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Portland!
BIG MAN, little playing time
— SEE SPORTS, B8
PortlandTribune
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Bike
envoy
gears up
for fun
Film festival, other
events lighten up
city’s bike culture
By JENNIF ER ANDERSON
The Tribune
There used to be a time
when cyclists in Portland
would whoop and holler during videos of other cyclists
blowing past stop signs,
weaving in
and out of
traffic and
disobeying
the rules of
the road.
Not anymore, says
Ayleen Crotty,
a self-proclaimed “bike
culturalist”
who’s produced dozens
of bike-themed
events, rides
— Ayleen Crotty and festivals
in Portland
since 2002.
“We don’t do that here,”
Crotty says. “We share the
road. It’s actually how we’re
living, staying alive, getting
around to our friends’ houses,
school and work. Nowadays we
don’t have that in Portland,
and we don’t need it.”
That’s not to say that the
bike-obsessed in Portland take
their cycling too seriously.
To the contrary, 38-year-old
Crotty, who lives in Woodlawn,
has made it her mission to
make Portland’s bike culture as
fun and quirky as possible.
While advocates lobby for
more bike infrastructure and
funding and entrepreneurs
come up with new cyclistfriendly innovations, Crotty has
found her niche.
“I stay focused on the fun and
flair, and leave the advocacy
and politics to others,” she
says.
Working as a photographer
and event marketer by day,
Crotty has founded many of
“I feel like
we’re
capturing
an
important
time in bike
history in
Portland
and the
U.S.”
FOR RAPE VICTIMS –
A LIGHT IN DARKNESS
■ Police Bureau advocate Susan Lehman helps sex
assault victims recover from crisis
T
here are days, more than a few,
when Susan Lehman feels, if not
torn, at least tugged by the possibility of what could be done.
Lehman works as a Portland Police Bureau sex abuse victim advocate. Her job
is to help women who have been raped.
On the job, she is as likely to hug a teenage girl
who has been sexually
abused as she is to spend
an entire afternoon lining
up shelter for a victim who
is homeless. At night, she
FIRST OF
occasionally finds herself
TWO PARTS
in tears, having successfully maintained the professional barriers her job requires, saving
emotional reaction for her private time.
And sometimes, in her private moments,
Lehman gives way to the feelings she is
not allowed to voice on the job.
TRIB
SERIES
Story by Peter Korn
Photos by Jaime Valdez
“I have thought to myself, I would like
to get this bad guy off the street,” Lehman
says.
Lehman is one of two victim advocates
hired five years ago by the Portland Police
Bureau after a 2007 city audit determined
that Portland had a remarkably low rate
of conviction in sexual assault cases. Too
many victimized women, the audit noted,
were not coming forward to work with police, and not following through to testify
after their assailant was arrested.
It was hoped that advocates working
with assaulted women might help prosecutors achieve a higher conviction rate, as
Susan Lehman, a
Portland Police Bureau
advocate for sex assault
victims, talks with a
former homeless woman
who has been victimiz ed
several times on the
streets.
Homeless, mentally
ill most vulnerable
For many women on street, rape
is fact of life, goes unreported
By PETER K ORN
The Tribune
Kim was walking in Old
Town recently when a man
came up and gave her a big
bear hug before stepping
back and continuing on his
way. Later, Kim, a tiny sprite
of a woman who has been
homeless on and off in Old
Town for years, explained
how she knew the man. He
had raped her just a few
blocks away.
Kim (not her real name),
says she hardly reacted to the
hug. What could she do? After
the rape she had felt the same
sense of impotence. Convinced
nothing would be done to the
man, she had not bothered to
See HOMELESS / Page 2
See RAPE / Page 2
See BIK E / Page 13
Can F rancesconi be the comeback kid?
After failed mayoral
bid, politico seeks
county chair post
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
F ilmed by Bike founder Ayleen
Crotty launched the iconic event
in Portland 12 years ago. The
four- day festival kicks off April 19
at the Clinton Street Theater.
When Jim Francesconi first
ran for Portland City Council
in 1996, he was the social justice-minded community organizer, the friend to the injured
worker and disadvantaged, the outsider pounding on
the doors of City
Hall.
But after eight
years on the City
Council, Francesconi’s political career fizzled after
he cozied-up to downtown business leaders, raising an unprecedented $1 million in an unsuccessful bid for mayor.
A decade after that embarrassing defeat, Francesconi
is back seeking the Multnomah
County chair post, one of two
main contenders along with former county commissioner
and state lawmaker Deborah
Kafoury.
Multnomah County voters
Portland Tribune
Inside
might well wonder which Francesconi will show up to run the
county if he wins.
Will it be the activist Catholic
committed to workers, the poor
and dispossessed? Or will it be
the friend of Portland’s business
elite known to some as the “$1
million man?”
Right out the gate in this race,
Francesconi adopted a message
sounding like his old self, saying
the rising gap between rich and
poor is the key issue of our time.
“We’re leaving a
lot of people behind,”
Francesconi told
community leaders
in Gresham’s Rockwood neighborhood
at a recent roundtable discussion. “We
need to talk about the fact that
poverty’s almost doubled in the
last 11 years in the county.”
Francesconi’s failed bid for
mayor led to some deep soulsearching, he says. “It made me
wiser and stronger and clearer
about what I care about.”
As his decades-long record of
community activism attests,
Francesconi has never been
content to just practice law and
retreat to private life. His wife,
who initially didn’t want him to
“I represented a lot
of workers. Most trial
lawyers don’t represent
them because it’s not
lucrative.”
