CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT FOR THE HEACOCK

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CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT FOR THE HEACOCK
CULTURAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT FOR THE
HEACOCK CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT PROJECT,
CITY OF MORENO VALLEY, RIVERSIDE
COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
Prepared for:
Melissa Perez
Albert A. Webb Associates
3788 McCray Street, Riverside, CA 92506
Authors:
Sherri Gust, Lynn Furnis and Francisco Arellano
Principal Investigator:
Sherri Gust
Riverside County Certified Archaeologist #116
March 2014
Cogstone Project Number: 2458
Type of Study: Cultural Resources Assessment (Phase I Survey)
Sites: None
USGS Quadrangle: Sunnymead 7.5-mi Quadrangle
Total Area: 50-acres
Fieldwork Dates: November 20, 2013
Key Words: Cahuilla, Serrano, Gabrielino, Luiseño, Sunnymead Master Drainage Plan, negative survey
1518 West Taft Avenue
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Heacock Channel Cultural
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ III
INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 1
PURPOSE OF STUDY ............................................................................................................... 1
PROJECT DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................... 2
AREA OF POTENTIAL EFFECTS............................................................................................ 2
PROJECT PERSONNEL ............................................................................................................ 2
REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................ 3
FEDERAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS ................................................................................ 3
National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, as amended ........................................................ 3
National Register of Historic Places ........................................................................................ 3
STATE LAWS AND REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 4
California Environmental Quality Act ..................................................................................... 4
California Register of Historical Resources ............................................................................ 4
Public Resources Code............................................................................................................. 5
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................... 5
ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING ................................................................................................. 5
PREHISTORIC SETTING .......................................................................................................... 6
Ethnography ............................................................................................................................. 6
HISTORIC BACKGROUND...................................................................................................... 6
RECORDS SEARCH RESULTS ................................................................................................ 9
CALIFORNIA HISTORIC RESOURCES INVENTORY SYSTEM ........................................ 9
OTHER SOURCES ................................................................................................................... 11
NATIVE AMERICAN CONSULTATION .............................................................................. 12
SURVEY RESULTS ................................................................................................................... 13
SURVEY METHODS ............................................................................................................... 13
SURVEY RESULTS ................................................................................................................. 13
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................. 16
REFERENCES CITED .............................................................................................................. 17
APPENDIX A: NATIVE AMERICAN CONSULTATION ................................................... 18
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LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE 1. PROJECT VICINITY .......................................................................................................... 1
FIGURE 2. PROJECT LOCATION ........................................................................................................ 1
FIGURE 3A. APE MAP, NORTH HALF .............................................................................................. 1
FIGURE 3B. APE MAP, SOUTH HALF ............................................................................................... 2
FIGURE 4. LAND GRANTS NEAR PROJECT AREA .............................................................................. 7
FIGURE 5. CANAL, EAST BANK, AT GENTIAN AVENUE, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST ................................ 14
FIGURE 6. CANAL NORTH OF REVERE PLACE, VIEW TO SOUTH ...................................................... 15
FIGURE 7. CANAL AT EAST END OF SURVEY CORRIDOR, VIEW TO NORTH....................................... 15
LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1. PREVIOUS STUDIES WITHIN ONE-MILE RADIUS OF APE .................................................... 9
TABLE 2. PREVIOUSLY RECORDED CULTURAL RESOURCES WITHIN ONE-MILE RADIUS OF APE .... 11
TABLE 3. ADDITIONAL SOURCES CONSULTED ............................................................................... 12
TABLE 4. BLM LAND PATENT FOR PROPOSED APE ........................................................................ 12
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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The current study is a cultural resources assessment report, prepared for the proposed Heacock
Channel Improvement Project. Cogstone has undertaken the assessment to determine the
potential Project-related effects on cultural resources during construction activities for channel
improvements on approximately 50 acres. The proposed project is a multi-jurisdictional and
includes the design and construction of a flood control channel to protect residential,
commercial, federal, public and privately owned properties within the City of Moreno Valley
and March Air Reserve Base. The Project alignment generally follows the existing channel
alignment along Heacock Street for approximately 10,000 feet. Involved jurisdictions include
March Air Reserve Base (MARB), March Joint Powers Authority (MJPA), the City of Moreno
Valley, and Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFCWCD).
Construction Activities along the canal route would include fencing and maintenance access
roads along the length of the reach. Stage 1 will consist of constructing a reinforced concrete
trapezoidal open channel with a 25-foot base width and depth of 15 feet along the northernmost
3,590 lineal feet, ending at the existing sanitary landfill. Stage II will involve constructing a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet within the
2,625 lineal feet adjacent to and easterly of the existing landfill. Stage III construction will entail
3,600 lineal feet along March Air Reserve Base, terminating at the Heacock Street Bridge at
Lateral A (approximately 2,065 feet south of Iris Avenue). Either a covered (underground)
facility of reinforced concrete box or cast-in-place concrete pipe (triple cell 15-foot high by 15foot wide) will be constructed or the structure will continue as a reinforced concrete rectangular
channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.
A search for archaeological and historical records was conducted at the Eastern Information
Center (EIC) at the University of California at Riverside on October 17 and 18, 2013. The
record search covered a one mile-radius around the Project area. The records search indicates
that 17 cultural resources investigations were previously completed, five of which included a
portion of the Area of Potential Effects (APE). There are no known historic properties/historical
resources within the APE.
An intensive cultural resources survey was performed by on November 20, 2013. No cultural
resources were identified during the survey. There are no historic properties/historical resources
within the project area. Extensive prior development has occurred in the vicinity without
revealing buried resources. Based on this, no adverse effects/impacts are anticipated.
Unanticipated finds during excavation require that the project halt work in the vicinity of the find
(minimum 50 foot radius) until it can be evaluated by an archaeologist meeting, at a minimum,
the standards of the Secretary of the Interior.
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INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE OF STUDY
The purpose of this study is to determine the potential Project-related effects on cultural
resources during construction activities for channel improvements on approximately 50 acres
(10,000 linear feet). The project is located in the City of Moreno Valley (Figure 1).
Figure 1. Project Vicinity
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PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The Heacock Channel Improvement Project is a multi-jurisdictional project contained within the
Sunnymead Master Drainage Plan (MDP) and includes the design and construction of a fully
lined concrete flood control channel that will provide 100-year flood protection to residential,
commercial, federal, public and privately owned properties within the vicinity of the Project site.
Future connection “stub-outs” will be constructed at appropriate locations along the project
alignment to accommodate future development. Types and sizes of future connections are not
known at this time. The Project alignment generally follows the existing channel alignment
commencing at the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Heacock Street, running parallel with
Heacock Street for approximately 10,000 lineal feet, terminating at the recently improved
Heacock Street Bridge at Lateral A. There are approximately ten existing connections to the
proposed channel from March Air Reserve Base (MARB), March Joint Powers Authority
(MJPA), the City of Moreno Valley, and Riverside County Flood Control and Water
Conservation District (RCFCWCD), ranging in size and materials. All channel connections
(future and existing) will be analyzed and designed as part of the Project (Figure 2).
The Project is situated in Sections 13, 24, and 25 of Township 3 South, Range 4 West, on the
Sunnymead, California 7.5’ quadrangle. The purpose of the project is to reduce flood risk in the
area with improvements to an existing 10,000 lineal foot channel. Construction Activities along
the route would include fencing and maintenance access roads along the length of the reach
according to RCFCWCD standards. The other improvements would take place in stages as
follows:

Stage 1 begins at the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Heacock Street, paralleling
Heacock Street approximately 3,590 lineal feet south to the existing sanitary landfill
located southerly of John F. Kennedy/Meyer Drive. Stage 1 will consist of constructing a
reinforced concrete trapezoidal open channel with a 25-foot base width and depth of 15
feet.

Stage 2 continues from the existing sanitary landfill located south of John F.
Kennedy/Meyer Drive along Heacock Street (downstream of Stage 1) and proceeds south
approximately 2,625 lineal feet adjacent to and easterly of the existing landfill located on
City of Moreno Valley Parks Department property. Stage 2 proposes to construct a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.

