Remembering the Korean War

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Remembering the Korean War
EAGLE GROVE
EAGLE
2011
www.theeaglegroveeagle.com
Your local news media source
Volume 129
School
Board
approves
new
elementary
principal
contract
Also hear about free
activity ticket plan
By LES HouSER
[email protected]
Newly hired Eagle Grove Elementary
Principal Joe Erickson was introduced
to the Board of Education during their
meeting last Monday, June 9. He will
replace the departing Mike Kruger, who
will be with the Northeast Hamilton
School District starting this fall.
“I eagerly look forward to getting
started and meeting everyone,” said
Erickson. Watch for an article about him
in an upcoming issue of the Eagle.
In communications and celebrations
reports from the building principals,
Kruger highlighted staff changes taking
place for next school year. “Most staff
will remain fairly consistent, but I have
moved a few people due to openings that
I feel will make our elementary stronger
as a whole by improving our teams
approach,” said Kruger. Those staff reassignments include Jen Conaway (1st
Grade), Beth Nelson (2nd Grade) and
Jennifer Lenane (3rd Grade). They are
still looking for a new special ed teacher,
and need to hire a couple of associates
to replace Pat Thomason (retiring) and
Misty Pickering (transferring to the high
school).
Kruger reported that they are
averaging 64 students for breakfast, and
166 for lunch, as the summer nutrition
program gets underway. “That is
currently way up from past years, and I
want to continue to encourage students
to come in and enjoy a good breakfast
and/or lunch anytime,” said Kruger.
Summer School starts this week, and
Kruger has identified about 20 students
in kindergarten thru 3rd grade for that
program. He also expressed appreciation
for the two grants received from the
Wright County Charitable Foundation.
$2,300 was granted for providing crisis
buckets and other security items, while
another $300 was given to help offset
the costs of free activity passes for the
students.
Continued on Page 3
•
Issue Number 25
•
Cost $1.25
•
Thursday, June 19, 2014
In
Remembering
the Korean War
thIs
week’s
eagle
Kwon to speak at Eagle Grove Memorial Library
By KIM dEMoRy
[email protected]
It’s been referred to as “The
forgotten war,” but Jack Kwon,
born and raised in South Korea,
and now living in Eagle Grove,
is doing his best to make sure
people remember the Korean
War and the men and women
who fought it.
Kwon will be giving a
Korean War Presentation on
June 25, 2014 (which is the 64th
Anniversary of the start of the
Korean War) at the Eagle Grove
Memorial Library beginning at
6:30 p.m. While the purpose of
the program is to honor Korean
War Veterans, Kwon would
like to invite all interested
individuals to come and listen,
learn, and remember.
“I would like to introduce
Korea, give a background of
the war, war processing and the
U.S. involvement, casualties
(5.5 million - which is more
than the current population of
Iowa), tension between North
an South Korea after the truce,
and development of South Korea
from devastated land after the
war,” Kwon said.
Kwon’s presentation has
condensed three years of the war
into roughly one hour of slides,
movies, and interesting facts.
He will talk about the United
States’ relationship with Korea, a
comparison of North and South
Korea, the establishment of the
Communist Party in the North,
open fire to the South on June
25, 1950, the intervention of the
UN, intervention of Chinese
Communist forces, and so much
more.
He will also talk about
Korean War casualty numbers,
economic loss, and the effect
of the Korean War on world
politics.
“It wasn’t a regional or a civil
war…it was a world war,” Kwon
said, considering 16 countries
deployed soldiers to South Korea
under the United Nations name.
You’ll find
More than 60 faces inside
this week’s eagle
remembering the
korean war
Page 1
Jan Grandgeorge (left) and Renee Evje (right) show how times
have changed in archiving local news. They are excited to
announce that archives are now available online. Read on to
find out more details. Photo by Kim Demory
JACk kWon
Kwon
has
given
this
presentation twice before, both
times in Wisconsin in 2012. He
has modified it to make it more
relevant to the Eagle Grove area
now. One of the reasons he was
inspired to put the presentation
together in the first place was
because of a close friend who was
a Korean War veteran who said
he wasn’t even sure why the war
happened. Kwon wanted to give
him, and others, the answers.
Born during the Korean War,
Kwon has learned all his life about
communism and why it happened.
So when an opportunity came
up for him to move to the United
States in 1998, he took it. His son
had previously studied in Arizona
and loved it. Combine that firsthand experience with the fact that
there were more opportunities in
America, Kwon made the move.
Now, he is hoping to give back to
an America that has done so much
for him and his homeland, by
educating people about the War,
honoring American Veterans, and
pursuing world peace.
Kwon will also be accepting
questions at the end of his
presentation.
So, if there is
something specific you would like
to know, about the war, Korea, or
related matters, please feel free to
ask him.
What do you want
to know about
Eagle Grove’s past?
Newspaper archives now available online
By KIM dEMoRy
[email protected]
Have you ever been curious what the front page news of the Eagle
Grove area was back in the late 1800s? Are you looking for ancestors from
the Eagle Grove area? Are you interested in the business district from years
gone by? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then have we got
news for you!
The Eagle Grove Eagle and the Eagle Grove Memorial Library are
proud to announce they have partnered together to bring the past and
present into the future - of technology, that is. Digital archives (dating back
as far as 1882) of the Eagle Grove Eagle, Times Gazette, Goldfield Gazett,
Goldfield Chronicle, Boone Valley Gazette, Eagle Grove Times Gazette,
Eagle Grove Times, Goldfield Booster, Evening Times, and Woolstock
News are now available for your free access at http://eaglegrove.advantagepreservation.com.
“We are so thankful to our benefactors that made this possible,” said
Jan Grandgeorge, director of the library.
Those donors include money from the Roger and Palmer Larson
fund, Our Foundation for the Future, and the Wright County Charitable
Foundation. While these three groups provided the financial support for
the roughly $12,000 project to convert the microfilm of the newspapers to
digital content, Grandgeorge said it wouldn’t have been possible without the
cooperation of Mid-America Publishing and President/CEO Ryan Harvey.
“Our biggest thanks to them for giving us permission to pursue the
project,” she said.
“The Eagle is happy to partner with the library in this important
project,” said Harvey. We believe it is a great way to preserve the history
of the community.”
The idea for such a website started about five years ago, when
Grandgeorge and a few other librarians got together and talked about
preservation as well as public access, no matter where you live. It’s a
regular occurrence for the library and the Eagle Grove Eagle to get requests
Continued on Page 3
Paddle Wheel Players to present comedy/mystery/thriller
Cast and crew of the Paddle Wheel Players have been practicing hard and putting in some long hours to perfect their upcoming performance of Loco-Motion,
Commotion, Dr. Gorilla and Me. The comedy/mystery/thriller will be performed during Summerfest on Friday, June 27 beginning at 7 p.m., and again Sunday, June 29
at 3 p.m. Tickets are available in advance or at the door of the Robert Blue Auditorium. Don’t miss your chance to see local stars of the stage. Photo by Kim Demory
fareway donates 100
movies to library
Page 2
supervisors
Page 3
eg city council
Page 4
wright county storms info
Page 5
wright county assessments
Page 7
7th & 8th softball action
Page 18
a survivor’s story
Page 18
BRIEFLY
Free Breakfast & Lunch Served
8:15 to 9:15 a.m. and
11:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m.
Every Monday - Friday
RBMS Multi-Purpose Room
_______________________
Summer Nights
June 20
5pm to 9pm
Downtown, Webster City
Friends of the George Reeves
Memorial will be selling t-shirts
and prints
*All proceeds go to H.E.R.O
_______________________
Texas Style Jam
Friday, June 20
6-9 p.m.
Dows Convention Center
_______________________
Vincent Fire and Rescue
57th Annual Fireman’s Ball
Friday, June 27
5-8 p.m.
Vincent Community Hall
_______________________
Fly Like An Eagle 5K Run
Saturday, June 28
7 a.m. Reg. & 8 a.m. Start
Front of Old Chamber Building
_______________________
EG Summerfest
Saturday, June 28
Greenwood Park
_______________________
EG Summerfest Fly-In Pancake
Breakfast and Car Show
Sunday, June 19
8 a.m. - Noon
EG Airport
_______________________
EG Memorial Library
Summer Hours
Monday -- Thursday
10 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Friday & Saturday
10 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
2
LocaL News
Thursday, June 19, 2014
EaglE grovE EaglE
Lindsay Morgan of Security Savings Bank was just one of 70
golfers who enjoyed a day on the golf course instead of in the
office on Friday, June 13. She could be found playing 18 holes
at the Eagle Grove Golf Course as a fundraiser for the Eagle
Grove Chamber. Photo by Kim Demory
Friday,
June 13
2014
Fareway donates 100 movies
Jan Grandgeorge (center) and Renee Evje (right) were more than excited to accept a donation of
100 used movies from Chris Livengood (left) of Eagle Grove Fareway earlier this week. Livengood
said, “I can’t think of a better place for (the movies) to go. The movies are previously viewed
movies that have been available in Fareway’s DVD Center, through farewaymovies.com. “It’s just
something we could do to benefit the library,” added Livengood. Grandgeorge said the generosity
of the donation was just unbelievable. “We’re so lucky. Thank you,” added Evje. The movies will
be available to rent, free of charge, soon. There is a variety of titles for adults, young adults, and
children as well. Photo by Kim Demory
Helpful Hint
Did your child use the
painted walls as a canvas?
Mist them with hairspray
and wipe immediately to
remove colored marker. For
crayon, scrub with a toothpaste-covered toothbrush,
or gently massage with
baking soda and a damp
microfiber cloth.
Good! Teresa Pohlman sinks the putt as her teammates,
Deb Vance (left) and Jan Derscheid (center) watch
Terri Torkelson lines up her
shot to the green during the
annual Eagle Grove Chamber
Golf Outing held Friday, June
13. Not being an avid golfer,
Torkelson was glad the
tournament was best shot so
she could just concentrate
on having fun.
Photo by Kim Demory
closely during the annual Eagle Grove Chamber of
Commerce Golf Outing. The event was held Friday
the 13th, and despite the superstitious day, all the
golfers had a great time, and a good excuse for
those “bad” shots. Championship flight 1st place
town & country 2nd place first state bank. 1st
flight 1st place linn construction 2nd place Sadler
construction. 2nd flight 1st place gold eagle
2nd place ryerson realty/ inner dynamic designs.
Photo by Kim Demory
They say a bad day on the golf course
is better than a good day at work - and
these golfers would likely agree as
they enjoyed the sunshine and fresh air
during the recent Eagle Grove Chamber
Golf Outing. Photo by Kim Demory
Chamber Golf Outing
We want your stuff in our paper!
• Fix It Secrets • Jokes • Photos • Weekend visitor announcement • Short Stories • Poems
• How-To Info • Good Websites • Sports • Military “Shout-Out” • Helpful Thoughts
~ It’s Free to submIt, so go ahead ~
Eagle Grove Eagle
Deadline is
Fridays at Noon!
LocaL News
EaglE grovE EaglE
—School Board —
Continued from Page 1
Kruger finished his report by
thanking everyone for this career
experience in the district. “It’s been a
great year, and I’m very proud of our
staff that have worked hard this year,”
said Kruger. “There are lots of great
things happening in the elementary,
and I want to thank the Board for the
opportunity given me to work here.
It’s been a great 20 years, and I will
miss everyone in Eagle Grove that has
impacted my life during that time.”
During his report, Robert Blue
Middle School Principal Scott Jeske
told Board members that the Awards
Assembly was again a big success,
with students honored for their many
accomplishments for the past school
year. He felt the end of year field trips
went superbly, with all students having
a wonderful time enjoying their three
respective venues. He also reported
that, due to the success of the Step Up
Reading classes, they will be starting
a similar effort in math for 7th and 8th
grade students.
“Students will get a second-dose
of math, and we will concentrate
on their deficiencies,” said Jeske.
“They will get some pre-teaching of
new concepts they will learn in the
regular math room. They will not be
required to take technology to make
room for this in their schedule.” He
also announced that the theme for
next year is “Character is our Super
Power” which will feature super
heroes in many of the activities.
He shared fresh data from the
resiliency survey that was filled out
by students. “We continue to create
an environment where students feel
welcomed, safe and ready to learn,”
said the principal.
They have decided on a hot dog
cookout, rather than a pool party,
for this year’s Open House event. “It
might be a better way to get students
and parents to come,” said Jeske. “One
of our major goals for next year is to
create an environment where parents
feel comfortable in taking part in
school and school activities.”
He presented to the Board the
revised student handbook for next
year, which includes only minor
changes. “We will not be ordering
planners for next school year, but
rather teaching the students to use
their Chromebooks to keep track of
assignments, etc.,” said Jeske.
He also recognized Janea
McKinley, who was one of 50 out of
a total of 350 applicants to receive a
Project Proficient grant. It will pay for
her obtaining of an ELL endorsement
through Morningside College. He
wrapped it up by telling the Board that
15 students will be attending Summer
School to make up any classes they
failed.
High School Principal Jeff
Siebersma was not able to attend the
meeting.
Board members heard an update
from Superintendent Jess Toliver on
the infrastructure projects for this
summer. The new lighting in the
high school gym is finished, and has
really brightened it up. The track
rehab project is scheduled now and
should be completed by late fall,
and the middle school roofing crew
should be on site to start in the next
few days. During his time, Toliver
also highlighted for the Board what
he feels are legislative action priorities
for next year’s session. Those include,
in order: 1) Set Supplemental State
Aid (SSA), which was supposed to
be done in the last session; 2) Set the
SSA at an adequate level; 3) Expand
the use of PPEL and Statewide Penny.
The Board will now consider these
prior to formal adoption.
The Board approved the school
fees list as proposed for next year. It
includes an increase in book rent of $1
for Prep-K thru 4th, $5 for 5th thru 8th
and $5 for 9th thru 12th, along with
small increases in nutrition program
fees based as State guidelines. The
driver’s education fees, for next
summer, will also increase by $10 for
district students and $15 for out-ofdistrict students.
The most noticeable change in the
fee schedule is with the $60 student
athletic event pass. “It will now be
offered free to all students k-12, with
an optional suggested $10 donation,”
said Toliver. “We wanted to get more
kids to the games to support our
athletic program. We generated about
$2,100 per year from the current
fee. The $1,500 from the student
government, along with the WCCF
grant (mentioned earlier), will allow
us to get every student an activity
pass.” Watch an upcoming edition of
the Eagle for a more extensive story
detailing this effort.
The Board approved the
recommendations from the School
Improvement Advisory Committee
on reading and math goals for the
coming school year. Those include:
High School 11th graders-reading at 78
percent proficient (current goal of 74.1
percent) and math at 83 percent (79.7
percent); Middle School 8th gradersreading at 78 percent (72 percent),
math at 84 percent (82 percent) and
science at 81 percent (79 percent);
Elementary 4th graders-reading at
76 percent (70 percent), math at 86
percent (83 percent) and science at 85
percent (83 percent). “These are the
goals we will now use,” said Toliver.
In other action the Board:
-approved resignations from
Chelsey Axtell (assistant softball),
McKristie Jeske (assistant volleyball),
Angela Gloede (elementary teacher
and coach), Dan O’Hern (assistant
volleyball after 32 years as Eighth
grade coach) and Shonda Schafer
(cook);
-approved contracts for Bruce
Dahlhauser (high school PE and head
football coach), Justin Schwake (high
school band teacher/director) and
Katie Noll (high school English);
-approved the list of 2014
graduates to be entered into school
records;
-approved the milk bid from AE
Dairy and the bread bid from Bimbo
Bakeries USA of Dubuque;
-approved a request for a Spanish
Club trip to Belize for the summer
of 2015. Twenty-one students have
signed up as expressing interest in
going on the eight-day, every-two year
educational and recreational trip;
-set a special meeting for Monday,
June 30 at noon for dealing with the
end-of-year business.
Summer fun reminder
Look carefully and you’ll notice a kite tangled in these lines
located near the EGHS football practice field. This sight is just
a reminder to check your surroundings for dangers this summer
before flying kites, swimming, biking, or enjoying any other
warm-weather activities. Stay safe so you can enjoy more fun
tomorrow. Photo by Kim Demory
Supervisors approve fitness
center loan guarantee
by MATT vOIGTS
[email protected]
At the their June 16 meeting,
the Wright County Supervisors
made a motion of intent to guarantee
a loan for the Clarion Foundation
for Community Improvement, Inc.,
who is seeking to purchase the Main
Street building in Clarion in which
Clarion Fitness is located. The
Foundation reached an agreement
with current owner Stan Erikson to
purchase the building for $125,000,
intending to apply for loans from
Corn Belt Power and Prairie Energy
to cover either 80% or 90% of the
purchase ($100,000 or $112,500,
respectively). Through the guarantee,
the Foundation is able to reduce
its interest rates from 3% to 2%, a
savings of over a $1,000 per year.
David Johnson, Foundation
President, said the purchase is in
preparation to potentially expand
the services the facility offers, and
the non-profit may launch a capital
campaign in December or January to
renovate the building’s interior and
exterior. Erikson is presently in the
process of cleaning out the building’s
second floor and basement. The
Foundation had hired an engineer to
do a “walk-through inspection” for
between $2,000 and $3,000 and, in
Johnson’s words, “the bottom line
is that this is a good, safe, sound
building.” Clarion Fitness operates
as a non-profit.
The Supervisors had no
reservations about guaranteeing the
loan, with Johnson citing confidence
in the community members working
on the project. “These people are not
going to let this project fail,” he said,
also advocating for the importance
of the fitness center as a “Main
Street business” that occupies two
storefronts.
The meeting happened amid
discussions on when an expected
afternoon
storm
would
hit.
Supervisor Karl Helgevold was gone
on a planned absence.
Also at the meeting, Wright
County Engineer Adam Clemons
presented bids received for fuel
purchase contracts. The Supervisors
approved the apparent low bid of .08
cents below rack price to Farmers
Cooperative. The County typically
spends around $350,000 a year for
fuel. Clemons also noted that the
County’s new motor grader will be
arriving June 19, and that pouring
concrete on the bridge deck on C-70
was scheduled to begin the day of
the meeting. The bridge should be
completed within “three or four
weeks.”
Steve Soma of the Wright
County
Insurance
Committee
presented the insurance premium
rates for the County for the 2014-
15 financial year, which begins July
1. The overall costs for the County
will reduce from $266,155.04 to
$257,287.08, a difference $8,867.96.
Soma also presented an alternate plan
that would cost around $5,000 more,
but provide greater coverage for a
cyber-attack or other technological
intrusion on County records. The
Supervisors decided to have the
County Information Technology
department review the risk of such an
incident before making a decision.
At the previous week’s meeting,
the Supervisors had approved
a mutual support agreement to
reimburse Iowa Specialty Hospital
(ISH) for reimbursement for
ambulance transfers up to $50,000
per year, to cover costs for County
residents otherwise unable to pay. At
their June 16 meeting, the County
debated approving a version with
changes made by Steve Simonin of
ISH. The proposed changes:
- Amended the text that
“ambulance transfers for mental
health services shall not be covered
by this Agreement” to “Mental
Health transfers will be covered by
a separate agreement.”
- Struck an item limiting the
reimbursement to 50% or up to $600
per individual transfer
- Changed a requirement to
provide “an itemized accounting”
“of its actual costs” to “normal
billing costs”
ISH’s Steve Simonin visited the
Council Chambers, and after a call
with Brad Leckrone, County Social
Services, it was determined that an
agreement was already in place to
cover mental health transfers for
residents otherwise unable to pay.
On the second item, ISH and the
Supervisors agreed that cost would
be changed to cover up to 50% of
“billable” expenses, with the $600
limit removed. On the third item,
both the Supervisors and the County
clarified that their interest was less in
the services themselves than efforts
to recover costs, and the wording was
changed so that ISH would provide a
“billing history” rather than a list of
services.
The Supervisors also approved
a fireworks permit to Gary Groves,
for use on a farm near Eagle Grove.
The County Assessor also noted
receiving a letter from an individual
claiming the right as a “sovereign
citizen” not to pay taxes.
Thursday, June 19, 2014
3
Newspaper archives
now available online
Continued from Page 1
for genealogy information, business
opening/closing dates, and the likes.
While microfilm and hard copies
of the papers were always available
for the public to come in and look
through, it wasn’t always feasible
for the public as many requests
come from far away. In addition,
the microfilm reader at the library
broke down and would have cost
$9,000 to repair. This website has
solved that problem and will not
only save staff time, but will allow
a greater majority of the public to
have all the information they need
right at their fingertips, when they
want it.
Grandgeorge
noted
one
individual who contacted the
library, looking for information
about a business that had existed
in Eagle Grove in the early 1900s.
She referred them to the brand new
website. Shortly after, Grandgeorge
received an email in response,
saying how wonderful the website
was and that they had discovered
an abundance of information,
even more than she had originally
started looking for.
Grandgeorge also told Paul
Wilde about the new archive site as
he has spent many hours using the
microfilm to research obituaries
of family members, most of whom
are from Eagle Grove. He found
that this manual search was time
consuming, and when he heard
about the archives, it was a dream
come true for him.
“I do not know where to
begin, as this is such a major
breakthrough for our community.
The site is very user friendly and
allows one to search by any means.
By using the search engines within
the site, it will bring up those
items on whatever the search is
for,” said Wilde. “It allows one
to zoom the print, go from page
to page of certain issues, etc. It is
so neat. What is the old saying -best thing since sliced bread? Well
this major breakthrough of the
archived newspapers is just that
-- the best thing! Now with the
Eagle being archived and online, I
can find out more of the Good Old
Days and reflect back on my years
of growing up in Eagle Grove.”
Wilde added that there is a
Facebook page called “Growing
Up in Eagle Grove” that currently
has 713 members recalling their
past and living or growing up in
Eagle Grove.
“I think they will greatly love
the fact of the archived newspapers
being online. I can only wait to see
what is being posted about people
using this new opportunity to look
back. Most of the 713 people
probably live in some other part
of the United States and do not
have access to our library and
the archived newspapers. Not so
anymore, our community library
is bringing their services right to
them. What better service could
they ask for? Oh, what enjoyment
they should have,” commented
Wilde.
“I’m so glad it’s here,” said
Grandgeorge. The more people
that use it, the better.”
Links to the archived newspaper
website will also be available on
the Eagle Grove newspaper website
at
www.theeaglegroveeagle.
com or the library website at
www1.youseemore.com / N I LC/
eaglegrove/. Try it out. Tell your
friends about it. Then tell us what
you think of it. We would love to
hear from you.
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EAGLE GROVE
EAGLE
Weekly Coverage in Eagle Grove
and Surrounding Communities
Postal Information:
USPS 163-740
Weekly periodicals postage paid at the
Eagle Grove, IA, and additional
mailing offices. Send address
changes to the Eagle Grove Eagle, P.O.
Box 6, Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Location
314 West Broadway
Mailing Address
P. O. Box 6, Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Office Hours
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday,
except Holidays
Telephone
515-448-4745
Toll-free 1-888-448-4745
Fax
515-448-3182
News and Ads E-Mail
[email protected]
Sports E-Mail
[email protected]
Web Site Address
www.theeaglegroveeagle.com
Deadlines:
All News, Ads, Legals, Classified Ads,
Obituaries, and Churches
Noon on Friday
Contacts
Frankie Aliu, Advertising
[email protected]
Kim Demory, News Editor and
Composition Supervisor
[email protected]
Les Houser, Sports Editor
Lynn Fevold, Composition
[email protected]
Mitch Jones, Composition and
Webmaster
[email protected]
The Eagle Grove Eagle is the
publisher of the Dual County Leader
which comes out 12 times a year with
coverage in four counties
A Division of Mid-America
Publishing Corporation
Ryan Harvey, President & CEO
[email protected]
4
Public RecoRd
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Marriage Licenses
James D. Harvey and Lisa L.
Asche, both of legal age and from
Goldfield. June 6, 2014
David N. Hill, 31, and Jaqueline
R. Wilson, 30, both of Clarion. June
6, 2014.
Property Transfers
WARRANY DEED - Leonard
K. Phillips and Lori Ann Phillips to
Douglas R. Kovacs and Jennifer Kovacs, 28-91-26, as desc. 6-4-14
WARRANTY DEED – Gerald L.
Kapler and Phyllis A. Kapler to Alan
Leadley, City of Eagle Grove, Fitzmaurice’s First Addition, Block 5,
Lot 5, as desc. 6-4-14
WARRANTY DEED – Lewis W.
Banta and Frances J. Banta to Kevin
G. Kackley and Lisa R. Kackley,
City of Belmond, Railroad Addition,
Block 20, Lot 4, as desc. 6-4-14
WARRANTY DEED – Brinkman
Duane L. Trustee, Brinkman Duane
L. Revocable Trust, and Duane L.
Brinkman Revocable Trust to RSBR
Investments LLC, City of Clarion,
Sheldon’s Addition, Block 2, Lots
9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, and 16, as
desc. 6-4-14
QUIT CLAIM – US Bank National Association Trustee and Wells
Fargo Home Equity Trust Mortgage
Pass Through Certif to City of Dows,
City of Dows, Eskridge’s 3rd Addition, Block 4, Lot 1, as desc. 6-5-14
QUIT CLAIM – Michael L. Walters and Angie Walters to Ana Karen Breceda, City of Eagle Grove,
Hewett’s Third Addition, Block C,
Lots 6 and 7, as desc. 6-6-14
WARRANTY DEED – Scott
W. Churchill and Dianne Laura
Churchill to City of Clarion, 32-9224, as desc. 6-6-14
WARRANTY DEED – PNI Real
Estate Holding Company LLC to
City of Clarion, 32-92-24, as desc.
