May 14, 2015 - Alexandria Times

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May 14, 2015 - Alexandria Times
Vol. 11, No. 20 Alexandria’s only independent hometown newspaper
An incredible send-off
PHOTOs/Susan hale thomas
Sailors stand by the casket of longtime Alexandria resident and retired World War II veteran Thomas Richard
Downs at his burial service last Friday. Family members said the occasion was particularly meaningful since
it fell on the 70th anniversary of V-E Day, when Germany surrendered to Allied forces.
may 14, 2015
Alexandria veteran
buried on anniversary
of V-E Day
By Susan Hale Thomas
For a veteran, being buried
at Arlington National Cemetery is considered
a great honor. But
for the family of
longtime Alexandria resident and
World War II veteran Navy Cmdr.
Thomas Richard
Downs, his burial
service last Friday
had added significance: May 8 was the 70th anniversary of the end of the conflict in Europe.
Downs died of natural causes
on January 2 at the age of 91.
A memorial service was
held at the Old Post Chapel at
Fort Myer. Afterward, Downs’
casket was lifted onto a caisson. Family and friends followed the procession escorted
by a casket team, color guard,
and military band to the burial site. At the site, there was
a small service including a
three-rifle
volley, “Taps” performed by a bugler, the formal
folding of the flag
and its presentation to the family.
Downs made
h is home i n
Rosemont for 57
years and was
known to friends and family
as “The Commander.”
Born January 23, 1923,
Downs lived with his family
in Middletown, Ohio and after
graduating with honors from
SEE Veteran | 5
First in a series of three profiles of Democratic Candidates for Mayor
Kerry Donley looks to up the ante
Former mayor believes
development in Alexandria
should move quicker
By ERich Wagner
photo/Chris Teale
A community of support A 20-foot installation of giant blackboards stands along Mount Vernon Avenue in Del Ray, on which people have written in chalk what they wish they had the courage to do.
Unveiled by local resident Nancy Belmont, people have written their
dreams, hopes and fears as well as what holds them back.
Former Mayor Kerry Donley may appear all business
on the campaign trail, throwing around statistics and proposals for future development
in Alexandria, but he stressed
some of the best parts of being mayor are simply interacting with residents.
“That’s the beauty of local government,” he said.
“[Going] out and doing those
things, I actually enjoy that
because it gives me the opportunity to have a direct re-
Kerry Donley
lationship with our citizens.
The Giant [Food] on Duke
Street used to be a Hechinger,
and I went to buy a box of
nails one Saturday and I got
stopped by four people who
came up to me complaining about the difficulty there
was to try to turn left into the
Hechinger.
“I went back and talked
to transportation and environmental services, and they
said, ‘You’re exactly right.
There needs to be a dedicated turn lane here.’ And two
months later, there was one.”
Donley, who served as
mayor from 1996 until 2003,
again is vying for Alexandria’s top elected position in a
three-way Democratic primary on June 9. He will square
Camp & Enrichment directory – page 17
SEE donley | 6
OLD TOWN
$2,200,000
2 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
Christine
Roland Garner
ristine Roland
Garner
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ll More Because
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ince
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QUAKER
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WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM may 14, 2015 | 3
THE WEEKLY BRIEFING
Voter registration deadline approaches
City officials reminded
residents planning to participate in the upcoming local
Democratic primary on June
9 that the deadline to register
to vote is Monday, May 18.
This year, voters will be
able to vote for the Democratic candidate for mayor, as
well as the Democratic nominees for the 45th Virginia
House of Delegates district.
Voters may register online, in person or by mail. To
register online, fill out an application form at www.vote.
virginia.gov before midnight
on May 18.
To register in person, visit
the Office of Voter Registration and Elections at 132 N.
Royal St., Suite 100 before 5
p.m. on May 18.
To register by mail, download the application form at
www.alexandriava.gov/elections and send the completed
form to the Office of Voter
Registration, 132 N. Royal
St., Suite 100, Alexandria, VA
22314. Applications must be
postmarked by May 18.
Officials urged residents
to update their registration records if they have changed addresses within the city or from
elsewhere in Virginia to avoid
the risk of problems on Election Day.
New or transferred registrants’ voter information cards
will be mailed within one week
of the registration date.
Voters who only need to
update their address may do
so through all the methods
above or by completing the
back of their old voter information card and mailing or
faxing it to the Office of Voter
Registration and Elections,
703-838-6449 before 5 p.m.
on May 18.
To verify your registration
is up to date, visit www.alexandriava.gov/elections and
look for “Am I Registered and
Where do I Vote?” under the
Voter Registration links. Voters may also call the Office of
Voter Registration and Elections at 703-746-4050.
Elmer’s
Lawn and Garden
Elmer’s
Elmer’s
Lawn
Lawn
and
and
Garden
Garden
Elmer’s
Lawn
and
Garden
Absentee voting is curElmer’s
Lawn
and
Garden
• Lawn Mowing
• Gutter C
rently underway and will run
• •Lawn
Mowing
Gutter
Cleaning
• Lawn
Lawn
Mowing
Mowing
• •Gutter
• Gutter
Cleaning
Cleaning
• Fertilizing
• Seasona
•• Seasonal
Gutter
Cleaning
Lawn6.Mowing • Lawn
• Gutter
Cleaning
Elmer’s
Lawn• •and
Garden
• •Fertilizing
Seasonal
Cleaning
• Mowing
Fertilizing
Fertilizing
Seasonal
Cleaning
Cleaning
Elmer’s
Lawn
and
Garden
through 5 p.m. on •June
• Weed
Control • •Planting
• Planting
• •Weed
Control
Planting
• Fertilizing
• Seasonal
Cleaning
• Weed
Weed
Control
Control
Fertilizing
•• Planting
Seasonal
Independent candidates
who •
20+• Gutter
Yrs. Cleaning
20+
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• Lawn
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• •Mulching
•New
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Lawns
• Weed Control • •
•
Planting
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Control
• Experience
Planting
Experience
• Fertilizing Experience
•Walls
Seasonal Cleaning
plan to run for the Virginia state • Fertilizing
• Seasonal
Cleaning
20+
Yrs.
Experience
• •Aeration
Retaining
•20+
Aeration
• Retainin
• Aeration
Aeration • New
• •Retaining
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Walls
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Yrs.
• Mulching
Lawns
•
Weed
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•
Planting
•
Trimming
•
Patios
Mulching
•
New
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•
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Senate, House of• Aeration
Delegates, • •
Experience
• Trimming
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• Patios
• Patios Lawns
• Trimming
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20+
Yrs.
•
Retaining
Walls
20+
Yrs.
• Tree•Pruning
• Drains • New Lawns
Experience
Mulching
• New Lawns
mayor, city council
or school • •
• Tree• Pruning
TreeMulching
Pruning
• Drains
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•• Drains
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Experience
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Call
for
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board have until 7 •p.m.
June
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Call
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• elmerslawnan
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to file. For candidate bulletins, • •
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Call
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gov/index.php/candidatepacinfo/candidate-bulletins.
For more information, including sample ballots, inperson absentee voting hours,
photo ID requirements and
Election Day precinct information visit www.alexandriava.gov/elections or call 703746-4050.
Elmer’s Lawn and Garden
- Susan Hale Thomas
POLICE BEAT
The following incidents occurred between May 6 and May 13.
30
4
Thefts
Vehicle
thefts
11
2
2
Drug
Crimes
21
4
2
robberies
bURGLARies
Assaults
SEXUAL
OFFENSEs
Aggravated
Assaults
*Editor’s note: Police reports are not considered public information in Virginia. The Alexandria Police
Department is not required to supply the public at large with detailed information on criminal cases.
Source: raidsonline.com
4 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
The Lamplighter
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Photo by
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The Alexandria Times May Photo Contest
May’s Theme: Game Day
(Send us your favorite sporting photos from
little league to professional games)
Send us your photo to win
Two Club Level tickets to a Nationals game
May Photo
Contest
Sponsored
By:
HUDSON
STUDIO
Send us your Game Day photos
through April 30.
#ALXPhotoTimes or send to
[email protected]
Interested in sponsoring the photo contest? Call 703-739-0001
or visit alextimes.com/monthly-photo-contest for more information!
City council formally approves
2016 fiscal year budget
ACPS, Maury Schoolyard
and police big winners
this budget season
By Chris Teale
At a special meeting of Alexandria City Council on May 7,
City Manager Mark Jinks recalled that in December 2014,
the city faced a $31 million
deficit based on thenproposed budgets for
city departments for
fiscal 2016.
Jinks asked city
staff and officials
in the office of management and budget to
suggest ideas to reduce the
shortfall, ideally so that no additional taxes would be levied
on citizens.
Just four months later, city
council unanimously passed
legislation approving the new
budget without any tax increases but with a modest increase
in spending after a budget season with relatively little drama
compared to previous years.
The city’s overall budget
totals $816.3 million, with
$649.2 million in the operating budget. That represents an
overall increase on the 2015
fiscal year overall and operating budgets of 1.4 percent and
1.9 percent, respectively.
Within that, approximately
$1.3 million was added to staff
Fire Station 210 on the West End
between December 2015 and
March 2016, after it opened last
month without any firefighters.
Alexandria City Public Schools
will receive a total of $198.8
million, which includes an extra
$1 million granted in the add/delete work sessions.
The Maury Schoolyard Initiative from parents at Matthew
Maury Elementary School received $250,000 from the capital budget to aid improvements
to the school’s playground. The
combination of private and public funds to aid the project
drew praise from city
councilors, as did
the group’s constant
involvement in the
budget process.
“For Maury School,
you have been with us
always,” said City Councilor
Del Pepper in chambers after the
budget’s approval. “I particularly feel a good bit of warmth
towards that particular project
because there were so many parents that were involved in this.
“At the very beginning,
when it looked like ‘Mission:
Impossible,’ they still had the
hope and they still kept pushing. When a community goes
out like that and really fights
for something they have to
have, and if you’re meeting us
part-way, that really is incentive for sure.”
“We really applaud all that
you’re doing and have done already,” added Vice Mayor Allison Silberberg. “I also love
the fact that the children have
been involved. Anywhere in
the city where we have similar situations, coming forward
as a community and working
with us hand-in-hand is definitely welcome.”
The budget invests $2.1
million in the pay of police
officers to try and regain regional competitiveness. After
years without a pay bump, officers lobbied City Hall for an
increase and under the 2016
budget will receive a 4.5 percent raise across the board.
Entry-level pay for officers
will increase by 9 percent.
Finally, the city’s transportation improvement plan has been
given $1.85 million for its top
three priorities to improve city
infrastructure, while the Alexandria Law Library received
$60,000 to continue operating,
albeit with reduced hours.
The budget process underwent some changes late last
year to prevent the tension and
freneticism of past cycles, as
city councilors looked to find
funding for projects late on.
City councilors Paul Smedberg
and John Chapman pushed successfully for a new process that
looks to garner citizen input
much earlier, with a requirement that city councilors fill out
a form on a deadline explaining how a proposal for funding
aligns with the city’s strategic
plan, with two other city councilors as co-sponsors.
Smedberg noted at the
May 7 meeting that while the
process is still not perfect, it
ensures that the responsibility
is with city councilors to ensure they are communicating
effectively with each other
and with the public, and that
issues are debated in a more
timely manner.
