
(3 feet) in height.
• Be sure that raised beds do not result in soil or moisture against exterior house
walls above the level of masonry weeps and the floor.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
8
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
• Acceptable Wall Materials: Masonry, Brick, Stone, Stucco, Split-face Concrete
Block with cap.
• Unacceptable Wall Materials: Standard Concrete Block, plain or painted
• Decorative or planter walls that are partially below the finished grade shall be
moisture-proofed to avoid unsightly water staining.
Terraces
Raised stone planter
Low stucco wall
3.c. Mulch:
Mulch plant beds to combat weeds, keep soil cool and moist, and give your yard a
finished look.
• All areas planted with trees, perennials, and shrubs shall be finished with a 3 inch
deep layer of high quality organic mulch, or rock mulch.
• Decomposed granite is a good alternative mulch for many heat loving native
plants.
• Acceptable Mulch Materials: Shredded Cedar, Shredded Hardwood, Cypress,
River Rock, or Decomposed Granite.
• Unacceptable Mulch Materials: Lava Rock, Rubber Mulch, Color-Enhanced
Wood Mulch, or Redwood Mulch.
River rock
Decomposed granite
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Wood
9
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
4 Plants
A common misconception of native landscapes is that they
are unsightly and hard to maintain. Native plants can be
both beautiful and hardy. In addition to natives there are
well-adapted, non-native plants that perform well in Central
Texas soil and climate conditions. Planting native and welladapted plant material has many built-in benefits. They play
an important role in creating an attractive and manageable
garden at the residential scale, while directly benefiting the
environment at the neighborhood, community, and regional
scales.
?
Did you know...
The California
Fan Palm,
Washingtonia filifera, is
the only species of palm
tree that is native to the
continental United States
west of the Hill Country’s
Balcones Fault.
The use of native and adapted plants in the Texas Hill Country landscape ensures
three important things. First, homeowners can appreciate that their landscape will
take on the regional character of Central Texas. Second, it will thrive during times
of drought. And third, it will not only require less supplemental water, but it will also
require a lot less time and maintenance because native plants rarely need pesticides or
fertilizers.
Attractive, colorful,
l f l and
d easy to maintain native landscape.
l d
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
10
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
4.a Plant Selection and Placing:
• Shrubs and flowers should be selected from the
native and well-adapted plant list at the end of
this manual.
• No more than 50% of the planting area in the front
yard shall be planted in turf.
• Invasive plants shall not be used. Refer to
Suggested Plant List.
• Masses of one species will eliminate a scattered
appearance that is often associated with a
native landscape. Grouping a single species into
clusters of five to seven plants helps to achieve blocks
of color and texture.
?
Did you know...
Late February
through early
May and September October are the perfect
time for planting
perennials, grasses,
turf and shrubs. Tree
planting season is
October - March.
• Plant the right plant in the right place. Group sun-loving plants together in the
sun and shade-loving plants in the shade. Allow plants adequate space to grow.
Refer to Suggested Plant List for suggested spacing.
Ornamental Grasses
Native Plant Material
• Trees shall not be planted in utility easements. Shade trees shall not be
planted closer than twenty five feet (25’) from above ground utility lines and
five feet (5’) from underground utilities.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
11
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
4.b. Lawn Care:
• Reduce turf to meet your aesthetic or family lifestyle
needs because grass generally requires more water
and chemicals to maintain.
• Turfgrass shall have summer dormancy
capabilities to insure that landscapes will survive
under mandatory water restrictions.
?
Did you know...
Taller grass
shades its
own roots, lowering
evaporation and
requiring less water.
So let your grass
grow longer in the
summertime.
Little or No Turf
• In a sunny yard, Zoysia is recommended. Buffalo grass is in keeping with
the native plant character but can be prone to weeds and does not tolerate a
lot of foot traffic.
• In order to create a uniform look throughout the community, Bermuda grass
must be used in turf areas in front yards and areas visible from the street.
Homeowners may choose to use alternate grasses, such as Zoysia or buffalo
grass, in rear yards.
• Bermuda is a low water-use option but can be invasive. Use hybrid species
only e.g. Tif 419 Bermuda.
• Fertilization of turf areas shall not be required. If turf areas are fertilized,
natural or certified organic fertilizers with less than 4% phosphorus shall be
used.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
12
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
5 How to Plant:
• Planting at the right time allows plants to establish
themselves with minimal stress. Avoid planting
during the summer in Central Texas.
• To keep plants from sinking into the planting hole
over time, dig holes to be only as deep as the root
ball in the pot.
• For root-bound plants, cut through any roots that
seem to be wrapping around and around the root
ball. This allows plant roots to grow outward for
better stabilization and nutrient and water uptake.
?
Did you know...
Half of all
stormwater
pollution comes from
residential property.
That pollution is from
products we use for our
yard care and household
activities and from our
yard waste.
• To keep roots from drying out, firmly pack soil back
around the plant once it is in the planting hole.
• Thoroughly water plants just after planting to help settle the soil and remove air
pockets.
• Keep soil moist, but not wet, for several months after planting to establish root
systems. Before watering, allow soil to become almost dry.
• Cut back on irrigation once plants are established. Drought-tolerant plants only
require occasional supplemental watering during dry summer months.
• Avoid over-watering and enjoy lower water bills.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
13
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
6 Landscape Design
Rancho Sienna is part of the Hill Country and each home should be reflective of this natural
beauty. Create outdoor rooms and offer a variety of experiences by utilizing plant beds
and pathways or hardscape. Several things to consider when designing your landscape
are water drainage, sunny and shady areas, and what activities you and your family
enjoy. For additional design ideas, visit the Chisholm Trail S.U.D. Landscape Laboratory in
Florence or the Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower Center in Austin.
6.a. Drainage Swales and Rain Gardens:
• Create a “dry creekbed” to direct water draining on your property. Direct water
to a lower spot where it can better infiltrate the soil.
• Low areas of your landscape that capture water and allow it to soak into the
ground are called “rain gardens.” Rain gardens can either be filled with plants
for both wet and dry conditions or they can be filled with only stone.
• For rain gardens, do not add weed barrier fabric as this reduces the water’s
ability to soak into the ground.
• Divert water from roof downspouts into rain gardens. These gardens act as
filters for overflowing water on the way to storm sewers.
• Rain gardens allow water to soak into the ground. Overflow eventually runs into
storm sewers.
Low spots make good rain gardens
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Dry creekbed
14
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
6.b. Hardscape
• Creating seating areas, outdoor dining areas, or pathways using decorative
paving materials.