Stage 3 continues from the southerly limit of the landfill (downstream of Stage 2) and
proceeds south approximately 3,600 lineal feet along MARB, terminating at the Heacock
Street Bridge at Lateral A (approximately 2,065 feet south of Iris Avenue). Stage 3
proposes to construct either a covered (underground) facility of reinforced concrete box
or cast-in-place concrete pipe (triple cell 15-foot high by 15-foot wide) or continue as a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.
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Figure 2. Project Location
Construction of the proposed Project will necessitate the relocation of several utilities crossing
and/or paralleling the project footprint, street improvements, the reconstruction of the Meyer
Street Bridge to span the drainage facility to connect MJPA, MARB, City of Moreno Valley
properties with Heacock Street, and construction of a vehicular crossing near Iris Avenue. All
construction staging is anticipated to occur on or around the Project site. Construction is assumed
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to commence in late 2015. Each stage of the channel is considered a construction phase. While
timing and construction of each phase is dependent upon availability of funding, each phase will
likely take approximately 8 to 12 months to complete.
AREA OF POTENTIAL EFFECTS
The Area of Potentials Effects (APE) was defined by the MARB, MJPA, City of Moreno Valley,
and the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFCWCD). The
APE includes all areas which may be adversely affected by construction impacts including
staging areas (Figure 3). The vertical APE is 15 feet. Generally, the western portion of the
project alignment in within March Air Reserve Base.
PROJECT PERSONNEL
Cogstone Resource Management Inc. (Cogstone) conducted the cultural resources studies.
Sherri Gust served as the Principal Investigator for the project, supervised all work, and wrote
report sections including regulatory environment, background and others. Gust is Riverside
County Certified Archaeologist 116. She has an M.S. in Anatomy from the University of
Southern California, a B.S. in Anthropology from the University of California at Davis and over
30 years of experience in California.
Lynn Furnis wrote the historic setting and drafted the conclusions and recommendations. She
has an M.A. in Anthropology from the University of Nevada Reno, a B.A. in Anthropology from
the University of California at Davis and more than 40 years of experience. Matheson Lowe
conducted the archaeological records search. He has a B.A. from the University of Arizona and
over two years of experience in California. Francisco Arellano and Sarah Sederholm performed
the field survey. Arellano has a B.A. in Anthropology from San Francisco State University and
more than 15 years of experience. Sederholm has a B. A. in Anthropology from California State
University, Long Beach and a year of experience.
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Figure 3a. APE Map, North Half
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Figure 3b. APE Map, South Half
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REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT
FEDERAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS
NATIONAL HISTORIC PRESERVATION ACT OF 1966, AS AMENDED
The National Historic Preservation Act (NHPA) is the primary federal law governing the
preservation of cultural and historic resources in the United States. The law establishes a
national preservation program and a system of procedural protections which encourage the
identification and protection of cultural and historic resources of national, state, tribal and local
significance.
Section 106, as noted above (item d), requires the head of any Federal agency having direct or
indirect jurisdiction over a proposed Federal or federally assisted undertaking in any State and
the head of any Federal department or independent agency having authority to license any
undertaking shall, prior to the approval of the expenditure of any Federal funds on the
undertaking or prior to the issuance of any license, as the case may be, take into account the
effect of the undertaking on any district, site, building, structure, or object that is included in or
eligible for inclusion in the National Register. The head of any such Federal agency shall afford
the Advisory Council on Historic Preservation a reasonable opportunity to comment with regard
to such undertaking.
NATIONAL REGISTER OF HISTORIC PLACES
The National Register of Historic Places is the nation's official list of buildings, structures,
objects, sites, and districts worthy of preservation because of their significance in American
history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture. The National Register recognizes
resources of local, state and national significance which have been documented and evaluated
according to uniform standards and criteria. To be eligible for listing in the National Register, a
resource must meet at least one of the following criteria:
A. Is associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns
of our history
B. Is associated with the lives of persons significant in our past
C. Embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period or method of construction, or
represents the work of a master, or possesses high artistic values, or represents a
significant and distinguishable entity whose components may lack individual distinction
D. Has yielded, or may be likely to yield, information important in history or prehistory
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STATE LAWS AND REGULATIONS
CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT
CEQA declares that it is state policy to "take all action necessary to provide the people of this
state with...historic environmental qualities." It further states that public or private projects
financed or approved by the state are subject to environmental review by the state. All such
projects, unless entitled to an exemption, may proceed only after this requirement has been
satisfied. CEQA requires detailed studies that analyze the environmental effects of a proposed
project. In the event that a project is determined to have a potential significant environmental
effect, the act requires that alternative plans and mitigation measures be considered. CEQA
includes historic and archaeological resources as integral features of the environment.
CALIFORNIA REGISTER OF HISTORICAL RESOURCES
The State Historical Resources Commission has designed this program for use by state and local
agencies, private groups and citizens to identify, evaluate, register and protect California's
historical resources. The Register is the authoritative guide to the state's significant historical
and archeological resources.
The California Register program encourages public recognition and protection of resources of
architectural, historical, archeological and cultural significance, identifies historical resources for
state and local planning purposes, determines eligibility for state historic preservation grant
funding and affords certain protections under the California Environmental Quality Act.
To be eligible for listing in the California Register, a resource must meet at least one of the
following criteria:
1) Associated with events that have made a significant contribution to the broad patterns of
local or regional history or the cultural heritage of California or the United States
2) Associated with the lives of persons important to local, California or national history
3) Embodies the distinctive characteristics of a type, period, region or method of
construction or represents the work of a master or possesses high artistic values
4) Has yielded, or has the potential to yield, information important to the prehistory or
history of the local area, California or the nation
In addition to having significance, resources must have integrity for the period of significance.
The period of significance is the date or span of time within which significant events transpired,
or significant individuals made their important contributions. Integrity is the authenticity of a
historical resource’s physical identity as evidenced by the survival of characteristics or historic
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fabric that existed during the resource’s period of significance. Alterations to a resource or
changes in its use over time may have historical, cultural, or architectural significance. Simply,
resources must retain enough of their historic character or appearance to be recognizable as
historical resources and to convey the reasons for their significance. A resource that has lost its
historic character or appearance may still have sufficient integrity for the California Register, if,
under Criterion 4, it maintains the potential to yield significant scientific or historical information
or specific data.
PUBLIC RESOURCES CODE
Public Resources Code (PRC) Section 5097.5 states that no person shall knowingly and willfully
excavate upon, or remove, destroy, injure or deface any historic or prehistoric ruins, burial
grounds, archaeological or vertebrate paleontological site, including fossilized footprints,
inscriptions made by human agency, or any other archaeological, paleontological or historical
feature, situated on public lands, except with the express permission of the public agency having
jurisdiction over such lands. Violation of this section is a misdemeanor. As used in this section,
"public lands" means lands owned by, or under the jurisdiction of, the state, or any city, county,
district, authority, or public corporation, or any agency thereof.
BACKGROUND
ENVIRONMENTAL SETTING
The project area is within the City of Moreno Valley, situated in the Moreno Valley, in Riverside
County, and located approximately 50 miles east of Los Angeles and 15 miles south of San
Bernardino. It is on level terrain at an elevation of about 1490 feet above sea level, part of the
Perris Plain alluvial valley, surrounded by the San Bernardino, the San Gabriel, the Santa Ana,
and the San Jacinto mountain ranges. The area is within the San Jacinto Watershed which drains
into the San Jacinto River, 6.0 miles to the southeast. [JRP 2011]
The climate is mild and semi-arid with Riverside County summer temperatures averaging in the
high 70° F range, and in the low 50s in winter, but with many days a year being more that 90° F.
Annual rainfall averages 10.9 inches for the county, most of it falling between November and
April. Alluvial deposits that comprise the Perris Plain consist of alternating strata of sand, clay,
silt, and mixed composition gravel, which can vary greatly in thickness within the Project area,
from 24 inches to up to 300 feet. [JRP 2011]
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The current vegetation in the area is a mixture of grasslands, disturbed scrublands, riparian areas,
and landscaped areas (JRP 2011). Within the grassland areas are remnants of coastal sage scrub,
scrub oak, Palmer’s goldenbush, and leafy buckwheat. Riparian areas host thistle, cattail, giant
reed (invasive), mulefat, and Fremont cottonwood, in addition to willows. Within the APE itself,
which is a man-made riparian zone, Cogstone personnel noted eucalyptus, caster, willows
(possibly arroyo and sandbar species), and red pepper trees.