Approved fiscal 2016 budget highlights
FY 2015
FY 2016
Change
Operating budget
$636.8 million
$649.2 million
1.9 percent
ACPS funding
$191.8 million
$198.8 million
3.6 percent
Source: City of Alexandria
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM may 14, 2015 | 5
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PHOTOs/Susan hale thomas
Longtime Alexandria resident and World War II veteran Thomas Richard Downs (top left) was buried last
week at Arlington National Cemetery. Family members said Downs was constantly bettering himself through
education and was renowned for his support of the Alexandria Symphony Orchestra.
veteran
FROM | 1
high school he attended the
University of Cincinnati. Downs
enlisted in the U.S. Navy in
1942 and became one of the
youngest chief petty officers in
Navy history at the age of 21.
During the war, Downs
served in England on the
staff of the U.S. Naval Forces
France preparing for the Invasion of Normandy. After V-E
Day, Downs was transferred
to the Pacific where he served
on an amphibious vessel.
After the war, Downs was
released from active duty and
continued his education, earning bachelor’s and master’s
degrees from Miami University in Ohio.
Downs taught for three
years at his alma mater, Middletown High School, but at
the onset of the Korean War,
he was recalled to active duty
and served on the staff of the
Supreme Allied Commander,
Atlantic, in Norfolk, Va. Later
he would serve with the occu-
pational forces of Germany on
the staff of the Commander of
U.S. Forces Europe.
During his service in Germany, the National Sojourners honored Downs with the
Americanism Service Award
for his off-duty work teaching
adult Germans at the State Department’s America House. He
was instrumental in collecting
children’s clothing from American families and sharing them
with local families in need.
Downs continued his service in the Navy in the Mediterranean, the Caribbean, the
Naval Gun Factory, the Bureau
of Naval Weapons, and as staff
of the secretary of defense in
international security affairs.
Education was never far
from Downs’ mind. He earned
two additional master’s degrees
from George Washington University, and earned his doctorate in management from Pacific
Western University. He taught
for 16 years at various government installations and at Southeastern University in D.C.
In the 1960s, Downs served
as a military advisor in China,
and during the Vietnam War
he was involved with the operation of the port of Da Nang.
He managed 5,000 U.S. and
South Vietnamese personnel
and coordinated supply ships
and cargo for U.S. troops.
Downs received a presidential appointment to the
Joint Logistics Review Board
and continued his work in the
Pacific region.
Upon his retirement from the
Navy, Downs was awarded the
Navy Meritorious Service Medal. Over the course of his career,
he earned 18 different decorations, three twice earned, and
four Vietnam campaign stars.
Downs was married to Juliane Hudson Downs for 41
years until her death in 1998.
The couple had two children,
Susan Downs Smouse of Austin, Texas and Richard Warren
Downs of Alexandria. He had
three grandchildren.
SEE Veteran | 9
May 19th Design Online Auction
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Visit us online at www.potomackcompany.com
6 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
The 2015 Alexandria Times
Bridal Directory
B ridalD irectory
AlexAndriA timeS 2015
one more issue ~
May 21, 2015
Contact 703-739-0001 or [email protected] to advertise!
Get a jump on spring wedding planning by reserving
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The 2015 Bridal
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Alexandria Times to
bring local residents
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where I’ve finally
found my family.”
—Helena Scott
Total distribution:
19,311 copies
Issues:
February 19
March 19
April 16
May 21
contact:
Alexandria Times
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| alextimes.com
beauty salon, sits on the Health Center Committee and delivers
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our courteous and helpful staff, and an overall feeling of caring
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Alexandria, VA
www.Hermitage-Nova.com
First in a series of three profiles of
Democratic Candidates for Mayor
donley
FROM | 1
off against incumbent Mayor
Bill Euille and Vice Mayor
Allison Silberberg.
Speaking of his top priorities, Donley said he wants to
solve the city’s structural deficit — expenditures annually
outpacing revenue growth —
by bolstering its commercial
tax base, followed by increasing the percentage of city dollars that goes to Alexandria
City Public Schools.
“What’s the solution? Potomac Yard Metro, getting
back on schedule and staying
on schedule,” he said. “And in
the Carlyle area, it’s the home
to the [U.S. Patent and Trademark Office] and soon the [National Science Foundation].
That area of the city could be
internationally recognized as a
center for science, innovation
and creativity.”
Donley criticized Euille
and city council for, in his eyes,
not moving quickly enough
on plans for the proposed Potomac Yard Metro station, and
he stressed the city must move
quickly on development elsewhere in the city.
“In West Eisenhower,
we’re in the midst of a replanning effort, which is good
but calls for a 20- to 30-year
build-out,” he said. “I don’t
believe we should wait that
long. The infrastructure is in
place and we should have an
interim plan for development.
“The big box retailers in
Potomac Yard will eventually
go away [as the rest of the area
redevelops with the Metro station], so we should set up an
overlay zone in Eisenhower
West that relieves retailers from
the special use permit hurdle.
We can say, ‘Here’s where we
want you, and we’ll make it
easier for you to get there.’”
Donley noted that encouraging the retailers in Potomac
Yard to move to the Eisenhower
Valley also could have the added benefit of keeping the traffic
those businesses generate on
the Capital Beltway and in the
southwest corner of the city.
On education, Donley said
he wants to increase funding from its current level —
30.6 percent of the operating
budget — to around 32 or 33
percent. And to deal with capacity issues, he would recommend looking at the possibility of making more schools
into K-8 institutions.
“We’ve got Jefferson-Houston and we’re looking at that for
Patrick Henry, but from an edu-
In West
Eisenhower,
we’re in the midst
of a re-planning
effort, which is
good but calls for
a 20- to 30-year
build-out. I don’t
believe we should
wait that long. The
infrastructure is in
place and we should
have an interim plan
for development.”
– Kerry Donley
Democratic mayoral candidate
cation policy standpoint, K-8
schools might afford the opportunity for more neighborhood
schools, rather than having all
middle school students go to
one place,” he said. “But the
big challenge, if enrollment is
sustained, is that we’ve got one
high school [in T.C. Williams].
We’ll have to get creative there
and maybe even lease space offsite for some programs.”
Donley was pragmatic
about the drop in availability
of affordable housing in the
city over the past decade.
“There’s not much we can
do on the financial side; local
SEE donley | 7
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM donley
may 14, 2015 | 7
FROM | 6
government is primarily responsible for education, public
health and public safety, and
it’s just not equipped to have a
serious impact on this issue,”
he said. “We can’t devote the
dollars necessary to offset that
loss of affordable units.”
The place where city officials can improve the situation,
Donley said, is through the
zoning and development processes, as well as working with
local nonprofit organizations.
“We have to go to the zoning code,” he said. “When
we rezoned [the] Beauregard
[neighborhood], we secured
the largest single set aside
for affordable housing in the
city’s history, with 850 units.
So we have to use zoning
tools with new developments.
“And we have to develop
partnerships with nonprofits to help them buy or redevelop affordable housing.
With current units, we have
to both preserve affordability
Shop Around the Corner
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Donley said, if elected, he
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areas by more effective priority setting in his agenda.
“You have to identify and
limit your priorities,” he said.
“I always say: If you wind up
with 16 priorities, you have
no priorities, because then
everything is a priority.”
And he stressed he relishes the fact that as mayor, one
is always on the job.
“When I was mayor, I think
I got more done on the soccer
field, watching my kids play,
than at City Hall,” Donley said.
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8 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
Advertorial
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WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM veteran
may 14, 2015 | 9
FROM | 5
Richard Downs said his father remained sharp, even as
he got older.
“He maintained his love
for gardening, mowed his own
grass, did his own housekeeping, insisted on hanging his
laundry outside to dry, and he
remembered the birthdays and
graduations of children on the
street with cards and gifts,”
Richard said.
Three months before his
death, Downs asked Richard
to pull out his copy of the Bill
of Rights.
“He proudly recited it word
for word,” he said.
Downs was an enthusiastic
supporter of the Alexandria
Symphony Orchestra and was
its first trustee emeritus. He
earned the moniker “Mr. Symphony” since he greeted many
of the subscribers by name.
Neighbor John Schilling
had fond memories of Downs,
calling him a sage.
“I’d visit and he’d hand me a
clothes pin and have me hanging
up his socks and sheets,” Schilling said. “We’d have a chat over
an iced tea. ‘How about a sweet
roll?’ He was a provider. He always wanted to provide a bit of
hospitality to everyone.
“I would go and visit him
as if he were my counselor.
He’d give me wonderful advice. He was just a statesman,
very diplomatic and an ambassador of goodwill. … He
could have a conversation with
a complete foreigner the same
as he would his neighbors over
an iced tea on the back porch.
He was very broad and culturally minded.”
PHOTOs/Susan hale thomas
Susan Downs Smouse is presented with the flag from her father’s casket at a graveside service last
Friday at Arlington National Cemetery on the 70th anniversary of V-E Day.
A change in name, but not
a change of heart.
Mount Vernon Cardiology has joined
Inova Medical Group.
Over the past 30 years, Mount Vernon Cardiology
has built an enviable reputation for top-notch
cardiovascular care with a personal, caring touch.
And that’s just what they’ll continue to practice
alongside their Inova colleagues at Inova Medical
Group, a network of more than 400 physicians
who are experts in general medicine and adult
specialties.
Mount Vernon Cardiology’s four offices, two in
Alexandria, one in Lorton and one in Woodbridge,
will keep providing a broad range of services and
cardiovascular care, guided by the belief that “the
interest of the patient comes first.”
For more information about Inova Medical Group visit
our website at www.inova.org/inovamedicalgroup
Seated from L-R: Dr. Arnold Rosenblatt, Dr. Kinda Venner-Jones, Dr. Jason Morda, Dr. George Besch
Standing L-R: Dr. Minh Van Ngo, Dr. David Park, Dr. Cleveland Francis, Dr. Archana Reddy, Dr. Narian Rajan, Dr. Rahsaan Smith
10 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
Sports
Titans coming in hot for playoff run
T.C. boys soccer battle
back after setbacks in
state title defense
By Chris Teale
At one stage in their final
game of the regular season,
things looked ominous for the
T.C. Williams boys soccer team,
playing away against rivals West
Potomac High School.
The Wolverines took the
lead with 16 minutes left in the
first half on a goal from midfielder Bright Somuah, who
was played in behind the Titans defense by Nelson Flores.
Then, midway through the second half, things got worse for
the visitors as senior defender
Emir Crnovic was ruled to have
brought down a West Potomac
attacker as the last man and was
shown a straight red card.
The ejection means Crnovic
will be suspended for the Titans’ first game in the Patriot
Conference tournament, and,
with just over 20 minutes left
in the match at Jeffrey C. Dietze Stadium, things could have
gotten even worse for the visitors as a strong West Potomac
offense was bursting with confidence on senior night.
But Crnovic’s ejection and
their one-goal deficit actually
served as a motivator for T.C.,
who battled back to a 1-1 tie
thanks to Ramsey Benzina’s
header at the near post from a
long throw by defender Zachary
Eisenhour caused havoc in the
Wolverines penalty area.
The away side were spurred
on by the red card and the
scoreline, and had much of the
momentum, although they were
unable to find a winning goal
even in the two five-minute periods of overtime played at the
end of regulation.
“It was definitely slow at
first,” Benzina told reporters
after the game. “Once we went
a man down, we knew we had
to pick it up and we saw a little
spark. We need that spark ev-
Photo/Chris teale
Titans forward Edwin Hernandez Gonzalez battles to retain possession against West Potomac defender Nick Cucinotta during their final boys soccer game of the regular season. T.C. battled to a 1-1
draw thanks to Ramsey Benzina’s goal in the second half.
ery game, that’s the one we’ve
been missing, that intensity and
that passion. It’s showing in this
game and it’s going to keep on
showing, so I’m proud of that.”