— Jim F rancesconi
F ormer City
Commissioner
Jim F rancisconi
is tackling social
issues head- on
in his campaign
to be the nex t
Multnomah
County chair.
PAMPLIN MEDIA
GROUP: JIM CLARK
run for office again, finally relaxed that stance, Francesconi
says. “I think she realizes that
public service is who I am.”
Francesconi, 61, likes to describe himself as “100 percent
Catholic, 100 percent Italian.” He
grew up in Eureka, Calif., a modest lumber and fishing town not
far from the Oregon border,
close to his extended family. His
dad tended bar and his mom
was a bank teller, and his grandparents lived next door. A star
student at St. Bernard’s High
School, Francesconi was the
first from the Catholic school to
attend Stanford University.
Francesconi identified with
the ascendant liberal wing of
the 1960s-era Catholic Church,
inspired by Robert Kennedy,
Dorothy Day and the anti-war
Berrigan brothers. After Stanford, he moved to Portland to
join the Jesuit Volunteer Corps.
His assignment: recreation
work with inner-city black
SOUL’D OUT
MUSIC FESTIVAL
— SEE LIFE, PAGE B1
youth and others, working out of
St. Andrew Catholic Church on
Northeast Alberta Street and
Eighth Avenue. Francesconi
met his wife and lifelong partner
in the Jesuit program, and
joined the St. Andrew congregation, where he remains an active
member.
Years later, Francesconi’s Catholicism factored into the 2004
mayor’s race, when he came out
in favor of civil unions for samesex couples, but not gay marriage. That same year, Democratic standard-bearer John
Kerry, a Catholic running for
president, staked out the same
position.
But that was a year when
some local governments, including Multnomah and Benton
See F RANCESCONI / Page 14
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
OWNER & NEIGHBOR
A2 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Rape: Jane Doe kit allows anonymous report
■ From page 1
Out of every 100 rapes:
40 are reported to police
more victims learned to trust 10 lead to an arrest
the criminal justice system. 8 get prosecuted
Lehman knows this. But she 4 lead to a felony conviction
also knows that her first loyalty 3 rapists will spend time in prison
is to the women (and very oc- Data: Rape Abuse & Incest
casionally men) she tries to National Network
help after they have been assaulted. Which is why during
the daytime she so often has to only the emergency departkeep her thoughts about what ment at Oregon Health and Scishe’d like to happen to the bad ence University could do so.
guys to herself.
And victim advocates such as
Nationally, only a small per- Lehman are available to viccentage of victimized women tims when they report rapes or
— estimated at less than 1 in 10 when they are interviewed by
— brave the full process that detectives.
leads to a conviction. Lehman
These changes have been occould, if she were of a mind to, curring nationally as well. And
influence some hesitant vic- yet, the data surrounding sex
tims to work with police and assault cases still puzzles extestify in court. But she never perts, including some within
does. Not even close.
the Portland police. First, sta“I have never thought I hope tistics appear to show that in
the victim changes her mind,” the last two years, women have
Lehman says. “It is such an in- become less willing to report
tensely emotional process that rapes. Nationally, 28 percent of
I wouldn’t want someone to victims reported sexual asdo that who isn’t thoroughly saults to authorities in 2012,
prepared.”
down from 56 percent a decade
In February,
earlier. Some exthe Portland City
perts say the last
Auditor issued a
two years may
report assessing
have been an aberthe current state
ration, because
of the police repreviously reportsponse to sexual
ing rates had been
assault. The rerising. But in addiTRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
port said that
tion, according to
there have been
the latest Portland Assault victim advocate Susan Lehman says most of Portland’s homeless women have been assaulted or raped. The victims are part of the
— Susan Lehman,
significant impolice data, police vulnerable population in the city’s Old Town area and other neighborhoods.
Portland Police Bureau
provements since
here are clearing
victim advocate
the scathing 2007
fewer sex assault
audit.
cases than they ing with victims would in- they have the support of an ad- tor of the Trauma Informed
“She is phenomenal,” Davis
Victims in Portland now can did six years ago.
crease the rate of convictions. vocate. In 2013, victims report- Care Project at Portland State says. “She is what all advocates
report sex assaults anonyAfter the 2007 audit, the rape And that as word got out about ed 194 rapes to Portland police. University’s School of Social should be like.”
mously using a Jane Doe rape clearance rate for Portland po- the support, more victims Fifty-six of those cases ended Work, says Lehman’s willingBut the tension inherent in
kit. That means police can start lice jumped to 55 percent (in might be willing to report sexu- up suspended, almost all be- ness to see to the needs of vic- the work done by women such
an investigation, and if the vic- 2008) from around 30 percent. It al assaults.
cause the victim was unwilling tims is crucial in helping them as Susan Lehman makes it imtim later decides to testify, the has declined each year since.
“I think they absolutely drive to pursue prosecution. Unfortu- get through the criminal jus- possible to know if Davis and
evidence will be available. All
Experts — nationally and in the clearance rate up,” says nately, Portland police do not tice process, and she’s pretty Mahuna are right. Lehman and
of the major Portland hospital Portland — say that victims Sgt. Pete Mahuna, who heads have comparable data from the certain having Lehman on the police bureau’s other advoemergency departments now need and benefit from the sup- the Portland police sex crimes years before they began using hand increases the chances cate, Slavica Jovonavich, work
have those rape kits and are port of advocates. They have unit. Mahuna is convinced victim advocates.
victims will testify against
See VICTIMS / Page 3
able to use them; previously assumed that advocates work- more victims testify because
Mandy Davis, clinical direc- their attackers.