Stamped & stained
concrete
Decomposed granite and
flagstone
Seating area
• Acceptable Materials: Washed-Aggregate Concrete (aggregate less than 3/8”
for slip-resistance), Stamped & Stained Concrete, Decomposed Granite, Stone,
Brick or other Unit Paver
• Use pervious pavement such as stone without mortar, mulch, or porous
concrete to allow water to soak into the
ground.
6.c. Habitat
Many people enjoy the sights and sounds
of songbirds calling, frogs croaking, or
butterflies floating by. Attracting wildlife such as
hummingbirds and songbirds, lizards, and insects
is easy if you provide food, water, cover, and
places to raise young.
• Create a buffet for wildlife with nectar,
pollen, nuts, seeds, and berries by
planting a variety of native plants.
• Bird baths, small ponds, and rain
gardens provide water for wildlife.
Animals need water for drinking and
some need it for breeding.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Plant diversity and boulders create
habitat
15
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
• Offer shelter from predators and bad weather with stacked rock walls and
landscape boulders, planting layers of vegetation, or by planting evergreen
shrubs.
• Dense shrubs, a bird house, or pond are examples of places wildlife need to
mate and raise their young.
7 Irrigation
Shrubs, trees and lawn all need water, but not the same amount of water. Be sure to water
plants according to their need. Know your watering schedule and change it seasonally.
Whether you’re hand watering or using modern efficient irrigation equipment, here are
few things to keep in mind.
7.a. Efficiency
• Water no more than twice a week and comply with watering restrictions of the
local jurisdiction(s) during drought.
• Group plants with similar water needs together. This is called “Hydrozoning”.
?
• Apply only enough water to moisten the root zone of
plants six to eight inches
(6”- 8”) deep, then
allow soil to dry before watering again. In thin Hill
Country
soils, apply a maximum of
1/2” of water twice a week.
• The best time to water is from dusk to dawn. Sun and
wind cause evaporation
and keeps plants
from getting the water they need. Early morning
watering allows the sun to dry the plants’ foliage,
preventing pest problems.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Did you know...
According
to the Irrigation
Association, up to
a 50% water savings
can be achieved by
increasing soil depth
for a turf area from
4” to 8”. Compost
increases the water
holding capacity of
soil which decreases
runoff and improves
plant health.
16
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
• Another way to decrease evaporation is to use low-angle sprinklers that
produce droplets of water. Also consider low flow (drip and micro spray) equipment.
• When hand watering or using irrigation system, “cycle and soak”. Apply a little
water at a time allowing water to soak in and decreasing run-off.
• Direct sprinklers toward lawn and away from pavement.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
17
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
7.b. Irrigation System Types
?
Did you know...
Evaporation
Today there are many types of automatic irrigation systems
can be as
that reduce water use by incorporating low-output or low-flow
sprinklers, and controllers that use weather-based calculations high as 40% during
and environmental conditions to determine the amount of water the heat of summer,
applied to a landscape based on the plants’ water needs. Use so be sure to water at
a sprinkler that emits large drops of water close to the ground dusk and dawn.
and avoid one that sprays a fine mist into the air. Drip irrigation
systems take longer to wet the soil but they lose very little water
to evaporation. Because different plants require varying amounts of water, several types
of heads may be used on one site. Different zones should be used for these varying
irrigation head types and plants. Bubblers work well for trees by providing a large amount
of water, drip irrigation is well suited for shrubs and ground cover because water is
applied on the ground and close to the roots, while sprays and rotating streams water turf
areas.
Drip irrigation
www.rainbird.com
Spray head close to ground
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
www.toro.com
www.hunterindustries.com
www.
u e dus es.co
Bubbler with large drops of water
close to ground
18
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
7.c. Rainwater Harvesting
• Use of rain barrels, tanks, and bladders to capture water from roofs and reuse
on landscapes is encouraged.
• Rain barrels must be located in rear yard or side yards with surrounding planting,
or fencing to screen the view from the street.
• To use captured rainwater for
automatic irrigation, a small
pump is required to pressurize
the water for use. A licensed
irrigator with experience in rain
water harvesting can assist in the
design of a complete system.
Rain barrel
Rain tank
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
http://www.penick.net/digging/
http://waterplex.com.au/solutions/
Rain bladder under
d deck
d k
19
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
8 Residential Landscape Requirements Design Intent
The design intent is to create a Texas native landscape that is attractive, easy to maintain,
and conserves water. Planting plans shall emphasize native, ornamental grasses and
other plants that are native and/or well adapted to Central Texas for long-term success of
your yard.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
20
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
9 Landscape Requirements
1.
Plant no more than 50% of your yard in turf grass.
2.
Soil in planted areas, including turf and plant beds, shall be a minimum of 6” of high
quality topsoil. Topsoil shall be native soil from the site, or fertile, friable, blended
sand/loam/compost topsoil. Non-native topsoil shall contain not less than 20%
organic matter (compost) that is blended through the soil. Incorporate topsoil into
existing surface by first loosening any compacted soils. Do not place more than 2”
of topsoil within the drip zone of existing trees; instead feather from deeper topsoil
to the drip zone.
3.
Trees and plant beds shall be topped with a 3” deep layer of high quality organic
mulch.
4.
See Design Guidelines for list of acceptable materials for edging, raised plant beds,
mulch, and hardscapes.
5.
Rock mulch or river gravel may be used in areas that are narrow or areas with foot
traffic and/or seating. No more than 20% of a yard within public view may contain
an unplanted area. An unplanted area is an area of more than 30 square feet
without a plant. If rock mulch is used, plant material shall be incorporated to soften
these spaces.
6.
Group plants based on sun and water requirements.
7.
At minimum, 90% of plant material shall come from Suggested Plant List located in
these guidelines. No invasive plants or plants from the Do Not Plant List are allowed.
8.
Plant beds shall be sized appropriately to allow correct spacing of plants within the
beds. Plants need sufficient space from structures and other plants to grow to full
size.
9.
Non-turf planting may include ground cover plants of appropriate size. Such
plantings shall minimize encroachment onto the sidewalk. Avoid planting plants
with spines or sharp edges near walkways or pedestrian areas.
10.
Turf in front yards and areas visible from the street must be Bermuda hybrid seed or
sod as specified in the Suggested Plant List of this guide. Homeowners may choose
to use alternate grasses, such as Zoysia or buffalo grass, in rear yards.
11.
Trees shall not be planted in utility easements.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
21
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
12.
A minimum distance of fifteen feet (15’) shall be maintained between all shade
trees. Trees are to be planted a minimum of four feet (4’) behind the sidewalk.