The result against the 4-54 Wolverines means that the
Titans finish the 2015 regular
season with a 10-2-2 record,
with the defending Virginia 6A
state champions tasting defeat
at home to Lake Braddock and
away to W.T. Woodson, both
by just one goal. At the time
of writing, they likely will face
either South County or West
Springfield in the first round of
the conference tournament.
For most of the game, the
two teams were very evenly
matched and managed to combine a potent offense with a
strong defense. With Somuah
pulling the strings for West Potomac in the heart of the midfield, the hosts had several good
chances, but the Titans also
enjoyed a good amount of possession and were able to create
opportunities of their own.
Unfortunately for the visitors, they struggled to find the
finishing touch, with Sebastian Hendi, Benjamin Velis
and Benzina all having good
chances but failing to find the
target. That missing finish for
both sides meant that the game
quickly became stretched, with
the two teams also not shying
away from meaty tackles in
midfield.
“I thought we were creating
opportunities, we just weren’t
putting them away,” T.C. head
coach Marty Nickley said after the game. “I think West
Potomac did a great job of really taking over that match and
coming at us and taking that
lead, it was awesome. I think
it was a tribute to our boys as
SEE Titans | 11
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM Titans
may 14, 2015 | 11
ly incentives and they help us
build,” added Hendi. “We’re
going to practice tomorrow
and look at what we did wrong
and we’re going to work on
that, so Friday when we come
out we’re going to show that
these games only make us
stronger.”
T.C. believes their comeback and battling spirit will
serve them well, especially as
they managed to defy the odds
at West Potomac and earn a
hard-fought draw.
“A lot of people might think
a tie would slow us down, but
I’m coming home thinking
about this as a win,” said Hendi. “Even though we should
have won, coming down with
a red card fired us up. Coming
into Districts we’re coming in
hot, and we’re going to show
people that we’re here to win.
We’re T.C. and we don’t lose.
When playoffs come, we win.”
FROM | 10
well that they were able to fight
through that and get that tie at
the end.”
The Titans players believe
the losses that came after
an unbeaten run of almost a
year, coupled with their result at West Potomac, will
serve as learning experiences
ahead of what they hope will
be a deep playoff run and a
chance to defend last year’s
state crown, the first in program history.
“I think this was a turning
point, the last part of that second
half was a turning point in our
season for the better, for sure,”
Benzina said. “Both of those
losses, we played well in those
games, but we learned from that
and put it beside us and we’re
hoping not to lose another game
and fight to regain what’s ours.”
“These games are definite-
Photo/Chris teale
T.C. forward Sebastian Hendi
misses a glorious chance to open
the scoring for the Titans away to
West Potomac as Wolverines defenders Vaughn Basset and Fernando Acosta look on.
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12 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
SCENE AROUND TOWN
A heart wrenching tale of traditions
PHOTOS/C. STANLEY PHOTOGRAPHY
In Arena Stage’s production of
“The Blood Quilt,” four sisters and
one daughter come together to
mourn the death of their mother,
and decide who gets 100 painstakingly made family quilts. Tonye
Patano (above) provides star power and pathos as the self-appointed new matriarch of the family,
Clementine.
‘The Blood Quilt’ features
star power, sisterhood
By Jordan Wright
Earth, wind and fire blew
into town for the world premiere of “The Blood Quilt,”
now playing at Arena Stage.
Written by Katori Hall, who
based the story on the Gullah
Geechee culture of Sapelo Island, and directed by Kamilah
Forbes, this soul-wrenching
play is filled with the tears,
anger and laughter of a family
divided by distance and psychological baggage yet held together by the power of sisterhood.
Four sisters: Clementine,
Gio, Cassan and Amber as well
as Cassan’s daughter Zambia
gather together on the windswept island of Kwemera, one
of Georgia’s Sea Islands, and
the African word for “endure.”
The scene is the ancestral cottage of the Jernigans and the
home of their recently departed
mother — a woman they both
revered and feared.
Each summer, the women
craft a new quilt, stitched together from clothing and rags
handed down by family members. Woven into these quilts
are their deepest memories, gutwrenching hardships and personal failures. It is within these
stitches that they tell their truths
in a story as old as time and as
foreseeable as the circle of life.
To provide the foundation
for this story, it is important to
know that hundreds of years
ago, Geechee culture, as it is
called, arrived by boat from
West Africa onto these remote
islands off the coast of Georgia.
Slave ships bore men and women who were sold off to work
on the islands’ rice plantations.
After the Civil War, some of the
freed slaves stayed behind, becoming landowners and raising
generations of their own families. The dialect they spoke still
is heard today and is echoed
throughout the play.
Within this mysterious
world, spiritualism, mythol-
ogy and shibboleths run deep,
influenced by the stars and the
sea. These traditions provide
a singularly rich backdrop for
this comic drama, recalling the
evocative film “Daughters of
the Dust” that drew on the African-centric Gullah culture of
North Carolina.
Much of the Geechee’s mysterious customs and rituals are
threaded throughout this deeply
affecting tale, reflecting a legacy of memories embodied by
the fabric scraps incorporated
into the quilts. The play turns on
the question of who will inherit
the 100 precious quilts. And
therein lies the rub.
Set designer Michael Carnahan has created a breathtaking
stage set that features a simple
cabin along a shoreline. An arc
of waist-deep water frames the
proscenium and patches of quilts
hang from the rafters. Delicate
Spanish moss sways over the
rooftop and the whole stage is
bathed in a roseate hue, courtesy
of lighting designer Michael Gil-
liam. Snippets of old-time gospel music are sung in harmony,
and the classic “I’ll Fly Away”
evokes the confluence of church
and tribal culture.
Clementine (Tonye Patano),
who takes direction from the
natural world, is the eldest.
Assuming her new role as matriarch, she shushes and bosses
her younger siblings around,
insisting they carry out what
she believes their mother would
have wanted. “Mama was my
god,” she reminds them.
But her interpretation is not
borne out by their mother’s
will. Meeya Davis plays Amber: “Perfection is my shield
and my protection,” she reveals. A successful Hollywood
attorney and Harvard grad, she
has been given the responsibility of reading the will. Davis
gives a razor-sharp performance with elegance and wit,
balancing out Patano’s wellpolished star quality.
Caroline Clay soars in the
role of Gio, a tough talking, beer
guzzling cop cursed with a chip
on her shoulder as wide as the
sea. But why? Cassan (Nikiya
Mathis) has brought her daughter Zambia (Afi Bijou), who is
a hijab-wearing political activist just beginning to spread her
wings. Bijou proves she is well
up to the challenge of playing
against such seasoned actors in
a role that calls for her to be the
polar opposite of the others.
The cast is tightly woven
together in this haunting and
hugely comical play filled with
the ghosts of the past, the challenges of modern life and the
guidance of an ancient culture
imported from an Africa they
never knew.
Through June 7 at Arena Stage,
1101 Sixth St., SE, Washington,
D.C. 20024. For tickets and
information call 202-488-3300
or visit www.arenastage.org.
(On display throughout the run
of the show are 17 contemporary quilts created by Joan
Gaither of Baltimore.)
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM Calendar
of Events
To have your event
considered for our
calendar listings,
please email
[email protected]
Each Monday
TAVERN TODDLERS Join other
families as you and your toddler (walkers
through 36 months) have fun in Gadsby’s Tavern Museum’s historic ballroom.
Playtime features a craft table, book
corner, toys, as well as group dancing.
Time: 10:30 to 11:30 a.m.
Location: American Legion, 400 Cameron St., check in at museum first.
Information: 703-746-4242 or www.
gadsbystavern.org
Now to May 25
MOUNT VERNON’S HISTORIC
PLANT AND GARDEN SALE His-
toric trees, shrubs and plants as well
as a wide variety of annuals, perennials, heirloom tomatoes and herbs,
each carefully nurtured in the Mount
Vernon greenhouse, will be available
for purchase. Spectacular hanging
baskets, grown at Mount Vernon, will
be available in limited numbers. In the
gardening tent, you will find books,
tools, seeds and decorative items.
Time: All day
Location: George Washington’s
Mount Vernon, 3200 Mount Vernon
Memorial Highway
Information: 703-780-2000 or
www.mountvernon.org
Now to May 30
HISTORIC ALEXANDRIA ATTICS
AND ALLEYS TOUR Visit rarely
seen spaces at four of Alexandria’s
historic sites on this special threehour walking tour of Gadsby’s Tavern
Museum, the Stabler-Leadbeater
Apothecary Museum, Lee-Fendall
House Museum & Garden and Carlyle
House Historic Park. Tickets are $35
each and can be reserved online.
Time: Saturdays 9 a.m. to noon
Location: Departs from Lee-Fendall
House Museum & Garden, 614 Oronoco St., or Gadsby’s Tavern Museum,
134 N. Royal St.
Information: 703-746-4242 or
www.alexandriava.gov/gadsbystavern
Now to September 26
BASEBALL BOAT TO NATIONALS PARK Avoid the crowds
and take a leisurely cruise from to
Nationals Park along the scenic
may 14, 2015 | 13
Potomac River for a select number of
Washington Nationals home games.
Boats returning to Alexandria depart
20 minutes after final pitch.
Time: Nationals home games
Location: Alexandria Marina, 1
Cameron St.
Information: 703-684-0580 or
www.baseballboat.com
May 14
LECTURE WITH WINE AND
DESSERT The Alexandria-Caen Sis-
ter Cities Committee presents a lecture
called, “The Hero of Two Worlds: The
Marquis de Lafayette, the Revolutionary War, and the French Revolution,”
presented by Marc Leepson, author of
“Lafayette: Lessons in Leadership from
the Idealist General.” RSVP at http://
herolafayette.eventbrite.com
Time: 7 to 9 p.m.
Location: George Washington
Masonic National Memorial, 101 Callahan Drive
Information: 202-203-0177, [email protected] or
www.alexandriacaen.wordpress.com
cellar, appearances by “George and
Martha Washington” and live jazz on
the east lawn overlooking the scenic
Potomac River. Admission costs $40
on Friday, $46 on Saturday and $36
on Sunday.
Time: 6 to 9 p.m.
Location: Mount Vernon: George
Washington’s Estate & Gardens, 3200
Mount Vernon Memorial Highway
Information: 703-780-2000, [email protected]
mountvernon.org or www.mountvernon.org
May 16
SOLDIER-LED TOURS OF FORT
WARD Tours of the historic fort led by
an interpreter in Union uniform highlight the history of Fort Ward and army
life in the defenses of Washington.
Tours begin in the museum at 10 a.m.
and 2 p.m., and last about 90 minutes
each. This event is free of charge but
weather dependent.
Time: 10 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.
The Odd Couple
4/25 - 5/16
The Odd Couple - LTA presents Neil Simon’s
comedy classic with a twist! Unger and
Madison are at it again — Florence Unger
and Olive Madison, that is — a in Neil Simon’s
hilarious contemporary comic classic. Come
watch this time-honored comedy reinvented
from a different perspective as the ladies take
over the juicy roles of the Coming soon
famously mismatched
couple to give this wellknown play a whole new life. Watch and laugh as
this “odd couple” learn that friendship may have
its ups and downs but in the end it overpowers
all. Warning — show contains adult language.
600 Wolfe St, Alexandria | 703-683-0496
w w w . t h e l i t t l e t h e at r e . c o m
SEE calendar | 21
ASCENSION DAY EVENSONG
A celebration of Ascension Day with
a special evensong. Any proceeds
from donations will go to the St. Paul’s
Lazarus Ministry.