“My job is to
make sure the
detectives do
what the victims
want.”
Homeless:
Men often
sexually
abused, too
■ From page 1
report the rape to police.
In fact, Kim says, she has been
raped a number of times. Pretty
much every homeless woman
she knows in Old Town has been
raped as well. Kim suffers from
schizophrenia, and, while clean
now, has a history of drug abuse.
She knows she wouldn’t make a
great witness in a he said/she
said courtroom case.
Only once has Kim reported a
rape. Two and a half years ago a
stranger happened by and saw
Kim, arms and legs bound by
tape, tape across her mouth to
keep her silent, being raped in
Southeast Portland. The passerby stopped the assault and called
police.
Kim was taken to a hospital
emergency department where
she met Portland police Det. Jeff
Myers, who called victim advocate Susan Lehman. Myers took
Kim’s statement and Lehman arranged to have Kim taken to a
women’s shelter after her release from the hospital.
The rapist, one day out of prison after serving time for a similar assault, was easily identified
by the bystander. Convinced that
this time was different because
of her rescuer’s corroboration,
Kim agreed to file a report with
police.
Lehman’s job during the succeeding 10 months was to “keep
her on board.” Lehman found
Kim a subsidized apartment,
drove her to medical appointments, even found a used computer and set it up so Kim could
get email. When Kim said she
was afraid to sleep alone, a police officer supplied a cat.
Two to three times a week
Lehman visited Kim, taking her
grocery shopping and to doctor
and dental appointments, aware
that if Kim were to become
homeless again or her schizophrenia flared up, the case
against her rapist would likely
be dismissed.
On the day Kim was scheduled to testify in court, Lehman
and Myers picked her up and
drove her downtown. Lehman
had taken a black skirt from her
daughter and given it to Kim,
along with a burgundy top, so
Kim would look “ready for
court,” according to the advocate. Lehman noticed Kim fidgeting in the back seat of the car,
so they stopped at a Starbucks
and talked awhile. Clearly,
Lehman says, the prospect of
testifying was unnerving Kim,
whose mental illness, which can
include hearing voices, is exacerbated by stress.
At the courthouse, Lehman
stayed with Kim in the victims’
lounge, and later walked her into
the courtroom, aware all the
time that, “She could have done
anything.”
Kim was able to describe the
events of her rape well enough
that her rapist was sentenced to
25 years in prison.
Behind bars
Her experience is pretty much
the standard for homeless women, says Doreen Binder, executive director of nonprofit Transition Projects Inc., which provides day services and shelter to
the homeless in Old Town.
Asked what percentage of
downtown Portland homeless
women have been raped, Binder
doesn’t hesitate. “A hundred percent,” she says.
“We’re not just talking about
women. Men are sexually
abused on the street all the
time.”
Binder says whether it occurs
while they are living on the
street or before, sex abuse in
some form is almost always part
of the life narrative for the homeless. Many homeless women, she
says, are incest and domestic violence survivors. Sexual abuse
has shaped their world view and
often shaped their later lives.
“You can’t be an incest survivor and abused as a child, end up
on the street and say, ‘I won’t allow it.’ It just becomes the norm
for you,” Binder says.
As it was to Kim, until Susan
Lehman entered her life. Lehman still sees Kim nearly every
week. The man who raped Kim
in 2011 is behind bars, but others
who did the same, including the
one who gave her the bear hug,
are still walking around Portland.
Kim credits Lehman for much
more than helping her put one
rapist behind bars. Asked what
would have happened if she had
not met Lehman, Kim says, “I
wouldn’t be living here and I
wouldn’t be stable.”
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■ A story in the April 8 Portland Tribune listed an incorrect date
when TriMet’s new light-rail line to Milwaukie will open. The line
opens in September 2015.
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©2014 Portland Tribune
NEWS A3
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
T
he coalition against
the proposed Portland Public Water
District on the May
20 primary election ballot
keeps growing.
New contributions to the
campaign against Measure
26-156 include $10,000 from
PacifiCorp and $5,000 each
from real estate investor Albert Solheim and the Professional & Technical Employees Local 17 union, which
represents workers in the
water and sewer bureaus.
They join contributors from
environmental organizations
and other public employees
unions trying to stop the creation of an independently
elected utility district. The
Stop the Bull Run Takeover
political action committee has
raised more than $51,000 in
cash and in-kind contributions so far.
Victims:
Advocates
help spur
testimony
■ From page 2
with 650 to 700 women a year.
Another a half-dozen or so cases each year involve men,
whose reporting rate is even
lower than that of women.
Separating abused, abuser
More than 80 percent of sexual assault cases in Portland
involve women Lehman describes as extremely vulnerable. Most are homeless or very
poor, many suffer from addictions or mental illness. Most
know the men who rape them,
if only from the streets. So
Lehman’s first form of victim
assistance, and often most
long-lasting, involves making
sure victims have housing that
can keep them separate from
their abusers. Homeless women who have been raped need a
place to sleep where they can
shut the door — immediately.
Many need psychological and
addiction counseling. Some
simply need food.
“You can’t address some-
More voters choosing not
to pick a party
A disillusioned former
Democrat has started a website for nonaffiliated voters
to share information with
one another. Non-Affilated
Corporations wet
beaks in water
district campaign
Oregon launched on April 5
with a quote from consumer
activist Ralph Nader labeling the Democrat
and Republican
parties “two
sides of the
same coin.”