PREHISTORIC SETTING
The greater Moreno Valley area has not been well researched and there is no model of
prehistoric human habitation that is well accepted. Ancient peoples of this region are not well
understood but are thought to have been highly mobile hunters and gatherers. Later peoples
changed to a settlement pattern with permanent villages although seasonal treks for specific
resources would still have been conducted. In conjunction with villages more defined material
culture is found including ornaments and ritual objects. Roughly 1,500 years ago, locals adopted
bow-and-arrow technology and pottery reflecting migration, intermarriage and other factors.
Bedrock milling stations, pottery, tools of bone and shell and increasingly refined arrow points
are observed in archaeological sites. [JRP 2011]
ETHNOGRAPHY
The greater Moreno Valley area is thought, by various researchers, to have been traditional tribal
territory of the Cahuilla, Serrano, Luiseno or Gabrielino. Some place the vicinity of this project
as an area of overlapping use and many think the area was occupied by different groups over
time.
All of these groups traditionally established villages near reliable water sources and had seasonal
camps to use when collecting food and other resources. While political and religious practices
were not uniform, the groups were familiar with one another due to intermarriage, trade
relationships, etc. Traditional life was altered by establishment of Missions and introduction of
exotic diseases in the late 18th century. Most native people lived on or near reservations by the
beginning of the 20th century. [JRP 2011]
HISTORIC BACKGROUND
The project area is within Moreno Valley. The Spanish explorer Juan Bautista de Anza passed
through the Moreno Valley in 1774, as he led the first expedition by land to Alta California from
Mexico (Heil 2013). De Anza noted at the time that this region had an abundance of wildlife,
particularly birds. Nevertheless, lands within the project area and within the present-day
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community of Moreno Valley were not part of any Mexican land grants. There were two land
grants in the region, with San Jacinto Nuevo y Potrero being approximately 3.5 miles to the
(Figure 4). Miguel de Pedrorena was granted the large San Jacinto Nuevo y Potrero grant in
southeast and with El Sobrante de San Jacinto located approximately 4.5 miles to the southwest
1846 by Governor Pio Pico (O’Farrell 1845, Smythe 1908). It included 48,823 acres.
Pedrorena and Rosario E. de Aguirre co-owned the second nearby land grant, which was 22,195
acres in extent.
Figure 4. Land Grants near Project Area
In the 1850s, a stage station belonging to the Butterfield Stage Line was established in Moreno
Valley (Heil 2013). It served John Butterfield’s Overland Mail Company’s stage route from
Tucson, Arizona to San Francisco, California, which passed between San Diego and Los Angeles
(City of Moreno Valley 2013). The area was occasionally visited by Wyatt Earp and by Frank
and Jessie James on their way to the Elsinore Mountains. On September 20, 1870, William B.
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Bourn acquired a serial patent for 10,560 acres, all of it within Township 3 South, Range 4 West.
The patent included sections 13, 24, and 25, all of which are partially within the Project area, as
well as sections 8, 11, 12, 14, 15, 17, 20, 21, 22, 26, 27, 28, 29, 34, 35, and 36, which are outside
the Project area. George H. Bancroft and Andrew D. Bradbeer patented land in 1891 and 1892
in Section 8 of the same township (BLM GLO accessed 2013).
Along the west edge of the City of Moreno Valley, the railroad was completed in 1883,
connecting San Bernardino with the Mexican border (Heil 2013). Adjacent to the new rail line
was established a new townsite in 1887, dubbed Alessandro, on 10,000 acres. This tract was
located where present-day March Air Reserve Base stands. The settlement was expected to
become an important agricultural center, but it was thwarted from the start by problems with
water and money. At this same time, a dam was being built in the San Bernardino Mountains,
creating Big Bear Lake. The water from the lake was to be used for irrigation in Redlands, in the
Moreno Valley, and elsewhere in the region.
The town of Moreno was founded in 1890 by the Bear Valley and Alessandro Development
Company; it was situated approximately 5.0 miles east of the Alessandro townsite (Heil 2013).
As water from Big Bear Lake made its way to Alessandro and Moreno by means of the Perris
and Alessandro Irrigation District, property values sky-rocketed. But, the prosperity was shortlived. By the mid-1890s, both towns were dry due to drought and the upstream water claims of
the city of Redlands. Most residents soon abandoned Moreno and Alessandro.
Present-day Moreno Valley city claims its origins from 1912, when developers from Los
Angeles and Riverside established the Sunnymead Orchard Tract between the two towns
abandoned in the 1890s (Heil 2013). The Tract’s location adjacent to the road between Riverside
and Hemet has ensured its existence since 1912. The communities of Sunnymead, Moreno, and
Edgemont remained unincorporated, rural settlements for many years, until the City of Moreno
Valley incorporated in 1984 (City of Moreno Valley 2013).
March Air Reserve Base, an edge of which is within the Project area, was established in 1918 as
March Field (City of Moreno Valley 2013; Heil 2013). Its purpose was for training of the Air
Corps and the War Department initially acquired 640 acres of Hendrick Ranch land for the base.
It closed from 1922 to 1927, after which time it became a permanent facility which expanded
into 7,000 acres of the old townsite of Alessandro. The base has been active ever since and is
currently the largest one in the United States for the air reserve.
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RECORDS SEARCH RESULTS
CALIFORNIA HISTORIC RESOURCES INVENTORY SYSTEM
A search for archaeological and historical records was conducted at the Eastern Information
Center (EIC) at the University of California at Riverside on October 17 and 18, 2013 by
Matheson Lowe. The record search covered a one mile-radius around the APE boundaries of the
approximate 50-acre Project area. The records search indicates a total of 17 cultural resources
investigations have been completed previously within a one-mile radius of the APE (Table 1).
Of these, five studies included a portion of the APE, one investigation was completed within a
0.5-mile radius of the APE, and thirteen studies were undertaken between a 0.5-mile and 1-mile
radius of the APE.
The results of these studies indicate there are no known archaeological or historic resources
within the APE. A total of nine cultural resources have been previously documented outside the
APE within the one-mile radius (Table 2). Of these nine resources outside the APE, two are
prehistoric isolates and five are historical architectural resources and one historic district. The
prehistoric isolates include a fragmented pestle composed of granite and a bifacial granitic mano
fragment. The historical architectural resources include four buildings, one linear resource that
can be referred to as a historic build environment (a canal), and one site that consists of a guard
post, visitor’s center, monument walls and palms with landscaped medians. The site was once an
entrance to the base. Of the other eight resources within one mile of the APE, only the linear
historic canal is listed as eligible for the National Register due to the fact the WPA build the
canal and it maintains integrity.
Table 1. Previous Studies within one-mile Radius of APE
Author
Report
Number
Kyle, Carolyn
E.
5795
Jordan,
Stacey C.
7127
McKenna et
al.
5035
Ahmet, Koral
and Evelyn
N. Chandler
6278
Cogstone
Report Title
Cultural Resource Assessment for AT&T
wireless facility 950-031-029A located at 24899
Alessandro Boulevard, City of Moreno Valley,
Riverside County, California
Archaeological survey report for Southern
California Edison company: Conversion of
overhead to underground projection the Rule
20C, Riverside County, California (WO#65777281, AI#6-7227)
Letter Report: monitoring at the site of the
proposed Indian middle school in the City of
Perris, Riverside Country, California
Cultural resource survey for a proposed bikeway
in Moreno Valley, Riverside County, California
Distance
from
APE
Date
USGS Quad
2004
Sunnymead
Within 1
mile of
APE
2007
Sunnymead
Within 1
mile of
APE
2005
Sunnymead
Within 1/2
mile
2005
Sunnymead
Within 1/2
mile
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Author
Report
Number
Loma Billat
7990
McKenna,
Jeannette A.
8367
Rebecca
McCorkle
Apple,
Christopher
L. Shaver,
and Monica
Strauss
8389
McKenna,
Jeannette A.
8598
M. J.
Cromarte
8799
McKenna,
Jeannette A.
8244
Brian F.