Time: 7:30 p.m.
Location: St. Paul’s Episcopal
Church, 228 S. Pitt St.
Information: 703-549-3312 ext. 17
or [email protected]
May 15
BIKE TO WORK DAY A regional
celebration where participants bicycle
in, enjoy music, food and gifts, while
there will be various vendors who will
offer information.
Time: 5:30 to 11 a.m.
Location: Market Square, 301 King St.
Information: 703.746.4083 or
[email protected]
BIKE TO WORK DAY BOOTH
Nonprofit VeloCity Bike Coop welcomes
donations of bikes or accessories
donations to help welcome our newest
riders and support the local community.
Time: 6 to 9 a.m.
Location: VeloCity Bike Coop, 2111
Mount Vernon Ave.
Information: [email protected]
SPRING FOR ALEXANDRIA
In partnership with the City of Alexandria, Spring for Alexandria 2015
is Volunteer Alexandria’s Community
Service Day. Hundreds of volunteers
will perform community service at
nonprofit and city agencies throughout
the city.
Time: 12:30 to 4 p.m.
Location: Throughout Alexandria
Information: 703-836-2176 or
[email protected]
May 15-17
SPRING WINE FESTIVAL AND
SUNSET TOUR Celebrate the history of wine in Virginia with exclusive
evening tours of the Mansion and
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at their home on Martha’s Vineyard for
their annual summer holiday. Personality
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14 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
At Home
Curing a leaky basement from the inside
By Henri de Marne
Leaky foundations are the
bane of one’s existence for a
large number of homeowners.
Whenever possible, the best
way to cure the problem is
from the outside.
There are times, though,
when it is very difficult — and
sometimes even impossible
— to do so. Such conditions
may include: heavy planting of
shrubs, healthy perennials or
ground cover along the foundation; the presence of plants
that are valuable or difficult to
move without the risk of losing
them; plants which will suffer
having their shallow root system covered with additional
dirt; or simply not enough
room to work safely, if at all,
with the needed machinery or
to store materials. These are all
reasons to make outside waterproofing undesirable.
This does not mean, however, that the only recourse
for the unfortunate homeowner is to set everything he or
she stores in the basement on
pallets or put concrete blocks
under the washer and dryer
(as I have seen done in desperation).
The problem can be solved
from the inside in several ways.
But one thing that should
never be done with a block
foundation is what most people think of doing first, and
what is most often advertised
by various manufacturers and
merchants. Concrete blocks
should never be waterproofed
from the inside unless an escape for any water that might
accumulate is provided (this
element will be discussed in
a future column).
I have seen several examples of this being done with
catastrophic results. The cores
of the blocks can fill with water, which evaporates and invades the exterior walls and the
attic of the structure. The worst
case I have seen involved a
four-unit apartment structure
built in sand (which one may
consider as the safest environment) that had to be evacuated.
The interiors of these units
had turned black from mold
growing on the walls and ceilings. The heavy smell of excessive moisture in enclosed spaces was quite uncomfortable.
The doors and windows were
swollen and dripping. The roof
sheathing had also suffered. In
other words, the apartments
were unlivable, and the tenants
had moved out long ago to save
their furnishings and health.
There are several approaches to dealing with basement leakage from the inside:
- an underslab system
- an above-slab system with
open drain
- above-slab system with concealed drain
This month, I’ll discuss underslab systems.
UNDERSLAB SYSTEM
If, for some reason, you
wish to conceal the drainage
system, there are two ways to
achieve it.
If the leakage is coming
through cracks in the floor
and at the joints of walls and
floor, it usually indicates that
the hydraulic pressure under
the floor is such that it is causing the water to rise to a level
above the slab.
If you know for sure, or
can ascertain by a trial cut or
hole, that there is a substantial
SEE sump pump | 15
HOME OF THE WEEK
Enjoy the old and the new
Renovated and expanded
with a three-story addition, this
freshly painted Cape sparkles.
From the lovely arches in the
front of the house to the soaring ceilings and skylights in
the rear, it is a masterful blend
of traditional and contemporary detailing.
The main level features a living room, dining room, sitting
room and a spacious eat-in white
kitchen with Carrera marble
counters, a large double stainless steel under mount sink and
new fixtures. It adjoins a family
room complete with entrance to
a multi-level deck and side entry
with tiled mud room. Also on
this level are the fourth bedroom
and an updated full bathroom.
PHOTOs/truplace
A renovated cape with three story addition (above) features a master
bedroom with walk-in closet on the top floor. A spacious eat-in white
kitchen (left) adjoins a family room with entrance to a multi-level deck.
The master bedroom with
walk in closet on the top floor
has numerous large windows, a
large powder room and an office
space. There is floor support and
plumbing for a jetted tub and
At a Glance:
Address: 1727 Crestwood Drive,
Alexandria, VA 22302
Neighborhood: Dyes Oakcrest
shower. The upper level also has
two additional bedrooms and a
renovated full bathroom.
The recreation room is large
enough for a pool table and a
seating area for large gather-
Price: $879,900
Bedrooms: 4
Bathrooms: 3.5
Parking: Driveway
ings. Completing this floor is
a workshop, storage room and
laundry room, as well as a third
bathroom with shower.
There are wood floors in
most areas including the rec-
reation room. Meanwhile, the
deck looks out over a lovely
landscaped rear yard that backs
to trees. This is truly a very special property and is only one stop
light from Washington, D.C.
Contact: Donna Cramer,
McEnearney Associates,
703-627.9578, donnacramer.com
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may 14, 2015 | 15
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crushed stone bed underneath
the slab, the stone bed can be
used as the drainage bed, and
all you may need is a sump
equipped with a quality submersible pump.
However, if there is no
good draining stone bed, or if
it is determined that the water
is coming through the walls
above the slab (this is more
likely with a block foundation), the slab needs to be cut
and removed, from the foundation walls to approximately
one foot back along the entire
perimeter.
The material below the cut
in the slab should be removed
to a depth of approximately
12 inches from the top of the
floor. Place a couple inches
of egg-size crushed stones in
the bottom of the trench and
a four inch perforated plastic
pipe over it.
Lead the pipe to a sump
placed strategically where
outside drainage makes the
most sense. The pipe need
not be sloping; water seeks its
own level.
Drill or punch holes in the
inside faces of concrete block
foundation walls between the
webs just above the footing to
allow for drainage.
Complete the backfilling
of the excavation with stones,
making sure that you cover
the top of the footings with
a layer of stone as the conduit to the stone bed. Place
removable strips of plywood
wrapped in plastic against the
walls with their tops at the
level of the top of the concrete patch and use them as
a screed when you patch the
concrete. Remove them when
the concrete has set enough
to do so. These will provide
a narrow slot for water that
may come through the walls
to be able to reach the drainage system (the belt and suspender approach).
You may want to slope the
concrete patch slightly toward
the walls, just in case there is
so much water that it spills
onto the slab. This should help
keep the water from spreading
over the entire floor.
If you are in a high radon
area, you should investigate a
radon mitigation system that
will suck the gas out from under the slab and discharge it
over the roof.
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16 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
OUT OF THE CLASSROOM
Ed u c at io n Se c t io n
Alexandria Country Day School
celebrates Earth Day
Alexandria Country Day
School students, faculty and
staff hopped on buses and bicycles on Earth Day last month
to begin a day of service.
Eighth graders led the way
to Alexandria’s Founders Park
on their bicycles, where they
met up with third grade students
to plant more than 1,200 flowers. Picturesque Lake Accotink
Park in Springfield was the
second, fourth, sixth and seventh grades’ destination. There,
they walked along the creek
and around the lake and picked
up what amounted to 25 bags
of trash while spotting turtles,
birds, wild flowers and even a
couple of snakes.
In partnership with the
city’s department of recreation,
parks and cultural activities, the
seventh graders continued work
on an assessment and monitoring plot in Monticello Park.
Kindergarteners and first graders remained on campus, but
Courtesy photo
did their part by working in the
school’s gardens.
Kindergarteners planted a
butterfly garden while first graders planted 400 bean plants that
will be donated to the Capital
Area Food Bank. Through these
efforts, the students gained a
deeper understanding of the
importance of service and the
positive impact they can have on
the world. As one student put it,
“This is what humans should be
doing every day of their lives.”
Courtesy photo
Alexandria Police Chief Earl Cook spoke with students from George Washington Middle School and T.C.
Williams High School about careers in law enforcement as part of the Community Lodgings after-school
program. He also answered questions about the challenges local officers face.
SSSAS student launches food
drive to fight hunger
Campbell Reid, a 5-year-old
junior kindergartner at St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes School, is
doing his part to fight hunger.
At school, he has been
learning about the food needs
of people in his city and the
importance of serving others.
He was so impacted by what he
learned that he asked his parents if he could set up a stand
to make food available for those
in need. With the help of Safeway, he opened Campbell’s
“More Than Soup” Food Drive
at the store’s location at Bradlee
Shopping Center last month.
He made his own signs
while teachers and friends at
SSSAS helped rally the school
community through flyers, the
school’s newsletter and social
Courtesy photo
media. With a few days still
to go, Campbell had collected
$600 and received 15 grocery carts full of donations.
He plans to bring the donated
food to ALIVE! Alexandria
and toiletry items to Carpenter’s Shelter.
Courtesy photo
Students at Lyles
Crouch Traditional
Academy were
named the best
youth team at the
Alexandria Animal
Welfare League’s
Walk for Animals
fundraiser earlier
this month. The
students participated in a 1.5-mile
walk and also held
a bake sale to raise
money for the city’s
animal shelter.
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM may 14, 2015 | 17
Immanuel Lutheran students raise funds for student
in South Africa
Immanuel Lutheran School
fifth and sixth grade girls are
raising money for Sponsor a
Child, Cultural Care Au Pair’s
charitable initiative, to support
a 6-year-old girl’s education in
South Africa.
On their own initiative, these
young leaders gathered on their
day off from school in early
April to begin the project. Working together, they developed a
strategy to raise funds to support
the little girl with whom they
were matched. The girls then designed and produced hand-made
favors, including bookmarks
and bracelets, and developed
scripts for their charitable appeals. Then they went door-todoor to share information about
the program and gather support
for their efforts.
Reservations
encouraged
us today
to learn more.
Interested
an excellent Contact
Openin
House
Reservations
encouraged
Open
House
academic
environment
Call 703.549.0155
or &
Summer
Programs
Boys
Girls
Summerfor
Programs
for Boys & Girls
Call
703.549.0155
oremail
email
Thursday,
January
15th [email protected]
that nurtures
your child’s
Thursday,
January
15th
- July
31
[email protected]
Summer Programs for June
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& Girls15
June
15
July 31
Summer
Programs
for Boys & Girls
mind, heart,
and
body?
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AM
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June 15 - July 31
Early admission application deadline is Feb. 6th
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ABBEY
June 15 - July 31
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1801
Russell
Alexandria,
VA
22301| | 703.549.0155
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Alexandria,
22301
www.ImmanuelAlexandria.org
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at Road,
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AbbeyVA
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SchoolSummer Programs f
1801 40-acre
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• Highly Affordable at St. Anselm’s Abbey School
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Courtesy photo
The Sponsor a Child program
supports at-risk children in South
Africa, Thailand and India.
Sponsors must raise at least $150,
which then is matched by Cultural Care Au Pair. These funds
help provide educational opportunities that would otherwise be
unavailable to children by paying
for educational fees, including
tuition, uniforms, books and supplies. Sponsors are provided with
the profile of a child their con-
ADVENTURES
ADVENTURES
ADVENTURES
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tributions support and have the
Full-day camps starting at $215/week!