6-6-14
WARRANTY DEED – Harold L.
Wintz to City of Clarion, 32-92-24,
as desc. 6-6-14
WARRANTY DEED – Janis L.
Hellard Trustee, Marie D. Kelch
couRthouse News
Trustee, Wintz Rose Mae Residuary
Trust, and Rose Mae Wintz Residuary Trust to City of Clarion, 32-9224, as desc. 6-6-14
QUIT CLAIM – Alan Leadley and
Ann M. Leadley to Alan D. Leadley
and Ann M. Leadley, City of Eagle
Grove, Fitzmaurice’s First Addition,
Block 5, Lot 5, as desc. 6-9-14
WARRANTY DEED – Jacob M.
McVey, Jacob Matthew McVey,
Jacob McVey, Yuridia D. McVey,
Yuridia D. Romero, Yuridia Doree
Romero, and Yuridia Romero to Nicole R. Nuehring, City of Belmond,
Morse Brother’s Addition, Block 16,
Lots 5 and 6, as desc. 6-9-14
WARRANTY DEED – Margaret
A. Mennenga to Michael Yutzy and
Holly Lynn Yutzy, 14-93-23, as desc.
6-9-14
WARRANTY DEED – Paul W.
Edwards and Diane C. Edwards to
Diane C. Edwards Revocable Trust,
Diane C. Edwards Trustee, and Edwards Diane C. Revocable Trust,
City of Clarion, Evans-Kay Addition, Block 2, Lot 3, as desc. 6-9-14
WARRANTY DEED – Paul W.
Edwards and Diane C. Edwards to
Paul W. Edwards Trustee, Edwards
Paul W. Revocable Trust, and Paul
W. Edwards Revocable Trust, 31-9324 and 1-92-25, as desc. 6-9-14
WARRANTY DEED – Paul W.
Edwards and Diane C. Edwards to
Diane C. Edwards Trustee, Edwards
Diane C. Revocable Trust, and Diane
C. Edwards Revocable Trust, 31-9324 and 1-92-25, as desc. 6-9-14
QUIT CLAIM – Dawn Jackson
and Scott Jackson to Rollin I. Eivins
and Misty L. Eivins, 17-93-25, as
desc. 6-10-14
QUIT CLAIM – Donna Watson
and Jeffrey D. Watson to Rollin I.
Eivins and Misty L. Eivins, 17-9325, as desc. 6-10-14
QUIT CLAIM – Diane Johnson
and Marvin Johnson to Rollin I.
Eivins and Misty L. Eivins, 17-9325, as desc. 6-10-14
QUIT CLAIM – Debra Stevens
and Michael Stevens to Rollin I.
Eivins and Misty L. Eivins, 17-93-
EaglE grovE EaglE
— Eagle Grove Police Department —
25, as desc. 6-10-14
Clerk of Court
Possession/purchase of alcohol by
person 18/19/20: Calan L. White of
Clarion, $200;
Speeding 55 or under zone (6 thru
10 over): Jose A. Salazar Palma of
Belmond, $40; Frank L. Howe of
Pocahontas, $40; Rebecca A. Lindley
of Kanawha, $40; Grant H. Stephas
of Johnston, $40; Joel E. Prescott of
Belmond, $40;
Speeding 55 or under zone (11
thru 15 over): Clint R. Berardi of
Des Moines, $80;
Speeding over 55 zone (6 thru 10
over): Ward A. Rouse of Clive, $40;
Speeding over 55 zone (16 thru 20
over): Maciej Cydzik of Harwood
Heights, $90;
Speeding – road work zones (1
thru 10 over): Donald R. Clark of
Lakeville, Minn., $150;
Speeding: Isabel Aviles De Rodriguez of Belmond, $40;
Speeding/surban district: Tiffany
M. Grummitt of Clarion, $40;
Speeding/residence of school district: Lyle E. Roberts of Venice, Fla.,
$40; Christopher M. Nobre of Oak
Creek, Wisc., $20; Thomas J. Marks
of Fort Dodge, $20;
No valid drivers license: Jose A.
Salazar Palma of Belmond, $200;
Adolfo Covarrubius-Diaz of Latimer, $200; Gerardo Agustin Pedro of
Eagle Grove, $200; Roger Zamora
of Clarion, $200; Miguel LopezLopez of Clarion, $200;
Violation – financial liability
coverage: Jose A. Salazar Palma of
Belmond, $250; Marcela CrisantoAvendano of Eagle Grove, $250;
Frank L. Howe of Pocahontas, court
costs; Miguel Lopez-Lopez of Clarion, $250; Shaen N. Clark of Garner,
$375; Alfonso Salazar-Ruiz of Eagle
Grove, $375;
Fail to properly stop at railroad:
Timothy R. Bachtell of Hubbard,
$200;
Operation without registration
card or plate: William R. Juarez Morales of Dows, $75;
Minor using tobacco product – 1st
offense: Colton D. Bonin of Belmond, $50;
Improper rear lamps: Isabel Kay
of Clarion, $30;
Failure to maintain or use safety
belts: Aroldo Poac-Ochoa of Clarion, $50;
Failure to obey stop sign and yield
right of way: Bailey Kothe of Clarion, $100;
Careless driving: Thomas P. Hartmann of Webster City, $35;
Traffic control device: Terri M.
Havens of Belmond, $100;
Operators
licensed: Alfonso
Salazar-Ruiz of Eagle Grove, $200;
Cesar Garcia Rodriguez of Eagle
Grove, $200;
Driving while license under suspension: Amber Kocour of Eagle
Grove, $250; Kirstie L. Schmidt of
Eagle Grove, $250;
Civil Court
The court handled three child support or child custody cases.
Small Claims
Paul B. Larson, 1511 1st St SW,
Clarion vs. Deborah L. Geary and
Michael L. Geary, 1978 Sandy
Beach Rd, Clarion. Case was dismissed June 10 with prejudice. Case
was originally filed April 7.
Joseph Ogiba, Brookfield, Mo., vs.
Joel A. Ellis, 603 NE 5th Street Lot
21, Eagle Grove. Eviction of mobile
home judgment for the plaintiff on
June 9 plus court costs.
District Court
The court issued one search warrant.
City of Eagle Grove vs. Katie E.
Kocour, 620 N. Montgomery, Eagle
Grove. The defendant pled guilty
June 10 to dog at large and was fined
$65 plus the statutory 35 percent
surcharge and court costs. This sentence is the result of an incident June
10 investigated by the Eagle Grove
Police Department.
Council removes golf cart equipment
requirements from new ordinance
By LeS houSer
[email protected]
After some lengthy discussion,
the Eagle Grove City Council decided
it might be better to just remove the
portion of an amendment to city
ordinances pertaining to equipment
on golf carts.
On the agenda was the first
reading of Ordinance 2014-03, which
would amend provisions pertaining
to operation of snowmobiles, ATV’s
and golf carts within the city limits.
The document stated under the
section on equipment that “headlights
and taillights shall be on at all times
while the golf cart is being operated
on any public street or alley.” This
was added following the last Council
meeting.
The point was then brought up,
by Councilperson Wally Lorenzen,
that not all carts are equipped as
such. Police Chief Ray Beltran also
stated that he only wants them used in
daytime hours anyway. The Council
decided to vote on the first reading,
but with the requirement removed.
The vote was 3-3, with Lorenzen,
Tony Axtell and Dennis Vandewater
voting against the amendment. At that
point, Mayor Sandra McGrath broke
the tie by voting for the amended
ordinance. The Council will now
take up the second reading at their
next meeting. As the ordinance will
now read, an SMV sign, safety flag,
adequate brakes and rear view mirror
will still be required.
A group of residents on Richards
Drive appeared at the meeting to
request maintenance for their deadend road off of Southeast Seventh
Street. There are a total of four houses
on that road. “It was never turned
over to the city, but should have been
when Dick Sadler put the street in,”
said spokesperson Nate Brockman.
“We have no snow removal or upkeep
on our street. We pay city taxes, so
would like to see the city maintain it
for us. Even just an alley would do.”
Mayor McGrath pointed out
that it’s not a platted street as such.
Brockman also stated that two
handicapped people are living there
and that raises concerns. “What
happens if an ambulance can’t get
in there, and none of us have fourwheel drive vehicles either,” said
Brockman.
Councilperson
Vandewater,
while sympathetic, told the group
he has a similar problem where he
lives. “I’m in that same situation,
and who knows how many others,”
said Vandewater. It was agreed that
the public works committee would
look at the issue and report back at a
future meeting.
Tim Moreau with V & K gave
a brief update on the DD#94 project
through the city. While he reports
nice progress, as south 10th Street
is now open again, he wished he
had better news on the Union Pacific
situation.
“Negotiations with the railroad
are not progressing as we had hoped,”
said Moreau. He then presented three
options in dealing with the crossing
of right-of-way.
The Council could either go
ahead as planned with the concrete
pipe, or go with the railroad’s proposal
to use steel pipe. The third option is
to ask FEMA for an extension of
time to continue negotiations, which
Moreau said is “really not feasible
at this point.” “The steel pipe would
result in a $6,000 deduct, but it won’t
have near the life expectancy as the
concrete will,” said Moreau. “We’ll
just be tearing it up again in 30 years,
if that.” The Council’s consensus was
to proceed as originally planned.
In other action the Council:
-approved Resolution 2014-17 for
a loan agreement and providing for
sale and issuance of G.O. Corporate
Purpose Bonds, and providing for the
levy of taxes to pay for same. UNB
Bank of Kansas City, Missouri, in
cooperation with First State Bank
of Webster City, was the successful
bidder for the bonds in the amount
of $1.450 million. The interest rate
of 2.0502 percent is considered an
extremely low rate;
-approved the first reading of
Ordinance 2014-02, which amends
the City Code pertaining to sewer
service charges. This will make it a
rate of $8 per month for each water
meter and a monthly rate of $2.57 for
each 100 cubic feet of water used per
customer plus a pro-rated amount for
each fractional amount in excess of
100.
“We haven’t had an increase
in several years,” said City
Administrator Mike Boyd. “It’s just
to keep pace with expenses;”
-approved change order #3 for
$11,500.60 for the DD#94 project,
and pay request #5 from McKiness
Excavating for $272,002.55, as
presented by Moreau. This represents
30 percent of the project now
completed;
-approved Resolution 2014-20
setting July 21 as a public hearing for
the annexation of properties into the
city;
-approved Resolution 2014-19
setting salaries for city employees for
FY14-15;
-approved fireworks permits
for Gary Lalor, Diane Jessen, Matt
Jergens and the Wright County Fair
Board;
-approved beer/liquor licenses
for Cenex Ampride, Family Table
Restaurant and Eagle Grove
Greenhouses.
Weekly Log
Friday 6/6/14
7:28 AM
Investigated reported theft at Lewright’s Meats.
8:24 AM
Responded to a domestic call behind
Eagle Laundromat.
11:21 AM
Responded to loose dog complaint.
12:53 AM
Investigated gas theft in Goldfield.
1:31 PM
Investigated theft on Parkview.
4:23 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
6:15 PM
Issued warning for speeding.
6:55 PM
Responded to complaint on Garfield.
7:29 PM
Follow-up investigation on theft.
8:14 PM
Patrolled Goldfield and stopped at
Crossroads.
8:23 PM
Responded to complaint of noisy
neighbor on West Broadway.
9:35 PM
Stopped a vehicle for no plates.
9:48 PM
Ran radar on Cedar Street.
10:01 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
11:32 PM
Responded to complaint on East
Broadway.
11:37 PM
Responded to complaint on attempted break-in at residence on Northeast
Fourth. Unable to locate anyone in the
area.
11:53 PM
Investigated a DHS case at residence
on East Broadway.
Saturday 6/7/14
4:32 AM
Patrolled Goldfield and ran radar.
9:30 AM
Assisted Lions Club at Broadway &
Commercial.
10:51 AM
Assisted another agency concerning
car parked on tracks.
12:12 AM
Conducted door checks at Emerson
Building.
12:59 AM
Responded to complaint of loud noise
from house on South Commercial. Told
them to shut down music for the night.
12:12 PM
Assisted another agency at car-deer
accident.
3:04 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
3:11 PM
Responded to dog complaint on South
Eastern.
6:50 PM
Issued warning for brake light out.
7:20 PM
Issued warning for brake light out.
8:49 PM
Responded to erratic driver complaint
on Highway 17 south. Turned onto another road. Unable to locate.
9:18 PM
Responded to noise complaint on
Northwest Second. Kids playing.
9:38 PM
Patrolled Goldfield and ran radar.
Sunday 6/8/14
2:38 AM
Patrolled Goldfield and ran radar.
8:36 AM
Patrolled Goldfield.
1:51 PM
Responded to loose dog complaint on
West Broadway.
8:42 PM
Issued warning for brake light out.
8:47 PM
Responded to noise complaint on
West Broadway. Construction taking
place. They will stop for the night.
Monday 6/9/14
12:45 AM
Ran radar on Commercial.
1:25 AM
Patrolled Goldfield. Subject found at
River Park. County took him to Renwick.
5:29 AM
Responded to alarm at Feed Mill Office.
11:10 AM
Responded to report of suspicious van
vicinity of Southeast First & Blaine. Unable to locate.
11:33 AM
Located van driver. He was looking
for a friend.
6:20 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
7:31 PM
Attempted to serve warrant on resident. Told us on phone he would turn
himself in.
8:24 PM
Issued warning for no plate and taillight out.
8:38 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
10:43 PM
Responded to noise complaint at residence. Advised occupant to stop hammering.
Tuesday 6/10/14
2:17 AM
Patrolled Goldfield.
3:40 AM
Conducted door checks on Main.
12:09 PM
Responded to complaint of kids with
fireworks on Northeast Fourth. Father
arrived at same time.
1:48 PM
Follow-up at Lewrights. Found out
cart was left in a store.
2:08 PM
Found an open window at vacant
house on Northeast First. House was
secure.
4:15 PM
Went on bike patrol.
4:34 PM
Follow-up at residence on Oak Street
in Goldfield concerning loud music
complaint.
5:47 PM
Responded to out of control 7-year
old at residence.
6:38 PM
Attempted to serve papers at residence
on Northeast Third.
6:50 PM
Arrested Sean McMillan for driving
while barred.
7:34 PM
Responded to loose dog complaint.
Unable to locate.
8:12 PM
Attempted to serve papers at same
residence.
8:31 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
9:22 PM
Issued warning for speeding and following too closely.
9:24 PM
Responded to dog complaint by bus
barn in Goldfield.
9:30 PM
Issued warning for no lights on.
9:40 PM
Issued warning for taillight out and no
insurance.
9:55 PM
Issued warning for headlight out.
10:06 PM
Puppy found in Goldfield. Taken to
Vet Office.
Wednesday 6/11/14
12:37 AM
Issued warning for no headlights on.
A consent to search vehicle found nothing.
1:11 AM
Responded to complaint of fireworks
at Jaycee Park. Unable to locate.
3:19 AM
Conducted door checks on Main.
4:31 AM
Patrolled Goldfield.
7:12 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
8:05 PM
Served papers at residence on Northeast Third.
9:54 PM
Responded to complaint on North
Wright of someone yelling out window
of van.
Thursday 6/12/14
1:46 AM
Responded to alarm at Lewright’s.
3:17 AM
Responded to verbal argument at residence on East Broadway.
7:28 PM
Responded to complaint of barking dog on Southwest Second. Advised
owner that next time he would be cited.
8:51 PM
Responded to complaint of loose dog
on North Wright. Taken to Vet Clinic.
10:00 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
11:12 PM
Responded to complaint at Kirkwood
Apartments.
11:53 PM
Patrolled Goldfield.
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EaglE grovE EaglE
Jennifer’s
produce
Tidbits
Welcome back to another week of
Produce Tidbits. This week I would
like to talk about blueberries (a
favorite of mine on my cereal, or in
my yogurt).
Blueberries are actually native
to North America. They are
sometimes also known as bilberries
or whortleberries, but not to be
confused with the huckleberry.
Blueberries have been used
through the years for many different
medicinal purposes—from curing
a cough, abdominal problems, to
even used as a laxative. Blueberries
have also been used in the past for
clothing dye, because of their rich
blue color.
Until 1822, blueberries were
picked by hand. It was then that
Abijah Tabbutt from Maine invented
a blueberry rake to speed up the
picking process.
Blueberries are rich in antioxidants,
which help prevent cancer-causing
cell damage, as well as vitamins
A, C, E, beta-carotene, potassium,
magnesium, and manganese, too.
Blueberries are high in fiber and low
in fat, cholesterol, and also sodium.
America’s favorite kind of muffin is
the blueberry muffin, of course!
When choosing your berries,
choose those that are deep blue
in color, as they will not ripen any
further after they have been picked.
Avoid packages with watery juice
in the bottom of the container. This
indicates that they are past their
point of prime goodness.
Store your blueberries in the
refrigerator and do not wash them
until you’re ready to use them.
Blueberries can be frozen for up to a
year in the freezer.
Don’t forget to check out the
great price we have on packages
of blueberries in our produce
department at Fareway, where we are
ALWAYS BEST AT FRESH! Have
a super fantastic week and until next
time, good-bye!
summer food
program menu
Breakfast - 8:15-9:15
MON.: Pancake, sausage on a
stick, juice, and milk.
TUES.: Breakfast pizza, juice,
and milk.
WED.: Biscuits and gravy, juice,
and milk.
THURS.: Donut, yogurt, juice,
and milk.
FRI.: Cereal, toast, juice, and
milk.
lunch - 11:15-12:15
MON.: Chicken nuggets, green
beans, pears, and milk.
TUES.: Cheeseburger, tomato,
pickle, and onion, Sunchips, peaches,
and milk.
WED.: Crispito, orange wedge,
corn, salsa, and milk.
THURS.: Pizza, lettuce salad,
ranch cup, fruit cocktail, and milk.
FRI.: Hot dog, chips, carrot sticks,
apple, and milk.
NOTE: Free meals are for
children two - 18. Adults can eat too,
but they are NOT free. Adult meal
prices are $3.25 for lunch and $2.00
for breakfast.
Do you scrapbook?
We can make copies
up to 12x12 for you!
4-H neWs
Wright Warriors meet
The monthly meeting of the Wright
Warriors 4-H club was held Saturday,
June 14. At this meeting we had so
many presentations to do that both
Rachel Clagett and Michael Clagett
presented before the meeting started.
President Danielle Koester then
called the meeting to order at 12:17
p.m, and Leslie Cooper then led the
club in the Pledge of Allegiance.
The Rotary Home Activities
group reported that the next day we
would be going out there would be
Wednsday, June 25 at 1:30 pm. All
club members are invited to come.
The HOPES committee reported
that the 4-H Club would be
purchasing a fair packet for the
family. They will receive buttons to
use at the fair as well as tickets to
ride the rides, coupons, and more.
For the Leader Dog Project,
Hannah Demory and Maggie
Wachowiak took name suggestions
for the new leader dog. If it’s a boy
they decided that the name would be
Lucky, and if it’s a girl they decided
that the name would be Lilly.
In old business, the club was
reminded to check their hanging
folders as their are still some fair
books in there. A reminder that
Achievement Day is Friday, June 25
at 1 p.m. Please make an attempt to
be there, even if your project isn’t
finished you can still get some good
input on it.
In new business, the club found
out that our club’s judging time for
exhibits is on Tuesday, July 8 from
10:30 to 11:30 a.m. Come around
10:15 in case you can get a judge
early. The club was also told that
you must wear a 4-H or fair shirt
to show animals at the fair, and it
is preferred that you wear one on
judging day too. Another reminder
to pick up fair exhibits at 5 p.m. on
Sunday, July 15. Nothing can be
taken before 5 p.m.
This year, our club is in charge
of cleaning up the Exhibit Building
after the fair. Be there at 5:15 p.m.
Remember, this is for all members to
do, not just some.
At our next meeting we will have
a record book work shop for those
wanting help, but there will be no
club meeting until September.
During comments from Phyllis,
Phyllis brought fair materials such
as goal tags and goal sheets. If
you have not yet received these
fair materials you may stop by her
house and get them. Everyone was
reminded that if you are showing an
animal at the fair make sure you are
working with them.
Alana Moris led the club in the
4-H Pledge and President Danielle
Koeater adjourned the meeting at
12:57 p.m. Snacks were brought
by Kelly Jo Ttoler and drinks were
provided by Lizzie Hogrefe and
Peyton Larsen.
The club then
finished giving presentation, the
presenters being Joseph Tilley, Kelly
Jo Toler, and Thomas Matthes. After
presentations were given, the club
finished off their busy meeting with
fun workshops to attend.
The
Bridal
Registry
Leah Sadler
& Jeremy Rachu
June 21, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Abby Kingery
& Jerry Wagner
June 21, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Katie White
& Chris Foster
July 12, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Beth Nelson
& Kyle Egemo
Sept. 6, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Jill Pepples
& Tim Chelesvig
Oct. 4, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Amanda Elston
& Dana Watson
Oct. 11, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Heather Crees
& Brandon Evje
Oct. 18, 2014
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
Free Gift Wrap & Delivery
A gift the couple really wants.
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nutzon'
"The Idea Store"
211 W. Broadway • 448-4425 • Eagle Grove, IA
448-4745 • 314 W. Broadway
Social NewS
eagle grove NewS
It’s a Boy!
BIRTHS
Daniel and Meghann Solis of Cherokee/Holstein, are proud to announce
the birth of a son, Zakary Li Solis, on June 10, 2014, at Iowa specialty
Hospital in Clarion. He weighed 8 pounds 7 ounces. He joins Niklas, 7,
Matheu, 6, and Tretyn, 3.
Grandparents are Rey and Maggie Solis of Clarion, and Dennis and Ann
Gries of Holstein. Great-grandparents are Larry and Jan Conlon of Clarion,
Belia Solis of Brownsville, Texas, and Joseph Kace of Floodwood, Minn.
It’s a Girl!
Jeff and Genevieve Clemens of Garner are proud to announce the birth of
a daughter, Lillian Karol Clemens, born on June 11, 2014, at Iowa Specialty
Hospital in Clarion. She weighed 7 pounds. She joins a brother, Jason
Clemens, 16.
Grandparents are Rusty and Carol Clemens, Ventura, and Karren and the
late Dean Stephens of Clear Lake. Great-grandparents are Bonnie Sheets of
Goldfield, and Charlie Clemens of Ventura.
Rotary Senior Living Auxiliary holds June
birthday party
Rotary Senior Living Auxiliary held the June birthday party on Monday,
June 9. Those celebrating birthdays in the North Building were Shelly Gill
and Robert Hansen. Those celebrating birthdays in the South Building
were Marie Manning, Lorene Meier, and Mary Jane Spangler. Margaret
Williamson, Auxiliary member, provided a bouquet of flowers for each one
from her flower garden. Dean Anderson provided entertainment for the South
Building. Geraldine Sutter provided piano music for the North Building.
Auxiliary members helping with the birthday party were Jan Trepp, Jackie
Habben, Evelyn Wergeland, Donna Madson, Blanche Bosteder, and Bev
Jacobson.
Catholic Daughters of the Americas meet
The Catholic Daughters of the Americas met Tuesday evening, June 10, at
the Sacred Heart Center. The rosary was recited followed by a potluck meal
and a meeting.
Officers for the coming year were installed. They are: Miriam Hart, grand
regent; Mary Lindstrom, vice regent; Loretta Moon, recording secretary;
Maureen Thielen, treasurer; and Judy Frakes, financial secretary. The
memorial crosses were placed at the grave sites of deceased members over
the Memorial Day weekend. Pauline Turner, Muriel Gearhart, Pat Johnston,
and Bonnie Govern will serve on the appeals committee. They will meet and
submit a report at the September meeting. The Yearbook Committee will
meet August 4, to set up the meal committees and programs for the coming
year. The next meeting will be in September.
4-H neWs
Liberty Pathfinders meet
The Liberty Pathfinders 4-H Club met Sunday, June 1, 2014, at the Goldfield
United Presbyterian Church with 13 members and 10 visitors present.
President Sarah Rasmussen called the meeting to order. Peyten Rasmussen
led us in the Pledge of Allegiance. The minutes of the May meeting were
read and approved. There was a thank you from Teen Council. Treasurer
report was given. There were no bills.
Michelle Mericle made a motion for the fair booth decorating committee
to meet June 8 and 29, at 6 p.m., to work on decorations. It was seconded
by Garrett Seaba.
Forms were available for fair entries. They will also be available at the
July meeting.
Judging of State Fair exhibits will be Tuesday, July 8, from 8:30-9:30
a.m.
Sign-up sheets to work at the food stand, pop stand, and to host the exhibit
building were available. We need everyone’s help.
Check your 4-H newsletter for workshops, deadline dates, web-sites for
forms, etc.
The next meeting will be Sunday, July 6, 2014, 6 p.m., at the Goldfield
United Presbyterian Church.
Jarika Eisentrager made the motion to adjourn the meeting, and it was
seconded by Blaire Rasmussen.
The group enjoyed presentations by Katherine Soenen, Mia Toomsen,
Emily Rasmussen, and Garrett Seaba.
Blaire Rasmussen led the 4-H Pledge.
Lunch was served by Shanee Tate and Mia Toomsen.
Blaire Rasmussen, Secretary
RETIREMENT FARM AUCTION
6 miles WesT of HampTon, ia on HWy 3, 2 ½ miles
souTH on indigo ave, or from THe laTimer-CoulTer
Corner on HWy 3, 1 ½ miles easT To indigo ave & 2 ½
miles souTH To 1152 indigo ave
Thursday June 26, 2014 • 10:30 aM
Lunch served by Jessica’s Country Kitchen
TRACTORS, LOADERS,
SKIDSTEER
2008 8430 JD MFWD, R50 duals,
SFI Star Fire ITC Receiver w/brown
box, 1476 hrs.