13.
For Builders installing landscapes, each house floor plan shall contain a different
planting plan. These guidelines are to be applied to landscape improvements
on each lot, within public view. Home builders remain responsible for landscape
requirements within public rights-of-way, including designated street trees, sod and
irrigation between street curbs and sidewalk.
14.
Before digging deep into the ground, verify where utility lines are located. At least
three days before you are ready to dig, call the Rancho Sienna Reviewer office at
254-793-3103 and call 1-800-DIG-TESS (344-8377) and provide the location of
your excavation project.
15.
Trees:
• Before submitting a plot plan for approval, builder shall visit the home site to
catalog existing trees and ensure minimal impact to existing trees. Submitted plot
plans should indicate any existing trees to be maintained (per the Neighborhood
Diagram and per on-site visit) as well any smaller trees that must be removed.
• Builders will get “credit” for protecting trees on the home site; those trees will
count toward the minimum tree requirement of at least two trees. Trees should
only be removed when necessary to properly place a home on a home site.
Tree and Shrub Chart: Refer to Section 5.12 Suggested Plant List.
Lot Width
From
40
50
60
70
80
To
49
59
69
79
90+
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Trees
Quantity
2
2
2
2
3
Shrubs
A
15 Gallon
2
2
2
2
3
B
5 Gallon
10
10
15
15
20
C
1 Gallon
20
30
30
30
40
22
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
10 Irrigation Requirements
1. Landscape irrigation systems are not mandatory.
2. All irrigation must comply with all local and State codes and regulations.
3. Watering by hand or automatic irrigation system must occur between the hours of 7:00
pm and 10:00 am.
4. Use of low flow (drip and microspray) irrigation is encouraged.
5. Zoning of irrigation system shall be based on plant water requirements.
6. Do not over-spray onto adjacent hardscapes, driveways, sidewalks, or streets. Adjust
heads for pressure and pattern to keep mist and over-spray off adjacent pavements.
7. Landscape irrigation systems shall include rain shut-off sensor.
8. Controllers shall allow multiple programs to allow multiple start times and 7-day calendar,
seasonal adjusting and connection to an on-site weather station such as Hunter’s ET
(Evapo-Transpiration)Station, Weathermatics SmartLine controller and sensor, Rainbird’s
ESP-SMT Smart Modular Control System. These controllers have the capability of selfadjusting watering schedules based on weather. Each zone’s irrigation schedule is
customized to meet the specific water requirements of each zone based on plant types,
exposure, soil type, slope conditions, etc. The on-site weather sensor makes real-time
irrigation schedule adjustments based on daily reference evapotranspiration (ET - a
measure of the plant’s water requirements). These on-site sensors have rain sensors that
shut off water schedules in the event of rain.
9. Backflow prevention devices shall be installed in accordance with all local and State
codes and regulations.
10. Automatic sprinkler systems shall operate at 80 psi or less in application
pressure (Low-flow systems or zones require additional pressure regulation).
11. Areas less than ten feet (10’) wide shall use low flow irrigation application
systems such as less than 0.5 gpm (gallons per minute) per emitter.
12. Homeowner should possess system design plans, and a zone schedule
must be posted in the irrigation controller box.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
23
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
13. The irrigated zones of any lot shall be limited to 2.5 times the foundation
footprint, including house and garage but not the driveway or patio, with
a 10,000 square foot maximum including. This includes irrigated lawn and
plant beds. Refer to Diagram C.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
24
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Property Line
Lawn
Mulched landscape bed
Lawn
Rock mulch
Building Setback Line
Accent plant
Large shrub
Small shrub, perennial
Ground cover, annuals
Boulders / flagstones
Calculations on following
page include area inside
property line only. Owner is
responsible for maintaining
area between street curb and
property line.
A minimum of 90% of plants
in the landscape should be
selected from the Suggested
Plant List in these residential
landscape requirements.
Decomposed granite
w/ flagstones and
planting
Plant bed
Building Setback Line
Lawn
Decomposed granite
mulch w/ plantings
Diagram A - Example Landscape
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
25
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Lawn
Landscape bed
Building footprint
Pavement
Total Lot Size
Foundation footprint
Pavement
Potential Landscape
Bed / Lawn Area
6,250 sq.ft.
2,800 sq.ft.
480 sq.ft.
2,970 sq.ft.
No more than fifty percent (50%) of
landscape should be planted in turf.
Landscape Bed as shown 1,560 sq.ft.
(1,560 sq.ft. / 2,970 sq.ft. = 53%)
Lawn area as shown
1,410 sq.ft.
(1,410 sq.ft. / 2,970 sq.ft. = 47%)
Diagram B - Landscape Beds and Lawn Percentages
Foundation footprint
Pavement
Unirrigated area
Irrigated area
2.5 x (Foundation footprint) = Maximum spray
irrigation
Note: maximum irrigated area is 10,000 sq.ft.
Potential Irrigated Area 2.5 x 2,800 = 7,000 sq.ft
Total Lot Size
Foundation footprint
Pavement
Unirrigated area
6,250 sq.ft.
2,800 sq.ft.
480 sq.ft.
640 sq.ft.
Irrigated Area
as Shown
2,330 sq.ft.
Diagram C - Irrigated Area Calculations
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
26
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Street
Columns, garden entry
Planter wall
Driveway
Front Door
Fence
Plant bed
Small, ornamental
tree
Large rock or boulders
(typical)
Flagstone patio
Habitat area w/
native grasses,
ground cover, and
shrubs
Lawn
Seat wall w/ fire
pit or planter in
center
Large, shade tree
(typical)
Example Landscape - Irregular Lot with Unirrigated Habitat Area
Total Lot Size
Foundation footprint
Pavement
Potential Landscape
Bed / Lawn Area
13,260 sq.ft.
2,690 sq.ft.
700 sq.ft.
9,870 sq.ft.
Landscape Bed as shown
2,400 sq.ft.
(2,400 sq.ft. / 9,870 sq.ft. = 24%)
Lawn area as shown
3,360 sq.ft.
(3,360 sq.ft. / 9,870 sq.ft. = 34%)
Unirrigated area as shown
4,110 sq.ft.
(4,110 sq.ft. / 9,870 sq.ft. = 42%)
No more than fifty percent (50%) of landscape should be planted in turf.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
27
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Street
Large shade tree
Lawn
Driveway
Flagstone path through
plant bed
Front
Door
Fence
Street
Patio
Lawn
Small, ornamental tree
Arbor w/ flagstone
patio
Example Landscape - Corner Lot
Total Lot Size
Foundation footprint
Pavement
Potential Landscape
Bed / Lawn Area
7,840 sq.ft.