Smith
8948
McKenna et
al.
5055
White, Robert
S.
3704
McDonald,
Med and Barb
Giacomini
Foster, John
M., James J.
Schmidt,
Carmen A.
Weber,
Gwendolyn
R. Romani,
and Roberta
S. Greenwood
Manley,
William
Clough,
Helen
Cogstone
3510
3693
8272
130
Report Title
`New tower ("NT") submission packet Fcc form
620 (Project Name: JFK Park, Project Number:
IE-25830A)
A cultural resources Investigation and
assessment of Potential impacts of the proposed
March Village medical campus at the March Air
Force Base in Riverside County, California
Archaeological Survey Report for the Los
Alamos / Interstate 15 Overcrossing, City of
Murrieta, County of Riverside, California.
A summary report on the proposed
improvements at the John W. North High
School Campus, Riverside County, California
Letter Report: Concrete Gutter/Swale
Installation Project at Naval Operational
Support Center Moreno Valley
A Phase I Cultural Resources Investigation of
the Proposed Moreno Valley Unified School
District K-12 School Site at Indian Street and
Cactus Avenue, City of Moreno Valley,
Riverside County, California.
An Archeological And Paleontological Survey
For The Saddleback Estates Project, Riverside
County, California
Review for an Archaeological records check for
area D-3 within the March Joint Powers
Authority, Riverside County, California
An Archaeological Assessment of the Perris
Lateral "A", a 2.1 Mile Daylight Channel
Located in the City of Moreno Valley, Riverside
County
An Intensive Survey of Approximately 2,500
acres of March Air Force Base, Riverside
County, California
Cultural Resource Investigation: Inland Feeder
Project, Metropolitan Water District of Southern
California
Historic Building Inventory and Evaluation,
March Air Force Base
Filed Notes for the Archaeological Survey of
PL984 Water Systems Additions
Distance
from
APE
Date
USGS Quad
2008
Sunnymead
Within 1/2
mile
2008
Riverside
East
Within 1/2
mile
2010
Riverside
East
Within 1/2
mile
2010
Riverside
East
Within 1
mile
2012
Riverside
East
Within 1/4
mile
2009
Sunnymead
Within 1
mile
2003
Riverside
East
Within 1
mile
2002
Riverside
East
Within 1
mile
1993
Sunnymead
Adjacent
1996
Sunnymead
Within
APE
1991
Sunnymead,
Riverside
East
Within
APE
1995
Riverside
East
1974
Sunnymead
Within
APE
Within
APE
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Heacock Channel Cultural
Table 2. Previously Recorded Cultural Resources within one-mile Radius of APE
Primary
No. (P-33-)
17971
17972
17970
17969
18039
9191
17967
17968
15301
Site Description
Telephone Building of the 1950s-era
utilitarian structure
Corps of Engineers Building; 1950sera build roughly "L" shaped in design
and residential in use
Building 755 is originally a singlestory residence of the 1920s & 30s
California Bungalow and relocated to
the base
Building 768 is a single-story office
complex showing various additions
and alterations from various time
periods
1950s-era property consisting of a
guard post, visitor center, monument
walls & palms with landscaped
medians
March Field Historic District; historic
buildings and landscape elements
Bifacial granitic mano fragment
WPA Canal made of rock and mortar
with associated pipe work and
crossing for water movement, 1942
prehistoric granite pestle fragment
NRHP
Status
Ineligible
Date
Recorded
2008
Quad
Distance
from APE
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Riverside East
Ineligible
2008
Riverside East
Ineligible
2008
Riverside East
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Ineligible
2008
Riverside East
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Ineligible
2008
Riverside East
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Contribut
ing
Ineligible
1992
Riverside East
2008
Sunnymead
Eligible
2008
Riverside East
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
Within 1/2
mile
Within 1/4
mile
Ineligible
2005
Sunnymead
Within 1 to
1/2 mile
OTHER SOURCES
In addition to the records at the EIC, a variety of sources were consulted by Matheson Lowe in
October, 2013 to obtain information regarding the APE (Table 3). Sources include the National
Register of Historical Places (NRHP), California Register of Historical Resources (CRHR),
California Historical Resources Inventory (CHRI), California Historical Landmarks (CHL),
California Points of Historical Interest (CPHI) and local historical registers. Specific
information about the APE, obtained from historic maps and aerial photographs, is presented
below, in the Project Area History.
The March Field Historic District, a NRHP listed property, is located 0.5 mile west of the APE.
In addition to these resources, within the one-mile radius, a large collection of buildings
comprise the cultural historic district, named the March Field Historic District, consisting of 228
buildings from the March Air Force Base. These buildings are listed in the Archaeological
Determinations of Eligibility maintained by the California Office of Historic Preservation (OHP)
and considered contributing resources to the National Register for Historic Places. The report of
this district was obtained for this report.
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Table 3. Additional Sources Consulted
Source
Results
National Register of Historic Places (NRHP; 1979-2002 &
supplements)
March Field Historic District and one
eligible(WPA canal)
Historic USGS Topographic Maps
1953 topo for Riverside East &
Sunnymead shows the existence of Air
Force base and Heacock Road. Structures
are shown near but outside the APE.
Historic US Department of Agriculture Aerial Photographs
1967 aerial, the earliest available, shows
structures (March Air Force Base) adjacent
to west but outside the APE, little to no
buildings to the east of APE.
California Register of Historical Resources (CRHR; 1992-2010)
Negative
California Historical Resources Inventory (CHRI; 1976-2010)
Negative
California Historical Landmarks (CHL; 1995 & supplements to
2010)
Negative
California Points of Historical Interest (CPHI; 1992 to 2010)
Negative
Caltrans Historic Bridge Inventory (Caltrans 2013)
Positive
Local Historical Register Listings
Negative
One land patent was granted for all of the
APE
Bureau of Land Management (BLM) General Land Office Records
A search of the BLM General Land Office Records available online revealed that one land patent
were issued in 1870 for all of the land within the APE (BLM n.d.; Table 4).
Table 4. BLM land patent for proposed APE
Name
William B. Bourn
Year
Aliquots
1870
Section
Township
Range
13
3S
4W
24
3S
4W
25
3S
4W
NATIVE AMERICAN CONSULTATION
A sacred lands record search was requested by Cogstone from the Native American Heritage
Commission (NAHC) on October 10, 2013. The Commission responded on October 14, 2013
that there are no known sacred lands within 0.5 mile of the APE. The NAHC requested that ten
Native American tribes or individuals be contacted for further information regarding the general
Project vicinity.
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Heacock Channel Cultural
Cogstone subsequently sent letters to the ten Native American contacts on October 17, 2013,
requesting any information related to cultural resources or heritage sites within or adjacent to the
Project area. Additional attempts at contact by letter, email or phone call were made on
November 6 and 21, 2013.
On October 23, 2013 Daniel McCarthy from the San Manuel Band of Mission Indians responded
by email stating that the tribe has no knowledge of cultural sites within the project area. The
tribe requested that in the event that cultural resources are identified that a draft copy of the
report be provided to them so they may comment.
On November 4, 2013 Laura Shaker replied by email requesting more information. On
November 6, 2013 Cogstone replied by email with a more detailed project description and the
results of the record search. No comments have been received since that time.
No response has been received from the other individuals or tribes on the contact list. All
consultation correspondence and a contact log are provided (Appendix A).
SURVEY RESULTS
SURVEY METHODS
An intensive pedestrian survey of the entire proposed Project area was conducted on November
20, 2013 by Francisco Arellano and Sarah Sederholm. The survey consisted of walking
north/south transects at intervals of 3-5 meters where possible along both sides of the channel
and within the channel when possible while closely inspecting the ground surface. Ground
visibility varied from zero to 100 percent. The surveyors were accompanied within the
boundaries of MARB by Jon Wreschinsky, Community Planner for the facility.
SURVEY RESULTS
A pedestrian survey was conducted on both sides of the channel and within the channel when
accessible. For the most part, the channel was active with very dense thickets of vegetation. The
flat land west of the canal is cleared of thick vegetation, and compacted with decomposing
granite, with ground visibility between 80 percent and 100 percent. Along the western and
eastern banks of the canal, the ground visibility was zero to 60 percent, with visibility affected by
vegetation. Within the channel, the visibility was good to fair, averaging 60 percent with dense
vegetation in long thickets. Ground visibility under the bridges at Cactus Avenue and Meyer
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Heacock Channel Cultural
Drive was zero percent as the canal held stagnant water and was overgrown with vegetation.