2004 6420 JD premium MFWD
w/cab sold w/ 640 JD loader, 1707
hrs.
1997 8100 JD MFWD, w/42” JD
duals, 3980 hrs.
1988 JD 4450 2WD, power shift,
6361 hrs.
1993 Bob Cat 742B gas skid loader, 36 HP, 2 buckets, 1450 hrs.
COMBINE, HEADS, HEAD
TRAILER
2009 JD 9570 STS Combine,
21.5 auger, 30.5-32, Mauer ext,
782/1166 hrs.
2009 606C 6-30 poly corn hd.
2010 25’ JD 625F full fing flex
hd.
Unverferth small whl hd trailer.
PLANTER, SPRAYER
2007 12-30 JD 1760 Vac planter, 3
bus boxes, trash whip, Proshaft, 350
comp trak mon, hyd wing fold.
1000 gal Sprayer Specialties pull
sprayer, 60’ boom, 12.4-38, Raven
460.
GRAIN CART, WAGONS
2011 Brent 678 grain cart.
4 - 544 Brents & gears
500 Parker 2 dr
300 Dakon w/ hyd auger
TILLAGE EQUIPMENT
2009 30’ 9” 2310 JD Mulch finisher, 6 bar spike harrow.
2008 12’6” JD 512 Disk ripper
Lots more
PICTURES ON THE WEB
oWners - Boyd & irene dohrmann
1152 Indigo Ave, Hampton, IA • Home phone 641-866-6741 • Cell phone 515-460-3849
auCTioneers:
eugene & michael ryerson
515-448-3079
www.ryersonauctionrealtyltd.com
ClerKs:
ryerson auction realty, ltd.
eagle grove, ia
Nobody brings you hometowN
coverage like the eagle Grove eagle!
Thursday, June 19, 2014
5
udmo needs families to
preregister for the Back
to school program!
School just ended and Upper Des
Moines Opportunity, Inc. is busy
planning their annual Back to School
program. This program provides
backpacks and school supplies to
low-income children in Wright
County who are in grades Pre-K to
12th.
Income-eligible families must
preregister for the Back to School
program by completing an application
at the UDMO Outreach Office,
which is located at 221 W. Broadway,
Eagle Grove. Preregistration will
begin on June 23 and end on July 25.
Office hours are Monday, Tuesday,
Thursday, and Friday from 9 a.m. to
4 p.m. The office closes for lunch
from Noon to 1 p.m.
This year’s Back to School event
will be held on August 4, from 3:30
to 5 p.m., at Memorial Hall, located
at 200 S. Park Ave. Eagle Grove.
Preregistered,
income-eligible
families may pick up their children’s
backpacks and supplies at this event.
There will also be various providers
from the community present with
information on additional resources
and programs available for families.
A light snack will be provided to
families who are attending.
Donations of school supplies or
monetary donations can be delivered
or mailed to the UDMO office,
located at 221 West Broadway, Eagle
Grove, IA 50533. If you have any
questions or concerns, please contact
UDMO at (515) 448-3704.
wright County
residents with
substantial property
damage from June
16 storms asked to
contact their City hall
Severe weather moved through
Wright County last evening causing
damage to trees, power outages and
flooded roadways to several areas of
the county.
Strong winds and possibly a
tornado included in the storms,
caused significant damage to
property and trees in the rural areas
NE of Woolstock as well an area NE
of Belmond.
Wright County Sheriff’s Office,
Secondary Roads and Emergency
Management have been out this
morning assessing the damage and
will provide information to the
National Weather Service for their
storm surveys as well.
Residents with substantial
property damage are asked to report
the damage to their local City Hall.
Rural residents can provide their
information to the Wright County
Communications Center at 515-5322610.
“Given the extent of some of the
damage we’ve seen, we are fortunate
that no one was injured in these
storms,” said Wright County Sheriff
Jason Schluttenhofer.
Wright County Emergency
Management Coordinator Jim Lester
would like to remind Wright County
residents that they can opt-in to
receive CodeRed Weather Warnings
to receive important severe weather
warnings for their geographical
location.
To sign up for CodeRed in
Wright County visit the county’s
website www.wrightcounty.org and
click on the CodeRed link near the
bottom of the page.
eagle grove Weather
Date
June 9
June 10
June 11
June 12
June 13
June 14
June 15
Total Precip. for Week:
High
73
73
82
73
80
75
80
Low
55
57
52
61
46
59
68
Precip.
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
.00
AFTERNOON EsTATE AUCTION
Located one North on Hwy 17 North of Eagle Grove, go West on
250th St. 1½ miles to Calhoun continue on West on 250th St. go
right on Buchanan to 2438 Buchanan Ave.
Wednesday, June 25, 2014 • 4:P.M.
Lunch served by Jessica’s Country Kitchen
moBile Home: (Buyer is responsible for Paperwork) 1970’s
Marshfield Manor 60’ Trailer Home on gear. Buyer has 14 Days
to remove
Car: 1991 Chevy Lumina runs 4 door sedan
laWn garden & sHop: Craftsman Automatic 42” cut 19 ½ HP
Briggs & Stratton engine twin cylinder lawn mower, 524 MTD 2
stage snow blower, rubber wheeled wheelbarrow, bikes, 100 gal.
fuel barrel, garden tools, old table saw, Hand tools, Agri Fab tin
two wheel garden trailer, tire chains, come along, Black & Decker
tool chest
applianCes: Whirlpool Washer/ Dryer(gas), Amana 18 Cu. Ft.
refrigerator/freezer, Tappan 30” gas stove, Norge upright 14 Cu.
Ft. freezer, sm. wood cook stove, Maytag 18 Cu. Ft. refrigerator/
freezer
furniTure: Floral sofa, 2 ladies La-Z-Boy recliners, table
lamps, end tables, entertainment center, twin bed, desks, electric
lift chair (tan), Oak rockers, commode 1920’s, wood drying rack,
tin cupboards, Modern Oak Buffet, Oak parlor table, Oak library
table, wood high chair, flex steel sofa, 3 pc. dark finish double
bed set, waterfall dark finish cedar chest, 3pc. Walnut double bed
set, 3 pc. Maple double bed set, Ash wash stand, cast iron school
desks, 1940’s baby stroller
anTiques & ColleCTiBles: 4 wheel gas engine cart w/
tongue, Brass lard tin, Clock & parts, fruit jars, cookie jar, Boyd’s
Bears, Singer sewing Machine in case, bedding
Terms: Cash or good Check. not responsible for accidents or Thefts.
OwNER - OwNER: wIlMA ThOMpsON EsTATE
EAglE gROvE, IOwA
michael ryerson & assoc. auctioneers
eagle Grove, Iowa • 515-689-3728
www.ryersonauctionrealtyltd.com
6
ChurCh News
Praise & worshiP
Thursday, June 19, 2014
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH
Eagle Grove
Pastor Mike Agnew
448-4701
DIAL-A-DEVOTION: 448-3355
http://www.eaglegroveumc.org
SUNDAY:
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
11:30 a.m. Fellowship Hour
NO Sunday School
GOLDFIELD UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH
Pastor Christina M. Perkins
Goldfield, Ph: 515-825-3754
THURSDAY:
9-11:30 a.m. Pastor at Goldfield
11:30 a.m. Soup and Scripture
6-8 p.m. Support/Recovery Group at
Crossroads
SUNDAY:
9 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship
5:30-7 p.m. CHAOS
MONDAY:
9 a.m.-Noon Pastor Christina at
Goldfield
TUESDAY:
9 a.m.-Noon Pastor Christina at
Renwick
WEDNESDAY:
9 a.m.-Noon Pastor Christina at
Renwick
GOLDFIELD UNITED
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Rev. Sara Hill, Pastor
220 E. Oak St.
Goldfield, Ph: 515-825-3581
[email protected]
www.goldfieldupc.com
THURSDAY:
9:15 a.m. TOPS #IA 1348, Goldfield,
(Take Off Pounds Sensibly), weigh-in
and meeting. Use north door. New
members always welcome!!
5:30-7 p.m. Support & Recovery for
Youth, Crossroads
7-8 p.m. Support & Recovery for
Adults, Crossroads
SATURDAY:
6-11 p.m. Relay For Life Event
(American Cancer Society) at the high
school track in Belmond. Come out and
support your church team!
SUNDAY:
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
11:30 a.m. Fellowship Coffee, East
Room
WEDNESDAY:
3 p.m. Summer Story-Time, East Room
6 p.m. Supper’s On! A free meal for
the community, held at this church.
Join us!
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
Rev. Dr. Fran Pettigrew
Eagle Grove, Ph: 448-4612
SUNDAY:
8:30 a.m. Sunday School
9:30 a.m. Fellowship
10 a.m. Worship Service
TUESDAY:
10 a.m. Bible Study
HOLMES BAPTIST CHURCH
2137 Hancock Ave.
Holmes, Iowa
Zach Fischer, Pastor
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Sunday School
10:30 a.m. Worship Service
6 p.m. Evening Service
WEDNESDAY:
7 p.m. Prayer Meeting
7 p.m. Souled Out - Youth Group
7 p.m. Kids Club for ages 4 to 6thgrade
EAGLE GROVE
UNITED CHURCH OF CHRIST
(CONGREGATIONAL)
Ph: 448-3584
Everyone is Welcome!
Building fully
Accessible to the Disabled
Pastor Jim Cunningham
THURSDAY:
Articles due for the July/August
Newsletter
SATURDAY:
5 p.m. New Hope Lutheran Church
Sunday
SUNDAY:
9:30 a.m. Worship
10:30 a.m. Fellowship
MONDAY:
8 a.m. - 5 p.m. WIC
GRACE EVANGELICAL FREE
CHURCH
Ph: 448-5414
Sunday Worship - 9 a.m.
Sunday School - 10:45 a.m.
www.graceefc.com
SOUTH ENES LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Susan Stone
205 Johnson Street
Vincent
515-293-2965
FRIDAY:
9 a.m. Gather Bible Study at the
Family Table (3rd Friday of the month)
SUNDAY:
9 a.m. Sunday School
10 a.m. Worship
GOLDFIELD
ACCESS NETWORK
GAN
536 N. Main
Goldfield, IA 50542
515-825-3996
SACRED HEART
CATHOLIC CHURCH
Eagle Grove, Ph: 603-4765
Fr. Nils Hernandez
THURSDAY:
8 a.m. Mass, at Sacred Heart, Eagle
Grove
SATURDAY: HAITI COLLECTION
WEEKEND
4 p.m. Mass at St. Francis Xavier,
Belmond
8 p.m. Spanish Mass at St. John,
Clarion
SUNDAY: HAITI COLLECTION
WEEKEND
8 a.m. Mass at St. John, Clarion
10:10 a.m. Rosary at Sacred Heart,
Eagle Grove
10:30 a.m. Mass at Sacred Heart, Eagle
Grove
TUESDAY:
NO Care Center Mass at Eagle Grove
9:30 a.m. Rosary at South Rotary
Senior Living at Eagle Grove
10 a.m. Rosary at North Rotary Senior
Living at Eagle Grove
SAMUEL EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Rich Taylor
Eagle Grove, Ph: 448-5038
FRIDAY:
9 a.m. Bible Study
SUNDAY:
8:30 a.m. Contemporary Worship
THURSDAY:
9:30 a.m. Newsletter Assembly at
Samuel
10 a.m. Pastors’ Prayer
HOLMES EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Rich Taylor
Holmes
FRIDAY:
9 a.m. Bible Study at Samuel Lutheran
SUNDAY:
10 a.m. Worship
THURSDAY:
9:30 a.m. Newsletter Assembly at
Samuel
10 a.m. Pastors’ Prayer
NEW HOPE LUTHERAN CHURCH
Pastor Susan Stone
1115 SW 2nd
Eagle Grove
515-603-6151
FRIDAY:
9 a.m. Gather Bible Study at the
Family Table (3rd Friday of the month)
SATURDAY:
5 p.m. Worship Service
A Congregation of ELCA
ULLENSVANG LUTHERAN
CHURCH
Pastor Darryl Landsverk
Thor
SUNDAY:
11 a.m. Worship with Food Pantry
Ingathering
LAKE LUTHERAN CHURCH
GOLDFIELD
LCMC
Lutheran Congregations in Mission
for Christ
Pastor Truman Larson
SUNDAY:
9 a.m. Worship
10:15 a.m. Sunday School
MT. CALVARY LUTHERAN
CHURCH—LC-MS
EAGLE GROVE
Pastor Mark Peterson
Ph: 515-448-4668
SUNDAY:
8:30 a.m. Worship Service
EAGLE GROVE EVANGELICAL
LUTHERAN CHURCH
615 SW 2nd Street
Eagle Grove, Iowa
Pastor Jason Cooper
Phone: 515-448-3697
www.eaglegrovelutheran.com
THURSDAY:
NEWSLETTER DEADLINE
10 a.m. Pastors’ Prayer
1:30 p.m. ELCW Bible Study
SATURDAY:
9 a.m. Men’s Bible Study at EGELC
SUNDAY:
9 a.m. Worship
10 a.m. Fellowship Coffee
5:30 p.m. Worship
MONDAY:
5:30 p.m. Worship on Cable – CH12
TUESDAY:
9 a.m. Small Group Bible Study at
Family Table
7 p.m. Evangelism/Social Ministry
WEDNESDAY:
9 a.m. Bible Study at EGELC
CROSSROADS
Christian Youth Center
Corner of Chestnut and Main,
Goldfield
515-825-3383
FRIDAY & SATURDAY:
7 - 9 p.m. 8th-Grade and Under
7 – Midnight - 9-12th Grade and
College
Goldfield, IA
50542
515.825.3181
This Church Page
message is brought to you by
these fine sponsors.
EAGLE GROVE MINISTERIAL
ASSOCIATION FOOD PANTRY
510 S. Jackson
Monday, Wednesday, & Friday,
1 – 3 p.m.
Helping Families in Need!
Joyful Noyz to
perform
Sunday morning, June 29, at 10
a.m., the Eagle Grove First Baptist
Church, 1210 Commercial Ave.,
will have Joyful Noyz, a Gospel trio,
perform during the worship service.
Everyone is invited to come and
enjoy the music.
Fri., June 20: Chicken tortilla
bake, beets or layered lettuce, hot
fruit compote, chocolate chip bar,
and orange juice.
Mon., June 23: COOK’S
CHOICE.
Tues., June 24: Lemon herb
chicken, rice pilaf, dill baby carrots,
strawberry and banana gelatin, and
tomato juice.
Wed., June 25: Salisbury ground
beef, mashed potatoes, peas, mixed
fruit, and raspberry lemonade.
Thurs., June 26: Sloppy Joe
on whole wheat bun, or crunchy
pollock, potato wedges, Brussels
sprouts, tapioca pudding, and orange
juice.
NOTE: Please return plastic
dishes if you have meals delivered.
AVOID STRESS!!
Let our expert service make your life more simple!
Specializing In:
Repair Service, Remodeling, New Construction and Pipe Thawing.
Repair all makes Appliances.
Pumps
Air
Central Air
Heating
Wiring
Conditioning
Heat Pumps
Equipment
Heating
211 W. Broadway
448-4425
EaglE grovE
After Hours call Larry at 603-3096
KNUTZON’S INC.
• COMMERCIAL • RESIDENTIAL • SERVICE ALL MAKES
Large selection
of all occasion
greeting cards
65¢
K
and up
s
nutzon'
"The Idea Store"
www.globalcn.us
310 East Broadway
Eagle Grove
Goldfield
Clarion
www.ssbankia.com
Rotary Senior Living
300 N Commercial, EG
603-6200
Hrs: Mon. - Fri. ~ 7 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Sat. ~ 8 a.m. - 10 p.m.
Sun. ~ 9 a.m. - 10 p.m.
ABENS - MARTY - CURRAN AGENCY
319 Hwy 3 East • Goldfield
515-825-3476
515-448-3856 • 866-756-2901
This space is reserved
for you!
Call 515-448-4745
to help sponsor!
F
Foust
Funeral Home
Chad D. Foust and Lisa M. Foust
Funeral Directors
620 N. Washington
103 N. CADWELL
Goldfield, IA 50542
P.O. BOX 345
515-825-3674
EAGLE GROVE, IA 50533
foustfh.com
(515) 448-3674
Psalm 27
Don’t be impatient.
Wait for the Lord.
EAGLE GROVE • 448-4321
Hours: Mon. - Thurs ~ 6 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Fri & Sat ~ 6 a.m. - 9 p.m. • Sunday ~ 7:30 a.m. - 8:30 p.m.
Ta k e o u t o r d e r s a v a i l a b l e !
Romans 12:12
Rejoice in our
confident hope.
Be patient in
trouble,
and keep praying.
Congregate Meals
211 W. Broadway • 448-4425 • Eagle Grove, IA
Grocery 515-448-3241
Meat 515-448-3526
Eagle Grove, Iowa
Celebrate your faith
at an area church
of your choice.
EaglE grovE EaglE
Eagle Grove, Iowa 50533
Complete Auto & Truck Repair
[email protected]
www.eaglegrovepharmacy.com
EAGLE GROVE
EAGLE
On our new website you can:
See the services we offer • Watch How-To Videos • Meet our Staff
Ask Mickey • Read GNP’s Monthly Publication • Access RefillRX
With RefillRX you can:
Refill Prescriptions • Track the Progress of Your Refill
Print Medicine Information guides
Eagle Pharmacy
515-448-3814
311 W. Broadway • Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Amy & Mike Wilson
(515 )851-2627
Nobody brings you
hometown news like the
Eagle Grove Eagle.
For it has been
granted to you on
behalf of Christ not
only to believe in
him, but also to
suffer for him.
Philippians 1:29 NIV
[email protected]
Let your business
name be seen
every week.
Call 448-4745 today.
Lalor Construction
Free Estimates • Professional Crew
• Family Owned - Over 40 Years • Licensed & Insured
Residential and Agricultural
• New Construction • Remodeling • Additions • Garages • Siding • Windows
• Concrete and Masonry • Plumbing • Electrical • Decks • Pole Buildings
Call Gary Lalor
Office: 515-448-5040 • Cell: 515-293-0778
Obituaries/Flashbacks
We remember Our lOved Ones
Eagle
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Charmona M. Willard, 75, Eagle Grove
Charmona Madelle Willard, the
daughter of Edward Waite and Marian
Berkland, was born December 14,
1938, in Eagle Grove, Iowa. Char
was raised in Eagle Grove by her
parents, Marian and Ivan Rengstorf,
and in the late 1980’s she was united
with her biological father, Edward
Waite.
On October 30, 1965, Char
married Bud (Louis A.) Willard in
Algona, and they had three children.
The couple made their home in
Eagle Grove except for a short time
while Bud served in the military in
California. The family shared many
great times in Myrtle Beach, South
Carolina.
Char worked for KQWC Radio
and drove taxi in Eagle Grove. She
will also be remembered for the
number of wedding, birthday, and
other special occasion cakes she
made, and her passion for quilting.
Char passed away on Sunday,
June 8, 2014, at the age of 75 years.
She was preceded in death by her
parents; son, Steven Willard; and a
very special dog, Emma.
Char is survived by her husband,
Bud Willard; son, Dave Willard and
wife, Renee; and daughter, Kathy
Willard (Rich Nicoletti), all of
Eagle Grove; four grandchildren:
Randi Willard of Des Moines,
Ashley Willard (Andrew Hawley)
of Denver, Colo., Caitlin Willard of
Fort Dodge, and Steven Willard of
Cedar Falls; brother, Ivan “Butch”
Rengstorf of Crystal, Minn.; her
dog, Emmie; and numerous nieces,
nephews, other family, and friends.
Visitation was held Wednesday,
June 11, from 5 to 7 p.m., at Foust
Funeral Home in Eagle Grove.
Memorials may be left to the
discretion of the family.
Foust Funeral Home of Eagle
Grove was in charge of arrangements.
www.foustfh.com
also very involved in local, state, and
national agricultural and political
organizations.
Bill passed away on Monday,
June 9, 2014, after a brief illness,
at the age of 83 years. He was
preceded in death by his parents;
one brother, Delbert Kuecker; and
Willis Kuecker
two sisters, Gertrude Balgeman and
Lois Kuecker.
Bill is survived by his wife of 60
years, Hope Kuecker; six children:
Susan Kuecker (Jim Graham),
Sara Kohl (Steve), Sharon Klassen
(Kirk), Barbara Fleischman (Jim),
William Kuecker (Connie), and
Benjamin Kuecker (Shavonta);
seven grandchildren; one greatgrandchild; four brothers: Kenneth
Kuecker, Kermit Kuecker, Gerald
Kuecker (Genelle), and Richard
Kuecker (Beverly); and two sisters,
Lucille Farr and Jean Gerdis (Don).
Funeral services were held at 2
p.m., Thursday, June 12, at Foust
Funeral Home in Goldfield with
Pastor Mark Peterson of Mt. Calvary
Lutheran Church in Eagle Grove
officiating.
Memorials may be left to the
discretion of the family. Hope can
be reached at: 1501 S. Main St., Apt.
6D, Clarion, IA 50525.
Foust Funeral Home of Eagle
Grove and Goldfield was in charge
of arrangements. www.foustfh.com
Verna L. Headrick, 84, Sioux Falls, So. Dak.
Verna Lucille Burras Headrick was
born on November 9, 1929, to Carl
and Berthilde (Anderson) Burras on
the family farm south of Kanawha,
Iowa.
Verna attended country
schools in Norway Township and
graduated from Eagle Grove High
School in 1947.
On August 20, 1950, Verna
was united in marriage to Junior
“Bud” Headrick. Their marriage
was a partnership of give and take,
friendship and respect, and the
foundation that forged a strong,
loving home to raise a gaggle of
girls.
In the early 50s, Verna took a
job as a waitress at Chris’ Café,
working for Chris Christopoulos.
One New Year’s Eve, Joe Floyd
of KELO called Chris and asked if
they could put together some food
for the television staff and drop it
off. Verna said no, Chris said yes.
They put it together and dropped it
off and Chris’ Catering was born.
It was the beginning of a long and
memorable career. Verna’s food
graced the tables of at least six US
Presidents, numerous musicians
and performers ranging from
Wayne Newton to Nine Inch Nails,
and everything in between, every
Lewis Store employee for decades,
and more brides and grooms than
could be counted. Her knowledge
and expertise was instrumental
in helping Great Bear Ski Area
become a thriving event center for
the City of Sioux Falls. Anyone
who ever worked with her learned
quick enough that Verna’s cooking
talents were matched by quick wit
and humor—”Don’t snitch the
food...you may have to cough that
up later.”
After her retirement in 2000,
Verna turned her talents toward
her church home of First Lutheran
where she became active in Ruth
Circle. Verna and her friends spent
countless hours serving food at The
Banquet, assembling baby layette
kits to ship overseas, preparing
for the annual church bazaar, and
Verna Headrick
sharing God’s word and fellowship
at Southridge Nursing Home. She
treasured her time spent with the First
Lutheran quilters and the men who
worked in the basement workshop.
Verna loved participating in many
activities offered at church, such as
Senior Ministries, Altar Guild, and
Bible Study. Her family lovingly
referred to her as “The Church
Lady.” She formed treasured and
Week of June 19
50 Years Ago
Local FBLA Chapter is rated
fourth in the nation.
Cec Dunn is named vicepresident of Iowa Growthland.
Eagle Grove anticipates 70
visitors for their fifth annual
Salesmen’s Day.
Girl Scout Day Camp is held
at Sportsmen Park south of
EAgle grove with 70 girls from
nine troops registered.
faithful friendships that carried her
through her final years.
Verna L. Headrick died Friday,
June 6, 2014, at the Hospice Unit of
Avera Prince of Peace Retirement
Community in Sioux Falls, South
Dakota, at the age of 84 years, 6
months, and 27 days.
Survivors include five daughters:
Georgia (Jim) Tirrel, Jill (Peter)
Lerdal, Jane “Lucy” (Calvin)
Welbig, Joan Headrick (Greg
Steele), and Jennifer (Cal) Morse;
14 grandchildren; 25 greatgrandchildren;
sisters,
Cora
Spangler of Eagle Grove, and Opal
Neese of Creston; and one brother,
Roger (Dorothy) Burras of Clarion;
numerous nieces and nephews, and
many treasured, forever friends.
Preceeding her in death were her
parents; her husband, Bud; their
firstborn daughter, Cynthia; sister,
Arlene Burres; and brothers, Stanley,
Irving, Carroll, and Raymond.
Funeral services were held on
Monday, June 9, at 10:30 a.m., at
the First Lutheran Church in Sioux
Falls, So. Dak., with Reverend
Barbara Wangsness officiating, and
Reverend Natanael Lizarazo giving
the sermon. Interment was held
at Hills of Rest Memorial Park in
Sioux Falls.
Our lives have been forever
blessed by our mother’s words,
lessons, and love. We are so very
thankful to have had the chance to
see how her life has blessed all those
she has encountered. We offer our
humble and simple thank you’s for
your kindness and support.
The Headrick Girls from Brandon
Paul D. Tokheim, CLU, LUTCF
[email protected]
them to: [email protected]
25 Years Ago
Bill and Carole Ristau of
310 S. Jackson win Chamber’s
Beautiful Lawn Contest.
Supervisors say “no” to
earthquake insurance.
Ernie Kell celebrates 100
years of a good life in Eagle
Grove.
10 Years Ago
Eagle Grove takes
options for bike trail.
land
New Eagle Grove Fire
Department recruits LuAnne
Pedersen and Janice Lalor are
featured in an article.