2,210 sq.ft.
1,050 sq.ft.
4,580 sq.ft.
Landscape Bed as shown
1,470 sq.ft.
(1,470 sq.ft. / 4,580 sq.ft. = 32%)
Lawn area as shown
2,620 sq.ft.
(2,290 sq.ft. / 4,580 sq.ft. = 50%)
Unirrigated area as shown
820 sq.ft.
(820 sq.ft. / 4,580 sq.ft. = 18%)
No more than fifty percent (50%) of landscape should be planted in turf.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
28
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
11 Suggested Landscaping Plan List Notes
1.
Plants in this list are native to Central Texas and/or are well adapted to the area.
2.
A minimum of 90% of the total plant material shall come from the Suggested
Plant List.
3.
No invasive plants or plant from the Do Not Plant List are allowed.
4.
Use only deer-resistant plants in open yard areas. Note: Deer-resistant does not
mean “deer-proof”. During times of severe drought or based on acquired tastes,
deer may browse deer-resistant plants.
5.
Suggested plant size minimum when purchasing specimens:
Shade trees and Ornamental trees - Refer to Suggested Plant List for size
requirements
Large shrubs- 5 gallon
Small shrubs- 1 gallon
Ornamental grasses- 1 gallon
Perennials & Groundcovers- four inch (4”) pot min.
Vines- 1 gallon
6.
A large shrub is defined as a specimen (when at full maturity) that is no smaller
than four foot in height by four foot in spread (4’ ht. x 4’ spread).
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
29
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
12 Suggested Plant List
Native Plant Material List
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size &
Spacing
Req.
Acer grandidentatum
Bigtooth Maple
30' x 20'
2" cal.
yes
Carya illinoinensis
Pecan
50' x 50'
3" cal.
yes
Catalpa bignonioides
Catalpa
35' x 35'
8' ht.
yes
Fraxinus texensis
Texas Ash
50' x 40'
2" cal.
yes
Populus deltoides
Cottonwood
60' x 40'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus glaucoides / laceyi
Lacey Oak
20' x 40'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus macrocarpa
Bur Oak
75' x 50'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus muhlenbergii
Chinquapin Oak
60' x 30'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus shumardii
Shumard Oak
60' x 40'
3" cal.
yes
Quercus texana
Texas Red Oak
25' x 15'
3" cal.
yes
Sapindus drummondii
Soapberry
30' x 25'
8' ht.
yes
Taxodium distichum
Bald Cypress
75' x 50'
2" cal.
yes
Ulmus americana
American Elm (Dutch Elm
Disease Resistant Varieties)
60' x 40'
2" cal.
no
Ulmus crassifolia
Cedar Elm
50' x 35'
2" cal.
yes
Ehretia anacua
Anacua
40' x 30'
8' ht.
yes
Quercus fusiformis
Escarpment Live Oak
50' x 50'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus virginiana
Southern Live Oak
40' x 40'
3" cal.
yes
Huisache
20' x 20'
8' ht.
yes
Botanical Name
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
SHADE TREES
Deciduous Trees
Dutch Elm Disease resistant cultivars
Evergreen Trees
ORNAMENTAL TREES
Acacia farnesiana
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
30
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Botanical Name
SHADE TREES
Aesculus pavia
Deciduous Trees
Bauhinia congesta
Ht. x Spd.
Drought
Tolerant
Red Buckeye
10' x 20'
8' ht.
yes
Anacacho Orchid Tree
6' x 12 '
8' ht.
yes
Cercis canadensis var. mexicana
Mexican Redbud
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Cercis canadensis var. texensis
Texas Redbud
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Chilopsis linearis
Desert Willow
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Cornus drummondii
Roughleaf Dogwood
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Cotinus obovatus
Smoke Tree
12' x 8'
8' ht.
yes
Diospyros texana
Texas Persimmon
15' x 10'
8' ht.
yes
Eysenhardtia texana
Kidneywood
12' x 8'
3" cal.
yes
Ilex decidua
Possumhaw Holly
20' x 12'
8' ht.
yes
Ilex vomitoria
Yaupon Holly
20' x 12'
8' ht.
yes
Juniperus virginiana
Eastern Red Cedar
25' x 15'
3" cal.
yes
Leucaena retusa
Goldenball Leadtree
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Myrica cerifera
Southern Wax Myrtle
10' x 8'
6' ht.
yes
Parkinsonia aculeata
Retama
25' x 20'
8' ht.
yes
Pistacia texana
Texas Pistache
20' x 15'
12' ht.
yes
Prunus caroliniana
Cherry Laurel
25' x 15'
6' ht.
yes
Prunus mexicana
Mexican Plum
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Prunus serotina var. eximia
Escarpment Black Cherry
20' x 30'
8' ht.
yes
Evergreencaroliniana
Trees
Rhamnus
Carolina Buckthorn
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Rhus copallina / lanceolata
Flameleaf Sumac
15' x 20'
8' ht.
yes
Sophora affinis
Eve's Necklace
20' x 30'
8' ht.
yes
Sophora secundiflora
Texas Mountain Laurel
20' x 10'
6' ht.
yes
Ungnadia speciosa
Mexican Buckeye
20' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Viburnum rufidulum
Rusty Blackhawk Viburnum
15' x 10'
3" cal.
yes
Berberis trifoliata
Agarita
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Leucophyllum frutescens
Texas Sage
5' x 4'
4' o.c.
yes
Myrica pusilla
Dwarf Wax Myrtle
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Rhus virens
Evergreen Sumac
12' x 8'
8' o.c.
yes
ORNAMENTAL TREES
A.
Common Name
Min. Size &
Spacing
Req.
Comments
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center
Anacacho Orchid Tree
Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center
Kidneywood
Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
LARGE SHRUBS
Evergreen Shrubs
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Mexican Buckeye
31
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size &
Spacing
Req.