The eastern bank is predominantly overgrown, with very little ground surface exposed between
the four-lane Heacock Street (tapers to two lanes in the south at Iris Avenue) and the channel
bank. A poured concrete wall is evident at Cactus Avenue. The depth of the wall is unknown
but it is exposed between two and three feet. There are three areas where the channel banks and
bed are covered in concrete; specifically, the storm drain at Gentian Avenue, at a lateral channel
from within March Air Force Base north of Revere Place, and the southern boundary of the
survey corridor where the canal spills into a larger perpendicular channel.
Transects were walked along the eastern unpaved sidewalks of Heacock Street, closely
inspecting the ground surface. These areas were recently tilled, providing ground visibility of
100 percent. Along the eastern survey boundary, laterals are located on and near existing paved
roadways and a pedestrian survey was conducted on both sides of the roads (Figures 5, 6, 7).
Traffic on the roadways was heavy along four lane Heacock Street and light on the two-lane
residential streets (Gentian Avenue, Revere Place and Iris Avenue). Erosion and cuts exposing
buried soils were inspected for anomalies that might indicate the presence of cultural or
paleontological resources. No cultural resources were observed.
Figure 5. Canal, east bank, at Gentian Avenue, view to southeast
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Heacock Channel Cultural
Figure 6. Canal north of Revere Place, view to south
Figure 7. Canal at east end of survey corridor, view to north
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Heacock Channel Cultural
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
There are no historic properties/historical resources within the project area. Extensive prior
development has occurred in the vicinity without revealing buried resources. Based on this, no
adverse effects/impacts are anticipated.
Unanticipated finds during excavation require that the project halt work in the vicinity of the find
(minimum 50 foot radius) until it can be evaluated by an archaeologist meeting, at a minimum,
the standards of the Secretary of the Interior.
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Heacock Channel Cultural
REFERENCES CITED
City of Moreno Valley
2013 The History of Moreno Valley. Accessed online on November 21, 2013 at
http://www.moval.org/community/about/city-history.shtml.
Heil, Louise
2013 History. Moreno Valley Historical Society. Accessed online on November 21, 2013 at
http://mvhistoricalsociety.com/history.htm.
JRP
2011 Integrated Cultural Resources Management Plan, March Air Reserve Base (March ARB),
Riverside County, California. Prepared for Civil Engineering Support/Environmental
Management Office, March Air Reserve Base, by JRP Historical Consulting, LLC,
Davis, California.
O’Farrell, Jasper
1845 Diagrama del Rancho de San Jacinto: comprendiendo el terreno de J.A.E. y el nuevo qe
pretende M.P. Añadido el Potrero del mismo nombre. United States Districe Court,
California, Southern District. Land case 82 SD. Land case map. Accessed online on
November 21, 2013 at Calisphere at
http://content.cdlib.org/ark:/13030/hb909nb57m/?layout=metadata.
Smythe, W. E.
1908 History of San Diego 1542-1908. Accessed online on November 21, 2013 at Balboa Park
Online Collaborative at http://www.sandiegohistory.org/books/smythe/index.htm.
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Heacock Channel Cultural
APPENDIX A: NATIVE AMERICAN CONSULTATION
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Heacock Channel Cultural
COGSTONE SACRED SITES INFO REQUEST
DATE
10/10/2013
COGSTONE PROJECT NUMBER:
2458
COGSTONE PROJECT NAME:
Heacock Channel Improvement Project
PROJECT DESCRIPTION:
Proposed improvements to an existing
undersized earthen channel that will
address flooding issues.
USGS 7.5' QUAD:
Sunnymead
COUNTY:
Riverside
SECTION/TOWNSHIP/RANGE:
T 3S R 4W Sections 13, 24, 25
AREA:
50 acres
TYPE OF SEARCH:
Sacred Sites
1:24000 map attached
√
Thank you.
Please Mail to:
Cogstone
Sherri Gust
1518 W. Taft Ave.
Orange, CA 92865
(714) 974-8303 fax
[email protected]
19
Heacock Channel Cultural
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25
Heacock Channel Cultural
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Heacock Channel Cultural
Native American
Group/Individual
Date(s) of First
Contact
Attempt
Date(s) of 2nd
Contact Attempt
Date(s) of 3rd Contact
Attempt
Pechanga Band of
Mission Indians, Paul
Macarro
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone,
voicemail
Ramona Band of
Cahuilla Mission
Indians, Joseph
Hamilton
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone
Santa Rosa Band of
Mission Indians, John
Marcus
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 phone,
left message with
receptionist
11/21/2013 phone, left
message with
receptionist
Morongo Band of
Mission Indians,
William Madrigal, Jr.
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone
Date(s) of
Replies Rec'd
Comments
10/23/2013 email
On October 23, 2013 Daniel
McCarthy from the San Manuel
Band of Mission Indians
responded by email stating that
the tribe has no knowledge of
cultural sites within the project
area. They request that in the
event that cultural resources are
identified that a draft copy of the
report be provided to them so
they may comment.
San Manuel Band of
Mission Indians,
Daniel McCarthy
10/17/2013
letter
Pechanga Band of
Mission Indians, Marc
Macarro
Cahuilla Band of
Indians, Luther
Salgado
Cogstone
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone,
voicemail
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone
27
Heacock Channel Cultural
Date(s) of First
Contact
Attempt
Date(s) of 2nd
Contact Attempt
Date(s) of 3rd Contact
Attempt
10/17/2013
letter
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone,
voicemail
Morongo Band of
10/17/2013
Mission Indians, Ernest letter
H. Siva
11/06/2013 email
11/21/2013 phone,
voicemail
Native American
Group/Individual
Pechanga Cultural
Resources Department,
Anna Hoover
Date(s) of
Replies Rec'd
Comments
11/04/2013 email
On November 4, 2013 Laura
Shaker replied by email
requesting more information.
On November 6, 2013 Cogstone
replied by email with a more
detailed project description and
the results of the record search.
No further response was
received.