Wright County disaster drill
is held at Eagle Grove High
School.
5 Years Ago
Eagle Grove celebrates
Junction Days instead of
Summerfest
Wright County housing assessment underway
[email protected]
Willis “Bill” J. Kuecker, 83, Eagle Grove
Willis “Bill” John Kuecker, the
son of Edward and Ida (Siems)
Kuecker, was born January 19, 1931,
on the family farm near Whittemore,
Iowa. He was raised and educated
in the area of his birth, graduating
from Algona High School in 1949.
Bill then graduated from Iowa State
University, where he pledged Alpha
Gamma Rho.
Bill served in the United States Air
Force in Korea, and was Honorably
Discharged on April 25, 1955.
In March of 1954, Bill was united
in marriage with Hope Moellering,
and to this union six children were
born. They were a very hardworking, committed farm family.
They raised livestock and numerous
specialty crops, including pumpkins,
gourds, strawberries, asparagus, and
of course, the “famous” Kuecker
Sweet Corn! He was a gregarious
early proponent of conservation
tillage and locally produced foods.
Bill was an active member of
Mount Calvary Lutheran Church –
Missouri Synod Lutheran. He was
Flashbacks
bY mAtt voigts
Charmona Willard
7
On June 16, Matt Mullins, Vice
President of Maxfield Research, met
with 20 local interested stakeholders
in the Wright County Supervisors’
chambers for a kick-off meeting
concerning a county-wide housing
assessment study the Minneapolisbased firm has been contracted to
produce.
The study was proposed and
discussed extensively at local
governmental and other board
meetings throughout April and May.
Initiated by Wright County Economic
Development (WCED), it will cost
around $15,000 that was raised from
WCED, the County Supervisors,
the County’s city governments,
Mankato-based developer Shrom
Construction, and others. Maxfield
Research produces around 100
housing studies per year, including
recent ones in Iowa’s Henry County
and Iowa Falls.
The report will assess the
housing needs and wants of potential
Wright County residents, providing
hard data for discussions that have
heretofore mostly been rooted in
anecdote. The study will offer
projections into 2025 on housing
types and price points supportable
by Wright County’s communities. At
the meeting, the assembled voiced
concerns commonly expressed
throughout the last few months about
the County’s aging housing stock and
local businesses’ new hires opting to
live out of county, which have been
implicitly verbally linked in much
local conversation.
“You’re going to help us get a
developer, right?” said Bob Malloy
– President of Wright County
Economic Development Board and
attorney for the City of Goldfield –
expressing a bottom-line concern,
lamenting that in contrast to now,
“25 years ago developers would put
up spec houses.”
Mullins was careful to phrase
developers’ reluctance in terms of
the gaps between costs and potential
PASS TIME
IN LINE.
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50542
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financial returns. “It’s a planning
document and a marketing piece,”
he said of the study’s uses. “It’s up
to the city authorities [and other
involved locals] to go out and pitch
that piece.”
“Conservatively, we’ve found
it spot-on,” said developer Troy
Schrom of Maxfield’s research,
suggesting that their assessment
would be taken to heart by potential
developers. “You see community
involvement in the area here,” he
said of Wright County, stating that
the enthusiasm of local boards and
businesses interested him in pursuing
developments here.
To make its community more
attractive to home builders, the City
of Eagle Grove recently earmarked
40 dilapidated properties for
demolition. The City of Clarion
has been in the process of revising
its rental ordinances, and created
non-profit developer i2i to ready
23 lots of White Fox Landing for
development. Two of those lots were
sold at an auction on April 5 with
another designated for construction
of a spec home.
Mullins said the study will seek
to answer three major questions:
- “What is your existing housing
stock?”
- “What are your housing
needs?”
- “How can you implement a
plan?”
Mullins asked those gathered
what the County does particularly
well with housing, amid vocalized
concerns of “lack of inventory all
around.” “We’ve got some great
landlords,” said Dave Maxheimer
of i2i and Hagie Manufacturing
suggesting a positive in Wright
County’s favor.
While the room mostly voiced
concern on drawing families and
expanding businesses, Mullins
noted the long-term challenges for
communities like Clarion is the
aging of Baby Boomers, the “Senior
Tsunami” coming between 2020
and 2030. “As people downsize,
what do they want?” he said of
challenges facing retirees. For the
Millennial generation, Mullins said
that they “grew up with the Internet,
have fewer siblings, and are used to
their own rooms,” and that while
“previous generations” may have
been used to purchasing first homes
that are older properties with repairs
needed (properties with “deferred
maintenance”), many Millenials
“desire newer housing stock right off
the bat.”
Supervisor Stan Watne noted
that opening lots to development
does not necessarily guarantee
that “young people” will want to
move to the area. “They’re used to
switching jobs and they like where
they [already] live,” he said of the
Millenials’ apparent desire to remain
in communities outside Wright
County.
The median year of construction
of homes in Wright County is 1938.
The County’s median household
income averaged from 2008-2012 is
$45,713.
The room also suggested
that Wright County’s situation
is strongly shaped by its relative
geographic isolation. “[They’re]
going to be bedroom communities,
or they’re going to have some type of
draws [such as a lake],” said LeeAnn
Waltzing, when the room was asked
for a potential community to serve
as a point of comparison. Brad
Hicks, WCED Director, and Duane
Asbe, Clarion City Councilperson,
named Osage as a town potentially
comparably to Wright County’s in
size and challenges that appeared to
be doing well.
“We’ll be spending the next two
months plus doing field research,”
Mullins said of where the project will
continue, saying Maxfield will call
and interview “property managers,
property
owners,
developers,
builders – anyone affiliated with the
housing market,” as well as renters
and potential homeowners.
8
Public Notice
Thursday, June 19, 2014
PUBLIC NOTICE
City Council Minutes
United Teacher Associates Ins., ins.
EAGLE GROVE REGULAR
premium ..............................................12.90
COUNCIL MEETING
Unitypoint Health, EMS tier ...................198.00
JUNE 2, 2014
UPS, shipping charges ............................17.78
Mayor McGrath called the meeting to order
at 7 p.m. with council members Vandewater,
Vantagepoint Transfer Agents 4, ICMA
Swalin, Axtell, Johnson, and Lorenzen present.
Retirement .........................................375.00
Also present: City Administrator Boyd and City
Veenstra & Kimm Inc., DD94 Inv
Attorney Legvold.
7, 8 & 9 .........................................28,052.31
A motion was made by Axtell, and seconded
Veenstra & Kimm Inc., other project ...3,675.00
by Lorenzen, to approve the consent agenda,
Verizon, cell phones ..............................569.66
which includes the May 19th minutes, Building
VFW, flags .............................................140.00
Permit Report, and claims. Roll Call Vote: All
Payroll Checks..................................31,536.04
ayes.
Previously Written:
Advanced Systems, copier maint. .........140.47
Visa, Police Academy, lodging, supplies &
Aflac, Aflac-After Tax .............................215.72
uniforms..........................................1,521.61
Airgas USA LLC, April invoices
Fund Totals:
not paid..............................................185.63
General .............................................74,408.47
Bankers Trust, Bond, Interest,
Road Use..........................................15,817.45
reg. fees .....................................314,465.00
Employee Benefits..............................7,257.66
Bomgaars, grass seed, etc. ...................967.40
Local Option Sales Tax .......................2,640.00
Nathan Brockman, mileage to mtgs. .....148.40
Debt Service ...................................314,465.00
Central Iowa Distributing, inverted paint ..74.55
DD94 & San. Sw Project ..................28,052.31
City - Flexible Benefits Accou,
Water ................................................20,282.43
Flex Benefit .......................................273.00
Water Capital Improvement ................1,035.00
City of Eagle Grove, Health-pre-tax....1,487.77
Sewer ...............................................16,892.21
Dearborn National Life Ins., Life ins. .....127.20
Sewer Capital Improvement ...............2,793.00
Dr. Mike Moffitt, Dental-Brockman .........230.00
Risk Mng./Serlf-Ins ................................230.00
Eagle Building Supply, window
Building Permits: Jack McGonegle, 1208
replacement.......................................769.46
SW 3rd St., Driveway; Michael Throntvent, 214
Eagle Grove Greenhouse, bedding
S. Lucas, Storage Shed & Parking Area.
plants .................................................134.98
Public Hearing on General Obligation Corp.
Eagle Pharmacy, drugs .........................179.83
Purpose Loan Agreement opened at 7:04 p.m.,
EFTPS, Fed/FICA Tax ......................10,569.32
and closed at 7:05 p.m., with no Verbal/Written
Elberg Electric, repair ............................140.20
comments.
Electrical Materials Co., lights ...............236.15
A motion was made by Lorenzen, and
Electronic Engineering Co., pager
seconded by Axtell, on Resolution 2014-14:
repairs ...............................................401.00
Approving General Obligation Corp. Purpose
Goldfield Access Network, telephone,
Loan Agreement. Roll Call Vote: All ayes.
internet ..............................................743.71
A motion was made by Axtell, and seconded
Grainger, stay open ball valve .................46.80
by Pohlman, to approve the first reading of
HSA-SSB ACH, HSA Account
Ordinance to City Code Zoning Regulation:
transfers .........................................4,812.47
Revision to 165.04 and a New 165.22. Roll Call
Iowa Police Chiefs Assoc., registration..125.00
Vote: All ayes.
IPERS, IPERS-reg............................14,299.60
A motion as made by Axtell, and seconded
J & J Sports, balls, bats, shirts, etc.....5,561.82
by Lorenzen, on Resolution 2014-15: approving
Knutzon’s Inc., thermostat repair ...........136.00
Yohn, Inc. Economic Dev. Agreement. Roll Call
Lalor Construction, door on Digester
Vote: All ayes.
building ...........................................2,793.00
A motion was made by Lorenzen, and
Lisa Kist, FTS facility fee .......................200.00
seconded by Johnson, on Resolution 2014-16:
Lyle’s Ford-Mercury, tow white Alero .....250.00
setting the public hearing date to June 16th for
MidAmerican Energy, parks electric ......218.21
the Proposed Grant Application with the USDA.
New York Life, New York Life...................10.00
Roll Call Vote: All ayes.
Payroll Fund, payroll transfer............52,888.12
Discussion on Ch. 75: Snowmobiles, ATVs,
Postmaster, postage for utility bills ........390.52
and Golf Carts.
Reliant Fire Apparatus, Inc., windshield
Department reports were given.
Cl9000 Ford.......................................303.59
A motion was made by Lorenzen, and
Sadler Construction Inc., electrical
seconded by Swalin, to adjourn at 8:26 p.m.
repairs ...............................................514.59
Motion carried.
Teamsters Local 238, Union dues-Team .47.74
Sandra McGrath, Mayor
Karla Thompson, Office for Mac ..............88.98
Mike Boyd, City Administrator
TMI Services Inc., cemetery-Mem. Day ..70.00
Wk.25
Treasurer, State of Iowa, State taxes .3,529.00
PUBLIC NOTICE
Public Input Meeting
the MIDAS website http://www.midascog.net,
The Regional V Regional Planning Affiliation
(RPA) will hold a public input meeting on the
or by contacting Shirley Helgevold at MIDAS
draft FY 2015-2018 Regional Transportation
Council of Governments, (515) 576-7183 ext.
Improvement Program (2015-2018 RTIP).
212, or e-mail at [email protected]
The RTIP is a document produced annually
Written comments should be received by
that identifies all transportation projects member
June 25, 2014, at 12 p.m. Please submit all
governments of the Region V RPA plan to
written comments to:
implement using federal funds over the next
Region V Regional Planning Affiliation
four years. Region V includes the following
602 1st Avenue South
counties: Calhoun, Hamilton, Humboldt,
Fort Dodge, IA 50501
Pocahontas, Webster, and Wright and the cities
Or e-mail to:
within these counties.
[email protected]
Project funded with regional Surface
PUBLIC INPUT MEETING
Transportation Funds or regional Enhancement
June 25, 2014
funds added to the 2015-2018 RTIP in 2015
2 PM
include:
MIDAS Building
- Hamilton County’s R27 Scarification,
602 1st Avenue South
resurfacing and overlay project at $1,000,000
Fort Dodge, IA 50501
in FY 2018.
If you have any special needs pertaining to
- Fort
Dodge’s
8th
Ave.
South
this meeting, please contact Shirley Helgevold,
reconstruction project at $1,200,000 in FY
MIDAS Council of Governments, 515-5762018.
7183, ext. 212.
- Eagle Grove bridge project on SW 9th
Wk.25
Street.
The Draft FY 2015-2018 RTIP is available on
EaglE grovE EaglE
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
Sheriff’s Levy and Sale
NOTICE OF SHERIFF’S LEVY AND SALE
IOWA DISTRICT COURT
COURT CASE # LNLN000167
WRIGHT COUNTY
SPECIAL EXECUTION
STATE OF IOWA
WRIGHT COUNTY
SS.
GREAT WESTERN BANK,
Plaintiff
VS.
MATTHEW W. RILEY; DENISE M.
RILEY, f/k/a DENISE M. CONSIER;
BEAR TOOTH PASS, L.L.C.; 709 DAVIS,
LLC; 815 BENTON, LLC; CHAPIN
CREEK, L.L.C.; SUNSHINE FALLS,
L.L.C.; 214 MONONA, LLC; MARK
DAVENPORT; DONNA DAVENPORT; REX
TOWNSEND; JUDY TOWNSEND; ADAMS
COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
CORPORATION; AND SHANE RAY TETER ,
Defendant (Judgment Debtor)
As a result of the judgment rendered in the
above referenced court case, an execution was
issued by the court to the Sheriff of this county.
The execution ordered the sale of defendant(s)
real estate to satisfy the judgment. The
property to be sold is described below:
A tract of land in the Northeast fractional 1/4
of the Northwest 1/4 of Section 3, Township
90 North, Range 26 West 5th P.M., Iowa,
described as follows: Commencing at the
Northeast corner of said quarter, thence South
along the East line of said quarter for 650 feet,
thence South 89°35’30” West for 67.2 feet to
the point of beginning, thence continuing South
89°35’30” West for 183 feet, thence South
0°15’ East for 216 feet, thence North 89°35’30”
East for 212 feet to the West line of Highway
No. 17 (formerly Highway No. 60), thence
North 0°15’ West along said West line for 213.5
feet, thence South 89°35’30” West for 29 feet,
thence North 0°15’ West along said West line
for 213.5 feet, thence South 89°35’30” West for
29 feet, thence North 0°15’ West for 2.5 feet to
the point of beginning, containing 1.05 acres,
more or less. Subject to easements of record
located at 2821 Hwy. 17, Eagle Grove,
Wright County, IA
The described property will be offered for
sale at public auction for cash only as follows:
July 29, 2014, 10 a.m., Lobby of Wright County
Sheriff’s Office, 719 2nd Street SW, Clarion, IA
50525.
Homestead: Defendant is advised that if the
described real estate includes the homestead
(which must not exceed 1/2 acre if within a
city or town plat, or, if rural, must not exceed
40 acres), defendant must file a homestead
plat with the Sheriff within ten (10) days after
service of this notice, or the Sheriff will have it
platted and charge the costs to this case.
This sale not subject to redemption.
Property exemption: Certain money or
property may be exempt. Contact your attorney
promptly to review specific provisions of the
law and file appropriate notice, if acceptable.
Judgment Amount: $132,473.96; Costs
$1,190.00; Accruing Costs PLUS, Interest at
daily rate of $75.50186 to and from August 15,
2013.
June 5, 2014
Jason Schluttenhofer, Sheriff
Wright County, Iowa
Patricia Barz, Deputy
Attorney:
Whitfield & Eddy, P.L.C.
317 Sixth Avenue, Suite 1200
Des Moines, IA 50309-4195
Phone: 515-288-6041
Wk.24,25
Call 448-4745 if
you see news happening!
Eagle Grove Community School Minutes of Regular Meeting
EAGLE GROVE COMMUNITY SCHOOL
DISTRICT
EAGLE GROVE, IOWA 50533
MINUTES OF REGULAR MEETING OF
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
MONDAY, JUNE 9, 2014
CALL TO ORDER:
The Eagle Grove
Community School District Board of Education
met on Monday, June 9, 2014, at 6 p.m., in the
board meeting room at the Emerson Building
with President Jon Rowen presiding. Members
present were:
Directors Crail, Halverson,
Manues, and Schope.
Others present:
Superintendent Toliver, Secretary Pohlman,
Principals Mike Kruger and Scott Jeske, and
Les Houser from the Eagle Grove Eagle. Also
present was Joe Erickson, new elementary
principal.
COMMUNICATIONS AND CELEBRATIONS:
Building Principals reported on past events,
close of the school year, summer work and
activities, summer breakfast and lunch program,
summer school programs, staffing changes,
and transition to new school year.
APPROVAL OF AGENDA:
Motion by
Director Manues, seconded by Director
Schope, to approve the proposed agenda. The
motion carried. Ayes: Crail, Halverson, Rowen,
Manues, Schope. Nays: None.
CONSENT ITEMS:
Motion by Director
Halverson, seconded by Director Crail, to
approve the minutes from 5/12/14, Bills and
Financial Statements for all district funds,
resignations from: Chelsey Axtell – asst softball
coach, McKristie Jeske – asst volleyball coach,
Angela Gloede – elem teacher and coach, Dan
O’Hern – asst volleyball coach, Shonda Schafer
– cook; Contracts with: Bruce Dahlhauser – HS
PE teacher and head football coach, Justin
Schwake – HS Band Teacher, Katie Noll – HS
English Teacher. The motion carried. Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues, Schope.
Nays: None.
ENTER 2014 GRADUATES INTO OFFICIAL
SCHOOL RECORDS: Motion by Director
Schope, seconded by Director Manues, to
enter the presented list of the 2014 graduating
class into the official school records with one
addition as noted by Jeff Siebersma. The
motion carried. Ayes: Crail, Halverson, Rowen,
Manues, Schope. Nays: None.
ELEMENTARY PRINCIPAL CONTRACT:
Motion by Director Halverson, seconded by
Director Manues, to approve a contract with
Joseph Erickson to serve as elementary
principal. The motion carried. Ayes: Crail,
Halverson, Rowen, Manues, Schope. Nays:
None.
HANDBOOKS:
Motion by Director
Halverson, seconded by Director Crail, to
approve the handbooks. The motion carried.
Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues,
Schope. Nays: None.
SCHOOL FEES AND FOOD SERVICE
PRICES FOR 2014-2015: Motion by Director
Halverson, seconded by Director Manues, to
approve the fees and food service prices as
proposed for 2014-2015. The motion carried.
Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues,
Schope. Nays: None.
BREAD AND MILK BIDS FOR 2014-2015:
Motion by Director Manues, seconded by
Director Schope, to accept bids from AndersonErickson Dairy for milk, and Bimbo Bakeries
for bread for 2014-2015. The motion carried.
Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues,
Schope. Nays: None.
BOARD
APPROVAL
OF
SIAC
RECOMMENDATIONS: Motion by Director
Schope, seconded by Director Manues, to
approve the School Improvement Advisory
Committee’s Growth Goals. The motion carried.
Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues,
Schope. Nays: None.
SET SPECIAL MEETING FOR YEAR END
BUSINESS – A special meeting for year end
business was set for Monday, June 30, 2014,
at 12 Noon upon a motion by Director Manues,
and a second by Director Halverson. The
motion carried unanimously.
SPANISH CLUB TRIP REQUEST: Motion
by Director Crail, seconded by Director Schope,
to approve the HS Spanish Club trip request to
Belize next summer 2015. The motion carried.
Ayes:
Crail, Halverson, Rowen, Manues,
Schope. Nays: None.
PUBLIC NOTICE
Eagle Grove Water Board
WATER BOARD MEETING MINUTES
June 11, 2014
The meeting was called to order with
trustees Peterson, Molitor, Neighbors, and
Rethman in attendance. Absent: Helgevold.
Also present: Superintendent Baker, City
Administrator Boyd.
Neighbors made a motion, and Molitor
seconded, to approve May 14 minutes and
claims. Vote: All ayes.
Bryan Baker, uniform reimb .................. 147.84
Carol Lundgren, meter deposit refund ... 19.99
Central Iowa Distributing, towels .......... 107.40
City Clerk, meter deposit refunds ......... 607.93
Eagle Trenching LLC, water leak
repair .............................................2,801.97
Hach Co., solutions.................................73.32
Hawkins, Inc., chlorine, sulfuric acid .3,261.50
J & J Sports, uniforms-Rick ....................60.00
Jeanette Reekers, meter dep refund......36.89
Lalor Construction,, replace steel water
plant .............................................10,228.00
Mississippi Lime Co., pebble
quicklime .......................................3,539.45
Nick Ferry, refund overpayment .............62.59
Sadler Construction Inc., wiring at
plant ............................................... 4,145.65
Samuel Boeke, meter deposit refund ..... 90.19
Smith & Loveless, Inc., shaft ................992.99
State Hygienic Laboratory, testing ......... 19.00
Treasurer State of Iowa, sales tax .....2,754.00
Turner Service, exercise water
valves............................................. 2,160.00
Van-Hof Trucking, Inc., hauling lime .1,595.07
Walmart, distilled water ..........................58.06
Fund Totals:
General .....................................................3.30
Water ................................................ 21,742.63
Meter Deposit Fund ..............................755.00
Water Capital Improvement ..............10236.00
Sewer ...................................................... 20.91
Sewer Capital Improvement .....................4.00
Department report were given and
discussed.
Meeting adjourned.
Bryan Baker, Secretary
Wk.25
Helpful Hint
SOLD
A dry paintbrush (with bristles at least 3 inches long) is
great for both the surface and
grooves of your collectibles.
Dust framed photos with a
pastry brush, which is softer
than a paintbrush and easier
to dip into corners and places
that are difficult to reach.
INFRASTRUCTURE ITEMS: Mr. Toliver
shared a brief list of anticipated and ongoing
projects.
SUPT.
EVALUATION
MATERIALS
DISTRIBUTED: Due June 30, 2014
BEGIN TO LOOK AT LEGISLATIVE ACTION
PRIORITIES
BOARD MEMBER REPORTS
SUPERINTENDENT’S REPORT:
Mr.
Toliver’s report consisted of announcing that
Scott Jeske was chosen as Iowa Educator of
Character, thanking Mike Kruger for his years of
service, and informing the board of the service
project by the Class of 1964 to redo the Study
Park across from the high school.
ADJOURN: Motion by Director Halverson,
seconded by Director Crail, to adjourn. The
meeting was declared adjourned.