Summer at St. Anselm’s Abbey School Before/After Care Available
opportunity to write
letters to the
40-acre Campus in Michigan Park / Brookland • Shuttles to MetroSummer
• Highly Affordable
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atAbbey
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atAnselm’s
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child with whom they are paired.
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40-acre40-acre
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“The girls were really exCampus
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the project with her classmates. Before/After Care Available
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been successfully accredited by
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the Virginia Association
of In- at www.abbeyadventures.org
Register
dependent Schools. The financial management of the school
is also strong. Grace now has a
comfortable operating reserve
Camps in
fund and an ever-increasing
quasi-endowment as a result of
Arlington &
sound investments, thoughtful
Alexandria
stewardship and a parsimonious
head of school.
“It has been a pleasure and
703-933-1111 www.janefranklin.com
an honor to work with and
serve the board of trustees,
faculty, staff and administrators, parents, rector and most
of all, the Grace students for
these past eleven years,” Byrnes said. “The best part of my
day is to greet each and every
student with a firm handshake
and a look into those beautiful,
wonder filled young eyes.
“[I] also owe a debt of gratitude to my husband, Jim, who
has been so understanding and
supportive of the adventures
that this headship has brought,
especially facility management. These have been joyful
and Grace-filled years. I will
treasure my time here and look
back with pride of all that has
Call 703-739-0001 to Advertise!
been accomplished.”
Grace Episcopal head of school announces retirement
More than 36 years ago, proud of the admirable work
when Chris Stegmaier Byrnes they do every day for our
began her career as a young school community,” Byrnes
first grade teacher, it was be- said. “A trusted, committed
yond her wildest dreams that and supportive board of trustshe would have the honor and ees (present and past), dedicatpleasure to serve as a head of ed to the mission of the school
school. Byrnes’ eduand the principles
cational career has
of good practice
been an indescribable
of governance,
journey — teachhas provided a
ing the youngest of
vision for the
preschool students
school’s future
to undergrad stusustainability.”
dents. Being the head
Much has been
of school of Grace
accomplished
Episcopal School has
during her 11
been the highlight of
years in the posithose many years in Chris Stegmaier Byrnes tion. The outside
education.
grounds with the addition of
At the end of the 2014-2015 a turf field, the walkway and,
academic year, she will retire.
most recently, the construction
“I cannot express how grate- of the amphitheater project,
ful I am to the many members have been beautified and exof the school community for panded areas for the children.
having had this opportunity,” The school’s technology proByrnes said.
gram, through the generosity of
She said Grace Episcopal the strong parent community,
continues to be blessed with has grown leaps and bounds
teachers, administrators and with Smart Boards or Smart
staff who are dedicated to the Tables in every classroom and a
successful day-to-day running one-to-one laptop program for
of the school.
grades one through five.
“I am so appreciative and In addition, the school has
Camp & Enrichment
directory
JANEFRANKLINDANCE
•
18 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
Our View
Mayor’s race features contrasting
candidates with divergent visions
Alexandria has been home to many great American leaders. A prominent port in colonial times and now an important
historic suburb of our nation’s capital, our city has claimed
famous leaders like George Washington, Robert E. Lee and
Gerald Ford as well as lesser known but still important activists like Samuel Tucker and Kate Waller Barrett.
Over the past quarter century or so, Alexandria’s political scene
has been dominated by former Mayor and state Sen. Patsy Ticer;
long-time City Manager Vola Lawson; former U.S. Rep. Jim Moran; and former City Councilor and current Mayor Bill Euille.
Alexandria’s stable of top-notch leaders again is on display
in this year’s mayoral race, where three impressive and highly
qualified current and former office holders are vying to lead our
city: Euille, Vice Mayor Allison Silberberg and former Mayor
and City Councilor Kerry Donley.
It is not easy to put oneself forward for elected office,
whether it’s a student campaigning for class president, a church
parishioner running to be an elder or vestry member, or a candidate for public service. Once someone becomes a candidate,
their views on issues, past statements and even appearance can
be fodder for criticism. Aspirants for office need determination,
vision and a thick skin.
Euille, Silberberg and Donley have very different visions
for the direction Alexandria should take over the next three
years and beyond. All three are intelligent and well intentioned, and all believe their path is the one that would make
this great city even better.
You, the electorate, have a difficult choice to make in the June
9 Democratic primary, which is open to all registered voters in
the city of Alexandria. We at the Times will perform our duty as
our city’s Fourth Estate by informing you in the weeks ahead.
We will run in-depth features on each candidate in our next three
issues, starting with this week’s profile of Donley. Next week we
will feature Silberberg and on May 28, Euille. The May 21 issue
also will contain coverage of the May 18 mayoral debate.
Our June 4 issue will contain coverage of the final mayoral
debate, scheduled for Tuesday, June 2 at George Washington
Middle School, along with a voters’ guide where candidates’
responses to our questionnaire will run so voters can see their
views on issues presented side-by-side. That issue also will include our endorsement of one of the mayoral candidates.
On Election Day itself, we will provide live election night
coverage, including updates on election results along with rapid reactions from candidates, residents and supporters. Check
www.alextimes.com or follow us on Twitter @AlexTimesNews
to follow along. Finally, the June 11 print edition will contain
comprehensive election wrap-up and analysis.
This year’s mayoral race, with three viable candidates for
the Democratic nomination, is virtually unprecedented in modern Alexandria. The election is important, as the difficult economy of the last decade has taken its toll on our city’s finances.
Among other issues, voters will have to decide whether development in our city needs to be accelerated or be done with more
care to its impact on neighborhoods.
We encourage all registered voters in Alexandria to study the
issues and go to the polls on June 9. The Times will do its best to
help you make your decision an informed one.
Opinion
“Where the press is free and every man is able to read, all is safe.”
- Thomas Jefferson
Your Views
Assign a waterfront construction ombudsman
To the editor:
The mayor’s ad-hoc monitoring group for waterfront construction continues to identify
the many adverse impacts that
might happen to property near
one of the six future construction sites on the waterfront.
Ironically, they are doing all this
without the assistance or advice
of the city’s attorney’s office,
which refuses to assist committees not appointed by city council. In other words, they refuse
to speak to the very citizens
who pay their salaries — a sad
commentary, at best.
To date, the monitoring
group has considered an option
to barge out demolition materials and barge in building materials to the Old and Historic
District, rather than to have
hundreds of overloaded dump
trucks rolling over our historic
streets. EYA, the developer of
the Robinson Terminal South
project, has agreed to barge
90 percent of materials in and
out of Old Town. The residents
living close to the waterfront
are most appreciative of this,
and they applaud EYA for this
promise.
But the city attorney and
All of this
disarray does
not bode well for the
affected residents, or
for the businesses
trying to make a
living. City Hall must
draft a reasonable
phasing schedule for
the projects so that
only one construction
site at a time is fully
operational.”
the director of the city department of transportation and
environmental services have
maintained that barging would
not be considered for the Carr
Hotel development. They have
failed to abide by the instructions regarding haul routes
within this development’s special use permit by dragging out
the process over a period of
months, when barging could
have been a viable alternative
to trucking. On at least four occasions, I have requested that
Mayor Bill Euille contact Oliver Carr to discuss barging for
his development, just as Bob
Youngentob (one of the owners
of EYA) has done. Euille advised me that he had someone
working on it, but regrettably,
after about six weeks, there has
been no headway.
One critical item that surfaced during the monitoring
group meeting was the review
of an overlay depicting construction schedules of the four
private developments: Robinson Terminals North and
South, the Carr Hotel and the
Old Dominion Boat Club. This
overlay revealed that by December 2015, all four sites will
be active, three of which are
within a two-block area. The
SEE waterfront | 19
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM may 14, 2015 | 19
Rally behind Bill Euille for mayor
To the editor:
In the upcoming Democratic primary for mayor,
it is imperative that Vice
Mayor Allison Silberberg
not be elected.
It is easy to see how
she could gain a plurality
in a competitive three-way
race. She has built a motivated following of those
whose parochial interests
she has championed to the
detriment of the long-term
greater good of the city at
large. The never-ending
and much debated waterfront redevelopment plan
and the recent Alexandria
Memory Care Center rezoning are just a couple of
examples.
Although she has demonstrated no leadership
on city-wide issues, an alliance of NIMBYs combined with Republicans
looking for the opportunity
to upset the status quo and
voters inclined to support
women candidates could
nominate her in a lowturnout primary in June.
I am supporting the
reelection of Mayor Bill
Euille. While either Euille
or former Mayor Kerry
and I urge voters to rally
around the mayor on June
9 to maintain the steady
leadership he has provided through difficult and
contentious issues.
- Jim Kornick
Alexandria
waterfront
other developments may
further add to this carnival
of dump trucks — the redevelopment of Windmill
Hill Park, and the city’s
waterfront improvement
plan (the promenade and
flooding abatement).
The real elephant in
the room that evening was
staff’s refusal to ensure
that the membership of
the monitoring group be
maintained
throughout
the entire development
process. As developments
progress from south to
north on Union Street,
other neighborhoods will
be affected, so new members must be added to the
group, while at the same
time keeping the current
members, whose areas
under construction had
not yet ceased. This might
mean adding three or
four new members to the
group, so we respectfully
ask the city manager to
amend the original group
membership to make it
more representational.
Furthermore, the city
needs to identify one individual to handle all inquiries and complaints
from citizens for the
duration of this massive
construction project. Essentially, an ombudsman
should be appointed, who
is empowered by council
to deal with all aspects of
the entire waterfront development. This worked
very well in the case of
the Woodrow Wilson
Bridge construction, and
should be used again.
- Townsend “Van” Van Fleet
Alexandria
FROM | 18
result is going to be chaotic, as dump trucks will
be running helter-skelter,
noise will be unbearable
from the pounding of pilings on multiple sites, and
debris, dirt and dust will be
strewn everywhere, thus
making that part of the city
a mess. Union Street essentially will be shut down.
All of this disarray
does not bode well for the
affected residents, or for
the businesses trying to
make a living. City Hall
must draft a reasonable
phasing schedule for the
projects so that only one
construction site at a time
is fully operational. Otherwise, the current plan
will result in a large catastrophe. Incidentally, two
Donley would make an
outstanding mayor, I do
not believe Donley has articulated a strong enough
case to replace Euille
While either Euille or
former Mayor Kerry Donley
would make an outstanding
mayor, I do not believe Donley
has articulated a strong enough
case to replace Euille.”
WHO CARES?
WE DO.
Email comments, rants & raves to
[email protected]
Alexandria in Action
with John Porter
Thank you, Alexandria, for
your amazing generosity
Alexandria is an amazing city. Another example of Alexandria’s
According to the Alexandria Eco- caring happens tomorrow with Volnomic Development Partnership, our unteer Alexandria’s annual Day of
wonderful city has been named in Service. In its eighth year, more than
national publications in the past year 400 volunteers supporting 27 sites
as one of the 100 Best Communities throughout the city will contribfor Young People; Top Foodie City; ute more than $40,000 in service to
Top Art Places; Most Romantic City; the organizations and agencies with
Top 50 Greenest Cities; and Top On- which they will work. Marion Brunkline Giving Cities among other dis- en, executive director of Volunteer
tinctions in the nation. That is quite Alexandria, expects this year’s event
a number of well-deserved recogni- to be the most productive to date.
“It’s a great way for voltions for the Port City.
unteers to learn about the
But what makes Alexwonderful organizations in
andria such a great place
our city … and to make a
to live, work and play?
huge difference in our comWhile not discrediting the
munity,” she said. You can
aforementioned list, it’s
learn more at www.volunmore about the people and
teeralexandria.org.
our sense of community.