Soboba Band of
Luiseno Indians,
Joseph Ontiveros
10/17/2013
letter
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Heacock Channel Cultural
From:
To:
Subject:
Date:
Daniel McCarthy
Molly Valasik
Re: Heacock Channel Improvement Project, MarchAir Reserve Base, Project #2458
Wednesday, October 23, 2013 9:15:40 AM
Molly,
Thank you for the opportunity to comment. We are not aware of any cultural sites located on the
subject property. Given the nature of the project and its location, we have no concerns at this
time. We appreciate your effort in helping to identify all cultural resources so that they can be
evaluated for significance. In the event you discover cultural resources during your field work,
please provide us with a draft copy of the report so that we may comment. //daniel
Daniel McCarthy, MS, RPA
Director
Cultural Resources Management Department
San Manuel Band of Mission Indians
26569 Community Center Drive
Highland, CA 92346
Office: 909 864-8933 x 3248
Cell: 909 838-4175
[email protected]
THIS MESSAGE IS INTENDED ONLY FOR THE USE OF THE INDIVIDUAL OR ENTITY
TO WHICH IT IS ADDRESSED AND MAY CONTAIN INFORMATION THAT IS
PRIVILEGED, CONFIDENTIAL AND EXEMPT FROM DISCLOSURE UNDER APPLICABLE
LAW. If the reader of this message is not the intended recipient or agent responsible
for delivering the message to the intended recipient, you are hereby notified that
any dissemination or copying of this communication is strictly prohibited. If you have
received this electronic transmission in error, please delete it from your system
without copying it and notify the sender by reply e-mail so that the email address
record can be corrected. Thank You
Cogstone
29
PALEONTOLOGICAL RESOURCES ASSESSMENT FOR
THE HEACOCK CHANNEL IMPROVEMENT
PROJECT,
CITY OF MORENO VALLEY, RIVERSIDE
COUNTY, CALIFORNIA
Prepared for:
Melissa Perez
Albert A. Webb Associates
3788 McCray Street, Riverside, CA 92506
Authors:
Kim Scott and Courtney Richards
Principal Investigator:
Sherri Gust
Riverside County Certified Paleontologist
March 2014
Cogstone Project Number: 2458
Type of Study: Paleontological Resources Assessment
Localities: None
USGS Quadrangle: Sunnymead 7.5’
Total Area: 50-acres
Fieldwork Dates: November 20, 2013
Key Words: Quaternary young alluvial fan, Quaternary very old alluvial fan, negative survey
1518 West Taft Avenue
Orange, CA 92865
Office (714) 974-8300
Field Offices
San Diego • Riverside • Canyon Country
• Morro Bay • West Sacramento
Federal Certifications 8(a), SDB, 8(m) WOSB
State Certifications DBE, WBE, SBE, UDBE
cogstone.com
Toll free (888) 497-0700
Heacock Channel Paleontological Resources
TABLE OF CONTENTS
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY ........................................................................................................ III
INTRODUCTION......................................................................................................................... 1
PURPOSE OF STUDY ............................................................................................................... 1
PROJECT DESCRIPTION ......................................................................................................... 2
PROJECT STUDY AREA .......................................................................................................... 4
PROJECT PERSONNEL ............................................................................................................ 4
REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT ............................................................................................ 7
FEDERAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS ................................................................................ 7
Paleontological Resources Preservation Act ........................................................................... 7
Antiquities Act .......................................................................................................................... 8
National Environmental Policy Act.......................................................................................... 8
STATE LAWS AND REGULATIONS ...................................................................................... 9
California Environmental Quality Act ..................................................................................... 9
BACKGROUND ........................................................................................................................... 9
REGIONAL GEOLOGY ............................................................................................................ 9
STRATIGRAPHY ....................................................................................................................... 9
Quaternary Young Alluvial Fans ........................................................................................... 11
Quaternary Very Old Alluvial Fans ....................................................................................... 11
KNOWN RESOURCES ............................................................................................................. 11
SURVEY RESULTS ................................................................................................................... 12
SURVEY METHODS ............................................................................................................... 12
SURVEY RESULTS ................................................................................................................. 12
FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS ............................................................................. 15
REFERENCES CITED .............................................................................................................. 16
APPENDIX A: PALEONTOLOGICAL RECORDS SEARCH ........................................... 17
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Heacock Channel Paleontological Resources
LIST OF FIGURES
FIGURE 1. PROJECT VICINITY ........................................................................................................................................1
FIGURE 2. LOCATION MAP .............................................................................................................................................3
FIGURE 3A. PSA MAP, NORTH HALF .............................................................................................................................5
FIGURE 3B. PSA MAP, SOUTH HALF .............................................................................................................................6
FIGURE 4. PROJECT GEOLOGY ..................................................................................................................................... 10
FIGURE 5. CANAL, EAST BANK, AT GENTIAN AVENUE, VIEW TO SOUTHEAST .............................................................. 13
FIGURE 6. CANAL NORTH OF REVERE PLACE, VIEW TO SOUTH .................................................................................... 14
FIGURE 7. CANAL AT EAST END OF SURVEY CORRIDOR, VIEW TO NORTH ..................................................................... 14
LIST OF TABLES
TABLE 1. KNOWN FOSSIL LOCALITIES FROM THE LAKEVIEW HOT SPRINGS SITE ......................................................... 12
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Heacock Channel Paleontological Resources
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
The purpose of this study is to determine the potential Project-related effects on paleontological
resources during construction activities for the proposed Heacock Channel Improvement Project
located on approximately 50 acres in the City of Moreno Valley. The proposed project is multijurisdictional and includes the design and construction of a flood control channel to protect
residential, commercial, federal, public and privately owned properties within the City of
Moreno Valley and March Air Reserve Base. The Project alignment generally follows the
existing channel alignment along Heacock Street for approximately 10,000 feet. Involved
jurisdictions include March Air Reserve Base (MARB), March Joint Powers Authority (MJPA),
the City of Moreno Valley, and Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District
(RCFCWCD).
Construction Activities along the canal route would include fencing and maintenance access
roads along the length of the reach. Stage 1 will consist of constructing a reinforced concrete
trapezoidal open channel with a 25-foot base width and depth of 15 feet along the northernmost
3,590 lineal feet, ending at the existing sanitary landfill. Stage II will involve constructing a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet within the
2,625 lineal feet adjacent to and easterly of the existing landfill. Stage III construction will entail
3,600 lineal feet along March Air Reserve Base, terminating at the Heacock Street Bridge at
Lateral A (approximately 2,065 feet south of Iris Avenue). Either a covered (underground)
facility of reinforced concrete box or cast-in-place concrete pipe (triple cell 15-foot high by 15foot wide) will be constructed or the structure will continue as a reinforced concrete rectangular
channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.
The surface of the Project Study Area (PSA) is mapped as Quaternary young alluvial fan and
Quaternary very old alluvial fan. A paleontological records search for the project area was
conducted by the San Bernardino County Museum (SBCM) and in the literature. No
paleontological localities are known in or near the PSA. An intensive field survey was
performed by Cogstone on November 20, 2013. Neither paleontological resources nor suitable
sediments were observed.
No paleontological resources are known within the PSA. Pleistocene sediments have previously
been demonstrated to be as shallow as 9 feet in the project vicinity. However, despite extensive
prior development in the vicinity, no fossils have been observed. No adverse effects/impacts to
paleontological resources are anticipated.
If unanticipated paleontological resources are discovered during project construction activities,
all work should halt within 50 feet of the find until it can be evaluated by a qualified
paleontologist.
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Heacock Channel Paleontological Resources
INTRODUCTION
PURPOSE OF STUDY
The purpose of this study is to determine the potential Project-related effects on paleontological
resources during construction activities for channel improvements on approximately 50 acres
(10,000 linear feet). The project is located in the City of Moreno Valley (Figure 1).
Figure 1. Project Vicinity
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PROJECT DESCRIPTION
The Heacock Channel Improvement Project is a multi-jurisdictional project contained within the
Sunnymead Master Drainage Plan (MDP) and includes the design and construction of a fully
lined concrete flood control channel that will provide 100-year flood protection to residential,
commercial, federal, public and privately owned properties within the vicinity of the Project site.
Future connection “stub-outs” will be constructed at appropriate locations along the project
alignment to accommodate future development. Types and sizes of future connections are not
known at this time. The Project alignment generally follows the existing channel alignment
commencing at the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Heacock Street, running parallel with
Heacock Street for approximately 10,000 lineal feet, terminating at the recently improved
Heacock Street Bridge at Lateral A. There are approximately ten existing connections to the
proposed channel from March Air Reserve Base (MARB), March Joint Powers Authority
(MJPA), the City of Moreno Valley, and Riverside County Flood Control and Water
Conservation District (RCFCWCD), ranging in size and materials. All channel connections
(future and existing) will be analyzed and designed as part of the Project.
The Project is situated in Sections 13, 24, and 25 of Township 3 South, Range 4 West, on the
Sunnymead, California 7.5’ quadrangle (Figure 2). The purpose of the project is to reduce flood
risk in the area with improvements to an existing 10,000 lineal foot channel. Construction
Activities along the route would include fencing and maintenance access roads along the length
of the reach according to RCFCWCD standards. The other improvements would take place in
stages as follows:

Stage 1 begins at the intersection of Cactus Avenue and Heacock Street, paralleling
Heacock Street approximately 3,590 lineal feet south to the existing sanitary landfill
located southerly of John F. Kennedy/Meyer Drive. Stage 1 will consist of constructing a
reinforced concrete trapezoidal open channel with a 25-foot base width and depth of 15
feet.

Stage 2 continues from the existing sanitary landfill located south of John F.
Kennedy/Meyer Drive along Heacock Street (downstream of Stage 1) and proceeds south
approximately 2,625 lineal feet adjacent to and easterly of the existing landfill located on
City of Moreno Valley Parks Department property. Stage 2 proposes to construct a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.