GENERAL FUND BILLS FOR APPROVAL JUNE 9, 2014
Activity Fund, reimb for towels &
acad letters .................................... 1,106.40
Airgas, blades ........................................ 291.48
Amazon, supplies .................................. 264.81
Ames School, tutoring ............................. 77.52
Anderson-Kahl, Alison, supplies reimb .... 22.39
Asset Genie, supplies ............................ 490.00
Ben Franklin, supplies ............................. 43.96
Bomgaars, supplies ............................... 558.04
Central Iowa Dist, cleaning supplies...... 868.72
Clarion-Goldfield, open enrollment
tuition/personnel sharing .............. 46,575.53
Comm Innovators, repairs ..................... 425.00
Double M Signs, supplies ........................ 25.00
Eagle Building Supply, supplies............. 156.10
Eagle Grove City of, water bills ......... 1,148.14
Eagle Grove Eagle, subscriptions &
legals/supplies .................................. 286.23
Eagle Grove Greenhouses, graduation . 831.98
Eagle Grove Schools, wire transfers ...... 30.00
Engel Law, legal services ........................ 42.50
Fareway, supplies .................................... 91.31
Feld Fire, smoke det sensitivity testing.. 750.00
Goldfield Access Network, telephone
service............................................ 2,345.80
Gov Connections, supplies .................... 620.74
Graduation Source, supplies ................. 551.84
Hawkeye West Pest Control, monthly
service............................................... 115.00
Heartland AEA, registrations .............. 2,000.00
Humboldt Schools, open enrollment &
concurrent courses ...................... 18,408.79
IJUMP, utilities .................................... 5,541.17
Iowa Testing Programs, test booklets .... 237.70
Iowa Workforce Devel, permits.............. 300.00
Jerry’s Window Service, cleaning ............ 30.00
Johnson Insurance, refund of room
rental ................................................. 150.00
Jostens, supplies ..................................... 32.04
Kruger, Mike, meeting exp ....................... 34.58
Lawson Auto Body, repairs .................... 296.14
Lennon, Lance, reimb for supplies ........ 317.00
Lifetouch, supplies ................................. 265.00
MidAmerican Energy, utilities ........... 10,336.91
Miller, Donna, supplies reimb .................. 26.00
Reality Works, supplies ...................... 2,837.50
Rieman Music, supplies ........................ 488.14
Rifton, chair for student ...................... 1,539.00
Scholastic, supplies ................................. 64.92
School Bus Sales, repair parts .............. 105.48
Schumacher, elevator maint .................. 154.27
Spencer Steel, supplies ........................... 41.50
T & D, vehicle repairs ......................... 1,566.02
Tapper, Lisa, reimb for fuel ...................... 81.00
Toliver, Jess, ......................................... 494.32
Trash Man, monthly service .................. 693.00
Trimark Physicians Group, drug testing .. 42.00
W & H, fuel ......................................... 6,620.14
Wal Mart, supplies ................................. 623.83
Why Try, registration and curriculum ..... 599.00
Williamson, Kelly, meeting exp reimb ........ 8.00
Wright County Health Dept, training ...... 150.00
$111,801.94
PPEL FUND BILLS FOR APPROVAL JUNE 9, 2014
Anderson Sewer & Drain Cleaning
Service .............................................. 220.00
Central Iowa Dist, floor finish .............. 4,912.20
Midwest Fence, new gate ...................... 996.89
Midwest Roofing, reroof MS .......... 150,176.00
Oldsons, repairs .................................... 502.00
Ricoh, copiers ..................................... 1,977.23
Roto-Rooter, clean main sewer line....... 695.00
Schindler Elev Corp, repairs ............... 1,630.61
Woodman, repairs .......................... __4,900.00
$166,009.93
NUTRITION FUND BILLS FOR MAY,
APPROVAL JUNE 9, 2014
Coca-Cola Bottling, Supplies ................. 150.88
Eagle Grove CSD, interest fee/
lunch Refunds ................................... 109.10
Earthgrains Baking Company, bread
products ............................................ 938.75
Fareway, Supplies ................................... 16.05
Gudmonson Service & Marsh Concrete,
service grease trap ........................... 400.00
Hiland Dairy Foods Company, LLC,
milk products .................................. 4,337.88
Keck, Inc., commodities......................... 198.68
Martin Bros. Dist. Co., supplies ........ 19,626.38
Resh, Shannon, lunch refund .................. 76.95
Sporra, Shelle, lunch refund .............. __124.95
$25,979.62
ACTIVITY FUND BILLS FOR MAY,
APPROVAL JUNE 9, 2014
2 Eagles Bakery, Prom supplies .............220.00
Adventureland Park, field trip ..............1,127.00
Anderson’s, Prom supplies ..................1,089.95
Ascherl, Amy, reimb. supplies...................30.82
Becker, Jerry, track official ......................240.00
Belmond-Klemme CSD, track entry fee....45.00
Ben Franklin Store, supplies.....................60.18
Blank Park Zoo Foundation, field trip .....160.00
Bomgaars, supplies ..................................26.70
Boone & Scenic Valley Railroad,
field trip .......................................... 1,166.00
Coca-Cola Bottling, supplies ................. 559.78
Dannco, Inc., softball supplies ............... 325.00
Decker Sporting Goods, Inc. supplies 3,026.45
Eagle Grove CSD, cash for activities . 1,199.64
Eagle Grove Greenhouses, supplies ....... 40.00
Ed Thomas Family Foundation, clinic...... 40.00
Fareway Store, supplies ........................ 112.09
FBLA/PBL, Inc., National Conference
registration ........................................ 665.00
FCA, B-track concessions ....................... 78.00
Fort Dodge Community Schools ............. 70.00
Fort Frenzy, field trip .............................. 564.00
Fridley, Ben, baseball official ................... 90.00
Gerhardt, Steve, baseball official........... 180.00
Gilbert CSD, BB official ........................... 85.00
Great American Opportunities, supplies .. 12.00
Hampton-Dumont CSD, track entry fee . 135.00
IGHSAU, annual dues ........................... 100.00
IHSMA, Music Festival fee/awards ........ 534.20
Instrumentalist Company, awards ......... 187.00
Iowa FBLA, leadership conference........ 350.00
Iowa Hall of Pride, field trip ...................... 30.00
J Galt Enterprises, supplies ................... 156.00
Jewell Golf & Country Club,
B-Sectional golf ................................... 60.00
King’s Pointe Waterpark, field trip.......... 220.00
Living History Farms, field trip ............... 656.50
Manson-northwest Webster, track
entry fee .............................................. 45.00
Martin Bros. Dist. Co., supplies ................. 6.69
Moore, Tom, FB membership .................. 30.00
NASSP, NHS membership/certificates .. 100.00
Neff Company, supplies ...................... 2,194.13
Newman Catholic HS, SB official ............ 50.00
Niewoehner, Wade, SB official ................ 90.00
O’Hern, Dan, reimb. supplies ................ 142.64
Pasco, supplies .................................. 1,160.00
Paukert, Marta, reimb. supplies ............... 12.35
Pepper, JW, supplies ............................... 15.74
Prairie Lakes AEA, supplies .................. 510.12
Sahr, Nathan, baseball official ................. 90.00
Scholastic Book Fairs, supplies .......... 2,059.43
Shriver, Ann, accompanist ..................... 210.00
South Central Calhoun CSD, WR
entry fee .............................................. 85.00
St. Edmond School, District golf .............. 60.00
Subway, supplies ................................... 202.26
Tapper, Lisa, reimb. supplies ................. 120.00
Teeselink, Kyle, reimb. supplies .............. 66.00
The Graphic Edge, supplies .................. 500.91
TMI Services, service ............................ 235.00
Trophies Plus, supplies ......................... 155.87
Urban Images, Prom supplies ............... 250.00
Weber, Bob, SB official ............................ 90.00
Wilke, Konrad, FBLA National Conf. __245.00
$22,367.45
Reports
and
supporting
documents
considered by the Board at this meeting are on
file in the Board Secretary’s office, 448-4749,
Monday through Friday, 8 a.m - 4 p.m.
Jon Rowen, Board President
Teresa Pohlman, Board Secretary
Wk.25
PUBLIC NOTICE
City Council Minutes
GOLDFIELD
CITY COUNCIL
June 11, 2014
Mayor Tom Stevenson called the meeting
to order at 7 p.m. Council members present:
Frakes, Reed, and Sampson.
Absent:
Schermer and Sorensen. Also present: Robert
Malloy, City Attorney; Barbara Jergenson, City
Clerk; PW Superintendent, Randy Purcell;
Eagle Grove Police Officer Garret Quintus; Scott
Curran, Stevenson Insurance; Stan Wagner, K
& W Coatings; and Greg Soenen (7:30).
Motion made by Sampson, second Frakes,
to approve the May 12th minutes. Motion made
by Sampson, second Frakes, to approve the
May 27 minutes. Motion made by Sampson,
second Frakes, to approve the June claims. All
ayes. Motions carried.
Payroll..............................................10,011.59
City Contributions ............................. 1,707.48
Goldfield Post Office, postage ............. 151.34
Century Link, non emergency line ......... 43.75
The Trash Man, May service &
clean-up day ................................ 1,473.10
Mid-America Publishing, publishing
legal’s .............................................. 191.31
Malloy Law Firm, legal fees ................. 315.00
AgSource Laboratories, testing ............. 52.50
Goldfield Telephone Co., telephone &
fax ................................................... 174.81
Bomgaars, supplies ............................. 358.28
Mary Schnobrich, Clean City Hall (2)
May ................................................... 43.50
MidAmerican Energy, gas & electric . 2,078.62
W & H Cooperative, diesel & gas
for city ............................................. 403.38
PSI, labels, magnifier, counterfeit
detector pens .................................... 44.75
Gopher, steel chain basketball nets ....... 24.90
Prairie Energy Cooperative,
RLF meter payment ........................ 748.13
Barbara Jergenson, mileage exp ........... 18.48
City of Eagle Grove, April thru
June 2014 police ........................ 14,080.94
Banyon Data Systems, software
support ......................................... 2,385.00
Brown Supply, water exp ....................... 66.55
Fire Department, volunteer firemen
pay ............................................... 2,442.00
Electronic Engineering, Fire Depart –
2 pagers + warranty + cases ........ 1,049.00
Continental Research, 4 gal-No Crack 173.38
Titan, Backhoe repair-swing cylinder
leaking ............................................. 841.48
Lawson Auto Body, pickup repair
from accident................................ 1,256.17
Zehner Safety, fire extinguisher
checks & tag...................................... 21.00
Elberg Electric, control panel light
bulbs/water plant ............................... 46.50
WCED, Housing Needs Analysis-
Wright County ................................. 600.00
L & L Service, fixed shafts for
pump stations ..................................117.20
Rasmussen Lawn Care, spring fertil. ... 250.00
MidAmerican Energy, Park electric ........ 27.05
Marco, copier contract/copies ................ 35.85
Stan Wagner, K & W Coatings LLC,
discussed the interior painting of the Water
Tower. Motion made by Frakes, second Reed,
to go with the Zinc/Epoxy interior coating
system. Along with surface preparation and
application of coatings, the cost is $35,275.00
with a completion date of July 11, 2014. All
ayes. Motion carried.
Motion by Frakes, second Sampson, to
approve Robert Campbell’s building permit for
an addition onto his shop and office. Motion
carried with Reed abstaining.
Motion made by Frakes, second Sampson,
to approve a July 4th Fireworks permit for
Arnold Kurfman. All ayes. Motion carried.
Motion made by Frakes, second Reed, to
renew Casey’s cigarette and tobacco permit for
FY 2014-15. All ayes. Motion carried.
Introduced and moved by Sampson, second
Reed, to approve Res. #615 to purchase two
new computers for City Hall. AYES: Frakes,
Reed, Sampson. NAYS: None.
Introduced and moved by Reed, second
Frakes, to approve Res. #616 for the City to
lease a Sharp MX-2615N Copier. AYES:
Frakes, Reed, Sampson. NAYS: None.
Motion by Sampson, second Frakes, to
approve giving the used computer and copier
to the Police office at Goldfield City Hall. All
ayes. Motion carried.
Motion by Frakes, second Sampson, to set
a Special Meeting for salaries and the Locust
Street repair bids on June 23 at 5:30 p.m. All
ayes. Motion carried.
Motion by Reed, second Frakes, to adjourn
at 8:45 p.m. Motion carried.
REVENUE & EXPENSES FOR MONTH OF
MAY 2014
FUND
REVENUE EXPENDITURE
General
12,876.86
9,758.07
Corn LP
4,166.66
4,230.17
Fire Department
0.00
324.23
LO Tax
4,332.77
0.00
Road Use Tax
2,978.37
1,731.60
Employee Benefit 1,017.14
1,024.87
Emergency Fund
282.56
0.00
TIF
2,765.45
9,400.00
Debt Service
0.00
0.00
Water Fund
11,933.00
13,439.52
Sewer Fund
5,996.24
9,067.36
Agency Fund
0.00
0.00
Totals
46,349.05
48,975.82
Tom Stevenson, Mayor
Barbara Jergenson, City Clerk
Wk.25
Want to read the entire Eagle newspaper on-line?
All you have to do is subscribe at
www.theeaglegroveeagle.com
EaglE grovE EaglE
Public Notice/Public oPiNioN/ArouNd the AreA
PUBLIC NOTICE
PUBLIC NOTICE
TRUST NOTICE
IN THE MATTER OF THE TRUST:
THE GEORGE LOUX FAMILY TRUST
To all persons regarding George Loux,
deceased, who died on or about the 20th day
of May, 2014. You are hereby notified that
Michael Loux and Kevin Loux are the trustees
of THE GEORGE LOUX FAMILY TRUST.
Any action to contest the validity of the trust
must be brought in the District Court of Wright
County, Iowa, within the latter to occur of four
(4) months from the date of second publication
of this notice or thirty (30) days from the date of
mailing this notice to all heirs of the decedent
settlor and the spouse of the decedent settlor
whose identities are reasonably ascertainable.
Any suit not filed within this period shall be
forever barred.
Notice is further given that any person or
entity possessing a claim against the trust
must mail proof of the claim to the trustee at
the address listed below via certified mail,
return receipt requested, by the latter to occur
of four (4) months from the second publication
of this notice or thirty (30) days from the date of
mailing this notice if required or the claim shall
be forever barred unless paid or otherwise
satisfied.
Dated this 29th day of May, 2014.
THE GEORGE LOUX FAMILY TRUST
Michael Loux
203 N. Iowa
Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Kevin Loux
15 Klemish Circle
Center Point, IA 52213
William A. Long, ICIS PIN#: AT0004877
Attorneys for Trustee
Ivers & Long Law Office, PLC
PO Box 145
Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Date of second publication: 19th day of
June, 2014.
Wk24,25
We make business
cards!
448-4745 • 314 W. Broadway
Nature’s Wood Shop, Supplies ...............25.00
Kathy Nicholls, Mileage ........................ 101.76
NC Coop, Fuel ...................................... 118.31
Oldson’s, Labor .....................................983.84
Lorie Patrick, Reimbursement .............. 142.83
PRS, Inc., Prescriptions..........................20.29
Pitney Bowes Inc., Supplies ...................84.99
PlanScape Partners, Service ............... 774.00
Praire Energy, Electric/Lake Cornelia .. 911.21
Press Ganey, Supplies .........................122.00
Primary Products, Office supplies........ 133.87
PSI, Supplies .....................................2,490.47
Provider Insights, Education..............1,000.00
Quality Medical, Equipment rental ....... 181.60
Kristina Cook-Rabe, Mileage ............... 510.24
Anne Radechel, Mileage ...................... 316.80
Jim Radke, Reimbursement ................... 12.00
Linda Rasmussen, Mileage ....................60.00
Cyndi Rector, Mileage ..........................265.44
Barb Redig, Mileage ............................. 314.40
Rehabilitation Center, Service........... 6,841.77
Angie Reiland, Mileage...........................25.92
RJThomas, Benches ............................ 467.43
Fawn Roberts, Mileage.........................133.92
Cindy Roosa, Mileage ............................76.80
Naomi Rothman, Mileage .....................228.96
Gayleen Rutherford, Mileage ...............192.48
Sadler, Service ..................................2,223.08
Peggy Schluttenhofer, Reimb. .............. 119.04
Schumacher, Scheduled maint. ...........239.67
Denise Schumacher, Mileage .............. 316.80
Joan Shillinglaw, Reimbursement .......... 59.71
Terry Silbaugh, Mileage........................379.68
Darcy Sisson, Mileage ..........................430.08
Sandy Smidt, Mileage ...........................129.60
Smith Tree Farm, Service .......................50.00
Jane Smith, Transcript ............................ 10.50
Solutions, Training ................................100.00
Shelle Sporaa, Mileage ........................ 167.52
Staples Advantage, Supplies ...............133.30
Staples Credit Plan, Supplies ...............154.64
State Medical Examiner, Autopsy .....1,586.50
Kim Thayer, Mileage .............................238.08
The Trash Man, Service ....................... 411.48
Juanita Thompson, Mileage ................. 174.40
TMI, Service............................................35.00
Tiffini Toliver, Mileage ............................. 93.12
TQ Technologies, Service .................2,536.01
Urness, Custodial supplies ................... 597.68
US Cellular, Service..............................434.79
VanDiest, Service .................................143.90
Verizon Wireless, Service ....................200.05
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .................... 2,422.13
WCPB, Rent ..........................................295.55
West Payment Center, Pamphlets........163.00
Sharon Woodley, Mileage.....................240.96
Wright County Auditor, Metered
postage .............................................839.27
Wright County District Fair,
Tax apportionment .........................2,208.33
Wright County Engineer, Fuel ...........2,930.22
Wright County Motors, Service ............910.54
General Supplemental
Betty Ellis, Reimbursement .................... 10.24
Barbara J. Westphal, Service...............180.00
Wright County Auditor, Metered
postage ...............................................36.04
Youth Shelter Care, Service .................326.55
Wright County Employee’s Side Fund
Belmond Fitness, Employee
memberships ......................................60.00
Clarion Fitness, Employee
memberships ....................................140.00
EMC, Life/premium ............................1,933.63
ISAC, Health/premium ................... 142,077.00
MetLife, Dental/premium .................10,659.42
Wright County PSF, Side fund .........16,025.72
Wright Wellness, Employee
memberships .................................... 107.00
Jail Commissary
Clarion Super Foods, Jail
commissary....................................... 427.88
MH-DD Services Fund
Casey’s, Fuel .......................................... 47.79
Goldfield Access, Service .................... 161.87
Jen Sheehan, Mileage ............................ 87.36
Staples Advantage, Office supplies .......44.08
US Cellular, Service..............................190.26
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .......................364.84
WCPB, Rent .......................................... 607.66
Dodi Whipple, Reimbursement............. 178.09
Wright Co. Clerk of Court,
Guardianship ...................................... 10.00
Rural Services Basic Fund
Belmond Library, Tax
apportionment................................2,480.58
Clarion Library, Tax apportionment ... 2,377.25
Dows Library, Tax apportionment ..... 1,136.91
Eagle Grove Library, Tax
apportionment................................2,790.67
Rowan Library, Tax apportionment ...1,550.42
Sanitary Landfill, Tax
apportionment................................ 6,018.75
Recorder’s Records Management
IMAGETEK, Service .............................536.78
Economic Development Marketing
BIDCO, Annual meeting ......................... 15.00
Mid-America Publishing, Service .........250.00
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .........................13.96
Secondary Road Fund
Adams Door Company, Service ...........789.00
Airgas, Supplies .................................... 277.80
Allender Butzke Engineers, Service 5,800.00
Alliant Energy, Utilities ..........................505.77
Aramark, Service ....................................48.00
Arnold Motor Supply, Supplies .......... 1,915.36
Belmond Independent, Publishing ....... 201.50
PUBLIC NOTICE
BMC Aggregates, Supplies .............16,490.95
Bomgaars, Supplies ............................. 402.14
Brown Supply, Supplies ........................136.56
Calhoun-Burns, Service ................... 8,994.00
City of Belmond, Utilities ........................56.61
City of Clarion, Utilities .........................246.06
City of Eagle Grove, Utilities................... 37.40
Clarion Distributing, Supplies ...............185.90
Cleveland Electric, Service .................. 175.00
Counsel, Service .................................... 57.22
CRA, Supplies ...................................... 152.68
Culligan, Water .....................................104.95
Eagle Building Supply, Supplies...........434.51
Farmers Coop, Fuel .........................34,438.42
Frank Dunn Co., Supplies..................... 749.00
Hoiberg’s, Supplies ................................337.16
Frontier, Service ..................................... 69.74
Ft. Dodge Machine, Supplies ............1,255.67
Glass Solutions, Supplies..................... 213.88
Goldfield Access, Service ....................529.84
Imagine That!, Supplies ........................135.96
Iowa State University, Service .............220.00
Jack’s O.K. Tire Service, Supplies ....2,424.36
Kimball Midwest, Supplies.................... 315.30
Lawson Products Inc., Supplies ........... 216.00
Marshall & Swift Inc., Service ................16.00
Martin Marietta Materials, Supplies 12,437.88
Mid-America Publishing, Service ......... 589.51
MA Safety & Health, MSHA training.. 1,075.00
MidAmerican Energy, Utilities ........... 2,718.03
Mort’s, Service ......................................302.50
Class C Solutions, Supplies ..............1,485.47
NC Coop, Supplies ...............................709.50
Northland, Supplies ...........................2,490.30
Prairie Energy Coop, Intersection
lights ..................................................308.70
Precision Midwest, Return freight .......... 14.90
PSI, Supplies ..........................................84.92
Rees Hydraulic , Service .......................117.02
Retriever LLC, Supplies .....................1,885.00
Safety X-treme, Supplies ...................3,993.43
Shopko, Supplies ....................................86.65
Spencer, Supplies .................................164.52
Star Equipment, Supplies ..................5,388.25
Superior, Supplies ................................440.88
The Trash Man, Service .......................330.40
TQ Technologies, Service ....................109.00
Urness, Supplies................................... 341.42
US Cellular, Service................................84.83
Verizon Wireless, Service .................1,948.24
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .................... 1,739.31
Windstream, Service .............................. 58.73
Wright County Auditor, Metered
postage ............................................... 18.62
Wright County Motors, Supplies........... 250.70
Wright Materials, Supplies......................40.05
Zep Sales & Service, Supplies ............. 206.17
Ziegler Inc., Supplies ......................... 7,330.97
Public Health Resource
Clarion Super Foods, Public relations......8.08
Critical Care Systems, Medical
supplies ..........................................2,380.02
Down to Earth, Public relations ................ 7.50
Eagle Grove Greenhouses, Public
relations .............................................. 13.00
Pizza Ranch, Public relations ................. 15.58
Thrifty White Pharmacy, Misc.
charitable usage ................................. 18.41
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .......................344.80
Empowerment
Tiffany Larson, Mileage ........................338.40
E911 Surcharge Fund
AT&T, Service ......................................... 41.05
CenturyLink, Service ............................549.00
Electronic Engineering, Service ........1,005.00
Frontier Communications, Service ........141.74
Goldfield Telephone, Service ................119.12
MidAmerican Energy, Electric/WCC ......55.59
Windstream, Service ............................164.66
WMTel, Service..................................... 119.00
Wright County Communications,
Contribution .................................15,000.00
Wind Farm Urban Renewal
Merryman Bridge Company,
Construction ................................51,980.88
Debt Service
Bankers Trust Company, Loan ....... 56,442.50
Debt Service
Bankers Trust Company, Loan ...... 186,553.13
Local Emergency Management
Clarion Super Foods, Training................76.39
Goldfield Access, Service ......................96.90
Mitch Nordmeyer, Training....................150.00
PSI, Office supplies ................................72.85
Wright Co. Communications
Bank of America, Credit card ............... 481.06
Arleen Nagell, Mileage .........................129.60
PLS, Subscriptions ...............................720.00
County Assessor Agency Fund
Counsel, Copier contract ......................248.77
Culligan, Water .......................................36.20
Goldfield Access, Service .................... 120.31
Carol Haupt, Mileage/BOR ..................... 11.52
ICIT , Conference ................................200.00
Office Elements, Office supplies ............ 63.71
Roberta McBain, Mileage/BOR ..............65.28
NWDAA, Training .................................300.00
Charles Peil, Mileage/BOR..................... 67.20
Schneider Corporation, Training ..........198.00
Margaret Solis, Cell phone/BOR ............25.00
Scott Thompson, Mileage/BOR ............. 51.84
US Cellular, Service..............................224.82
TCM/FCNB, Credit card .......................426.25
Wright County Auditor, Metered
postage ...............................................58.21
Grand Total ................................ $765,902.96
Wk.25
Iowa State University,
Northern Iowa Research
Farm Association
sponsor spring field day
Nitrogen management, the use of
unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) in
agriculture, and efficient fuel use on
the farm will highlight the spring
field day of the Iowa State University
Northern Research Farm.
The field day will take place
June 26 at the south location of
the ISU Northern Research Farm.
The address is 1040 James Ave.,
Kanawha, and is located about a
mile south of Kanawha on county
road R35.
Registration and refreshments
will be at 9 a.m., and the field day
will start at 9:30 a.m. A lunch will
be served at noon. The field day will
conclude at 1 p.m.
Micah Smidt, Northern Research
Farm superintendent will begin
the field day program. Smidt will
provide a season review of the farm.
John Sawyer, ISU Extension and
Outreach soil fertility specialist, will
discuss spring nitrogen management.
Sawyer will talk about research on
nitrogen rates, yield effects from
nitrogen deficiency, and in-season
applications of nitrogen.
9
NOTICE OF PROPOSED VOLUNTARY ANNEXATION
Supervisors Claims
WRIGHT COUNTY SUPERVISORS
MAY 2014 CLAIMS
General Basic Fund
A & R, Custodial.................................... 210.00
A-1, Equipment rental .............................50.00
Elizabeth Acat, Service .....................1,806.06
Jean Agena, Service ..............................34.56
AgSource Labs, Service .........................44.00
Ahlers & Cooney, Arbitration
service............................................1,000.00
Jillian Anderson, Mileage ....................... 16.32
Karen Andrews, Mileage ......................583.68
Arnold Motor Supply, Parts .................. 156.73
Denise Baker, Mileage ............................64.32
Jane Bangs, Mileage .............................. 69.12
Nancy Barkema, Mileage ......................213.12
Colleen Bartlett, Mileage ......................138.04
Patricia Barz, Mileage ............................99.69
Joyce Basinger, Mileage....................... 249.12
Bell Recycling Sanitation, Sanitation
disposal .............................................325.00
Belmond Independent, Service ............264.95
Bradley Berg, Mileage ..........................533.76
Black Hills Ammunition, Training
supplies .............................................459.00
Bloemke Pharmacy, Prescriptions ....2,584.27
BRW, Supplies ........................................65.30
Bomgaars, Supplies ............................. 134.97
Briggs, Supplies .................................... 427.22
Dr. Charles Brindle, Service ...................26.88
LuAnn Brunes, Mileage ........................122.88
Bank of America, Credit card ...............835.96
CBI, Mower parts .................................... 71.82
Central Iowa Detention, Service .......6,594.00
Central Iowa Distributing, Custodial
supplies ..........................................2,210.95
CenturyLink, Service .............................. 33.71
Katie Chapman, Mileage ........................39.36
Doris Chapman, Mileage/meals ...........180.88
CINTAS, Medical supplies ......................52.99
City of Clarion, Utilities ......................... 717.66
Clarion Super Foods, Inmate meals.. 2,176.81
Conney Safety Products, Signs .............82.00
Michele Cooper, Service ........................ 14.40
Counsel, Service .................................... 21.28
Culligan, Water ..................................... 113.55
Dakota Medical Solutions, Supplies..... 410.00
de lage landen, Office supplies ..............80.62
Deyta, Supplies.......................................20.00
Janet Disney, Mileage .......................... 236.16
Eagle Building Supply, Custodial
supplies ...............................................79.22
Mark Eikenberry, Service .....................760.80
Cathy Elkin, Mileage ...............................84.00
Betty Ellis, Mileage ............................... 124.66
Family Veterinary Practice, Impound .....50.00
Fareway, Supplies................................... 32.13
Farmers Coop, Fuel ........................... 9,497.61
Fillenwarth, Conference ....................1,753.30
Hoiberg’s, Service ............................. 3,547.32
Frontier, Service ..................................... 91.55
Goldfield Access, Service .................2,250.56
GRP, Sanitation disposal ........................75.00
Hamilton County Hospital, Service ...... 201.90
Carmel Hammen, Mileage ....................268.32
Hanson & Sons, Service ...................... 500.11
Hardin County Sheriff , Service fees .....45.36
Pamela Harklau, Mileage .....................302.88
Mary Haugen, Mileage .........................328.32
Hawkeye West Pest Control, Service .. 172.00
Health Education Center, Training .........36.00
Hennigar’s Wrecker Service , Service . 110.00
Brad Hicks, Mileage .............................. 215.52
Holiday Inn, Training ............................. 515.40
Honeywell, Medical supplies ................330.00
Hopkins, Medical supplies ....................556.59
Houser & Berkland, & Simonson,
Rent ................................................2,300.00
Nancy Huisinga, Mileage ...................... 197.28
HyVee, Prescriptions ..............................40.00
IACCVSO, Membership dues .................50.00
ICIT , Conference registration .............500.00
IMAGETEK, Service .......................... 2,827.63
Imagine That!, Supplies ........................122.45
Independence Medical, Supplies .........620.00
IOS, Copier contract ...............................83.39
ISH-Clarion, Service .......................18,349.53
ISH-Belmond, Service ....................... 4,115.00
IWD, Service ...................................... 1,122.02
JCL, Custodial supplies ........................194.94
Jensen Builders, Transit facility .........7,220.00
Cheryl Johnson, Mileage ........................69.60
David L Johnson, Mileage .................... 251.04
DeAnn Johnson, Mileage .......................34.56
Kanawha Equipment, Supplies .............. 73.12
KDE Security Services, Service ............55.00
Konica Minolta, Office supplies ............253.83
Melissa Lee, Service ............................240.00
Naomi Lette, Reimbursement............... 216.62
Lippincott, Supplies ................................33.90
Lizbeth Lopez, Service .........................268.50
Mary Lyons, Mileage............................. 311.04
Mail Services, Service ..........................432.73
MARCO, Office supplies ......................186.63
Martin’s, U.S. flags ................................ 179.94
Matt Parrott, Supplies ........................... 419.40
Mayo Clinic Stores, Supplies .................. 19.90
Patty McCoy, Mileage ........................... 152.16
Sandra McGrath, Mileage .................... 210.72
Barb Meyer, Mileage ...............................64.80
Mid-America Publishing, Service ......... 447.31
MidAmerican Energy, Utilities ...........3,932.58
MIDAS, Minor MV parts ..................... 1,857.61
Midland Power, Electric Oakdale Park ....41.17
Modern Sound, Service/JCS ................390.51
Penny Mohr, Mileage ............................156.00
Alexis Morgan, Mileage ........................200.64
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Mark Hanna, extension agricultural
engineer, will discuss recent research
on fuel use for crop production.