Barbados Cherry
3' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Buddleja davidii
Butterfly Bush
5' x 5'
4' o.c.
yes
Callicarpa americana
American Beautyberry
6' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
Cassia corymbosa
Flowering Senna
8' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
Lantana horrida
Texas Lantana
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Mimosa borealis
Fragrant Mimosa
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Rhus aromatica
Aromatic Sumac
6' x 4'
5' o.c.
yes
Rhus copallina / lanceolata
Flameleaf Sumac
8' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
Tecoma stans var. angustata
Yellow Bells
4' x 4'
4' o.c.
yes
Artemesia ludoviciana
Artemesia
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Hesperaloe parviflora
Red Yucca
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Ilex
vomitoria
'Nana
Evergreen
Trees
Dwarf Yaupon
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Rosa carolina
Carolina Rose
2' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Stachys coccinea
Texas Betony
1' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Tagetes lemmonii
Copper Canyon Daisy
3' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Salvia greggii
Cherry Sage
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Salvia leucantha
Mexican Bush Sage
4' x 4'
48" o.c.
yes
Wedelia texana / hispida
Zexmenia
2' x 3'
24" o.c.
yes
Anisacanthus quadrifidus var. wrightii
Flame Acanthus
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Capsicum annuum
Chile Pequin
3' x 3'
2' o.c.
yes
Dalea frutescens
Black Dalea
2' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Botanical Name
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
SHADE TREES Shrubs
Semi-evergreen
Deciduousglabra
Trees
Malpighia
Deciduous Shrubs
Melody Lytle, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center
B. SMALL SHRUBS
Evergreen Shrubs
Fragrant Mimosa
ORNAMENTAL Shrubs
TREES
Semi-evergreen
Norman G. Flaigg, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Deciduous Shrubs
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Mexican Bush Sage
32
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
C.
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size &
Spacing
Req.
Drought
Tolerant
Botanical Name
Common Name
SHADE TREES
Malvaviscus
arboreus var. drummondii
Turks Cap
3' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Deciduous
Trees
Pavonia
lasiopetala
Rock Rose Pavonia
2' x 3'
2' o.c.
yes
Symphoricarpos orbiculatus
Coralberry
3' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Comments
Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
GROUND COVERS, ANNUALS, AND PERENNIALS
Evergreen Ground Covers
Chrysactinia mexicana
Damianita
24" x 18"
18" o.c.
yes
Dichondra argentea
Silver Ponyfoot
6" x 48"
36" o.c.
yes
Rivina humilis
Pigeonberry
1' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Ruellia brittoniana 'Katie'
Katie Dwarf Ruellia
12" x 12"
12" o.c.
yes
Lantana montevidensis
Trailing Lantana
1' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Stemodia tomentosa
Wooly Stemodia
6" x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Achillea millefolium
Yarrow
18" x 3'
2' o.c.
yes
Evergreencanadensis
Trees
Aquilegia
Red Columbine
3' x 2'
12" o.c.
yes
Aquilegia chrysantha 'Texas Gold'
Yellow Columbine
3 ' x 2'
12" o.c.
yes
Aster oblongifolius
Fall Aster
3' x 2.5'
2' o.c.
yes
Callirhoe involucrata
Winecup
1' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Calylophus berlandieri
Calylophus
1' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
ORNAMENTAL
TREES
Conoclinium
greggii
Gregg's Mistflower
1.5' x 1.5'
18" o.c.
yes
Coreopsis lanceolata
Coreopsis
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Delphinium carolinianum
Blue Larkspur
2' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Echinacea purpurea
Purple Coneflower
2' x 1.5'
24" o.c.
yes
Gaura lindheimeri*
Gaura
3' x 2'
18" o.c.
yes
Hibiscus coccineus / moscheutos
Perennial Hibiscus
4' x 4'
4' o.c.
yes
Hymenoxys / Tetraneuris scaposa
Hymenoxys
12" x 12"
12" o.c.
yes
Liatris mucronata
Gayfeather
2' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Melampodium leucanthum
Blackfoot Daisy
1' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Monarda fistulosa
Bee Balm
3' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Rock Rose Pavonia
Deciduous Ground Covers
Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Perennials
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Woolly Stemodia
Mrs. W.D. Bransford, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Fall Aster
33
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Botanical Name
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size &
Spacing
Req.
SHADE TREES
Oenothera
missouriensis
Missouri Primrose
1.5' x 3'
24" o.c.
yes
Deciduous Trees
Oenothera speciosa
Evening Primrose
1.5' x 3'
24" o.c.
yes
Physostegia virginiana
Fall Obedient Plant
3' x 2'
36" o.c.
yes
Rudbeckia hirta
Black-eyed Susan
2' x 1.5'
24" o.c.
yes
Salvia coccinea
Tropical Sage
3' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Salvia penstemonoides
Big Red Sage
4' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Salvia roemeriana
Cedar Sage
2' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Thelypteris kunthii
River Fern
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
no
Verbena bipinnatifida
Prairie Verbena
1' x 2'
18" o.c.
yes
Viguiera stenoloba
Skeletonleaf Goldeneye
2' x 3'
24" o.c.
yes
Bignonia capreolata
Crossvine
50'
NA
yes
Gelsemium sempervirens
Carolina Jessamine
20'
NA
yes
Lonicera sempervirens
Coral Honeysuckle
12'
NA
yes
Parthenocissus quinquifolia
Virginia Creeper
20'
NA
yes
Passiflora incarnata
Passion Vine
12'
NA
yes
Wisteria macrostachya
Texas Wisteria
30'
NA
yes
Bouteloua curtipendula
Side Oats Grama
3' x 2'
36" o.c.
yes
Bouteloua gracilis
Blue Grama
1' x 1'
Seed
yes
Buchloe dactyloides
Buffalograss
1' x 1'
Seed
yes
Chasmanthium latifolium
Inland Sea Oats
4' x 8'
5' o.c.
yes
Muhlenbergia capillaris
Gulf Muhly
2.5' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Muhlenbergia lindheimeri
Big Muhly
5' x 3'
5' o.c.
yes
Muhlenbergia reverchonii
Seep Muhly
3' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Muhlenbergia rigens
Deer Muhly
1' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
Sally and Andy Wasowski, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Skeletonleaf Goldeneye
VINES
Evergreen Vines
Evergreen Trees
Deciduous
Vines
ORNAMENTAL TREES
GRASSES
Ornamental Grasses
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Sam Strickland, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Inland Sea Oats
34
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Well Adapted Plant Material List
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
Acer palmatum
Japanese Maple
15' x 10'
6' ht.
no
Fraxinus cuspidata
Fragrant Ash
10' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Juglans major
Arizona Walnut
40' x 50'
8' ht.
yes
Juglans microcarpa
Little Walnut
20' x 30'
8' ht.
yes
70'x 80'
8' ht.
yes
Botanical Name
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
specimen or container use only
SHADE TREES
Deciduous Trees
Juglans nigra
Koelreuteria paniculata
Golden Rain Tree
30' x 25'
2" cal.
yes
Lagerstroemia indica
Crape Myrtle
25' x 15'
8' ht.