Stage 3 continues from the southerly limit of the landfill (downstream of Stage 2) and
proceeds south approximately 3,600 lineal feet along MARB, terminating at the Heacock
Street Bridge at Lateral A (approximately 2,065 feet south of Iris Avenue). Stage 3
proposes to construct either a covered (underground) facility of reinforced concrete box
or cast-in-place concrete pipe (triple cell 15-foot high by 15-foot wide) or continue as a
reinforced concrete rectangular channel with a 35-foot base width and depth of 15 feet.
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Figure 2. Location Map
Construction of the proposed Project will necessitate the relocation of several utilities crossing
and/or paralleling the project footprint, street improvements, the reconstruction of the Meyer
Street Bridge to span the drainage facility to connect MJPA, MARB, City of Moreno Valley
properties with Heacock Street, and construction of a vehicular crossing near Iris Avenue. All
construction staging is anticipated to occur on or around the Project site. Construction is assumed
to commence in late 2015. Each stage of the channel is considered a construction phase. While
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Heacock Channel Paleontological Resources
timing and construction of each phase is dependent upon availability of funding, each phase will
likely take approximately 8 to 12 months to complete.
PROJECT STUDY AREA
The Project Study Area (PSA) was defined by the MARB, MJPA, City of Moreno Valley, and
the Riverside County Flood Control and Water Conservation District (RCFCWCD). The APE
includes all areas which may be adversely affected by construction impacts including staging
areas (Figure 3). The vertical PSA extends 15 to 20 feet below the current channel ground
surface.
PROJECT PERSONNEL
Cogstone Resource Management Inc. (Cogstone) conducted the cultural resources studies.
Sherri Gust served as the Principal Investigator for the project, supervised all work, and edited
this report and prepared the recommendations. Gust is a Riverside County Certified
Paleontologist and holds California and Nevada statewide BLM paleontology permits. She has
an M.S. in Anatomy (Evolutionary Morphology) from the University of Southern California, a
B.S. in Anthropology from the University of California at Davis and over 30 years of experience
in California.
Kim Scott wrote the portions of this report. Scott has an M.S. in Biology with and emphasis in
Paleontology from California State University San Bernardino, a B. S. in Geology with an
emphasis in Paleontology from the University of California, Los Angeles, and over 18 years of
experience in California paleontology and geology. Courtney Richards prepared portions of this
report. Richards has an M.S. in Biological Sciences with an emphasis in Paleontology from
Marshall University. Francisco Arellano and Sarah Sederholm performed the field survey and
wrote the results. Arellano has a B.A. in Anthropology from San Francisco State University, is a
cross-trained paleontologist, and has over 15 years of experience. Sederholm has a B.A in
Anthropology from California State University, Long Beach and cross-training in paleontology.
Molly Valasik prepared the GIS maps. Valasik has a M.A. in Anthropology from Kent State
University in Ohio and more than five years’ experience in with GIS and southern California
archaeology.
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Figure 3a. PSA Map, North Half
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Figure 3b. PSA Map, South Half
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REGULATORY ENVIRONMENT
FEDERAL LAWS AND REGULATIONS
PALEONTOLOGICAL RESOURCES PRESERVATION ACT
The Paleontological Resources Preservation Act (Public Law 111-011, Title VI, Subtitle D on
Paleontological Resources Preservation) requires the Secretaries of the Interior and
Agriculture to manage and protect paleontological resources on Federal land using scientific
principles and expertise. The law affirms the authority for many of the policies the Federal
land managing agencies already have in place for the management of paleontological
resources such as issuing permits for collecting paleontological resources, curation of
paleontological resources, and confidentiality of locality data. It only applies to Federal
lands. It provides authority for the protection of significant paleontological resources on
Federal lands including criminal and civil penalties for fossil theft and vandalism. The act
states (in part):
a) The term ‘‘paleontological resource’’ means any fossilized remains, traces, or imprints of
organisms, preserved in or on the earth’s crust, that are of paleontological interest and
that provide information about the history of life on earth.
b) The Secretary shall manage and protect paleontological resources on Federal land
using scientific principles and expertise.
c) The Secretary shall develop appropriate plans for inventory, monitoring, and the
scientific and educational use of paleontological resources, in accordance with
applicable agency laws, regulations, and policies. These plans shall emphasize
interagency coordination and collaborative efforts where possible with non-Federal
partners, the scientific community, and the general public.
d) A paleontological resource may not be collected from Federal land without a
permit issued under this subtitle by the Secretary.
e) The Secretary may issue a permit for the collection of a paleontological resource
pursuant to an application if the Secretary determines that:
1) the applicant is qualified to carry out the permitted activity;
2) the permitted activity is undertaken for the purpose of furthering
paleontological knowledge or for public education;
3) the permitted activity is consistent with any management plan applicable to the
Federal land concerned; and
4) the proposed methods of collecting will not threaten significant natural or
cultural resources.
f) A permit for the collection of a paleontological resource issued under this section
shall contain such terms and conditions as the Secretary deems necessary to carry
out the purposes of this subtitle. Every permit shall include requirements that:
1) the paleontological resource that is collected from Federal land under the
permit will remain the property of the United States;
2) the paleontological resource and copies of associated records will be preserved
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for the public in an approved repository, to be made available for scientific
research and public education; and
3) specific locality data will not be released by the permittee or repository
without the written permission of the Secretary.
g) Any paleontological resource, and any data and records associated with the resource,
collected under a permit, shall be deposited in an approved repository. The Secretary
may enter into agreements with non-Federal repositories regarding the curation of these
resources, data, and records.
h) Information concerning the nature and specific location of a paleontological resource shall
be exempt from disclosure under section 552 of title 5, United States Code, and any other
law unless the Secretary determines that disclosure would further the purposes of this
subtitle, not create risk of harm to or theft or destruction of the resource or the site
containing the resource and be in accordance with other applicable laws. [BLM 2009]
ANTIQUITIES ACT
The Antiquities Act of 1906 states, in part: That any person who shall appropriate, excavate,
injure or destroy any historic or prehistoric ruin or monument, or any object of antiquity, situated
on lands owned or controlled by the Government of the United States, without the permission of
the Secretary of the Department of the Government having jurisdiction over the lands on which
said antiquities are situated, shall upon conviction, be fined in a sum of not more than five
hundred dollars or be imprisoned for a period of not more than ninety days, or shall suffer both
fine and imprisonment, in the discretion of the court.
Although there is no specific mention of natural or paleontological resources in the Act itself, or
in the Act's uniform rules and regulations [Title 43 Part 3, Code of Federal Regulations (CFR)],
"objects of antiquity" has been interpreted to include fossils by the National Park Service, the
Bureau of Land Management, the Forest Service, and other Federal agencies.
NATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL POLICY ACT
National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) directs federal agencies to use all practicable means
to "Preserve important historic, cultural, and natural aspects of our national heritage…”. If the
presence of a significant environmental resource is identified during the scoping process, federal
agencies and their agents must take the resource into consideration when evaluating project
effects. Consideration of paleontological resources may be required under NEPA when a project
is proposed for development on federal land, or land under federal jurisdiction. The level of
consideration depends upon the federal agency involved.
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STATE LAWS AND REGULATIONS
CALIFORNIA ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY ACT
CEQA declares that it is state policy to "take all action necessary to provide the people of this
state with...historic environmental qualities." It further states that public or private projects
financed or approved by the state are subject to environmental review by the state. All such
projects, unless entitled to an exemption, may proceed only after this requirement has been
satisfied. CEQA requires detailed studies that analyze the environmental effects of a proposed
project. In the event that a project is determined to have a potential significant environmental
effect, the act requires that alternative plans and mitigation measures be considered.
CEQA includes historic and archaeological resources as integral features of the environment. If
paleontological resources are identified as being within the proposed project area, the sponsoring
agency must take those resources into consideration when evaluating project effects. The level
of consideration may vary with the importance of the resource.
BACKGROUND
REGIONAL GEOLOGY
The PSA lies within the Peninsular Ranges Geomorphic Province which consists of fault
bounded northwest/southeast trending mountain ranges and valleys. The San Andreas Fault
Zone in the Salton Trough/Salton Sea area and subparallel faults west of the San Andreas Fault
Zone have locally built up the San Jacinto and Santa Ana mountains and contributed to the
shapes of the intervening valleys. The PSA lies between the San Jacinto and Elsinore fault zones
which are both taking up much of the strain caused by the bend in the San Andreas Fault Zone to
the north of Hemet from the Salton Trough in the east to the Cajon Pass in the west.