Hanna will talk about ways farmers
can reduce diesel fuel consumption
during fieldwork operations.
Chris
Murphy
and
Zach
Vanderleest,
agricultural
and
biosystems
engineering
staff
members, will discuss technology
and legal aspects of unmanned
aerial vehicles. This discussion will
include legal standards, tips for
selecting an appropriate UAV, and
best management practices for use
in row-crop applications.
Angie Rieck-Hinz and Paul Kassel,
extension field agronomists, will
discuss issues in crop production,
including weed control issues, corn
rootworm management, and other
topics for late June.
Angie Rieck-Hinz is the recently
appointed field agronomist for North
Central Iowa. She will cover the
counties of Calhoun, Humboldt,
Webster, Wright, Hamilton, Worth,
Cerro Gordo, Franklin, and Hardin.
The City of Eagle Grove received voluntary
applications for the annexation of property into
the City. You are hereby notified that there will
be a public hearing before the Eagle Grove
City Council on July 21, 2014, concerning the
annexation applications beginning at 7 p.m. in
the City Hall for the City of Eagle Grove, Iowa.
The legal descriptions of the property proposed
to be annexed are attached.
Signed at Humboldt, Iowa, this 16th day of
June, 2014.
/s/ Brett D. Legvold
Brett D. Legvold, City Attorney for the
City of Eagle Grove, Iowa
LEGAL DESCRIPTION
RYERSON
Commencing at the Southeast corner of the
Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter
of Section 34, Township 91 North, Range 26
West of the 5th P.M., thence North 89° 47’ West
51.6 feet, thence North 11° 12’ West along the
Westerly right-of-way line of Iowa Highway 17,
129.1 feet to point of beginning, thence North
61° 20’ West along the centerline of D.D. No.
16, 352.11 feet, thence North 28° 17’ East
319.95 feet, thence North 81° 42’ East 24.72
feet, thence South 19° 40 ½’ East along said
West right of way line of Highway 17, 284.50
feet, thence South 11° 12’ East, along said right
of way line, 190.0 feet to the point of beginning
containing 1.78 acres, excepting therefrom the
following described real estate:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of the
Northeast Quarter of the Southwest Quarter
of Section 34, Township 91 North, Range 26
West of the 5th P.M., thence North 89° 47’ West
51.6 feet, thence North 11° 12’ West, along the
Westerly right of way line of Iowa Highway 17,
129.1 feet to point of beginning, thence North
61° 20’ West, along the centerline of Drainage
Ditch No. 16, 302.1 feet, thence North 28°17’
East 307.8 feet, thence South 19° 40 ½’ East,
along said west right of way line of Highway 17,
243.77 feet thence South 11° 12’ East, along
said right of way line, 190.0 feet to point of
beginning, containing 1.34 acres. (The East
line of the Northeast Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter of Section 34 is assumed to bear North
0° 00’ West).
CITY OF EAGLE GROVE, IOWA (WATER
TREATMENT PLANT):
Commencing 1,971.3 feet North of the
Southeast corner of the Southwest Quarter (SW
1/4 ) of Section 34, Township 91 North, Range 26,
and on the East line of said Southwest Quarter
(SW 1/4) and 613.4 feet West to the point of
beginning; thence 355.4 feet West; thence
Southwesterly to the West line of the Northeast
Quarter (NE 1/4) of the Southwest Quarter (SW
1/4) of said Section to a point 266.64 feet North
of the Southwest corner of the said Northeast
Quarter (NE 1/4) of the Southwest Quarter
(SW 1/4), thence South to Southwest corner of
said NE 1/4 of the SW 1/4, thence East on the
South line of the said Northeast Quarter (NE
1/4) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) 114.7
feet; thence Northeasterly on a straight line to
the place of beginning containing 4.11 acres
exclusive of the easement for Drainage District
No. 91; AND
A parcel of land in the Southwest Quarter of
Section 34, Township 91 North, Range 26 West
of the 5th P.M., Wright County, Iowa, and more
particularly described as follows: Commencing
at the South quarter corner of said Section
34; thence North 00° 05’ East 1317.30’ along
the quarter line; thence North 89° 30’ West
1314.84’ to the Southeast corner of the
Northwest Quarter of the Southwest Quarter of
said Section 34, and point of beginning; thence
continuing North 89° 30’ West 638.77 feet along
11/44 line; thence North 00° 01’ West 340.00’;
Global
Compassion
Network to host
Semi Tractor
Trailer & Farm
Tractor Obstacle
Course during
Albert City’s
Summerfest
Global Compassion Network is
holding a Semi Tractor Trailer &
Farm Tractor Obstacle Course on
Saturday, June 21, during Albert
City’s Summerfest. Sponsored
by Northland CDL Training &
Licensing, several events will be
offered, including a slow tractor
race and backing obstacle courses
for a semi tractor & trailer, as well
as a tractor & farm trailer.
Registration begins at 1 p.m. with
the events starting at 2:30 p.m. Prizes
include $75 for first, $50 for second,
and $25 for third for each event. For
more information, contact Dennis
Anderson at 712-887-0862.
All proceeds will benefit Global
Compassion Network’s Domestic
Disaster Relief.
Become a fan
thence South 89° 30’ East 705.00’ to the N.W.
property line of the Eagle Grove Sewage
Treatment Plant; thence South 42° 17 1/2’ West
98.39’ along said NW. property line to the East
line of the Northwest Quarter of the Southwest
Quarter, of said Section 34; thence South 00°
01’ East 266.64’ along said east line to the point
of beginning containing 5.0 acres more or less.
Note: The East line of the Northwest Quarter
of the Southwest Quarter of said Section 34
is assumed to bear South 00° 01’ East as
shown on plat of Eagle Grove Treatment Plant
property.
ARNOLD MOTOR SUPPLY
A parcel of land in the Northeast Quarter
(NE 1/4) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4) of
Section Thirty-four (34); Township Ninety-one
(91) North, Range Twenty-six (26), West of
the 5th P.M., Wright County, Iowa; described as
follows: Commencing at the Southeast comer
of said quarter-quarter, thence North 89° 47’
West for 51.6 feet to a point on the West right of
way line of Iowa Highway No. 17, thence North
11° 12’ West along said right of way for 129.1
feet to a point on the centerline of the open ditch
of Drainage District No. 16, thence North 61°20’
West along the centerline of said ditch for 432.2
feet to the point of beginning, thence continuing
North 61°20’ West along said centerline for
100.5 feet, thence North 28°22’40” East for
185.7 feet, thence North. 81°50’10” East for
124.7 feet, thence South 28°18’00” West for
260.5 feet to the point of beginning, containing
.5 acres, more or less, subject to easements of
record.
RYCOL CORPORATION
A tract of land in the Northeast 1/4 of the
Southwest 1/4 of Section 34, Township 91
North, Range 26 West 5th P.M., Wright County,
Iowa; described as follows: commencing at the
Southeast corner of said quarter-quarter, thence
North 89°47’ West for 51.6 feet to a point on the
West right of way line of Iowa Highway No. 17,
thence North 11°12’ West along said right of way
line for 129.1 feet to a point on the centerline
of the open ·ditch of Drainage District No. 16,
thence North 61°20’ West along the centerline
of said ditch for 352.11 feet to .the point of
beginning, thence continuing North 61°20’ West
along said centerline for 80 feet, thence North
28°17’ East for 261.3 feet, thence North 81°42’
East for 99.63 feet, thence South 28° 17’ West
for 319.95 feet to the point of beginning, subject
to easements of record.
BOWER MASONIC LODGE
All that part of the Northeast Quarter (NE
1/4) of the Southwest Quarter (SW 1/4); lying
West of Braden Avenue, (in Eagle Grove, Iowa)
and Northeast of Highway 17, in Section 34,
Township 91 North, Range 26, West of the 5th
P.M., Wright County, Iowa;
Also described as:
A triangular tract of land in Section 34,
described as commencing at the point where
Highway 17 intersects with Braden Street;
thence Northwest on the East side of Highway
17 to the South line of the corporation of the
City of Eagle Grove, Iowa, thence East along
the said South corporation line to the West
line of Braden Street in Eagle Grove; thence
Southwesterly along the West line of Braden
Street in Eagle Grove to where Braden
Street intersects with Highway 17 to place of
beginning, all in Township 91, Range 26 West
of the 5th P.M.
WAITT OUTDOOR, LLC
A Parcel of Land in the Southeast Quarter
(SE 1/4) of the Northwest Quarter (NW 1/4) and
the Northeast Quarter (NE 1/4) of the Southwest
Quarter (SW 1/4) of Section 34, Township 91
North, Range 26 West of the 5th P.M., Wright
County, Iowa and more particularly described
as follows: Bounded on the Westerly side by
the centerline of Drainage Ditch #15; Bounded
on the North by the South line of Parcel #3 of
a 1972 Survey Plat #2727; Bounded on the
Easterly side by the Westerly right of way line
of Iowa Highway #17; and Bounded on the
Southeasterly side by the centerline of Drainage
Ditch #94, (also shown as the Northwesterly
line of Parcel #2 of said 1972 survey). Said
described parcel contains 11 acres more or less
subject to easements of record.
THE ANTHONY D. ALIOTO AND GAIL
TWEDEN ALIOTO TRUST DATED OCTOBER
4, 1993
A 1.34 acre tract of land in the Northeast 1/4
of the SW ¼ of Section 34, Township 91 North;
Range 26 West 5th P.M., Wright County, Iowa,
described as commencing at the Southeast
corner of said quarter-quarter, thence N 89°47’
West for 51.6 feet to a point on the West Rightof-Way line of Iowa Highway No. 17, thence
North 11°12 West along said Right-of-Way
line for 129.1 feet to a point on the centerline
of Drainage District No. 16, and the point of
beginning, thence North 61° 20’ West along the
centerline of said ditch for 302.1 feet, thence
North 28°17’ East for 307.8 feet, thence South
19° 40 ½’ East along the West Right-of-Way
line of Highway No. 17 for 243.77 feet, thence
South 11°12’”East along said Right-of-Way line
for 190 feet to the point of beginning.
FIFTH GENERATION INVESTMENTS, LLC
A parcel of land in the NE 1/4 of the SW
1/4 of Section 34, Township 91 North, Range
26 West of the 5th P.M., Wright County, Iowa,
and more particularly described as follows:
Commencing at the Southeast corner of the NE
¼ SW 1/4 of said Section 34; thence N 89°47’
W 51.6 feet to a point on the West right-of-way
line of Iowa Highway #17; thence N 11°12’ W
129.1 feet along said West right-of-way to
a point on the centerline of the open ditch of
Drainage District No. 16; thence N 61°20’ W
779.0 feet along the centerline of said D.D. No.
16 to the point of intersection with the centerline
of the open ditch of Drainage District No. 15 and
the point of beginning; thence N 41°34’E 576.0’
feet along the centerlines of the open ditches
of Drainage District Nos. 15 and 94 to a point
on the West right-of-way line of Iowa Highway
No. 17; thence S 25°41 1/2’ E 389.0 feet along
said right-of-way line; thence S 81°42’ W 556.6
feet to the point of beginning. Said parcel
contains 2.4 acres more or less and is subject
to easements of record.
AND
An undivided one-half (1/2) interest in and
to a parcel of land in the NE 1/4 of the SW
1/4 of Section 34, T 91 N; R26 W of the 5th
P.M., Wright County, Iowa and more particularly
described as follows: Commencing at the SE
Corner of the NE ¼ SW ¼ of said Section 34;
thence N 89° 47’ W 51.6’ to a point on the West
right-of-way of Iowa Highway No. 17; thence N
11° 12’ W 129.1’ along said West right-of-way
to a point on the centerline of the open ditch
of Drainage District No. 16, thence N 61° 20’
W 432.0’ along the centerline of said DD #16
to the point of beginning; thence N 61° 20’ W
347.0’ along the centerline of said DD #16 to
the point of intersection with the centerline of
the open ditch of Drainage District #15; thence
N 81°42’ E 432.5’; thence S 28° 17’ W 261.3’
to the centerline of DD #16 and the point of
beginning. Said parcel contains 1.0 acres, more
or less and is subject to easements of record.
Including one-half of the party wall described
in that certain corporate Warranty Deed
executed on August 13, 1974, and recorded
in Book 104, page 428 of the Wright County
Recorder’s office.
Wk.25
ATTENTION ALL
EAGLES…
Are your kids restless
and in need of a
fun summer activity?
Well, Global Fingerprints
offers a great way to
get active and connect with
kids all the way around
the world! Go to this website
http://hopestand.globalfingerprints.org/
and watch the Hope Stand video with
your kids. Then, scroll to the bottom to
request your downloadable information
to start you very own Hope Stand. After
all, kids make the best entrepreneurs!
— A message from The Nice Guy
Weekly
FAREWAY
Flyers
are available at
8 a.m.
Wednesday
morning in store
Oldson’s Plumbing, Heating
and Air Conditioning, Inc.
Eagle Grove/Clarion
515-448-3456
Residential & CommeRCial Plumbing & Heating
We seRviCe any bRand/model
• Furnaces
• air conditioners
• FirePlaces
• Boilers
LENNOX
Check us out
on Facebook
MAYTAG
24-7 emeRgenCy seRviCe
• Geothermal
• heat PumPs
• ductless systems
• Water heaters
FUJITSU
RHEEM
10
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Classified advertising
EaglE grovE EaglE
Help wanted
HELP WANTED
Warehouse
Daybreak Foods, Inc., a growing, financially stable food processing
company, has the following full-time opportunities available at our
production facility near Eagle Grove, IA.
SEMI DRIVER/DOCK ATTENDANT
Valid CDL required. Responsible for moving trailers as needed on site.
Some driving to nearby locations. Assist in warehouse as needed. Wrap
pallets and load product onto trailers. Operate pallet jack and forklift.
Responsible for paperwork associated with moving of product. Shift:
Sun.–Thurs.; 7 a.m. to 5 p.m.
PACKAGING
Palletize egg cases and wrap pallets, while ensuring quality standards
are met and responsible for performing sanitation of equipment each day.
Requires lifting up to 30 lbs. repeatedly throughout shift. Shift start time
6:45 a.m. Regular schedule includes weekend days.
PROCESSING LEAD
Provide supervision and assist in egg packaging and sanitation duties.
Prefer familiarity with SQF and HACCP to ensure quality standards are
met. Shift start time 6 a.m. Alternating weekends off.
Benefits include: Overtime Pay, Medical, Dental, Vision, 401k, STD,
Life, AD&D, Aflac, PTO, vacation & holidays. E.O.E., Post-offer, Preemployment drug screen, Physical Capacity Physical, and background
check required.
Apply in person at Daybreak Foods, 3159 Buchanan Ave., Eagle
Grove, IA 50533. Or, e-mail your resume to: [email protected]
com.
Now HiRiNg
We are now taking applications and hiring for our manufacturing and yard operations.
Starting wage is $11.50 per hour and up depending on qualifications.
$.40 shift premium paid for 2nd and 3rd shifts.
These are full time positions, 40+ hours a week
Must pass company drug screen and physical.
CoMPANY PAiD Health insurance!
Disability Insurance, Insurance Flex Plan, Dental Insurance
and 401 K plan offered.
Please apply in person at:
Advanced Drainage Systems, inc.
100 NE 20th Street
Eagle Grove, IA.
25, 26
We are an Equal Opportunity Employer
CDL Truck Drivers Needed
Eagle grove, iowa
SigN oN BoNUS - $2,500!!!
Our business is growing and so is our team! Advanced Drainage
Systems, Inc., the world’s largest producer of corrugated HDPE drainage pipe is recruiting for full time drivers at our EAgLE gRoVE, iA
production facility.
ADS private fleet drivers must safely operate company equipment
and provide a high level of customer service. Drivers must maintain
DOT compliant driver logs, paperwork and have an established record
of safe driving practices. Must have a valid Class A CDL and one (1)
year of verifiable commercial driving experience. Must have acceptable MVR
We offer competitive mileage rate of $.43 per mile to start and we
offer comprehensive benefit package, including medical, dental, vision
& Employee Stock Ownership Plan (ESOP) and 401(k). Most nights
home and some weekends required.
Applicants are subject to drug screen, physical, background and
MVR check.
Please forward resume/work history or stop in at:
Advanced Drainage Systems, inc.
100 NE 20th st.
Eagle grove, iA 50533
[email protected]
Apply between the hours of 8 am to 4 pm Monday through Friday.
www.ads-pipe.com
ADS is an Equal Opportunity Employer
OTR Drivers! TSI Kansas, Inc. is
seeking Drivers living in Garner! We
have regular business here to get you
home! We pay up to .45 CPM in 2-4
months and offer medical benefits
for you and your family. Call John at
(785) 632-5183 ext.233. TSIKANSAS.COM
25,26
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
SaleS dateS
claimed
Renew your subscription,
or order a new one, at
theeaglegroveeagle.com
Retirement Farm Machinery
Auction
Thursday June 19
11 a.m.
1 East & 4 1/2 N, 1/2 East of
Webster City, IA, Hamilton Co
OWNER: Lynn Crystal,
Sale conducted by
Ryerson Auction Realty Ltd.
––––––––––––––––––––––
Retirement Farm Machinery
Auction
Thursday June 26
10:30 a.m.
6 W of Hampton, IA & 2 1/2
South Franklin Co
OWNER: Boyd Dohrmann,
Sale conducted by
Ryerson Auction Realty Ltd
25-26
25, 26
Classified advertising
EaglE grovE EaglE
Thursday, June 19, 2014
help wanted
events
Farmer’s Market
EAgLE gROVE COMMUNITy SCHOOL DISTRICT
Help Celebrate
Max Hamer’s
80th Birthday
Fri., June 13
COOK’S HELPER - 180 DAyS DURINg SCHOOL yEAR
5 Hours Per Day – 8:00 a.m.-1:00pm.
*Evidence of dependability, trustworthiness flexibility
*Demonstrated ability to get along with others and
Interact successfully with a variety of personalities
*Ability to work as a team player
*Must comply with physical exam upon hire
Fresh asparagus,
radishes, green beans,
tomatoes, green onions.
with a card shower on
Wednesday, Jun 25.
104 E. Neville St, Woolstock,
IA 50599
East of the
Eagle Grove Greenhouse
in the vacant lot. 25-26
Koenigs’ Acres Flea Market.
Saturday, June 21, July 19, and
August 16. 7 a.m.- 4 p.m., 1510-110th
St., Hampton. Four miles south and
one mile west of Hampton. Vendors,
$10. 641-456-4903. Expecting
antiques, collectibles, livestock
equipment, crafts, and much more.
Simple food, port-a-potties, and
firewood available.
Application MUST include:
1. Letter of Application
2. Resume’ Including 3 Work References
3. Completed Application Form (available in administration office)
4. Copy of High School Diploma/Transcript or Equivalent (GED) or
College Transcript
Send to: Supt. Jess Toliver
325 N Commercial, Eagle Grove, IA 50533
11
News
Tip?
Call Kim at
448-4745
EEO/AA
garage sales
HIgH COACHINg POSITION
BOyS’ gOLF COACH
Applications MUST include ALL of the following:
1. Letter of application to Superintendent
2. Coaching license
3. Resume’ and 3 work references
4. Proof of high school graduation
Send to: Supt. Jess Toliver
325 N Commercial, Eagle Grove, IA 50533
garage Sale
422 SE 2nd St.
Friday, June 20
9 a.m. - 6 p.m.
Saturday, June 21
9 a.m. - Noon
EEO/AA
Permanent Program Technician
The full vacancy announcement with mandatory application requirements can be obtained online at www.usajobs.gov.
Applications will be available online beginning June 17 and must be
completed by July 7, 2014.
Questions regarding this position can be directed to Tamara Pruin, at
515-532-2329.
USDA is an Equal Opportunity Employer.
Driver
FULL-TIME DRIVERS
Home Daily!
Based in Clear Lake, IA
GREAT PAY!
Health, Vision & Dental
CDL-A, 1 yr. T/T exp.
800-879-7826
RUAN
RUAN
www.ruan.com/jobs
Dedicated to Diversity EOE
Need Office Supplies?
We might have what you are
looking for!
Call us if you
need something.
448-4745 • 314 W. Broadway
[email protected]
G
ISTIN
NEw L
301 s.
CommeRCIAl
Craftsman style 4
BR, open floor plan
features oak ww &
blt-ins, LR, DR, fam
rm & spacious oak
kit. New paint/carpet throughout. See
This One!
P.O. Box 6 • 314 W. Broadway
Eagle Grove, IA 50533 • 515-448-4745
[email protected]
wANTED
Dental Office Employee
Part-time - will Train
Drop off resume at the office of
Dr. James Pollard,
306 W. Broadway, Eagle Grove
25-28
448-5022
OTR Drivers: TSI Kansas, Inc.
is seeking drivers living in Garner!
We have regular business here to get
you home! We pay up to .45 CPM
in 2-4 months and offer medical
benefits for you and your family.
Call John at (785) 632-5183 ext.
25-26
233. TSIKANSAS.COM
––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
wanted
wANTED:
Home grown eggs.
Call 825-3603
homes FoR sALe
ISTING
NEw L
ES M/L
2 ACR
In the garage, the house,
and the yard!
220 W. Oak, Goldfield
Friday, June 20 &
Saturday, June 21
8 a.m. - Noon
Adult men/women and tons of
kids’ clothes, furniture, and much,
much more!
Vacancy Announcement
The Wright County USDA Farm Service Agency (FSA) Office located
in Clarion, Iowa, is accepting applications to fill a permanent Program
Technician position. The individual selected will be responsible for
carrying out general office activities and technical functions pertaining
to FSA administered programs. Applicants should possess excellent
human relations skills as well as strong clerical and computer skills. A
general knowledge of agricultural practices would also be beneficial.
Humongous
Rummage Sale
dUPlex
PRoPeRty
2 BR units w/full
bath-shower, efficient
elec. heat, built in
70s, 2-car gar.
Call for details!
Glassware, quilts, linens, treadle,
crocks, collectibles, fridge,
furniture, household, misc. Don’t
miss it!
rent
FOR RENT: 1-Bedroom
house. No Pets. Prefer single
occupancy. 515-979-1601. 18TF
–––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––––
305 NW FIRST
HOUSE FOR RENT
1-Bedroom. Full basement.
Recent remodel. Washer, dryer,
stove, & frig. provided. No Pets.
No Smoking. $375/Mo. $500/
Deposit. References required.
515-669-3121
23TF
112 S. CADWELL
HOUSE FOR RENT
1-Bedroom.Recently remodeled.
Washer, dryer, stove, &
frig. provided. No Pets. No
Smoking. $375/Mo. $500/
Deposit. References required.
515-669-3121
for sale
AcreAge
For SAle
Recently remodeled ranch
home on nice clean acreage, one mile west of Renwick, 1530 Washington Ave.
Call Kirk Swanson at
515-890-1199
TF
FOR SALE: Antique 2 bottom
plow w/2 disk. Very good
condition. $600 OBO. Call after
5 p.m. 603-6313.
23TF
ISTING
NEw L
27 PARKVIeW dR - 3 BR, - Maint.-free ranch offers finished lower
level w/kit, non-conform 4th BR, gas fireplace, rec. tile, carpet, & bath.
Beautiful home on corner lot next to city park!
!