Jeffrey
Rempfer says he
was a loyal Democrat until Bill Clinton
was elected president, at
which time he began questioning his party’s commitment to
the middle class and became a
nonaffiliated voter, which
means he doesn’t belong
to a minor political
party. Now, with nonaffiliated voters
reaching the 30
percent mark in
Oregon, Rempfer says it’s time
for them to get organized and increase their
political influence.
“This is just an effort to
provide a forum for nonaffili-
SOURCESSAY
ated voters to exchange
ideas and information. A lot
of nonaffiliated voters don’t
know they’re not alone,”
Rempfer says.
Rempfer says he is not advocating any particular plan
to increase the clout of nonaffilated voter, although he
supports an initiative filed by
Eugene businessman Mark
Frohnmayer to create a fully
open primary election system in Oregon.
The site can be found at
nonaffiliatedoregon.com
Medicaid signups a success for Cover Oregon
Despite the ongoing problems with its website, Cover
Oregon is doing one thing
very well — signing up people for Medicaid coverage.
Even though no one can
register online yet, Oregon
leads the nation in the percentage of additional residents signing up for Medicaid
under the expanded eligibility
limits in the Affordable Care
Act, commonly called ObamaCare. According to a story in
the April 5 issue of The New
York Times, Medicaid enrollment is up 35 percent since
the law took effect.
Only two other states are
even close, West Virginia at
34 percent and Vermont at 32
percent. All other states are
below 24 percent, and many
are in the single digits.
Of course there’s no telling how high the increase
would have been if the
website worked as promised.
State officials still are deciding whether to keep working
on it, switch to the federal
website, buy one from
another state, or try some
combination.
one’s emotional needs until before being arrested.
their basic needs are met,”
About three times a week
Lehman says.
Lehman or Jovonavich starts
Most of the time Lehman working with a victim on a
meets victims alongside a de- case that looks like a good bet
tective who has been assigned for a conviction — but the victo investigate a case. But lower- tim says she won’t press charglevel sexual assault cases that es or testify. That’s where
involve offenses
Lehman’s resolve
such as groping
can get tested, but
often are not innot as severely as
vestigated by a
some
people
detective. The
think.
same is true when
“We only do
victims say they
what victims
don’t want to
want us to do,”
press charges. In
L e h m a n s ays .
both cases, the
“They don’t want
women are still retheir case investiferred to Lehman
gated, whether
or Jovonavich.
they are a minor
But those cases
or an adult, we
can be tricky. In
don’t investigate
one tragic incithem. Because
dent last year, a
that would be rewoman told a potraumatizing the
lice officer she had
— Susan Lehman, victim.”
been raped by a
In fact, Lehman
Portland Police Bureau
nurse at a local
says
her role can
victim advocate
hospital. But beput her at odds
cause the victim
with the investidid not initially say she wanted gating officer with whom she
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
to press charges, her case was works.
Susan Lehman talks with an assault victim during a meeting at her offi ce. Lehman works with victims
referred to Lehman rather than
“My job is to make sure the through the Portland Police Bureau to help increase prosecution of rape and sex ual assault cases.
a detective. Lehman attempted detectives do what the victo call her by phone and, after tims want,” she says. Possibly
not hearing back, sent a letter in reaction, at this point not ist who police think has assault- thinks the victim might be best not accurately testify. And conand later closed the case. A all the sex crimes unit detec- ed a number of women in Port- served by choosing not to testify. sider the emotional damage
month later, the victim called tives invite Lehman or Jovo- land, and will likely do it again.
“We restore the power in that would inflict on her, to feel
the district attorney, who con- navich to accompany them The rapist has been identified by their lives to them by giving somebody else yet again taking
away her power.”
tacted the police. Lehman when they interview victms, a victim who reported the rape them the option,” she says.
called the victim’s pager again, as has been recommended by but says she won’t pursue the
Also, pushing for testimony
did not hear back and closed auditors.
case. Lehman says the victim could backfire. “Imagine if we Next week: Are fewer victims rethe case again. Meanwhile, the
Lehman is working with a de- appeared to her “tentative and pressured a woman to go for- porting and prosecuting rapes? A
nurse assaulted other victims tective on a case involving a rap- pensive.” Not only does Lehman ward,” Lehman says. “She may look at Washington County’s alterfeels no desire to push, she not show up for trial. She many native model for victim advocacy.
“( If) they don’t
want their case
investigated,
whether they
are a minor or
an adult, we
don’t investigate
them. Because
that would be
re- traumatiz ing
the victim.”
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In the meantime, measure
supporters are reporting a
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Portlanders for Water Reform Committee. That’s how
much the group has raised
so far. The contribution was
transferred from the committee formed to put the measure on the ballot, which
spent around $190,000 on that
effort. Major contributors to
that effort included such
large corporate water users
as Siltronic Corp., American
Property Management, Portland Bottling Co. and the Hilton Hotel chain.
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A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Door-to-door program keeps seniors fit
BEAVERTON
Mobile exercise
classes bring health
to community centers
By SHANNON O. WELLS
Pamplin Media Group
When Lynn R obbin pulls
up to Holly Tree V illage in a
multicolored, fitness-themed
van on Tuesday and Thursday mornings, G ail Huddleston knows a group exercise session is not far behind.