yes
Magnolia soulangiana
Saucer Magnolia
30' x 25'
8' ht.
no
Platanus occidentalis var. glabrata
Texas Sycamore
70' x 40'
2" cal.
yes
Platanus mexicana
Mexican Sycamore
60' x 40'
2" cal.
yes
Prosopis glandulosa
Honey Mesquite
25' x 30'
8' ht.
yes
Quercus marilandica
Blackjack Oak
50' x 60'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus polymorpha
Mexican White Oak
40' x 30'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus sinuata
Durand Oak
50' x 70'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus sinuata brevifolia
Shin Oak
30' x 35'
2" cal.
yes
Quercus stellata
Post Oak
50' x 75'
2" cal.
yes
Salix babylonica
Weeping Willow
30' x 25'
2" cal.
no
park wetland and pond use only
Salix nigra
Black Willow
50' x 40'
2" cal.
no
park wetland and pond use only
Taxodium mucronatum
Montezuma Cypress
75' x 50'
2" cal.
yes
Arbutus texana
Texas Madrone
25' x 30'
6' ht.
yes
Cedrus deodara
Deodar Cedar
30' x 15'
12' ht.
yes
Cupressus arizonica
Arizona Cypress
30' x 20'
8' ht.
yes
Eriobotrya japonica
Loquat
15' x 10'
6' ht.
no
Juniperus chinensis ‘Blue Point'
Blue Point Juniper
15' x 5'
4' ht.
yes
Pinus eldarica
Afghan Pine
50' x 25'
8' ht.
yes
ornamental accent use only
ornamental accent use only
Evergreen Trees
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
35
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
Drought
Tolerant
Botanical Name
Common Name
Pinus pinea
SHADE TREES
Italian Stone Pine
80' x 40'
8' ht.
yes
Pinus
thunbergii
Deciduous
Trees
Japanese Black Pine
50' x 25'
8' ht.
yes
Lagerstroemia indica
Crape Myrtle
15' x 10'
8' ht.
yes
ornamental accent use only
Prunus persica
Flowering Peach
15' x 10'
8' ht.
yes
ornamental accent use only
Abelia grandiflora
Glossy Abelia
6' x 6'
4' o.c.
yes
Abelia grandiflora, dwarf varieties
Dwarf Abelia
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Artemesia x ‘Powis Castle'
Powis Castle Artemesia
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Cotoneaster glaucophylla
Grayleaf Cotoneaster
3' x 5'
3' o.c.
yes
Cotoneaster spp.
Cotoneaster
3' x 5'
3' o.c.
yes
Cycas revoluta
King Sago
6' x 4'
5' o.c.
no
Dietes bicolor
Bicolor Iris
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Elaegnus pungens
Elaegnus
6' x 6'
6' o.c.
no
Fatsia japonica
Fatsia
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
no
Feijoa sellowiana
Pineapple Guava
6' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
Jasminum floridum
Florida Jasmine
3' x 4'
4' o.c.
yes
Jasminum mesnyi
Primrose Jasmine
8' x 8'
5' o.c.
yes
Juniperus chinensis 'Hetzli'
San Jose Juniper
6' x 6'
6' o.c.
yes
Evergreen chinensis
Trees
Juniperus
'Parsonii'
Parsons Juniper
2' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Juniperus chinensis ‘Sea Green'
Sea Green Juniper
5' x 6'
4' o.c.
yes
Juniperus conferta
Shore Juniper
1.5' x 8'
6' o.c.
yes
Juniperus horizontalis cultivars
Andorra Juniper
2' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Loropetalum spp.
Loropetalum
8' x 5'
4' o.c.
yes
Mahonia bealei
Leatherleaf Mahonia
4' x 3'
3' o.c.
no
Nandina domestica 'Gulf Stream'
Nandina
2' x 3'
2' o.c.
no
Rosa spp.
Rose
varies
NA
yes
Rosmarinus officinalis
Upright Rosemary
4' x 5'
3' o.c.
yes
Rosmarinus officinalis 'prostratus'
Prostrate Rosemary
2' x 5'
3' o.c.
yes
Comments
ORNAMENTAL TREES
A. LARGE SHRUBS
Evergreen Shrubs
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
'Edward Goucher', 'Sherwoodii'
specimen or container use only
specimen or container use only
non berry varieties only
36
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Botanical Name
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
SHADE
TREES
Viburnum
suspensum
Sandankwa Viburnum
6' x 6'
4' o.c.
Drought
Tolerant
no
Deciduous Trees
Comments
Andy and Sally Wasowski, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Semi-evergreen Shrubs
Dalea bicolor
Dalea
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Salvia melissodora
Grape-Scented Sage
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Salvia x superba
Blue Queen Sage
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Ageratina havanensis
White Mistflower / Boneset
5' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Berberis thunbergii
Japanese Barberry
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Berberis thunbergii 'Atropurpurea'
Red Leaf Japanese Barberry
5' x 5'
4' o.c.
yes
Berberis thunbergii, dwarf varieties
Japanese Barberry, dwarf varieties
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Buddleja marrubiifolia
Wooly Butterfly Bush
6' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
Cassia lindheimeriana
Lindheimer's Cassia
2' x 3'
2' o.c.
yes
Cephalanthus occidentalis
Button Bush
8' x 10'
6' o.c.
yes
Chaenomeles speciosa
Flowering Quince
6' x 6'
5' o.c.
no
Eupatorium coelestinum
Blue Mistflower
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Eysenhardtia texana
Kidneywood
10' x 6'
6' o.c.
yes
Hamamelis virginiana
Witch Hazel
10' x 8'
6' o.c
yes
Hibiscus syriacus
Althea
10' x 6'
5' o.c.
no
Philadelphus coronarius
Mock Orange
10' x 8'
6' o.c.
yes
Deciduous Shrubs
B.
Punica granatum
Pomegranate
10' x 6'
4' o.c.
yes
Evergreen
Salvia reglaTrees
Mountain Sage
5' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Senna lindheimeriana
Lindheimer Senna
4' x 4'
3' o.c.
yes
Teucrium fruticans
Bush Germander
5' x 5'
5' o.c.
yes
Viburnum dentatum
Arrowwood
15' x 10'
8' o.c.
yes
Aspidistra elatior
Cast Iron Plant
36" x 24"
24" o.c.
no
Calyptocarpus vialis
Horseherb
8" ht.