TCHEN
I
NEw K
ISTING
NEw L
jUst lIsted - 901 Ne 2Nd st. - 3 BR spacious ranch situated
on 2 acres M/L within city limits, fenced back yard, large deck,
recent furnace/air, double garage, fam. rm w/frplc and much more!
GREAT LOCATION!
200 W. BRoAdWAy
Vintage bank building,
prime business location,
1800 sq. ft,walk-in vault,
TURN-KEy READy!
223 W. BRoAdWAy
Choice corner bldg on main st Hwy 17 - over 2000 sf., fin. interior to
suit and you’ve got the best spot
in town.
E!
CE SIT
CHOI
FARmLANd ListiNgs cALL
don Knudsen - 515-689-4270
15 PARKVIeW dR - 4 BR, many updates include new
hickory kit., carpeting, m/free siding, T-pane windows, you will
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206 FoRest - 3 BR ranch, well-maintained one-owner, brick ext. &
recent roof, spacious kit & dining, bsmnt family rm, big enclosed porch,
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ISTING
NEw L
322 s. CommeRCIAl - Apprx. 4,000 sq. ft., former church bldg,
adaptable to multi-use, adjacent property included.
For showings and information, call
Kurt Knudsen ~ 515-293-2000
KNUdseN ReAlty
201 s. Commercial, eagle Grove - 448-3717
LLER!
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Feel right at home in this
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ISTING
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421 s. CommeRCIAl
3-4 BR, open floor plan
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plus dbl gar. w/storage!
Shop on our website @ knudsenrealty.com
Email: [email protected]
12
LocaL News
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Homeschool Question
and Answer Night
More improvements at the fair
With the Wright County Fair only a few weeks away, preparations
and improvements are in full swing out at the fairgrounds. On
Friday, June 13, workers from Studer Construction of Clarion
were hard at work putting a new metal roof on the small dairy
animal barn. the fair, and the facilities, just keep getting better
and better. this year’s fair runs July 9 - 14. Photo by Kim Demory
Cayler awarded Gerontological
Nursing Certification
Stacey Cayler, RN, was recently
awarded a Gerontological Nursing
Certification from the American
Nurses Credentialing Center.
Initially Cayler was selected as
a recipient of a 2013 Gero Nurse
Scholarship provided by the Iowa
Health Care Foundation. A yearlong online course through the
University of Nebraska Medical
Center followed. Once the online
course was completed, she sat for
the American Nurses Credentialing
Center (ANCC) examination of
gerontological nursing. In early
June, Cayler received official notice
of her certification.
Since
the
early
2000’s,
gerontological nursing (the study
of the unique health issues of older
adults) has been recognized both as
a specialty and as an essential and
integral component of adult nursing.
Even though this certification has
been available since 1974, less than
one percent of registered nurses are
certified in gerontological nursing,
according to the National Academy
of Sciences, 2008.
“Stacey is a wonderful asset to our
team at Iowa Specialty Hospital,”
said Steve Simonin, CEO. “She
brings a vast array of skills and
talents to both the hospital and
Assisted Living. Stacey’s new
certification is a great win for our
facility and a major accomplishment
for her personally.”
Cayler graduated from Mercy
School of Nursing and Simpson
College, and has been a registered
nurse for 22 years. Currently she is
The Meadows Assisted Living Nurse
Leader and Program Coordinator/
CDE (Certified Diabetes Educator)
of the Iowa Specialty Diabetes
Center.
Have you been wondering what
it takes to educate your child at
home? There will be a Homeschool
Information Night held on Thursday,
June 19, from 7-9 p.m. at “The
Bridge,” 905 Des Moines St.,
Webster City, for all parents who
want to know more about this option
for their school-aged children.
Current homeschooling parents are
welcome to attend as well.
Many parents have questions about
laws, curriculum, college, military,
driver education, special needs,
and more. There will be a panel of
experienced Home School Parents to
answer those questions. They will
include Kristy Northway-Board,
member of NICHE (Network of
Iowa Christian Home Educators),
Nancy Janney-Supervising Teacher
and Stratford HSAP Teacher (Home
School Assistance Program), and
Janis
Johnson-Coordinator
of
NICHE State-wide Graduation and
home educator with 18+ years of
experience.
This event is free and open to the
public.
EaglE grovE EaglE
Festival in
the park
Al Bell remembered in klemme
Al Bell’s second daughter, Becky
Bell-Greenstreet, will visit Klemme
Friday evening, June 20, to talk
about her celebrity father. For thirty
years, Al Bell, entertainer/educator,
traveled to sixty countries over a
span of thirty years, bringing the
world to thousands of rural Iowa
schoolchildren. From 1949-1979,
Bell (and later, his wife Rhea Bell)
gave 400 assembly programs a
year, driving to school gyms and
auditoriums all over the state.
“Klemme was one of his favorite
schools,” said Becky in a phone
conversation with Nyla Bridges
in May. “Just like teachers have
favorite students, Al Bell had favorite
schools!”
As a part of Klemme’s 125th
anniversary, Bell-Greenstreet, an
Oregon resident for the last six
years, will host the showing of two
Al Bell films and a question and
answer discussion afterwards. She
will also have her book, “Al Bell
Remembered” and the DVD package
which contains 28 of Bell’s travel
movies (transferred from 16 mm.
to DVDs) available for purchase.
Some of the most popular films were
made in Ireland, Peru, Spain, Egypt,
Romania,
Scotland,
Morocco,
Holland, and Kenya.
This special Al Bell remembrance
in Klemme follows an “Al Bell Day”
at the Iowa Historical Museum held
on Sat., June 14, in Des Moines.
The Al Bell children donated many
artifacts, costumes, original posters,
and foreign dolls to the museum
which set up an exhibit on the
main floor last December. Films
were shown that day, as well as an
appearance of the Bell children:
Becky, Rhea, Allen and Doug. (The
Al Bell exhibit will be on display
through the end of this year for any
visitors to the Des Moines area.)
Nyla Bridges is a 1972 graduate of
Klemme High School. She is a travel
consultant and lives with her family
in Holmen, Wis. Her love of travel
was inspired by seeing Al Bell visit
the old Klemme gym. She and other
alumni have hosted Al Bell events in
the past at Klemme Ag Days.
Thanks to a couple of grownup Al
Bell fans, “I Remember Al Bell” is a
popular Facebook page, where many
Iowans and former Iowans write in
and post specific memories, what
school they went to, and occasional
questions which Becky and her
sister, Rhea, enjoy answering.
thanks
A special “thank you” to everyone who sent me cards, called, and visited me, while I was in the Clarion hospital and at Rotary Senior Living
North. To Amy, my daughter-in-law, thank you for visiting me at the hospital and doing things for me. She was a busy woman, as my son, Steve, was
in the Mason City Hospital. Thank you to my son, Bill and his wife, Kelly,
for their flowers, visits, calls, and transportation when needed. To my sister, Bev Jacobson, I appreciated your flowers, calls, and visits. To Helen
Burr, Pat Miller, and Lorene Maier, thank you for your caring ways.
Thank you Dr. Smith and Dr. Redding for the kindness and concern you
showed me, while I was in the hospital and at Rotary North. I appreciated
Brother Bob Dishman, from the Goldfield Park Church, for visiting me at
both places.
I wish to extend my appreciation to all the many employees at Rotary
Senior Living North for their kindness, caring, and loving ways, while I
was in the Skilled Care area of the home. While there, I was shown by
the physical and occupational therapists how to walk with a boot, on my
fractured foot, how to go up and down steps, how to dress myself, put my
boot on, and the many other things I needed to know before going home.
I am glad Dr. Smith, my family, and I made the decision for me to recover
at the home. It was a worthwhile and enjoyable stay. The food was delicious too!
— Barb Dodge
services
K+M Storage
Mini Storage
900 N. Iowa
Eagle Grove
515-321-6484
Used Appliances
Fully Guaranteed
Knutzon’s Inc.
211 W. Broadway
Eagle Grove
448-4425
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everyone to see. Email them to
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URNESS HARDwARE
Eagle Grove storm damage
High winds and heavy rain totaling in excess of 4.5 inches left
streets flooded, basements taking in water, and tree limbs down.
City crews were hard at work early tuesday morning cleaning up
the debris from the June 16 storm. Photo by Kim Demory
Go green in the kitchen
Adopting
an
eco-friendly
lifestyle is a great way to protect the
planet for future generations. As the
“go green” movement continues to
grow in popularity, men and women
are realizing more and more ways to
reduce their carbon footprints.
One method to find new ways to
be more environmentally friendly is
to examine a favorite hobby and think
of ways to enjoy that hobby in a way
that also benefits the environment.
Foodies, for example, can take a
look around their kitchens to find
ways where their love of cooking
and food can be joined together with
their desires to be more eco-friendly.
The following are just a few ways to
Appliances & Rental
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Eagle Grove
448-5025
1-800-225-0481
Eagle Grove Chiropractic Center
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FURNITURE
muebles
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Large Selection
go green in the kitchen.
* Banish bottled water in favor
of filters. Bottled water can be very
wasteful, even when bottles are made
from recycled materials. Waterfiltering pitchers are inexpensive,
which cannot always be said about
bottled water that needs to be
periodically restocked. Faucetmounted filters can be directly
attached to the faucet to make the
process of filtering water that much
easier.
* Reconsider how you store
leftovers. Many people store their
leftovers in plastic containers. Many
are made from recycled plastic
and are made from petroleum, a
nonrenewable resource. Instead, ecoconscious foodies can opt for glass
or ceramic containers rather than the
more popular plastic alternatives.
* Coffee grounds and eggshells
can be put to use in the garden. You
can add them to the compost pile in
your yard, where items you would
otherwise discard can help enrich
the soil, making for healthier lawns
and gardens.
* Fire up the dishwasher only
when it’s full. Choose an efficient
setting and let the dishes air dry
rather overnight instead of drying
them with heat.
* Rely on smaller appliances.
In addition, when heating water for
tea, hot chocolate or coffee, use an
electric kettle to heat water instead
of the oven cooktop. The smaller
appliance is more efficient and won’t
consume as much energy.
Hundreds, maybe even thousands, of people gathered
in Clarion, Iowa this past weekend to enjoy their annual
summer celebration known as Festival in the Park. there
was a parade, music, games, food, and so much more to
enjoy throughout the weekend. Photos by Matt Voigts
Bash on the Farm
Bash on the Farm will hold its 13th Annual free admission festival at
Heritage Park June 20-21. This will be the third year at the park. New
this year, will be an indoor “yard stage” (as it’s been known by) with more
gospel music. It will feature the McClellan Singing Sisters on Friday at 7
p.m., and The Forgiven Quartet from Oklahoma on Saturday at 1:30 and
6:30 p.m. The construction of the new building at Heritage Park is being
completed and will be ready just in time for it’s first use at Bash on the
Farm.
The main stage will feature rock groups 7eventh Time Down and
Manic Drive on Friday night with LED wall lighting. Saturday night
contemporary worship artist Todd Agnew will headline. He is well
known for his song “Grace Like Rain” a version of the hymn “Amazing
Grace”. Willet, a past favorite at Bash on the Farm’s main stage, will also
be Saturday evening.
There are many hard rock to metal bands in the shed for those who like
that style. Another new addition this year is the after party from 11:30 p.m.
Friday-1 a.m., with Tru Serva and Transformation Records.
Camping is available with registration at the gate. The festival hours
are 1 p.m. to 1 a.m., Friday and Saturday 10 a.m. to 10 p.m. Several
children’s activities are available including kid’s pedal pull on Saturday.
bashonthefarm.com has all the info.
Pollard Family Dentistry
of Eagle Grove is excited to
once again have Stacy Askelsen
as a dental hygienist. Call 515-448-5022 to make
your appointment in Eagle Grove
We are open every weekday.
StACy
ASkeLSeN
Emergency cell number at 515-230-5255.
LocaL News
EaglE grovE EaglE
— You are what you eat —
by Annette Snyder
MS, rd, Ld
registered dietitian
Wright medical center
[email protected]
Stand back, it’s time to do some
science—chemistry in particular.
When it comes to food these
days, everyone is concerned with
chemicals in their food. The internet
is littered with blogs of wouldbe food “investigators” that claim
certain foods or brands or additives
as unhealthy. There are some grains
of truth in their information, but
some of it is more hyped than it
maybe needs to be. Truly, even as
a dietitian, I would fall short of all
of the recommended food items that
these sensationalist articles or blogs
endorse.
All that aside, what is really
in our food? Obviously, we know
that the more processed an item is,
the greater chance it has for added
sugars, salt, fat, preservatives, etc.
Not all good. Sometimes, though,
processing is actually required to
make the food edible. Making whole
grain pasta is one example. That
wheat isn’t going to get to your dinner
plate without a little manipulation.
The benefit of processed foods,
if we are to look for a silver lining, is
that they are labeled with ingredients
and nutrition information. An apple,
however, does not come with a
nutrition label. We do have the most
information available to us than ever
before. That can be a good thing and
it can be very confusing.
Usually, a piece of advice that is
frequently shared is this: “if you can’t
pronounce it, don’t eat it.” Meaning,
if a food has a long chemical
name listed in the ingredients, and
especially higher up on the list, leave
it on the shelf. Well, what if “natural”
foods (“natural” actually does not
have a legally protected definition)
came with labels? Let’s take a look.
The first item’s label would
look like this: “yellow-orange E101,
yellow-brown E160a, ethyl hexanoate,
ethyl butanoate, 3-methylbut-1-YLethanoate, pentyl acetate, E1510,
natural ripening agent (ethene gas).”
Scary-looking, isn’t it? Know what
it is? The colors and flavors of a
banana, according to chemistry.
These are not preservatives, added
flavors, or man-made cocktails.
These are banana. Period.
What about this doozy? “ethyl
ethanoate, 3-methyl butyraldehyde,
2-methyl butyraldehyde, pentanal,
methybutyrate, octane, hexanal,
styrene,
nonane,
non-1-ene,
linalool,
citral,
benzaldehyde,
butylated hydroxytoluene (E321),
methylparaben…” That would be
the flavors in a fresh, all-natural
blueberry. I’m still going to eat it.
The moral of the story: we know
a lot about food, but sometimes are
misguided by good intentions. We
know that certain groups of foods
are healthier than others. Often, but
not always, chemicals added to foods
by man are not the best options.
However, sometimes things from
nature itself look scary, but may in
fact be completely innocent. There
are so many layers to the foods we
eat, so many as-yet unidentified
compounds that aid in keeping us
healthy, that we will never be able
to stay away from all chemicals.
Chemistry is everywhere, including
your grocery-store produce shelf,
farmer’s market, organic foods aisle,
or garden.
The Eagle Grove Eagle welcomes your Letter
to the Editor. Share your opinions, concerns and
praise with the community through your hometown newspaper. All signed letters will be considered, and are subject to General Manager’s
approval.
Thursday, June 19, 2014
King Band to feature Bob Patton
Summer concerts continue in Fort
Dodge at the Karl L. King Band
Shell in Oleson Park this Sunday
evening, June 22, with another
special concert. Conductor Jerrold P.
Jimmerson and Assistant Conductor
Dr. David Klee will lead the band
in a “Salute to Iowa,” with many
selections on the program written by
Iowa composers.
Concert time is 7:30 p.m., and
there is no admission charge, with
these concerts being provided by
the City of Fort Dodge. The Good
Shepherd Lutheran Church Bell
Choir will again have homemade
ice cream and cake, starting around
6:30 p.m. Persons attending these
concerts are reminded to bring their
own lawn chairs, since no seating is
provided.
Special guest soloist will be Bob
Patton, baritone, from Gowrie. Mr.
Patton attended the University of
Northern Iowa before joining the
U.S. Air Force Singing Sergeants in
Washington, D.C. During his twenty
year career in the military, Patton
soloed with the National Symphony
and the Boston and Cincinnati Pops
Orchestras. He also performed with
the Washington Civic, Baltimore,
Wolf Trap, Northern Virginia and
Annapolis opera companies.
In 1991, he returned to Gowrie and
became editor and publisher of The
Gowrie News, the fourth generation
owner of a 110-year-old family
business. He is now retired from the
newspaper after a 20-year career, but
is still very active and much soughtafter as a vocalist throughout the
Midwest.
Mr. Patton will perform highlights
from George Gershwin’s 1935 opera,
“Porgy and Bess,” with such wellknown songs as “Summertime” and
“It Ain’t Necessarily So”, followed
by the humorous “If I Were a Rich
Man” from Fiddler On The Roof.
Each concert always closes in the
traditional way, with the playing of
our National Anthem, “The StarSpangled Banner.”
In the event of inclement weather,
the concert will be cancelled. Plan
now to spend each Sunday evening
during June and July with the Karl
L. King Municipal Band in beautiful
Oleson Park, located in the southern
part of the city of Fort Dodge.
Senior Farmers Market
Nutrition Program
Iowa Department of Agriculture and Land Stewardship 2014 Senior
Farmers Market Nutrition Program (SFMNP) is available now through
Upper Des Moines Opportunity, Inc. All eligible participants in the Senior
Farmers Market Nutrition Program must live in the service area of this Area
Agency on Aging; be 60 years of age or older at the time of application (born
in or before 1954); and have a household income of less than $21,590 if
single, and $29,101 for a married couple.
Each eligible senior will receive ten $3.00 checks per person. The checks
can only be used to purchase whole fruits, vegetables, herbs, and honey from
state-authorized vendors. The Senior Farmers Market Nutrition Program is
an equal opportunity provider.
Those that qualify may complete an application at the following distribution
sites. Upper Des Moines Opportunity, Inc., located at 221 W. Broadway
Eagle Grove, office hours are Monday, Tuesday, Thursday, and Friday from
9 a.m. to noon and 1 to 4 p.m.; Leinbach Center located at 116 Luick Lane
N. in Belmond—Monday through Friday from 9 to 11 a.m. If you live in
Clarion, please contact Kim Thayer at (515) 408-2628 to set up a time when
she will be in Clarion to dispense the checks.
Workshop for Farm Businesses
set for June 24 in Fort Dodge
Farmers are unique—particularly
as there isn’t a distinct moment when
they just walk out the workplace
door to retirement as someone in a
regular wage-earning job might do.
Rather, farm families often need to
think about how to transition the
farm business to the next generation
during lifetime, as well as having an
estate plan in place.
“Talking about transitions and
estate planning is difficult for most
people—and especially for farm
families,” says Melissa O’Rourke,
the Iowa State University Farm &
Agribusiness Management Specialist
in northwest Iowa. “And actual
implementation of a transition plan
can be even harder.” That’s why
Iowa State University Extension
offers an “Evaluating Your Estate
Plan” workshop to answer transition
and estate planning questions and
help families prepare for the future.
The one-day workshop will be held
on June 24 at the Webster County
Fairgrounds, East Auditorium, Fort
Dodge.
“Families and individuals should
plan adequately to protect assets that
they have built over a lifetime of
hard work,” according to O’Rourke,
one of the speakers at the event.
O’Rourke is an attorney experienced
in agricultural law and estate
planning.
Kelvin Leibold, also an ISU
Extension Farm & Agribusiness
Management Specialist will be
the other featured speaker at
the workshop. Leibold joined
ISU Extension in 1987 and has
vast experience in working with
agricultural clients in farm and
business planning.
According to Leibold, “There
are options particularly suited for
consideration by farm families,
different ways to transition farm
management and assets. This
program helps farm families plan
for the future.” The workshop
will discuss the language of estate
planning, gift, estate and inheritance
taxes, calculating retirement costs,
and many other areas vital to creating
a good estate plan.
“We’re really excited about this
workshop because it doesn’t just stop
at providing valuable information for
anyone concerned about estate and
transition plans,” says O’Rourke.
“Everyone will participate in a
hands-on analysis and discussion
of case studies that will help folks
apply the information to their own
situations.”
Anyone who is unsure of how to
build a transition plan or what options
are best for their farm operation and
family should attend this workshop.
The workshop will be held at
the Webster County Fairgrounds,
East Auditorium, on June 24, with
registration starting at 9 a.m., with
adjournment at 4 p.m. Advance
registration is required and space
is limited. There is a fee for this
workshop which includes lunch
and materials. To register, call the
Webster County Extension Office at
515-576-2119.
Gospel Fest
Herman Park Gospel Fest will be held on Saturday, June 28, from 10:30
a.m. - 7 p.m. at the Herman Park Pavillion, Woodland Ave. and S. Green St.
in Boone.
There is no admission charge, but there will be a free will offering. Bring
your family, friends, and lawn chairs. There will be food available all day.
For more information, contact Harold and Betty Holmes, 515-432-7041, or
e-mail: [email protected]
Innovative system uses bacteria
to generate heat–and quality compost
The Practical Farmers project
may help fruit and vegetable farmers
cut operating costs.
Raising high-quality fruit and
vegetables requires a few key
resources: quality seed, adequate
sun and water, healthy soil—and the
ability to withstand volatile weather
like hail. More farmers are turning to
high tunnels to protect crops, as well
as to expand the growing season and
capitalize on early- and late-season
markets.
These resources come at a cost:
Many farmers need to purchase soil
amendments, like compost, and then
pay to truck it in. For those with high
tunnels, many pay for supplemental
heat to protect early- and lateseason crops from unpredictable
temperatures. For many fruit and
vegetable farmers, these added costs
are another drain on the budget at
a time when cash flow is already
tight.
But what if farmers could use one
system to get both compost and heat?
An innovative on-farm project by
Practical Farmers of Iowa is doing
just that: using waste heat from
composting to protect delicate crops
inside high tunnels during spring
and fall cold spikes. This innovative
project uses the concept of “trickle
charging” to heat soil inside a high
tunnel.
The system started heating a
portion of the high tunnel soil
shortly after the crop was planted in
early April at TableTop Farm near
Nevada. The novel system increased
soil temperatures by 5 degrees during
the mid-April cold snap – equivalent
to more than 5 gallons of liquid
propane for the 300-square-foot test
plot. Sally Gran, who runs TableTop
Farm, says the boost was a nice
surprise – especially in comparison
to her heating costs last year. Such
a system could become a viable way
for other fruit and vegetable farmers
to cut costs and better manage fickle
temperature swings.
“Last year we installed a $1,400
propane heater in the high tunnel
and spent an additional $1,200
on LP,” Sally says. “The cost was
unsustainable for the farm budget
and didn’t really fit with our energy
use philosophy. This time of year,
we’re hovering around freezing,
and 5 degrees can be the difference
between a plant living and dying.”
How the system works
Rich Schuler, energy consultant
with Practical Farmers, says trickle
charging the soil in a high tunnel
works the same way as in a car
battery: A large battery delivers a
flood of current to an electric motor
when the engine is started; the
depleted battery is then charged by
the alternator when the car is driven.
The compost system operates the
same way. An insulated 1,100-gallon
water tank acts as the battery, which is
trickle-charged by the heat extracted
from the aerobic composting process
over time. When heat is needed in
the high tunnel during a cold snap, a
pump moves hot water from the tank
into tubing in the soil. The pump
is turned off at the end of the cold
period, and trickle charging of the
water tank resumes.
Most materials for the system
are common hardware store items:
plywood, foam board insulation
and PVC pipes. Other components
include the pumps, blower, stainless
steel tubing and four 275-gallon
food-grade plastic totes.
eco-friendly energy
“The system was designed to use
very little electricity,” Rich says,
adding that it’s been operating offgrid on a single 140-watt solar PV
panel. “An important goal of the
project is to put alternative hardware
in the field that is not nearly the cost
of other renewable technologies.
Materials for the prototype system
cost roughly $7,000, including the
solar PV components. The next goal
will be to build a system with 80
percent of the performance of the
prototype, at 20 percent of the cost.”
“In the future, society will have
to make do with trickles of energy,
rather than the flood of energy
derived from readily accessible – but
dwindling – fossil fuels,” Rich says.
“Aerobic bacteria can provide that
continuous trickle of energy and are
a long-term source of generating onfarm energy in the form of heat.”
Another benefit of the Practical
Farmers project, he adds, is that
it produces high-quality compost
directly on the farm with less labor,
machinery and fuel than most
methods. Rich explains that aerobic
composting requires the right mix
of ingredients (carbon, nitrogen
and water); the right conditions
(temperature and oxygen); and proper
management to yield high-quality,
nutrient-rich
and
biologicallydiverse compost. If a compost pile or
windrow is not periodically turned to
allow oxygen to enter, the entrained
oxygen will be depleted, and it will
become anaerobic.
“Under anaerobic conditions,
useful fungi and bacteria die off.
When the fungi die off, the anaerobic
colony releases ammonia, and the
loss of nitrogen and biological
diversity results in a pile with greatly
reduced value as a soil amendment
– a lower-value product,” he says.
“The PFI compost heat system is
designed to eliminate the need to
turn the compost by forcing air
through the insulated compost box
with a solar-powered blower.”
A blower provides an adequate
supply of oxygen to the compost and
works with two heat exchangers to
stabilize the compost temperature
between 131 and 150 degrees. “After
the warmest phase of the composting
process, the material in the compost
chamber is moved outside to finish
curing before field application,” Rich
says. “The system is then loaded
with fresh material, and the process
starts over again.”
For Sally Gran at TableTop Farm,
the system means self-reliance and
a more sustainable way of farming:
“It’s important for us to be as selfreliant as possible. Anytime we
can use resources available on our
own farm, it lowers our ecological
footprint. Saving money on compost
and high tunnel heat purchases is an
added bonus.”
Practical
Farmers’
Energy
Program is designed to help farmers
reduce off-farm inputs and carbon
footprints. The compost heat project
is funded by The Ceres Foundation,
Soper Farms, and the members of
Practical Farmers of Iowa.