Huddleston, 65, looks forward
to joining about 14 of her fellow
residents of the senior living
complex on Southwest Murray
Boulevard for Robbin’s twiceweekly sessions of chair-based
total body workouts and Tai
Chi, a popular group exercise
based on Chinese martial arts.
While the participants remain
seated, their arms and legs are
reaching, stretching and twisting as Robbin — using yellow
foam balls and elastic bands as
props — guides poses and encourages beneficial breathing
patterns.
“She does an excellent job,”
Huddleston says of Robbin in Center for seniors at 5550 S.W.
her distinct Texas drawl. “If I Hall Blvd. “I only have the idea,
had known it would keep you and my staff continues it and
feeling this young, I’d have done sees it to fruition.”
it a lot sooner.”
It’s that kind of enthusiasm Moving on
Enger worked with Ann Satthat Linda Jo Enger hoped to
generate when she and her col- terfield, the Stuhr Center’s
leagues at the Elsie Stuhr Cen- health and wellness program
ter on Southwest Hall Boule- coordinator, on a business plan
for the program,
vard conceived
which launched in
We l l n e s s
on
January. Funding
Wheels. Symbolfor the van, equipized by the van
ment and partcarrying weights,
time salaries for
balls and other acinstructors Robbin
cessories to fuel
and Mignon Hamclasses, W.O.W. is
lin comes through
designed to bring
a hybrid of park
fitness classes to
district resources,
seniors who have
grants from the
little or no access
Oregon Research
to group exercise
Institute and donaprograms.
— Lynn Robbin, tions from seniors
While geared
Wellness on Wheels in the district.
toward adults “55
fi tness instructor
“The unique
and better” lookthing about this
ing to start or resume a neglected fitness regi- program is, while we did get opmen, the program accommo- erational money for it, our sedates a range of fitness levels niors paid for more than half of
from “chair fitness” to the ad- the van,” Enger says. “We got
support not only from the park
vanced or “athlete” level.
“I was looking at making sure district, but from the people in
seniors were being served out- this building. It shows fitness is
side this building,” said Enger, important not only to their lives,
supervisor at the Elsie Stuhr but to the community.”
“Part of my
motivation for
looking into
senior fi tness
was watching
older relatives
decline who did
not ex ercise.”
TIMES PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Lynn Robbin, fi tness instructor for Wellness on Wheels, works with residents of Holly Tree Village on
Southwest Murray Boulevard in Beaverton during a Tuesday morning ex ercise class. Robbin is one of two
instructors in the new mobile fi tness program.
As more grants and funding
sources become available, the
goal is to gradually expand
W.O.W. services to a variety of
facilities and locations within
park district boundaries. For
now — with Robbin or Hamlin
behind the wheel — the van
heads out to Holly Tree Village
and Bethlehem Lutheran
Church in Aloha for four sessions a week. In addition to an
eight-form version of Tai Chi
the Oregon Research Institute
determined can substantially
decrease the risk of falls, classes include Ageless Conditioning
and Total Body Workouts. The
former combines aerobics, muscle strengthening, flexibility
and joint range mobility moves,
while the latter utilizes hand
and leg weights and resistance
training with bands.
A relative newbie to fitness
instruction, Robbin had previously volunteered her services
and in January completed an
internship at Portland Community College.
“Part of my motivation for
looking into senior fitness was
watching older relatives decline
who did not exercise,” she says.
“I’ve always been involved in
sports myself, so this seemed
like a good thing to do. It’s a new
chapter to find ways to help seniors keep moving.”
Growing stronger
Instructors administer the
Senior Fitness Test to participants, gauging — in addition to
weight, height and body mass
index — their agility, strength
and overall fitness through
tests involving standing from a
chair, one-arm curls, stepping
and stretching.
“It’s nationally recognized,”
Satterfield says. “We use certain criteria that help seniors
age gracefully. That is our goal,
to help people age gracefully.”
The program, she notes, is a
logical extension of the wildly
popular facilities and classes
available at the Stuhr Center.
“We have 99 classes here a
week,” she says. “We’re outgrowing our center. Taking
(classes) out in the community
is the next step. That we’re being able to take them into the
community is really exciting.”
Robbin finds the seniors she
works with are always glad to
see her and are open-minded
about their fitness routines.
“I think they’re really happy
to have an exercise class at their
residence,” she says. “Those
who come regularly, when they
can’t make it because of a doctor’s appointment or something
always say they’re disappointed
because they’d rather be (at
class).”
Virginia Houston, who’s lived
at Holly Tree Village for three
years, finds the fitness house
calls in line with doctor’s orders.
“My heart specialist told me I
needed exercise,” the 74-yearold says. “Now there’s no excuse
about getting caught in the rain
or whatever. I just go down the
hall.”
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A6 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
New water, sewer district is not answer
O
n the surface, the idea of creating a water and sewer district in Portland has appeal.
After all, what could be more
democratic than having elected representatives whose sole function is to
oversee a specific area of government
spending?
We could even envision a time when
we might support a measure that removes the water
and sewer bureaus from the
City Council’s
control and places them under another board. But this isn’t the time —
and this certainly isn’t the measure.
The proposal in question will appear on Portland’s May 20 ballot as
Measure 26-156. It is carelessly written and raises the possibility of many
unintended consequences — so much
so that voters should say no to this
particular proposal even if they sympathize with the underlying objective.