STRATIGRAPHY
Morton and Miller (2006) map the PSA partially as Quaternary young alluvial fan and primarily
as Quaternary very old alluvial fan based on paleomagnetic studies of the sediment underlying
March Air Reserve Base (Figure 4). The 780,000 year old Brunhes-Matuyama paleomagnetic
boundary was identified 9.8 feet below the ground surface in the vicinity of the PSA (Morton et
al., 1997).
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Figure 4. Project Geology
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QUATERNARY YOUNG ALLUVIAL FANS
Morton and Miller (2006) mapped some of the PSA as Quaternary very young fans unit 1 (Qyf1;
Figure 4) ranging from Holocene to late Pleistocene (<100,000 years old). These sediments are
described as slightly to moderately consolidated, moderately dissected, primarily sands to
pebbles but also ranging to silt and boulder sized clasts. These fans comprise a majority of fill in
the valley areas south of the San Bernardino and San Gabriel ranges deposited at the transition
between the Pleistocene and the Holocene (Morton and Miller 2006).
QUATERNARY VERY OLD ALLUVIAL FANS
Morton and Miller (2006) mapped the majority of the PSA as Quaternary very old alluvial fans
(Qvofa; Figure 4) ranging from middle to early Pleistocene based on the presence of the 780,000
year old Brunhes-Matuyama paleomagnetic boundary at 9.8 feet (3 meters) below ground
surface (Morton et al. 1997). These sediments are described as moderately well consolidated,
well dissected, orangish-brown sands and silts with some gravels and conglomerates (Morton
and Miller 2006).
KNOWN RESOURCES
A paleontological records search for the project area was conducted by the San Bernardino
County Museum (SBCM; Scott 2013; Appendix B) and in the literature (Jefferson 1991a, 1991b;
Hay 1927). No paleontological localities are recorded in the PSA nor a one mile of the PSA.
Seven miles southeast of the PSA in the Lakeview Hot Springs area, east of the San Jacinto
River, is a late Pleistocene locality with a radiocarbon date of 9,900 + 50 to > 40,310 years
before present (ybp; Reynolds and Reynolds 1991). The younger 9,900 + 50 ybp date was
collected approximately 15 feet below surface, while the older date lies at approximately 45 feet
below the surface. Fossils were recovered from between 15 and 60 feet below surface (Table 1;
Reynolds and Reynolds 1991).
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Table 1. Known fossil localities from the Lakeview Hot Springs site
† = indicates that the animal is extinct; Reynolds and Reynolds (1991)
Group
mammals
birds
reptiles
amphibians
invertebrates - mollusks
plants
Common name
mammoth
horse
deer
sabre-toothed cat
vole
Botta’s pocket gopher
kangaroo rat
squirrel
bird
pond turtle
rattlesnake
frog or toad
fresh water snail
land snail
fresh water clam
California juniper
Taxon
†Mammuthus sp.
†Equus sp. cf. E. occidentalis
Odocoilius sp.
Smilodon sp.
Microtus sp.
Thomomys bottae
Dipodomys sp.
Scuridae
Aves
Clemmys sp.
Crotalus sp.
Anura (small)
Lymnaea sp.
Vallonia sp.
Anodonta sp.
Juniperus californicus
Depths recovered
from
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~15 ft, ~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft, ~50 ft
~15 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~25-45 ft
~15 ft
~15 ft, ~25-45 ft
SURVEY RESULTS
SURVEY METHODS
An intensive pedestrian survey of the entire PSA was conducted on November 20, 2013 by
Francisco Arellano and Sarah Sederholm. The survey consisted of walking north/south transects
at intervals of 3-5 meters where possible along both sides of the channel and within the channel
when possible while closely inspecting the ground surface. Ground surface visibility varied from
zero to 100 percent.
SURVEY RESULTS
A pedestrian survey was conducted on both sides of the channel and within the channel when
accessible. For the most part the channel was active with very dense thickets of vegetation. The
flat land west of the canal is cleared of thick vegetation, and compacted with decomposing
granite with ground visibility between 80-percent to 100-percent.
Along the western and eastern banks of the canal the ground visibility was 0-percent to 60percent, with visibility affected by vegetation. Within the channel the visibility was good to fair,
averaging 60-percent with dense vegetation in long thickets. Ground visibility under the bridges
at Cactus Avenue and Meyer Drive was 0-percent as the canal held stagnant water and was
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overgrown with vegetation. The eastern bank is predominantly overgrown with very little
ground surface between the four lane Heacock Street (tapers to two lanes in the south at Iris
Avenue) and the channel bank. A poured concrete wall is evident at Cactus Avenue. The depth
of the wall is unknown but it is exposed between two and three feet. There are three areas where
the channel banks and bed are covered in concrete; specifically, the storm drain at Gentian
Avenue, at a lateral channel from within March Air Force Base north of Revere Place, and the
southern boundary of the survey corridor where the canal spills into a larger perpendicular
channel.
Transects were walked along the eastern unpaved sidewalks of Heacock Street, closely
inspecting the ground surface. These areas were recently tilled with a ground visibility of 100percent. Along the eastern survey boundary laterals are located on and near existing paved
roadways and a pedestrian survey was conducted on both sides of the roads (Figures 5, 6, 7).
Traffic on the roadways was heavy along four landed Heacock Street and light on the two lane
residential streets (Gentian Avenue, Revere Place and Iris Avenue). Erosion and cuts exposing
buried soils were inspected for anomalies that might indicate the presence of paleontological
resources. No paleontological resources were observed.
Figure 5. Canal, east bank, at Gentian Avenue, view to southeast
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Figure 6. Canal north of Revere Place, view to south
Figure 7. Canal at east end of survey corridor, view to north
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FINDINGS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
No paleontological resources are known within the PSA. Pleistocene sediments have previously
been demonstrated to be as shallow as 9 feet in the project vicinity. However, despite extensive
prior development in the vicinity, no fossils have been observed. No adverse effects/impacts to
paleontological resources are anticipated.
If unanticipated paleontological resources are discovered during project construction activities,
all work should halt within 50 feet of the find until it can be evaluated by a qualified
paleontologist.
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REFERENCES CITED
BLM
2009 Paleontological Resources Preservation Act. Online at:
http://www.blm.gov/pgdata/etc/medialib/blm/wo/Planning_and_Renewable_Resources
/c oop_agencies/paleontology_library/paleon_legis.Par.45651.File.dat/PL-111-011prpa.pdf
Hay, O. P.
1927 The Pleistocene of the western region of North America and its vertebrate animals.
Carnegie Institution of Washington Publication 322B, 346 pp.
Jefferson, G.T.
1991a A Catalogue of late Quaternary Vertebrates from California: Part one, nonmarine lower
vertebrate and avian taxa. Natural History Museum of Los Angeles Technical Report #5.
1991b A Catalogue of late Quaternary Vertebrates from California: Part two, Mammals. Natural
History Museum of Los Angeles Technical Report #7.
Morton, D. M., B. F. Cox, J. C. Matti, J. W. Hillhouse, and R. C. Jachens, 1997
Regional geology and structure in the area of March Air Force Base, southern California. USGS
Administrative Report to March Air Force Base, 97-013A , 31 p., 9 maps, scale 1:24,000
(for informal agency use only). This report can be examined at the March Air Force
office or at the USGS office located in the Department of Earth Sciences at the
University of California, Riverside.
Morton, D. M. and F. K. Miller, 2006
Geology map of the San Bernardino and Santa Ana 30’ x 60’ quadrangles, California; Geology
and description of map units, version 1.0. Digital preparation by Cossette, P. M. and K.
R. Bovard. USGS Open File Report 2006-1217, scale 1:100,000.
Reynolds, R. E. and R. L. Reynolds, 1991
The Pleistocene beneath our feet: Near surface Pleistocene fossils in Inland Southern California
basins in Woodburne, M. O., Reynolds, R. E., and D. P. Whistler (eds.) Inland Southern
California: the last 70 million years. San Bernardino County Museum Association
Quarterly 38(3-4), p. 41-43.
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APPENDIX A: PALEONTOLOGICAL RECORDS SEARCH
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