You don’t have to look
While it’s easy to say that
John Porter
far to see other ways AlexAlexandria is one of the
most community-minded and car- andrians show their community spirit:
ing cities in the country, it could be • Rebuilding Together Alexandria
provided free repairs and upgrades
argued that, having lived here all
to 40 low-income homeowners on
my life, I have little with which to
April 25.
compare, yet my travels over the
years and connections with those in • On May 9, local letter carriers will
host a food drive called Stamp Out
other communities helps support my
Hunger.
belief that Alexandria stands out as
• Senior Services of Alexandria is
one of the best.
expanding its meals program to
On April 22, ACT for Alexandria
pets of seniors with Animeals on
hosted the fifth annual Spring2ACWheels.
Tion online giving day. In 24 hours,
more than 9,400 donors contributed • The Alexandria Police Department
and the Art League are both spon$1,276,909 to 129 nonprofits serving
soring youth camps this summer, as
Alexandria. This breaks down to apwell as many other organizations.
proximately $135 per donor, the majority of which are local residents. Alexandria is truly amazing and
The organizations which benefited a great place to live. The spirit of
ranged in size from smaller non- community, the caring for others, the
profits, like Quintango and UpCycle diversity of our experience and the
Creative Reuse Center, to the Alex- opportunities available to young and
andria Soccer Association, ALIVE! old alike make it a place like no other
and Carpenter’s Shelter. The number — one that would be good for other
of causes and individuals who will cities to emulate. Now, this doesn’t
be served as a result of the generos- mean there aren’t issues needing atity of donors on April 22 is remark- tention, just that we’re positioned to
able. ACT’s chief program officer provide that attention and, in most
Brandi Yee, who has coordinated the cases, devote the resources to solving
day of giving since its inception, be- the issues before us.
lieves it “has evolved from a strictly
online giving event to more of a
The writer is the president and
community-wide giving day.”
CEO of ACT for Alexandria.
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM
AprIL 23, 2015 | 25
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Alexandria,
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hOW TO rEACh uS
110 S. Pitt St.
The local
E. Lee
t the start of the Civil known as “Black Horse”, who a year. When the lease ended,
The
local
origin
story
of robert
E. Lee
Lee moved
the children
on April 23,
1861, quickly
became
ensconced
in
Thet War
Port
City’s
first
seat
of Mrs.
government
andaswas
forced
to sellwho
the to
a home
owned
by aended,
relajust start
threeof days
after debt
known
“Black
Horse”,
a year.
When
the lease
the
the Civil
A
FrOm THE WEb
In
responseTHE
to “planning
FrOm
WEb
From
the
web
commission OKs robinson
In
response
to
In
to “planning
In response
response
to
“planning
Terminal
South
project,”
“Half
a
fire
station
is | 25
commission
OKs
robinson
commission
OKs
robinson
AprIL
23,
2015
April 16:
not
enough,”
23:
Terminal
South
project,”
Terminal
SouthApril
project,”
brent
writes:
April
16:
April
16:
West
Ender
writes: WEb
FrOm
THE
known as “Black Horse”, who a year. When the lease ended,
Fitzhugh
Lee, at
homestead
withinensconced
a few years
Mrs.
Lee
the
quickly
in
Mrs. William
Lee moved
moved
the children
children
quickly became
became
ensconced
in tive,
607
Oronoco
St.,
near
to
after
the
older
Lees’
move
to
debt
and
was
forced
to
sell
the
to
a
home
owned
by
reladebt and was forced to sell the to a home owned by aa other
relaAlexandria.
members
of
the
family.
tive,
William
Fitzhugh
Lee,
homestead
within
a
few
years
at
homestead within a few years tive, William Fitzhugh Lee, at
Robert Atkinson has it exactly
For the short term, is it possible
after St.,
relocating
AlThe
Oronoco
near
after
the
older
move
607Soon
Oronoco
St.,
near to
totoother
other
after
theFederal-style
older Lees’
Lees’ dwelling
move to
to 607
right:
Alexandria,
and its waterbrent
writes:
brent
writes:
toIn
rotate
one member
from hired
at
611 Cameron St., as seen on exandria,
amid
British provoresponse
to
“planning
Alexandria.
members
the
Alexandria.
members of
of
the family.
family.
front,
should
be
allowed
toto
evolve
Robert
Atkinson
has
it
exactly
Robert
Atkinson
has
it
exactly
staff
at
our
city’s
fire
stations
staff
the The
left side
in this photo
dating cations
that
would
lead to
the
Soon
after
relocating
AlFederal-style
dwelling
Soon
after
relocating
to
AlThe
Federal-style
dwelling
commission
OKs
robinson
with
the
times.
It’s
refreshing
right:
Alexandria,
and
its
waterknown
as
“Black
Horse”,
who
a
year.
When
the
lease
ended,
the
West
End
Fire
Station
210?
Ro-to
right:
Alexandria,
and
its
waterdeclaration
of theBritish
War ofprovo1812,
from
the
1920s,St.,
was
actually
exandria,
amid
at
611
Cameron
as
seen
on
at
611
Cameron
St.,
as
seen
on
exandria,
amid
British
provosee
the
city
planners
approve
front,
should
be
allowed
to
evolve
tating
just
enough
thea
Lee
moved
the children
quickly
became
ensconced
in Mrs.
Terminal
project,”
front,through
shouldSouth
be allowed
to fill
evolve
built
inside
1795
by
cabinetmaker
Henry
Lee
was
offered
ato
milications
that
would
lead
the
the
left
in
this
photo
dating
the
left
side
in
this
photo
dating
cations
that
would
lead
to
the
modern
design
that
will
be
a
nice
with
the
times.
It’s
refreshing
new
station
shouldn’t
overly
stress
debt
and
was for
forced
to
selluse,
the to
a commission
home ownedasbya aMajor
relawith the
times. It’s refreshing to
to
tary
John
Bogue
his
own
April
16:
declaration
of
the
War
of
1812,
from
the
1920s,
was
actually
declaration
of
the
War
of
1812,
from
the
1920s,
was
actually
visual
counter-balance
to
colonialaa
see
the
city
planners
approve
any
of
the
existing
stations.
William
Fitzhugh
Lee, at
homestead
within
a few home
years tive,
see
the
city
planners
approve
along
with
the
companion
General.
He
readily
accepted,
built
1795 by
cabinetmaker
Henry
Lee
offered aa milibuilt in
in
byLees’
cabinetmaker
Henry
Lee was
was
miliand
mortar.
I wish
brick
Thank
you
for
editorial.
modern
design
that
will
be
nice
Oronoco
St.,offered
to other
after
the1795
olderwas
move by
to 607
modern
design
thatthis
will
be aathere
nice
next
door
that
purchased
but
on
the way
tonear
receive
his
brent
writes:
tary
commission
as
aa Major
John
Bogue
for
his
own
use,
tary
commission
as
Major
John
Bogue
for
his
own
use,
would
be
more
of
it.
Alexandria
is
better
than
“build
visual
counter-balance
to
colonial
PHOTO/Alexandria
Library
Alexandria.
members
ofonthe
family.
visual
counter-balance
to
colonial
command
July
27,
1812,
he
rope
maker
James
Irwin.
That
Robert
Atkinson
it exactly
General.
He
readily
accepted,
along
with
the
companion
home
along
with
the
companion
home
General.
Heonly
readily
accepted,
but
not
fill.”
have IIahas
lovely
new
brick
and
mortar.
wish there
within
a few
months
large
scale
growth
within
the tice,
Soon
after
relocating
to AlThe
Federal-style
dwelling
brick
and We
mortar.
there
wasthe
seriously
injured
in
right:
Alexandria,
andwish
itsSchool
waterbut
on
way
to
receive
his
next
door
that
was
purchased
by
next
door
that
was
purchased
by
but
on
the
way
to
receive
his
pre-K-8
Jefferson-Houston
would
be
more
of
it.
was
forced
into
personal
former
Virginia backwater.
at 611 Cameron
St., as seen on he
exandria,
amid
British
provowouldshould
bewrites:
more
it.
Chuck
Baltimore
while
trying
to
front,
be of
allowed
evolve
command
on July
27,
1812,
he
rope
maker
James
Irwin.
That
where
build came
first andto
students
command
July
27,
1812,
he
rope
maker
James
Irwin.dating
That bankruptcy.
the
Inleft
1817,
large
three-story
Soon
after,
hetoleft
sideain
this photo
cations
thaton
would
lead
the
I
can’t
wait
for
the next opdefend
his
close
friend
Alwith the 800
times.
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refreshing
was
seriously
injured
in
filling
seats
This
isto
was
seriously
injured
in
brick
hall was
constructOrleans
declaration
offor
theNew
Wareditor
of 1812,
from town
the 1920s,
was
actually Washington
portunity
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to do something
Chuck
exander
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a
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the writes:
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Baltimore
while
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Chuck
writes:
not
Smart
Growth
Alexandria.
Baltimore
while
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to
accept
work
that
ed
along
North
Street toHenry
built
in 1795
by Royal
cabinetmaker
Lee
was on
offered
acity’s
milito the
front
of my
and
the
II can’t
wait
for
the
next
oplocal
newspaper
opposed
to
modern
design
that
will
a nice
defend
his
friend
Alcan’t
wait
forhouse
the be
next
opdefend
his close
close
friend
AlBill
Campbell
writes:
review]
water
works
project.
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toJohn
replace
Street
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commission
as
a
Major
BoguetheforFairfax
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use, new
[board
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portunity
I
have
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do
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war,
from
a
mob
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visual
counter-balance
to
colonial
exander
Hanson,
editor
of
a
portunity
I have
to dobut
something
exander
Hanson,
editor
of
says
Notit’s
sure
“build
not fill”
there
in 1820
age
56
af-a
structure
opposite
the Cityhome
Ho- died
along with
the companion
General.
He
readily
accepted,
notthe
keeping
with
to
front
of
my
house
and
the
Hanson,
Leeatand
others
brick
mortar.
I wish
there
local
newspaper
opposed
to
to the
the and
front
ofin
my
house
and
the
local
newspaper
opposed
to
comparison
of
the
decisions
for
the
Yellow
Fever
in
tel,
Gadsby’s
butcontracting
on
the
way
to
receive
his
nextnow
door known
that wasas
purchased
by ter
historical
nature
of
Old
Town.
[board
of
architectural
review]
were
severely
beaten
by
the
would
be
more
of
it.
the
war,
from
a
mob
attack.
[board
ofversus
architectural
review]
the
war,
from
a
mob
attack.
fire
station
Jefferson-HousLouisiana
swamplands.
Tavern.
The James
new government
command
on
July
1812, sehe
rope maker
Irwin. That the
This
Robinson
South
design
says
it’s
not
keeping
with
the
crowd,
and
Lee27,
suffered
Hanson,
Lee
and
others
saysactually
it’s
notfitin
inhere.
keeping
with bethe
ton
Selection
of
Hanson,
Lee
and
others
1817
town
hall
on
Royal
structure was dominated by The
was
seriously
injured
in
fits
1974
Warsaw,
Poland,
not
Old
historical
nature
of
Old
Town.
rious
internal
injuries
and
were
severely
beaten
by
the
historical
nature
of
Old
Town.
school
size
is
not
limited
to
what’s
were
severely
beaten
by
the
Chuck
writes:
seen
in while
this trying
drawingto
a tall, central clock tower that Street,Baltimore
Town.