The push to amend the city charter
and create a water and sewer district
with an elected board of directors has
gained substantial support due the actions of former city Commissioner
Randy Leonard, who oversaw the wa-
OUROPINION
Portland
Tribune
F OUNDER
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
MANAGING EDITOR/
WEB EDITOR
Kevin Harden
VICE PRESIDENT
Brian Monihan
ADVERTISING DIRECTOR
Christine Moore
ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER
Vance Tong
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
CREATIVE
SERVICES MANAGER
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SY STEMS
MANAGER/WEBMASTER
Alvaro Fontán
NEWS WRITERS
Jennifer Anderson,
Peter Korn, Steve Law,
Jim Redden
F EATURES WRITERS
Jason Vondersmith,
Anne Marie DiStefano
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTSWRITERS
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
SUSTAINABLE LIF E
EDITOR
ter bureau. After a 2011 audit found
the water bureau had spent millions
of dollars on projects that had nothing to do with the delivery of water,
Leonard came under withering criticism for his water-related decisions.
Even after responsibility for the
Portland Water Bureau and the Bureau of Environmental Services was
turned over to Commissioner Nick
Fish last year, activists remained unsatisfied and began the initiative campaign. They argue that a water and
sewer district would put responsibility for the city’s water and sewer services into the hands of “representatives of the people of the city of Portland who have no obligations or allegiances other than to the operation,
financing, protection and enhancement of the sewer and waters systems
of the city.”
While we agree that the water
bureau needed better oversight, we
believe the proposed measure would
complicate the system, have a detrimental effect on the management of
these two agencies and could even
result in rate hikes rather than
reductions.
Flaws in this measure were high-
lighted by Multnomah County Circuit
Judge Leslie Roberts, who reviewed
the ballot title last fall. Roberts pointed out that the proposed measure has
poorly defined voting districts, based
loosely on the boundaries of Portland
Public Schools. Roberts raised the obvious question of who would represent the residents of Portland who
live east of Interstate 205 — in the David Douglas, Reynolds, Parkrose and
Centennial school districts.
As for the elected representatives,
the measure has far too many disqualifications for eligible board
members.
If you’re serving on your local
school board, you’re out.
Hold any other elected office? Out.
Have you contracted or worked for
the city in a position related to the
provision of water or sewer services?
You’re out as well.
The list goes on, effectively eliminating many people who might actually have a clue of how to run a water
district.
Management of the Portland Water
Bureau’s $256.5 million budget and
the Bureau of Environmental Service’s $426 million budget is no small
task. Yet, this measure would eliminate the possibility that someone who
had valuable experience managing
those agencies could serve on a newly
formed water and sewer board.
In opposing this measure, the Portland Business Alliance pointed out
that the initiative would require the
city to issue bonds for the new entity,
but the city would not have the authority to set rates to repay those
bonds.
We concede that the current system
— one that places these bureaus under the authority of a single commissioner — is also flawed. The Portland
Utility Review Board and the Citizens’
Utility Board have input into the direction of these agencies, but neither
has any real enforcement powers.
Those flaws, however, can be addressed without creating an independent district. Yes, Portland’s mayor
and city commissioners should pay
close attention to the frustration that
led to this particular ballot measure.
But Portland voters should reject
Measure 26-156 and instead require
their current elected officials to provide the oversight needed to avoid
mistakes of the past.
City vacation rental rules fail to catch air
MY VIEW
Steve U nger
R
ecently, when Airbnb
announced that Portland was to be its initial “shared city,” Mayor Charlie Hales scored a huge
victory in having Portland become the first city in the world
for which Airbnb agreed to remit lodging taxes.
However, now that Portland
has moved into the spotlight, it
is more important than ever
that Portland develop a comprehensive short-term rental
policy that addresses all Airbnb
rentals (as has Austin, Texas).
At about the same time, the
city Bureau of Planning and
Sustainability issued the
RICAP 6 Proposal Draft of an
ordinance on licensing shortterm rentals. Actually the
RICAP 6 proposal covers only
40 percent of the Airbnb listings for Portland — specifically
about 400 “private room” rentals in single-family homes and
duplexes that are the primary
residence of the host. These are
homeowners who would like to
rent one or two rooms in their
house to tourists.
I support the RICAP 6 proposal with some modifications
— primarily that the host be
living on-site during the guest’s
stay and a higher biannual license charge be used to cover
New city rules
on vacation
rentals should
more closely
match bed and
breakfast
regulations that
req uire a host
to live on the
site, according
to a MyView
writer. This
guest house is
following the
city’s rules.
TRIBUNE F ILE PHOTO:
CHRISTOPHER
ONSTOTT
the cost of a biannual fire inspection.
However, RICAP 6 does not
address:
■ More than 400 unsupervised Airbnb “entire place”
rentals
■ Any Airbnb rental in a
multifamily building
■ Any “vacation rental” listings on VRBO, HomeAway and
Flipkey.
Hundreds of these rentals are
already in operation. The Bureau of Planning and Sustainability says that these rentals
will simply continue to be “illegal,” which is to say that they
will only be closed down when a
complaint is filed. Yet it is difficult to file a complaint because
all the major websites intentionally mask the name and address
associated with the rental.
Therefore, I request that the
City Council mandate and fund
the Bureau of Planning and
Sustainability to develop a licensing policy and process for
the other 60 percent of the
short-term rentals in Portland
that are not currently covered
by RICAP 6.
Also, as part of its recently
announced partnership with
Airbnb, and in exchange for implementing a reasonable licensing process, the city needs to
have Airbnb provide the name
and address of their advertisers to assist the city in compliance activities. Airbnb could do
this with a one-sentence addition to its 43 pages of terms,
and doing so would not endanger Airbnb’s basic business
model.