12" o.c.
yes
Dalea
'Crimson Pygmy', 'Aurea'
park wetland and pond use only
SMALL SHRUBS
Evergreen Ground Covers
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
37
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Botanical Name
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
Drought
Tolerant
SHADE
CarexTREES
perdentata
Meadow Sedge
18" x 18"
12" o.c.
yes
Deciduous Trees
Carex texensis
Texas Sedge
8" x 18"
12" o.c.
yes
Carex tumulicola
Berkeley Sedge
12" x 12"
12" o.c.
yes
Hypericum calycinum
St. John's Wort
24" x 24"
24" o.c.
yes
Liriope gigantea
Giant Liriope
24" ht.
24" o.c.
no
Liriope muscari
Liriope and varieties
18" ht.
18" o.c.
no
Ophiopogon japonicus
Monkey Grass
12" ht.
12" o.c.
no
Oreganum vulgare
Oregano
36" x 36"
36" o.c.
yes
Phyla incisa
Frogfruit
4" x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Santolina chamaecyparissus
Santolina
12" x 24"
24" o.c.
yes
Sedum nuttallianum
Sedum
6" ht.
12" o.c.
yes
Setcreasea pallida
Purple Heart
12" ht.
12" o.c.
yes
Comments
Joseph A. Marcus, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Texas Sedge
specimen or con
C. GROUND COVERS, ANNUALS AND PERENNIALS
Deciduous Ground Covers
Ceratostigma plumbaginoides
Leadwort Plumbago
12" ht.
18" o.c.
yes
Plumbago auriculata
Blue Plumbago
3' x 5'
36" o.c.
yes
Agapanthus africanus
Agapanthus
24" ht.
2' o.c.
no
Aquilegia chrysantha x ‘Hinkleyana'
Hinkley's Columbine
3' x 2'
12" o.c.
yes
Mexican Butterfly Weed
3' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Butterfly Weed
3' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Bulbine frutescens / caulescens
Bulbine
2' x 2.5'
2' o.c.
yes
Caesalpinia pulcherrima
Poinciana
6' x 6'
5' o.c.
yes
specimen or con
Canna spp.
Canna Lily
4' x 4'
4' o.c.
no
specimen use o
Chrysanthemum leucanthemum
Oxeye Daisy
3' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Cuphea hyssopifolia
Mexican Heather
2' x 2'
2' o.c.
yes
Cuphea micropetala
Cigar Plant
4' x 3'
3' o.c.
yes
Dalea greggii
Gregg Dalea
1' x 3'
36" o.c.
no
Dietes spp.
Butterfly Iris
4' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Eupatorium wrightii
White Mistflower
2' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Perennials
Asclepias curassivica
Evergreen Trees
Asclepias tuberosa
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
specimen or con
38
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
Firebush
2.5' x 3'
36" o.c.
no
Maximilian Sunflower
6' ht.
36" o.c.
yes
Hemerocallis spp.
Daylilies
3' ht.
24" o.c.
yes
Hibiscus cardiophyllus
Heartleaf Hibiscus
12" x 12"
12" o.c.
yes
Ipomoea fistulosa / leptophylla
Bush Morning Glory
7' x 7'
6' o.c.
yes
Iris albicans
Bearded Iris
1' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Iris spp.
Iris
2'-5' ht.
24" o.c.
yes
Justicia brandegeana
Shrimp Plant
3' x 4'
24" o.c.
yes
Justicia spicigera
Mexican Honeysuckle
2' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Lantana x hybrida
Lantana
2' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Linum pratense
Meadow Flax
18" x 12"
18" o.c.
yes
Lisianthus russelianus
Texas Bluebells
12" x 12"
12" o.c.
yes
Lobelia cardinalis
Cardinal Flower
3' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Nepeta x faassenii 'Six Hills Giant'
Catmint
4' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Penstemon baccharifolius
Rock Penstemon
1.5' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Penstemon tenuis
Gulf Coast Penstemon
1.5' x 1'
12" o.c.
yes
Penstemon triflorus
Scarlet Penstemon
2' x 1.5'
18" o.c.
yes
Perovskia atriplicifolia
Russian Sage
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Phlomis fruticosa
Jerusalem Sage
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Phlox paniculata
Garden Phlox
3' x 2'
36" o.c.
yes
Plumbago auriculata
Plumbago
2' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Poliomintha longiflora
Evergreen Trees
Salvia farinacea
Mexican Oregano
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Mealy Blue Sage
2' x 1.5'
18" o.c.
yes
Salvia guaranitica
Majestic Sage
4' x 5'
48" o.c.
yes
Salvia x ‘Indigo Spires'
Indigo Spires Salvia
3' x 5'
48" o.c.
yes
Scutellaria suffrutescens
Pink Skullcap
1' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Stachys byzantina
Lamb's Ear
2' x 4'
36" o.c.
yes
Tagetes lucida
Mexican Mint Marigold
2' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Tradescantia x Andersoniana
Spiderwort
2' x 2'
24" o.c.
yes
Verbena peruviana
Peruvian Verbena
1' x 2'
18" o.c.
yes
Verbena tenuisectum
Moss Verbena
1' x 2'
18" o.c.
yes
Botanical Name
SHADE TREES
Hamelia patens
Deciduous Trees
Helianthus maximiliana
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
Andy and Sally Wasowsk, Lady Bird Johnson
Wildflower Center
Bush Morning Glory
Nan Hampton, Lady Bird Johnson Wildflower
Center
Mealy Blue Sage
39
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
Botanical Name
Common Name
Ht. x Spd.
Min. Size
& Spacing
Req.
Drought
Tolerant
Comments
SHADE TREES
VINES
Deciduous Trees
Evergreen Vines
Ficus pumila
Fig Vine
20'
NA
yes
Rosa banksiae
Lady Banksia Rose
20' ht.
NA
yes
Trachelospermum asiaticum
Asian Jasmine
1'-6'
NA
yes
Trachelospermum jasminoides
Confederate Jasmine
10'-15'
NA
yes
Antigonon leptopus
Coral Vine / Rose of Montana
NA
NA
yes
Bougainvillea spp.
Bougainvillea
NA
NA
yes
Campsis radicans
Trumpet Vine
NA
NA
yes
Clematis spp.
Clematis
NA
NA
yes
Ipomoea quamoclit
Cypress Vine
NA
yes
Parthenocissus tricuspidata 'Veitchii'
Boston Ivy
NA
yes
Vitus mustangensis
Mustang Grape
10'
NA
yes
Andropogon gerardii
Big Bluestem
5' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Andropogon glomeratus
Bushy Bluestem
4' x 2'
36" o.c.
yes
Bambusa spp.