This
Robinson
South
design behead
wounds.
crowd,
and
Lee
seThisI can’t
Robinson
South
beexpected
to wait
be the
in
crowd,
and
Lee suffered
suffered
seforenrollment
thedesign
next
opthe
pre-1871
east
side
projected forward of two ad- showing
defend
his
close
friend
AlThe
BAR
and
city
officials
fits
1974
Warsaw,
Poland,
not
Old
To
recuperate,
he
traveled
rious
internal
injuries
and
the
year
that
the
facility
opens,
but
fits
1974
Warsaw,
Poland,
not
Old
rious
internal
injuries
anda
portunity
I have to do
theexander
building
within
the marjoining
wings
to the
northa and
Hanson,
editor
of
who
approved
lostsomething
all credTown.
the
West
Indies
and
same year,
Bogue
opened
ship ofaround
rather
maybe 50this
years
from
that
head
wounds.
Town.
head
wounds.
to
the
front
of
my
house
and the
ket
area,
included
not
only
town
south.
The
clock
tower
was
local
newspaper
opposed
to
ibility
and
must
be
replaced
The
BAR
and
city
officials
way
back
to
Virginia
joinery that doubled as a cabinet on his
point
and
is
based
on
a
number
ofat
To
recuperate,
he
traveled
The
BAR
and
city
officials
To
recuperate,
he traveled
[board
ofopportunity.
architectural
review]
offices
and
court
facilities
but
designed
by
Benjamin
Henthe
war,
from
a
mob
attack.
the
next
This
thing
inputs
including this
new
housing
unit
who
approved
lost
all
credstopped
at the
home
of Gen.
and
home
building
workshop
around
the
West
Indies
and
same
year,
opened
aa ship
who it’s
approved
this
lost
all
credaround
West
Indies
and
same
year, Bogue
Bogue
opened
ship also
says
not
inlike
keeping
with
the
stallsthefor
Market
Square
ry
Latrobe,
aStreet,
British
trained
Hanson,
Lee
and
others
will
stick
out
a sore
thumb.
types,
enrollment
projections
proibility
and
must
be
replaced
at
Nathanial
Greene
on
Cumon
Princess
near
Hepon
his
way
back
to
Virginia
joinery
that
doubled
as
a
cabinet
ibility
and
must
be
replaced
at
on his
way
back
to
Virginia
joinery that doubled
as a cabinet
historical
nature
of
Old
Town.
vendors
and
a
museum
and
neoclassical
architect,
often
wereIsland,
severely
beaten
by the
Contemporary
smack
in
vided
by city
anddesign
school
demogthe
next
opportunity.
This
thing
berland
Ga.,
where
he
burn’s
Wharf.
A
former
British
stopped
at
the
home
of
Gen.
and
home
building
workshop
the
next
opportunity.
This
thing
stopped
at and
theassociated
home
of with
Gen.
and home
building
workshop
This
Robinson
South
design
rooms
referred
to as
the
“Father
of meeting
crowd,
Lee
suffered
seraphers
andout
other
inputs
provided
the
middle
of like
what
to
bebe-a
will
stick
aa used
sore
thumb.
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OUT OF THE ATTIC
The local origin story of robert E. Lee
WHO CArES?
WHO CArES?
WHO CArES?
Weekly Poll
Weekly Poll
Poll
Weekly
Do you
you satisfied
plan to participate
in Spring2Action
this
year?
Are
with city council’s
new budget
process?
58%
No.
Should
thehave
citysafety
havebeen
made
fire
staffing atsoStation
210
A.
Yes,
public
is
a most
top
priority.
With
whom
you
impressed
far in the
more
of
a
priority
at
the
start
of
budget
talks?
more
of
a
priority
at
the
start
of
budget
talks?
b. No, the budget
too tight.
Democratic
mayoralisprimary?
A.
priority.
A. Yes,
Yes, public
public safety
safety is
is aa top
top
priority.
Take
the poll at alextimes.com
A.b.Former
Mayor
Kerry
Donley.
No,
the
budget
is
too
tight.
b. No, the budget is too tight.
Take the poll at
B. Mayor Bill Euille.
Take
the
poll
at
alextimes.com
This
Week
Take
the
poll
at
alextimes.com
alextimes.com
C. Vice Mayor Allison Silberberg.
Should the city have made fire staffing at Station 210
more of a priority at the start of budget talks?
42%
Yes.
58% Yes,
No.
51%
needed
No. it is streamlined but still allowsWeekly
33 votes
fixes for oversights.
42% Yes.
Yes.
33
votes
Last
Week
33votes
votes
49%
No, it is too stringent.
43
Do you plan to participate in Spring2Action this year?
Poll
Celebrate
Mother’s Day
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM calendar
FROM | 13
Location: Fort Ward Museum & Historic Site, 4301 W. Braddock Road
Information: 703-746-4848
FIREFIGHTING HISTORY WALKING TOUR Participants learn about
volunteer firefighting in early Alexandria,
three devastating fires, and the five volunteer fire companies. The tour begins
at the historic Friendship Firehouse,
goes east on Prince Street and returns
to Friendship via King Street. For age 10
and older.
Time: 1 to 2:30 p.m.
Location: Friendship Firehouse Museum, 107 S. Alfred St.
Information: 703-746-4994
May 16-17
RELAY FOR LIFE OF ALEXANDRIA A community event to walk and
raise funds for cancer research. This
event also honors survivors of this
disease. Sponsored by the American
Cancer Society.
Time: Noon to midnight
Location: George Washington Middle
School, 1005 Mount Vernon Ave.
Information: 703-937-1912 or
[email protected]
may 14, 2015 | 21
May 18
AGENDA: ALEXANDRIA Spend an
evening listening to in-depth conversations with former Congressman Jim
Moran and former Governor and Senator George Allen. Admission costs $32
for members, $37 for non-members
with reservations made by 5 p.m. on the
Friday prior; $37 for members, $42 for
non-members after the Friday prior.
Time: Reception 6:15 p.m., buffet dinner 6:45 p.m., program starts 7:15 p.m.
Location: Hermitage, 5000 Fairbanks
Ave.
Information: 703-548-7089 or [email protected]
agendaalexandria.org
May 19
ALEXANDRIA SPORTSMAN’S
CLUB ANNIVERSARY BANQUET The Alexandria Sportsman’s
Club celebrates its 60th anniversary
with a banquet and the presenting of its
Athletes of the Year awards.
Time: Welcome reception 5:45 p.m.
Location: The Westin Alexandria, 400
Courthouse Square
Information: 703-598-6006 or www.
alexandriavasports.org
May 21
CIVIL WAR LECTURE “The Art of
May 17
ST. MARY’S SPRING FLING
St. Mary’s School will host this end-ofyear festival for the community. It will
include fun events for kids such as
carnival rides, games, crafts, entertainment, book sale, bake sale and food.
Time: 10:30 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Location: St. Mary’s School, 400
Green St.
Information: 703-569-1646 or [email protected]
TAKE 25 An outdoor event to provide
safety information to parents in honor or
National Missing Children’s Day. Features
community vendors, entertainment, and
free child friendly activities.
Time: Noon to 4 p.m.
Location: Market Square, 301 King St.
Information: 703-837-6112
MATTIE MIRACLE WALK & FAMILY FESTIVAL A fundraiser to raise
awareness for childhood cancer with a
walk and family festival.
Time: Noon to 4 p.m.
Location: St. Stephen’s and St. Agnes
School Upper Campus, 1000 St. Stephen’s Road.
Information: 202-549-8036 or [email protected]
mattiemiracle.com
TEA WITH MARTHA WASHINGTON Experience history with Martha
Washington as she discusses 18th
century tea customs as well as clothing
of the period. 18th century tea includes
the museum’s special blend of tea,
pound cake, dried fruit, and assortment
of cookies. Party attire requested. Admission costs $25 per person.
Time: 3 to 4:30 p.m.
Location: Gadsby’s Tavern Museum,
134 N. Royal St.
Information: 703-746-4242 or [email protected]
Memorializing the Civil War” by Susan
Cumbey, of Fort Ward Museum and
Historic Site. This lecture will present an overview of commemorative
Civil War art, with selected examples
ranging from sculptural monuments to
cycloramas.
Time: 7:30 to 9 p.m.
Location: The Lyceum, 201 S. Washington St.
Information: 703-746-4994
able amusements, food and booths.
Time: 6 a.m. to noon
Location: U.S. Patent and Trademark
Office, 600 Dulany St.
Information: 301-807-8529 or [email protected]
mc-coop.org
May 25
MEMORIAL DAY JAZZ FESTIVAL The 38th annual festival will
With Us
Special
Four Course Meal
(Available All Day)
– Brunch menu is available too –
Not valid
with
otherby
offers
and vouchers
Enjoy
music
SIMONNE
include entertainment from various jazz
bands including The Army Blues Jazz
Ensemble.
Time: 1 to 6 p.m.
Location: Waterfront Park, 1 Prince St.
Information: 703-746-5592
Happy Hour!
Monday - Friday
4pm - 6:30pm
May 27
ALEXANDRIA HISTORICAL
SOCIETY LECTURE A lecture by
historian Paula Whitacre on Julia Wilbur
and her role as an aid worker in Civil
War-era Alexandria. Admission is free.
Time: 7:30 to 8:45 p.m.
Location: The Lyceum, 201 S. Washington St.
Information: www.alexandriahistorical.org
May 28-June 11
LAFAYETTE BALL DANCE
CLASSES In preparation for the
Lafayette Ball on June 13, learn 18th
century English country dancing from
expert dance instructors. Admission
costs $12 per person, $30 for the
series.
Time: Each Thursday, 7:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Location: Gadsby’s Tavern Museum,
134 N. Royal St.
Information: shop.alexandriava.gov
From the founder of
Au Pied de Cochon
235 Swamp Fox Road, Alexandria VA 22314
Across from Eisenhower Metro Station
Celebrate
Mother’s Day
703-329-1010 • Open 7 Days a Week
With Us
Special
(Available All Day)
– Brunch menu is available too –
Enjoy music by S IMONNE
Happy Hour!
MAKE A SPLASH Bring the whole
NATIONAL EMS MEMORIAL
BIKE RIDE The National EMS Memo-
rial Bike Ride is an annual event that
honors EMS providers who lost their
lives in the line of duty. The event will
end at Oronoco Bay Park.
Time: 3 to 5 p.m.
Location: Old Town at the block of
King Street between Royal and Fairfax
streets
Information: 571-238-8771,
[email protected]
May 24
ALEXANDRIA RUNNING AND
FAMILY FESTIVAL A half-marathon
and 5K race as well as a family festival
that features music, beer garden, inflat-
$36
Four
Sun,Course
Mon & TuesMeal
evenings, dine-in only
May 22
family to Family Fun Nights for swimming and fun for all ages on Friday
evenings. Pool games include beach
ball relays, water basketball, diving for
prizes and fun on the ‘Aqua Challenge’
floating obstacle course. Admission is
$4 per person.
Time: 6 to 9 p.m.
Location: Chinquapin Park Recreation
Center & Aquatics Facility, 3210 King St.
Information: www.alexandriava.
gov/c/1028
$36
Monday - Friday
4pm - 6:30pm
AlexRenew customers...
It’s time
From the founder of
Au Pied de Cochon
235 Swamp Fox Road, Alexandria VA 22314
Across from Eisenhower Metro Station
to703-329-1010
cleanOpen
the
pipes.
7 Days a Week
•
Alexandria Renew Enterprises cleans the dirty water that’s pumped to our major
intercepting sewer lines from the smaller sewer lines owned and maintained by the City.