Steve Unger is the innkeeper of
Lion and the Rose, a Victorian
Bed & Breakfast Inn in Northeast
Portland.
Steve Law
COPY EDITOR
Mikel Kelly
Read our lips: Less trust, fewer taxes
ART DIRECTION
AND DESIGN
Pete Vogel
PHOTOGRAPHERS
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
INSIGHT
PAGE EDITOR
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler,
CONTRIBUTOR
Rob Cullivan
WEB SITE
portlandtribune.com
CIRCULATION
503-546-9810
6605 S.E. Lake Road
Portland, OR 97222
503-226-6397 (NEWS)
T he Portland T ribune
is Portland’s independent
newspaper that is trusted
to deliver a compelling,
forward- thinking and
accurate living chronicle
about how our citizens,
government and
businesses live, work
and play. T he Portland
T ribune is dedicated
to providing vital
communication and
leadership throughout
our community.
MY VIEW
Adam D avis
R
egardless of where
they live in the state,
Oregonians want to
improve K-12 education, fill potholes and assist
low-income children and seniors — and they are willing to
pay more in taxes to make
these things happen.
In fact, more than eight in 10
people feel taxes are necessary
for the common good, a point
that came through loud and
clear in the 2013 Oregon Values
& Beliefs Survey. Oregonians
also are willing to pay more in
taxes to make other things happen, too, including providing
work force training and protecting air and water quality.
Then what’s the problem? If
Oregonians want these things
and say they are willing to pay
for them, then why are so many
tax measures at the state and
local levels such a heavy lift?
The same Oregon Values & Beliefs survey reveals part of the
answer. When asked to agree
or disagree, more than six in 10
Oregonians agreed that government was wasteful and inefficient with our tax dollars and
could not be trusted to make
good decisions.
This feeling was shared
across the state — it wasn’t just
the more conservative, Republican and rural residents talking.
Democrats split down the middle on the question, with 47 percent agreeing and 48 percent
disagreeing. And, among Independents, let’s just say they
look a lot more like Republicans (85 percent who agreed)
than Democrats.
A majority of every demographic subgroup, including
age, income and ethnicity,
agreed with the statement. The
breadth and depth of government mistrust means that voter
turnout may not be the answer
It’s alarming that many Oregonians ex pect these
organiz ations to replace government when, even combining
their resources, they cannot come close to doing so.
either. So much for the belief
that all a campaign needs to do
is get those younger, lower-income voters to the polls and —
voila! — victory is ours.
Moreover, skepticism about
the government’s fiscal responsibility is only part of the challenge for tax measure supporters. Negative attitudes about
government are more deeply
rooted and include criticism
about lack of innovation and
creativity, and being answerable only to special interests
and big money.
Furthermore, Oregonians
don’t strongly differentiate
what is going on at the national
level with what’s going on at
the state or local levels. What
they perceive about Washing-
ton, D.C., affects their attitudes
about Salem. And all this
against a backdrop of ignorance about how government
works and benefits businesses,
households and individuals.
Negativity toward government is thus multidimensional
and, for many reasons, very difficult to remedy — and it poses
a tremendous obstacle to the
passing of any tax measure,
even for things Oregonians
care about deeply.
The future? We’re seeing a
pivot away from the public sector and toward other groups as
the providers of services, including nonprofits, businesses,
faith-based organizations and
individuals working together at
the local level. It’s alarming
that many Oregonians expect
these organizations to replace
government when, even combining their resources, they
cannot come close to doing so.
The public may come to realize the limitations of nongovernmental organizations, but it
is not likely to become more
supportive of government and
tax measures (not counting crisis response) without some major reform and improved communications.
And Oregonians are not very
optimistic that such changes
will happen very soon.
Adam Davis is founder and principal of DHM Research in Portland,
which conducted the 2013 Oregon
Values & Beliefs Survey.
Portland Tribune editorial board
Submissions
■ J. Mark Garber – president, Portland Tribune
and Community Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714; [email protected]
■ Kevin Harden – managing editor, Portland Tribune
503-546-5167; [email protected]
The Portland Tribune welcomes essays on topics of public interest. Submissions should be no longer than
600 words and may be edited. Letters should be no longer than 250 words. Both submissions should include your
name, home address and telephone number for verification purposes. Please send submissions via e-mail:
[email protected] You may fax them to 503-546-0727 or send them to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605 S.E. Lake Road, Portland, OR 97222.
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
{ INSIGHT }
INSIGHT A7
READERS’LETTERS
Voters, don’t put water decisions in wrong hands
Y
Measure makes city
responsive to citizens
The Citizens Utility Board is
too little, too late, and now we
learn that CUB is groveling for
donations from the same beleaguered ratepayers who already
have been drained by the Portland Water Bureau’s outrageous spending (Portland water and sewer customers get
new consumer advocate, web
story, March 25).
The May 20 vote to relieve
the bureau of its iron grip (Ballot Measure 26-156) may not reduce rates, and it may stumble
initially. However, this transition is an essential step toward
making city government responsive to the citizens who
fund and support it.