13
Try it for as little as $16
16
LocaL News
Thursday, June 19, 2014
EAGLE GROVE
YOUTH BALL ACTION
EG HiGH ScHool
AtHlEtE SpotliGHt
EaglE grovE EaglE
EG HiGH ScHool
AtHlEtE SpotliGHt
Learning the skills
Gavin Pedersen and the other Tball players can be found Friday
evenings out at Greenwood Park, enjoying a friendly game of
beginning softball/baseball. Fans enjoy watching the young
players learn the skills almost as much as the kids enjoying
playing in the dirt while they wait for a ball to roll their way.
SAm
kruckEnbErG
Photo by Kim Demory
Sam had a nice week at the plate, gathering seven
total hits including a homerun and a double. She had
two RBI and scored four runs herself. The junior is
the daughter of Nick and Renae Kruckenberg.
Palmer takes win
at Britt track
Last Friday night at Hancock County Speedway in Britt, Chad Palmer of
Renwick piloted his #14 machine to a win in the stock car class. Sixth went
to Heath Tulp of Belmond, with Parker Slagle of Eagle Grove 13th and Craig
Berhow of Belmond 15th at the finish. Kyle Schmauss of Eagle Grove was
sixth in the hobby stock feature.
On Friday night at Marshalltown Speedway, Tim Hennigar of Clarion
took fourth at the checkers in the mod lites class. Brother Andy Hennigar
was 14th in the same race after rolling his car just prior to the green flag.
Swing and a hit
Caitlin Christopher grabs the ball while Salem Willard (left) and
Mollie Demory (right) rush in to back her up during their Tball
game held Friday the 13th. Photo by Kim Demory
I got it
Ann White gets her glove down low to pick up this grounder
during the free Parks and Rec. softball clinic held recently. White
and the other 30+ kids who have been attending the clinic which
runs Mondays and Wednesday through June. Photo by Kim Demory
Over 50 golf
The Over 50 Golf Tour Group “A”
was hosted by the Algona Country
Club, on Mon., June 9, with 71
members participating.
The event winners were:
Closest to the Pin 1st Shot, Hole
#2: Scott Whyte of Algona, 49.
Closest to the Pin 2nd Shot, Hole
#4: Craig Lloyd of Blue Earth,
Minn., 35.
Longest Putt, Hole #9: Jack
McNernety of Blue Earth, Minn., 53.
Flight Winners:
1st Flight: Tony Schultz, Algona,
36.
2nd Flight: Kirk Swanson,
Goldfield, 42.
3rd Flight: Lyle Doege, Woden,
47.
4th Flight: Bernie Nelson,
Renwick, 45.
5th Flight: Ray Rouse, Wesley,
45.
6th Flight: Bruce Thomas,
Algona, 48.
7th Flight: George Good, Lakota,
49.
8th Flight: Bruce Nelson, Algona,
50.
9th Flight: Myron May, Algona,
52.
The Over 50 Golf Tour Groups “B”
was hosted by Britt, on Mon., June
9, with 52 members participating.
The event winners were:
Closest to the Pin 1st Shot, Hole
#8: Weldon Buhr of Eagle Grove,
44.
Closest to the Pin 2nd Shot, Hole
#2: Ron Madetzke of Emmetsburg,
43.
Longest Putt, Hole #9: Larry
Slifka of Swea City, 44.
Flight Winners:
1st Flight: George Zettles, Eagle
Grove, 36.
2nd Flight: Don Potthoff, Algona,
44.
3rd Flight: Ron Hansen, Britt, 46.
4th Flight: Harvey Larson, Swea
City, 48.
5th Flight: Cliff Van Berkum,
Swea City, 50.
6th
Flight: Maurice
Riley, Clarion, 53.
Yard and Garden: Strawberries
By Richard Jauron and
Willy Klein
Fresh strawberries, a favorite of almost
everyone, are relatively easy to grow and hardy
throughout Iowa. Strawberry plants require full
sun, well-drained soils and good management
to produce abundant, sweet fruit. Horticulturists
with Iowa State University Extension and
Outreach provide care and management
information for the home gardener. To have
additional questions answered, contact Hortline
at [email protected] or 515-294-3081.
When should strawberries be harvested?
Harvest strawberries when the fruit are
uniformly red (fully ripe). Pick the berries with
the caps and stems attached to retain firmness
and quality. Pinch off the stem about one-fourth
inch above the cap.
Strawberries should be picked about every
other day in warm weather, every three to four
days in cool weather. The harvest period for
some June-bearing cultivars may last three
to four weeks. Strawberries can be stored in
the refrigerator for up to five to seven days.
Optimum storage conditions are a temperature
of 32 degrees Fahrenheit and a relative humidity
of 90 to 95 percent.
Some of the strawberries in my garden are
covered with a gray, velvety growth. What is
it and how can it be controlled?
The gray, velvety growth on the berries is
probably gray mold. It is also known as Botrytis
fruit rot. Gray mold is favored by poor air
circulation and a high humidity in the strawberry
planting. The most commonly infected berries
are those touching the soil or other infected
JAkE
WildE
berries.
Cultural practices can reduce losses due to
gray mold.
• Do not fertilize June-bearing strawberries in
spring. The application of a nitrogen-containing
fertilizer in spring promotes lush, vegetative
growth. Dense foliage slows the drying of the
strawberry planting, resulting in a more favorable
environment for gray mold.
• Control weeds in the strawberry bed. Weeds
reduce air circulation and slow the drying of the
strawberry plants.
• Mulch the planting with straw to keep the
berries off the ground. Berries resting on a damp
or wet soil are more susceptible to gray mold.
• During dry weather, irrigate in the morning
when using a sprinkler. Plants dry quickly when
irrigated in the morning.
• “Clean-pick” the strawberry planting.
Harvest frequently. Pick berries as soon as they
are ripe.
• Handle berries carefully during harvest to
avoid bruising the fruit. Immediately refrigerate
the unwashed berries. Berries that exhibit
symptoms of gray mold should be picked and
removed from the bed.
Fungicides are used by commercial strawberry
growers to control gray mold. However, cultural
practices are the best way to control Botrytis fruit
rot in home gardens.
There are small, black, yellow-spotted
beetles feeding on my strawberries. What
should I do?
The small, black beetles are likely sap beetles.
They also are known as picnic beetles or picnic
bugs. Sap beetles commonly feed on overripe or
damaged fruits and vegetables in the garden.
Sanitation is the best management strategy for
sap beetles in home gardens. Keep the strawberry
patch as clean as possible through timely picking
and removal of damaged, diseased and overripe
fruit.
Insecticide sprays are available for sap beetles,
but they are difficult to use because they are
applied to a crop that is ready for harvest or
while harvest is underway. If you do spray, use an
insecticide with a short harvest-waiting interval
and follow label directions carefully.
Why do my strawberries have a slightly
bitter taste?
The flavor of most fruits and vegetables is
influenced by weather conditions. In regards
to strawberries, warm sunny weather produces
the most flavorful fruit. When the weather is
extremely hot, the berries may have a slightly
bitter taste. Strawberry plants produce smaller
quantities of sugars when the weather is cool and
cloudy. As a result, berries are not as sweet when
the weather is cool and rainy in May and June.
Leather rot, caused by a fungal disease, can be
a problem in wet weather. Infected fruit have a
leathery texture and bitter taste.
How long can I expect my June-bearing
strawberry planting to be productive?
June-bearing strawberry plantings that are
well-maintained and renovated annually should
remain productive for four or five years. Poorly
managed beds may be productive for only two or
three years. It’s time to plant a new strawberry
bed when berry size and numbers decline.
Jake made two hits, including a double, and scored
a run along with stealing a pair of bases during
baseball action in the past week. The senior is the
son of Chad and Ann Wilde.
EAGLE GROVE
SPORTS EVENTS
THURS., JUNE 19:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball vs. Fort Dodge
5 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
at CAL Cadets
7 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
at CAL Cadets
FRI., JUNE 20:
Noon Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
vs. Clarion-Goldfield-Dows
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
vs. Hampton-Dumont
5:30 p.m. Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
vs. Hampton-Dumont
7:30 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
vs. Hampton-Dumont
7:30 p.m. Boys’ Varsity Baseball
vs. Hampton-Dumont
MON., JUNE 23:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball vs. Algona
5:30 p.m. Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
at St. Edmond
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
at St. Edmond
7:30 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
at St. Edmond
7:30 p.m. Boys’ Varsity Baseball
at St. Edmond
TUES., JUNE 24:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball at Webster City
Noon Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
at St. Edmond
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
at So. Central Calhoun
7:30 a.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
CLARION-GOLDFIELD-DOWS
SPORTS EVENTS
FRI., JUNE 20:
Boys’ 9th-Grade Baseball
at Eagle Grove
Girls’ 9th-Grade Softball
vs. West Fork
Boys’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Baseball
vs. Bishop-Garrigan
Girls’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Softball
vs. Bishop-Garrigan
MON., JUNE 23:
Boys’ 9th-Grade Baseball
at Hampton
Girls’ 9th-Grade Softball
at Hampton
Boys’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Baseball
at Webster City
Girls’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Softball
at Webster City
at So. Central Calhoun
WED., JUNE 25:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball at Fort Dodge
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
vs. Clear Lake
5:30 p.m. Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
vs. Clear Lake
7:30 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
vs. Clear Lake
7:30 p.m. Boys’ Varsity Baseball
vs. Clear Lake
THURS., JUNE 26:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball vs. Webster City
Noon Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
at Humboldt
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
vs. Pocahontas Area
5:30 p.m. Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
vs. Manson N. W. Webster
7:30 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
vs. Pocahontas Area
7:30 p.m. Boys’ Varsity Baseball
vs. Manson N. W. Webster
FRI., JUNE 27:
9 a.m. Girls’ 7th & 8th-Grade
Softball vs. Iowa Falls-Alden
Noon Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
vs. Hampton-Dumont
5:30 p.m. Girls’ Jr. Varsity Softball
at Humboldt
5:30 p.m. Boys’ Jr. Varsity Baseball
at Humboldt
7:30 p.m. Girls’ Varsity Softball
at Humboldt
7:30 p.m. Boys’ Varsity Baseball
at Humboldt
TUES., JUNE 24:
Boys’ Varsity Baseball
vs. CAL
WED., JUNE 25:
Boys’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Baseball
at Iowa Falls-Alden
Girls’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Softball
at Iowa Falls-Alden
THURS., JUNE 26:
Boys’ 9th-Grade Baseball
at West Fork
Girls’ 9th-Grade Softball
at West Fork
FRI., JUNE 27:
Boys’ 9th-Grade Baseball
at St. Edmond
Boys’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Baseball
vs. St. Edmond
Girls’ Jr. Varsity/Varsity Softball
vs. St, Edmond
Horticulture Hints: Grow Iris –
for a rainbow of color!
By Yvonne McCormick, ISU Extension Horticulturist
Local gardens are now awash in
all hues of the rainbow and vibrant
iris are at their peak. Iris is one of
the easiest hardy perennial plants to
grow. With so many colors and types
of iris available for home gardens,
everyone should have a favorite!
Tall bearded German iris typically
bloom late in May and last but a few
short weeks each year. This wellknown plant was one most likely
grown in your grandma’s flower
garden. More recent cultivars have
larger flowers than the type grandma
grew. Beverly Sills, Bride’s Halo,
and Batik are just a few popular
choices for central Iowa gardens.
Locate beds in a full sun location for
best bloom.
Some tall bearded irises, such as
Immortality, are called rebloomers,
and may bloom again later in the
season. However, the reblooming
tendency is not reliable and can vary,
depending on weather conditions and
cultural practices. Keep plants wellwatered and apply fertilizer during
the summer months to encourage
rebloom.
Apply a light application of 1010-10 fertilizer in early spring and
a second light application a month
after blooming. Avoid high nitrogen
fertilizers, which can cause rot. Do
not fertilize after mid-August, to
allow plants time to prepare or
“harden off” before winter.
If your iris are becoming crowded
or producing less flowers, it is time
to divide them. Dividing established
iris beds every three or four years
will help to keep your plants healthy.
The best time to divide and plant
iris is mid-July and August. This
gives plants ample time to become
established before winter sets in.
EaglE grovE EaglE
Lady Eagles have string
of one-run losses
SportS
Kruckenberg homers versus SE Webster
BY LES HOUSER
[email protected]
The Eagle Grove varsity softball
team was at least giving themselves
a chance to win, and fighting to the
very last out, in three losses last
week and all decided by a single
run. In all three, the purple and gold
scored one or two runs in the final
inning as they never gave up trying
for a victory. In the end, luck was
just not on their side.
The first of those games occurred
Monday, June 9 in a home matchup
with Webster City. The Lynx went
up 2-0 in their half of the first,
with the Eagles staying close at 4-2
Webster City after four complete
innings. After scoring another run in
the sixth, the home team plated two
runs in their half of the seventh but
couldn’t push the tying one across to
send it into extra innings.
The Lady Eagles tallied 12 hits,
with Bailey Boyer going 2 for 4 and
driving in a run. Sam Kruckenberg
and Megan Crail were both 2 for 4 as
well, with Crail also scoring a run.
Aja Bell and Daisah Shivers both
stroked doubles for their only hit
in four tries, with Bell also getting
an RBI. Kylee Almond, Heather
Wilson, Tori Axtell and Brianna
Allen also singled for the team, with
Almond scoring a run and the other
three all credited with bringing a run
home each. Esme Figueroa picked
off a base, while Heather Wilson
drew a walk.
Sarah Wilson went the distance in
the circle to take the loss, giving up
five earned runs while issuing four
K’s.
“We really played well in terms
of not giving up the big inning, and
that kept us in the ball game,” said
head coach Jim McLaughlin. “After
hitting a two-run homer in the top of
the first, the Lynx only scored solo
runs in four other innings. We kept
them in check, as they stranded nine
runners on base over the next five
innings. Then after being down 6-3
in the seventh with two outs, we got
consecutive hits by Crail, Heather
Wilson and Axtell to close to within
one run and had the tying run on
second when the game ended.”
They traveled to Algona on
Wednesday night, with the Bulldogs
prevailing by a 4-3 score. It was
only 2-0 Algona until the top of the
sixth, with the Eagles tying the game
after Shivers belted a clutch double
to bring home Figueroa and Axtell.
The Bulldogs turned around and
scored two more in their half to keep
the lead. The Lady Eagles could then
only manage a single run in their
half of the seventh, as Kruckenberg
reached base and was brought in by
Boyer.
Shivers was 2 for 3, including a
double, and had two RBI. Axtell
was 2 for 4, including a double as
well, and she scored a run. Boyer
and Figueroa were both 2 for 4, with
Bailey credited with an RBI and
Esme a run scored. Kruckenberg
also singled, scored a run and
recorded the only steal.
Heather suffered the loss, but
issued no earned runs on 11 hits. She
allowed two walks and struck out
one.
“Another good close ball game
with Algona only up 2-0 entering
the sixth,” said the head coach. “We
kept battling, and after Kruckenberg
scored to get us within a run, Esme’s
infield single put the tying and goahead runs on base when the game
ended.”
On Thursday night, it was yet
another hard-fought game that saw
the Eagles lose to Southeast Webster
6-5. The SEW Eagles scored three
of their runs in the first inning, and
held a 6-0 lead after four complete
innings. The purple and gold finally
broke onto the scoreboard in the
top of the fifth, plating three runs
to cut the deficit in half. The rally
started with Bell bringing in Axtell,
followed by Kruckenberg stepping
up to smash a two-run homer (the
first of her career) over the left field
fence. They would tack on two more
in the top of the seventh, as a Boyer
single brought home Kruckenberg
followed by pinch-hitter Allen
smacking a grandout that brought
home Almond.
Kruckenberg swung the big stick
in this game, going 2 for 3 including
a homerun and a double which drove
in two runs while she scored two
herself. Boyer was 2 for 4 and also
drove in a run. Axtell had a 2 for 4
night and scored a run. Also hitting
singles were Almond, Shivers, Jana
Willard and Allen. Kruckenberg,
Almond and Boyer posted steals,
with Bell and Kruckenberg showing
plate patience in drawing a free pass
each.
Crail took the loss in the circle,
Sam Kruckenberg tries for a base hit during the home
game with Bishop Garrigan. The junior scored a run in that
game, and hit a homer and a double versus SE Webster.
Photo by Les Houser
allowing just two earned in seven
hits with two walks and two K’s.
“This was our third straight
one-run loss,” said McLaughlin.
“It was disappointing, because we
gave them a six-run lead after four
innings which was due mostly to our
errors. We were also facing a pitcher
that we should have hit a lot harder.
We had the tying and go-ahead runs
on once again when the game ended.
It’s good to see that we don’t quit and
keep battling back late in ball games.
We would instead want to take a lead
in a game and force the other team to
battle back against us.”
On Thursday, the team hosted
Bishop Garrigan with the Golden
Bears taking an 11-2 win. The
visitors did most of their damage
in the second and fourth innings,
scoring six runs combined. The
Eagles pushed across single runs in
their half of the second and sixth
frames, but were also plagued by
seven errors that helped Garrigan’s
cause.
Bell was 2 for 3 with a double and
an RBI, while Boyer also went 2 for
3 and drove in a run. Kruckenberg
and Heather Wilson scored those
runs. Heather and Allen also reached
on singles. Kruckenberg and Boyer
both had a stolen base each.
Sarah pitched five innings,
allowing seven earned runs while
walking none and striking out one.
Heather allowed just one earned
with three K’s.
“We had more errors than hits, and
their top five hitters combined for
13 hits and 10 runs,” said the head
coach. “Almond left with an ankle
injury and will be out for awhile.
It was not our night, other than two
hits each by Boyer and Bell with Aja
getting a double on one of them.”
At a Saturday tournament in
Belmond, the purple and gold lost
to Mason City Newman 6-1. Their
other game with Forest City was
rained out. The Knights plated three
scores in the third inning and two in
the seventh inning, while the Eagles
lone run came in the third as Bell
reached on a single then scored off a
Jarika Eisentrager base hit. Crail and
Shivers also reached first on base
hits. Kruckenberg, Eisentrager, Crail
and Bell all had a stolen base each.
Heather took the loss in the circle,
going the distance in giving up four
earned runs while walking just one
and throwing two K’s.
“We played a good ball game
against a tough team that had
five slap hitters in their lineup,”
said McLaughlin. “With the wind
blowing out, they hit a two-run
homer and scored three runs in
the third for a 3-0 lead. Other than
giving up two unearned runs in the
last inning, we really played a great
defensive game in getting many outs
that we would not have gotten earlier
in the season.”
The team is now 3-14 overall,
and hosts Clarion-Goldfield this
Wednesday before traveling to CAL
on Thursday. After a home contest
with Hampton-Dumont on Friday,
they play St. Edmond at Rogers
Sports Complex next Monday.
Thursday, June 19, 2014
17
Eagles struggle to get
back into win column
Wilde, Shivers smash doubles versus Garrigan
BY LES HOUSER
[email protected]
After winning four of their first
six games of the season, the Eagle
Grove varsity baseball team is now
mired in a five-game losing streak
following last week’s action on the
diamond.
Last Wednesday at Algona,
they dropped a 6-2 decision to the
Bulldogs. Algona plated two runs in
each of the third and sixth innings,
while the home Eagles put their two
scores on the board in the fourth.
Mike Dicke hit a double, while
Kent Jorgensen was 2 for 3 with an
RBI. Tyler Vorrie was 1 for 3 and
drove in a run, with Austin Griffin
going 2 for 3. Deion Shivers and
Brian Gonzalez both scored a run,
with Shivers also recording the only
steal for the Eagles.
Devon Omvig took the loss,
working 5 1/3 innings in allowing
two earned runs on eight hits. He
issued two walks and threw four K’s.
Jacob Grandgeorge pitched the rest
of the game, surrendering no earned
runs and no hits.
“We played our second best game
of the year,” said head skipper Bruce
Rholl. “But we runners on at crucial
times and couldn’t get a key hit.
Devon kept them off balance, but
then we gave up a late walk and then
he reached second. He came home
on a base hit and that’s how they
won. I’m proud of the kids. They
fought hard and should have won.”
On Friday, the team hosted Bishop
Garrigan with the Golden Bears
taking a 6-1 victory. The purple and
gold scored their lone run in the first,
with the Bears plating four of their
own in the third inning.
Jake Wilde and Shivers both hit
doubles in the game, with Wilde
going 2 for 2 and Shivers 1 for 3.
Wilde scored the run. Grandgeorge
was 2 for 3, while Dylan Thielen,
Jorgensen and Griffin all collected
a base hit each. Wilde also ran wild
on the base paths in grabbing two
steals.
Vorrie went the distance in taking
the loss, allowing no earned runs on
a five-hitter with five walks and six
K’s.
“My hat’s off to their pitcher, he
dominated the game with probably
14 strikeouts,” said Rholl. “Errors
killed us, and you can’t do that
against a good team. Garrigan put
the ball in play.”
Stats were not yet available for
the Monday, June 9 16-10 loss to
Webster City. “It was a case of
questionable umpiring for us,” said
the head coach. “We got the lead
early, then I think the kids put it on
cruise control from there. I told them
you can’t do that. The Lynx played
hard and came back. I felt sorry for
Tyler. He was going right or left near
the edges, and the ump wouldn’t call
it unless down the middle. You can’t
throw like that against a good hitting
team.”
The team is now 4-8 overall, with
a 2-5 conference record, and takes
on Clarion-Goldfield at home on
Wednesday. They host HamptonDumont on Friday, then play at St.
Edmond next Monday.
Jacob Grandgeorge gets ready to receive the ball for the
routine out at first base versus the Golden Bears. The
junior had two hits in that game, and has been also seeing
some work on the mound this year.
Photo by Les Houser
OUR ENERGY COMES THROUGH.
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PHOTO TO LEFT: Bailey Boyer
makes the throw from her right
field spot. The junior had two
hits and an RBI in the Garrigan
game, and contributed the same
thing in three other games last
week. Photo by Les Houser
Serving America’s Landowners since 1929
Gordy Mersch
Real Estate Associate
111 North Commercial Ave., P.O. Box 326
Eagle Grove, IA 50533
Office: (515) 448-9090
Fax: (515) 603-6600
Cellular: (515) 890-0155 Home: (515) 378-3216
For all your wireless phone service
NEEDS.
North Central Wireless/Goldfield Telephone
536 N. Main Street, Goldfield
825-3996
LocaL News
A survivor’s story
18
EaglE grovE EaglE
Thursday, June 19, 2014
Mark Havens is this year’s Wright County Relay for Life Honorary Survivor
by Kim demory
[email protected]
Mark Havens was only in his
early 30s when he was diagnosed
with Non-Hodgkins Lymphoma .
It was 1992, and Mark was
shaving when he noticed a lump
on his neck, under his jaw. Blood
work, bone marrow tests, and more
confirmed his fears - he had cancer.
His first treatment was in the
Mason City hospital. When it was
time for his second treatment, their
new Cancer Center had just been
completed, so his sessions moved to
that facility. With it being so new,
Mark joked that he was kind of their
guinea pig and probably the youngest
cancer patient there at that point.
In total, Mark endured 16
rounds of chemotherapy using a
combination of eight drugs. The
treatments worked, and Mark went
back to life as normal.
In 2009, Mark once again
noticed enlarged lymphnoids. This
time, they were under his arm. The
doctor wasn’t concerned as his blood
work had all come back normal. As
it was getting closer to his yearly
check-up time in 2010, the lump
was still there, and then, “boom,
out popped another one. It really
wasn’t a big shock,” said Mark when
he got the test results back that he
did indeed, once again, have NonHodgkins Lymphoma.
Further testing showed, however,
that it was not a relapse from 1992.
Instead, it was a different type of
the disease as there are many he
learned.
“Treatments have come a long,
long way (since the first round in
1992),” Mark said. “Fundraisers
like Relay for Life play a big part in
that.”
Seventh and eighth grade softball
Eighth grader Michelle Miracle warms up as her teammates stand behind her in the dug-out
cheering on their current batter against the St. Edmond Gaels in home action Friday morning,
June 13. The Eagles are coached by Chelsea Axtell. Photo by Kim Demory
Pictured left to right are Derek, Mark, Terri, and Travis Havens. Mark
is this year’s 2014 Wright County Relay for Life Honorary Survivor.
Photo provided
Believe it or not, even though
he was 18 years older, Mark said the
treatments the second time around
were easier. There were only six
rounds of chemo, and it was a five
drug combo he was given. He knows
this is because of money raised for
continued cancer research from
organizations like Relay for Life.
Although Mark hasn’t done
the relay every year, he is proud to
be part of a team this year, and also
serving as the “Honorary Survivor.”
He has been cancer free for four
years now. In the pasts, Mark has
also carried the Relay banner during
the survivor’s lap. He is continually
amazed at how “awesome” the event
is, and how touching it is to see the
people walking as survivors that he
never even realized had cancer.
Mark is looking forward to the
Wright County Relay for Life taking
place this Saturday evening in
Belmond beginning at 6 p.m. at the
Belmond High School located at 411
10th Avenue NE. You are invited to
join him and the many others who
will be there, walking to find a cure
for cancer and walking to celebrate
life.
Mark and his wife, Terri, and
their two sons, Derek and Travis live
in the Belmond area.
Swing and a hit
Eighth grader Sadie Stuhr connected with the ball to get a double
and drive in a run during the home seventh and eighth grade
softball game on Tuesday, June 3. The Eagles went on to defeat
the Humboldt Wildcats in both games. Photo by Kim Demory
On the pitcher’s mound
Pictured at right, seventh grader Mackenzie Crail did a nice job
finding the strike zone from the pitcher’s mound during their
first game against the Humboldt Wildcats on Tuesday, June 3.
Photo by Kim Demory

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