Bamboo
Cortaderia
selloana ‘Pumila'
Evergreen Trees
Dwarf Pampas Grass
6' x 6'
48" o.c.
yes
Elymus canadensis
Wild Rye
4' x 4'
48" o.c.
yes
Muhlenbergia dumosa
Bamboo Muhly
5' x 4'
48" o.c.
yes
Pennisetum alopecuroides
Fountain Grass
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Pennisetum
Purple Fountain Grass
3' x 3'
36" o.c.
yes
Cynodon spp., Tif 419
Bermuda hybrid varieties
Sod
yes
Cynodon spp., Sahara
Bermuda hybrid varieties
yes
Zoysia japonica
Zoysia
Seed or
Sod
Seed
orSod
Deciduous Vines
specimen or container use only
GRASSES
Ornamental Grasses
no
clumping varieties only
Turf Grasses
yes
"Palisades" or "El toro" variety
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
40
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
13 Do Not Plant List
The following list is taken from the Native and Adapted Landscape Plants Grow Green invasive plant list.
See Grow Green guide for most current list.
Running Bamboo
Cat's Claw Vine
Chinaberry
Chinese Parasol Tree
Chinese Pistache
Giant Cane
Kudzu
Japanese Ligustrum
Paper Mulberry
Nandina (berrying varieties)
Common Privet
Russian Olive
Tree of Heaven
Elephant Ear
Holly Fern
Wisteria (non-native)
Chinese Tallow
Janpanese Honeysuckle
Wax Leaf Ligustrum
Mimosa (non-native)
White Mulberry
Chinese Photinia
Pyrancantha
Salt Cedar Tamarisk
Vitex (agnus-castus)
English Ivy
Vinca (perennial varieties)
The following list of plants do not meet the design intent for the Texas native landscape character or
are inappropriate for on site conditions.
Trees:
Arizona Ash
Bradford Pear
Chinese Elm (Drake and Lacebark)
Green Ash
Italian Cypress
Palm Trees
River Birch
Silver Maple
Sugar Maple
Sweetgum
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
Shrubs:
Azaleas
Boxwood
Burford Holly
Camellias
Chinese Holly
Euonymus
Indian Hawthorn
Photinia
Pittosporum
Rhododendron
Topiaries
41
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
14 Landscape Design Review Process
The following procedure is intended to assist the Applicant in the design review process
and to ensure that the RSR is reviewing plans with the appropriate level of detail on which
to make their decisions.
Submittals
The Applicant shall submit drawings of a typical landscape for each house floor plan
to be built at Rancho Sienna. Upon completion of the landscape installation, the RSR
shall review the installation for compliance with the requirements and shall issue written
comments or approval. Favorable reviews of initial submittals will neither imply nor
guarantee acceptance of subsequent design submittals.
Applicant’s Landscape Plan, Installation, and Review
1. Applicant shall visit site to note slope and drainage conditions, utility locations, and to
verify existing site conditions.
2. The landscape must be constructed in accordance with Rancho Sienna Residential
Landscape Requirements. Approval is required by the RSR prior to construction of any
modifications to approved house floor plans.
3. Upon completion of landscape, the Applicant shall submit Checklist and Review and
a site plan (at a minimum scale of 1”=20’) to RSR for review. The site plan, one for each
house floor plan, shall show typical boundary lines, setbacks, and easements. The outline
of the house is to be shown with dimensions sufficient to show typical location on the
lot. Driveways, walkways, sidewalks, and patios are to be shown. Landscape beds, turf
areas, locations of tree and plant species and quantity must be shown. The Applicant must
consider adjacent lot’s landscape plan to avoid repetition of landscapes.
4. All plans shall include the following “Landscape Plan Notes”:
A. A minimum of 90% of installed plant material for each lot shall
be from the Suggested Plant List in the Ranch Sienna Design
Guidelines and Residential Landscape Requirements. No invasive
plants or plants from the Do Not Plant List are allowed.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
42
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
B. The minimum size of all plants shall be in accordance with the
Suggested Plant List in the Rancho Sienna Design Guidelines and Residential
Landscape Requirements.
C. Narrow areas of turf less than 3 feet wide shall be avoided.
D. Plant beds shall have a minimum of 6 inches of topsoil with approximately
20% organic matter, and shall be free from debris and rocks larger than 1” in
diameter.
E. Where steel edging is used, the top of the edging shall be a minimum of 1”
above finished grade.
F. Trees shall not be planted in public utility easements.
G. Shade trees shall be located to maintain the following minimum spacing
requirements:
1. Minimum 15 feet between other shade trees.
2. Minimum 8 feet from building foundations.
Ornamental trees shall be located away from foundations at distances appropriate
for species size and growth rate.
H.
A minimum of four tree species shall be incorporated throughout
the neighborhood.
For a single block face, at least two different tree
species shall be planted. Refer to the Tree Chart under 5.9 Landscape
Requirements.
Upon notification of completion of the residence by the Applicant, the RSR shall review the
landscape to assure compliance with the Rancho Sienna Landscape Requirements by use
of the checklist and Review on the following pages.
The RSR will review the Applicant’s installation and prepare written comments or approval.
If exceptions are noted, the Applicant is to address the comments by submitting
additional plans or written clarification.
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
43
LANDSCAPE
LANDSCAPE DESIGN GUIDELINES
15 Resources
CENTER FOR MAXIMUM POTENTIAL BUILDING SYSTEMS
http://www.cmpbs.org/
CHISHOLM TRAIL SPECIAL UTILITY DISTRICT
http://www.ctsud.org/links.html
THE DIRT DOCTOR
http://www.dirtdoctor.com/
ENVISION CENTRAL TEXAS
http://www.envisioncentraltexas.org/
GROW GREEN GUIDE
http://www.ci.austin.tx.us/growgreen/
LADY BIRD JOHNSON WILDFLOWER CENTER
http://www.wildflower.org/
LOWER COLORADO RIVER AUTHORITY
http://www.lcra.org/
NATURAL RESOURCES CONSERVATION SERVICES
http://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/main/national/home
TEXAS AGRILIFE RESEARCH
http://agriliferesearch.tamu.edu/
TEXAS COMMISION ON ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY
http://www.tceq.state.tx.us/
TEXAS URBAN LANDSCAPE GUIDE
http://urbanlandscapeguide.tamu.edu/links.html
UNITED STATES ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY
http://www.epa.gov/
UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY
http://www.usgs.gov/
NATIVE TEXAS PLANTS, LANDSCAPING REGION BY REGION
by Sally and Andy Wasowski
RANCHO SIENNA COMMUNITY DESIGN GUIDELINES - JUNE 2014
44

Similar documents