Beginning in February and ending in July, we will perform preventive maintenance on the
Potomac Interceptor by cleaning the pipes to ensure dirty water flows freely.
Want to learn more? Visit us at www.alexrenew.com or call 703-549-3383.
22 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
Weekly Words
37 Father of Rachel and Leah
38 Brewpub offering
39 “___ la Douce” (1963 film)
40 Rescue vehicle, for short
41 Flora and fauna
44 “The Simpsons” bartender
46 Brand, in a way
47 Estrada of “CHiPs”
48 Places for lions
50 Perfectly arranged
52 Relatives of 15-Down
55 Symphony woodwind
56 Greek cheese
57 Poor imitator
61 Lionel Richie classic
63 “Correct” suffix
65 Duffer’s obstacle
66 Partner for means
69 First U.S. space station
71 Roughen, as lips
72 Bindle bearer
73 Multivitamin supplement
74 No place for a roller skate
77 Chicago airport
78Birth-related
81 Waiter’s reward
83 Beyond stringy
85 Attachment to “one” or “your”
87 Boxing great Joe
89 Kind of 93-Across
100 PERCENT By Henry Quarters
91 Fleur-de-___
95 Rotating or pivoting
across
76 Ohio home of the Wright brothers 7 Banquet staples
96 Give the cold shoulder
1 Apportion
79Automobile sounder
8 Heartbeat rhythm
97 Bamm-Bamm’s friend
6“Uh-huh”
80“Beetle Bailey” dog
9Anxiety
99 “Silly” birds
9 Attempt, in slang
82Pancake toppers
10 Beauty pageant topper
100 Senator Specter and others
13“Beg pardon ...”
84Possesses
11 Tiny industrious insects
101 Starts the business day
17 Jeweler’s glass
86Bubbling hot
12 Buzzing insect
102 Some burial sites
18First name in the “Frasier” cast
88Comes down in buckets
13 “Keep hope alive”
103 Disney mermaid
19Athlete’s foot, e.g.
90Remove, as branches
14 Garfield’s predecessor
21 Shoestring
104 ___ cotta
91 Running behind
15 Sorbonne, e.g.
22Cupid’s boss
105 Diplomatic agent
92“101 Dalmatians” Dalmatian
16 Darns
23“___ It Romantic?”
93Chip companion
18 “The Twelve Days of Christmas” 108 Minute amount
musician
24 Badgerlike mammal
109 Pond residue
94“... and make it fast!”
20 “King of the Hill” beer
25Capital of Rhone
111 Bullfight bull
96Well-tossed pigskin
27 Barely managed (with “out”)
26Ballroom dance
98Even bigger
112 Bibliographical abbr.
28Lifeguards, at times
29Periwinkle
100 Alone
113 Art ___
30Off the beaten track
31 Babes in the woods
102 More moth-eaten
114 Hard, yellow cheese
32Mamie’s man
34 Highly motivated
105 Scottish Gaelic
117 Faucet
33Leaning Tower city
35 Hebrew calendar month
106 Brit’s bar
119 Fourth-qtr. followers, sometimes
34Collects
36 Tripoli’s home
107 Part of a threat
35Athletic elite
108 You acquire them upon marriage
41 Revealed, as an identity
110 Drop in the ocean?
42Used a rotary phone
115 Painter Joan
43Campus cadet’s org.
116 Hot spot in the kitchen
44“Cool” amount
118 Clickable image
45“Rudolph the Red-___ Reindeer”
120 Like oak leaves and ears
49French clergyman
121 Capital city on the Aare river
50Electric guitarist’s need
122 Use, as plates
51 Cool in manner
123 Brazil and pecan
53About 1.3 cubic yards
124 “All My Children” vixen
54Shag rug made in Sweden
125 Smeltery refuse
55Recently
126 Treats, as to dinner
58Abominable Snowman
127 Ball club VIPs
59Stretched out in bed
128 City of sin
60Cornell’s ___ Taylor Hall
DOWN
62Grander than grand
1 “Not to mention ...”
64Museum pieces
2 Advance money
67French novelist Pierre
3 Moon over Paris
68Forcibly splits
4 Makes a choice
70Historical times
5 4 p.m. in London, often
71 Santiago padres?
75Nerd kin
6“Absolutely!”
Last Week’s Solution:
Obituaries
IDA ADAMS,
of Alexandria, May 7, 2015
ANN P. CRUMPLER,
formerly of Alexandria, May 2, 2015
MERLE M. DELANCEY, SR. (76),
formerly of Alexandria, May 1, 2015
JAMES A. DERRICK (67),
of Alexandria, May 1, 2015
LANG W. FIELDS (81),
of Alexandria, May 5, 2015
CAROL L. FOSTER,
of Alexandria, April 28, 2015
JOHN D. HALL, JR. (65),
of Alexandria, May 4, 2015
WOODROW HOLMES,
of Alexandria, May 1, 2015
JAMES R. HOLSTROM,
of Alexandria, April 27, 2015
MILDRED HYMAN,
of Alexandria, May 6, 2015
JOHN J. KEARNEY, JR. (90),
of Alexandria, May 8, 2015
HARRY BENJAMIN LYON (82),
of Alexandria , May 6 2015
ROSALIND R. MODLIN (87),
of Alexandria, May 2, 2015
MILDRED NELLIE PICCIANO (94),
of Alexandria, May 4, 2015
PATRICK MCLAURIN RIDGELL,
of Alexandria, April 26, 2015
ARTHUR E. STURGILL SR.,
of Alexandria, May 3, 2015
BLAKIE VANCE,
of Alexandria, May 4, 2015
RUBY C. WOOLLS (69),
of Alexandria, May 4, 2015
Obituary Policies
All obituaries in the Times are
charged through the funeral home
on a per-word basis comparable to
the space rate offered to nonprofit
advertisers.
Deadlines are the Monday
prior to the issue date.
Call 703.739.0001 for details.
WWW.ALEXTIMES.COM may 14, 2015 | 23
Turning Back Time
Classifieds
LEGAL NOTICE
NORTH CAROLINA
!
IN THE GENERAL COURT OF JUSTICE
DISTRICT COURT DIVISION
FILE NO. 14 CVD 1654
CUMBERLAND COUNTY
BRITTANY SMITH,
Plaintiff
v.
DARRYCK D.E. SMITH,
Defendant
!
!
)
)
)
)
)
)
)
NOTICE OF SERVICE BY
PUBLICATION
TO: DARRYCK D.E. SMITH
Address Unknown
!
TAKE NOTICE that a pleading seeking relief against you has been filed in the abovecaptioned action. The nature of the relief being sought is as follows:
COMPLAINT FOR CHILD CUSTODY AND ABSOLUTE DIVORCE
You are required to make defense to such pleading not later than June 15, 2015 and upon
your failure to do so the party seeking service against you will apply to the Court for the relief
sought.
This the 28th day of April, 2015.
!
!
!
PARISH & COOKE
James H. Cooke, Jr
JAMES H. COOKE, JR.
Attorney for the Plaintiffs
343 Person Street/P.O. Drawer 1824
Fayetteville, North Carolina 28302
Telephone: (910) 483-7680
Business
Directory
Residential & Commercial
703.314.1287 • AllegroLLC.net
703.314.1287
AllegroLLC.net
Whole-house
Generators
Panel Replacement
Lighting
ALEXANDRIA PLANNING
DEPARTMENT
NOTICE OF
ADMINISTRATIVE REVIEW
The following request has been received for
administrative review and approval.
For information about this application or
to comment, visit the City’s website at
www.alexandriava.gov/planning or call
(703) 746-4666.
Special Use Permit #2015-00054
2700 Jefferson Davis Hwy
Proposed Business: Souvlaki Bar
New Administrative Special Use Permit request to operate a restaurant; zoned I/Industrial
APPLICANT: Souvlaki Bar, LLC by
Tom Christopoulos
PLANNER: Ann Horowitz –
[email protected]
In accordance with section 11-500 of the
zoning ordinance, the above listed request
may be approved administratively by the Director of Planning and Zoning. If you have
any comments regarding the proposal above,
please contact Planning and Zoning staff at
703.746.4666 or email the planner listed no
later than June 4th, 2015.
ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY
COMMISSION
PUBLIC INFORMATION MEETING
CITY OF ALEXANDRIA’S
COMBINED SEWER SYSTEM
LONG TERM CONTROL PLAN
UPDATE AND CHESAPEAKE BAY
TOTAL MAXIMUM DAILY LOAD
5% ACTION PLAN
The Alexandria City School Board will hold a
Public Hearing on the following topics during
the Special Called School Board Meeting at
7:00 p.m. on Tuesday, May 19, 2015.
•FY2016CombinedFundsBudgetand
FY2016-2025CIPBudget
•RedistrictingFramework
•PatrickHenryConstructionProject
The meeting will be held in the School
BoardMeetingRoom,locatedat1340BraddockPlace,Alexandria.Formoreinformationortoregistertospeakatthepublichearing,pleasecontacttheClerkoftheBoardat
703-619-8314 or email [email protected]
k12.va.us.
For Sale
27 acres large pond with running water.
Immediately live in facility. Excellent
investment property. Close to Keowee
and Jocassee Lake and Table Rock
State Park. Located at the foot of
Blue Hills, Pickens County, Northwest
South Carolina. $350k will negotiate.
Call 843-761-2557 before 6pm.
605 484-5582
Online all the time:
When: Monday May 18, 2015
7:30-9:30 p.m.
Where: City Hall, 301 King Street
Chet & Sabra Avery
Conference Room 2000
The Environmental Policy Commission
invites residents to attend a public
information meeting on the City’s Combined Sewer System (CSS) and the plans
being developed to reduce the impacts of
Combined Sewer Overflows (CSOs) on
receiving waterways; and the Stormwater
- Chesapeake Bay Total Maximum Daily
Load 5% Action Plan. Residents are invited
to give written or oral comments at the
public information meeting.
For more information about the City’s CSS,
visit alexandriava.gov/Sewers, and the
draft Action Plan visit alexandriava.gov/
Environment.
For questions, contact Erin Bevis-Carver,
P.E., Sanitary Section Lead, Transportation & Environmental Services at Erin.
[email protected] or Jesse E.
Maines, Watershed Management Planner at
[email protected]
This week in 2013:
The quiet fighter: Rising 15-year-old boxing
star eschews limelight – “Kids from the city’s
Parker-Gray neighborhood walk into the boxing gym at the
Charles Houston Recreation Center for all sorts of reasons.
Some come with parents, who want them trained to defend themselves at school. Others walk in alone, harboring
dreams of a quick route to stardom, only to later realize the
first lesson of boxing: Nothing comes easy.”
Booming sales prompt brewery’s expansion:
Port City Brewing will double annual output –
“Port City Brewery’s line of local craft beers has got
tongues wagging, so much so the West End brewery is
expanding capacity — again.”
The Alexandria City School Board will hold
a Public Hearing on the Strategic Plan during the School Board Meeting at 7:00 p.m. on
Thursday, May 28, 2015.
The meeting will be held in the School Board
Meeting Room, located at 1340 Braddock
Place, Alexandria. For more information or to
register to speak at the public hearing, please
contact the Clerk of the Board at 703-6198314 or email [email protected]
New dawn for Jefferson-Houston School –
“Alexandria’s education officials will break ground for
construction of the new Jefferson-Houston on Tuesday,
signaling the beginning of a new era in the troubled
school’s history.”
24 | may 14, 2015ALEXANDRIA TIMES
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109 S. Pitt St • Alexandria, VA 22314