The Water Bureau, the Portland Development Commission,
TRIBUNE F ILE PHOTO: L.E. BASK OW
and several other city entities
Portland’s Bull Run Reservoir is an important asset for the city, according to letter writers who say voters
have evolved into oligarchies
should not approve a measure to turn the city’s water and sewer systems over to an independent board.
run by free-spending risk takers, utterly unconcerned with
the financial plight of Portland’s that those who disagree are for
natown is their home, too.
residents. The convention hotel “completely dismantling landThrough our partnerships with
use planning ...” So in his eyes,
is another painful example —
more than 6,800 school districts
I read with interest your arti- around the country, NWEA has
three local governments break- if you don’t agree with him and
cle (Mayor: Old Town needs
ing state laws so they can jam a his cause, then your goal must
learned the importance of servsome TLC, March 18) about
be to destroy the land.
massive public bond funding
ing all stakeholders, and that inplanned investments in Old
Second, Miner’s comment
scheme down peoples’ throats
cludes our neighbors as well.
does not reflect an understand- Town/Chinatown. As president
without the benefit of any pubWe take pride in being a Porting of the extent and breadth of of the Northwest Evaluation As- land-based business and look
lic approval.
sociation (NWEA), I welcome
The city needs to be jolted in- the process that went into the
forward to partnering with the
recent land-use plan in the first the investment in this vibrant,
to performing responsible govcity as it redirects much-needed
diverse neighborhood — and to resources to this community.
place. Over a period of years,
ernance
Lee Hill the Washington County Board businesses that may be considMatt Chapman
ering this location, I encourage
Southwest Portland of Commissioners heard from
President and CEO, NWEA
professional land-use planners, you to join us.
Northwest Portland
NWEA chose to relocate in
attorneys and the testimony of
a diversity of citizens. The plan Old Town/Chinatown from Lake
Oswego and has 380 of our 600
ultimately was approved by
employees in our headquarters
three boards of county comJason Miner’s guest column
at the building at Northwest
missioners, by Metro, and by
As a Portland business own(Fighting Sprawl, March 18) is
the Land Conservation and De- Second Avenue and Everett
at best naíve on at least three
Street (the “blue column” build- er, I oppose coal export termivelopment Commission.
counts: First, his viewpoint is
ing, former headquarters of the nals in the Columbia River
But Miner says “Quite simsingle-issued, concerned solely ply Washington County overPort of Portland). We moved in- Gorge and encourage other
businesses to do the same.
with his own self-interest. Secto the neighborhood in 2010,
reached in the land reserve
These projects would make
ond, he does not demonstrate
process.” Really? Where is the having renovated the space to
an understanding of the proearn a Gold LEED certification, Oregon the largest coal export“overreach”? Considering this
er in North America, endangercess involved in this particular process, it is impossible to give and we frequently host educainstance of land-use planning.
credence to such an accusation. tion and community events con- ing our health, recreation, environment, agriculture and more.
Third, either he has not read
sistent with our not-for-profit
Third, did Miner read the
Studies show coal would be exthe state Court of Appeals rulruling of the Court of Appeals? status and our mission of parttremely costly for Oregon withing or else he is misrepresentnering to help all kids learn.
It clearly states the LCDC
out a corresponding return on
ing its findings.
The neighborhood’s amenimade multiple errors in the apinvestment.
First, Miner’s statements as- proval process. Not the Washties, including access to public
Our sustainable Northwest
sume that everybody who distransit, and its unique character
ington County Board of Comagrees with him operates from missioners.
attracted us to relocate here. So economy benefits all of us, but
coal exports would sacrifice
an evil motive. He says that
it is our hope, as plans develop
Readers of this paper dethis long-term strength of the
those with the loudest voices
for the new funds, that this
serve to have a balanced point
many for the short-term gain of
have something to gain. Well,
of view on this complex, many- character is respected and
the loudest voices have been
maintained, and that those most a very few rail, energy and fifaceted subject.
nancial companies. Demand for
“Save Helvetia” and 1000
Roger G. Smith vulnerable in our society conFriends of Oregon. He states
Cornelius tinue to feel that Old Town/Chi- coal is dropping around the
Old Town great spot
for doing business
Land use is complex;
columnist simplistic
Coal exports benefit
few in short-term
world, and these companies
will not stay to clean up their
damage when the money spigot
stops flowing.
Coal export terminals would
be a crushing blow to the environmental and business values
of our region, but our voices matter. I urge all Northwest people
and businesses to speak out on
this critical issue, and I ask Gov.
John Kitzhaber to deny these
coal export terminal permits.
Oregon businesses are leading the way toward a clean and
green future, but coal is a step
backward from that vision. It’s
an expensive, dangerous step
we can, and should, avoid.
Tom Dwyer
Tom Dwyer Automotive
Services
Southeast Portland
Don’t complain if
you’re not involved
What the proponents of the
measure (Ballot Measure 34210, opposing high-capacity
transit lines in the city of Tigard) that just passed March 11
have said over and over is that
they hate Metro and they hate
government making decisions
for them (Tigard to voters:
What were you thinking?,
March 25).
I spoke with one of the sponsors of the measure and informed him of the many meetings that have been occurring
in Tigard and all over the region. He had never been to
one!
People need to get involved
and get informed. Attend meetings. If you don’t attend these
meetings and let the decisionmakers know your opinion, the
people you elect will make decisions without input from you.
Highway 99 is a state highway
and so is Southwest Hall Boulevard. The decisions for making
some kind of rapid transit will
be made without Tigard’s input
due to the measure that passed.
It will be built, and it’s too bad
that the citizens decided to let
others make the decision for
them.
Sydney Webb
Former Tigard city
councilor, 2002-10
468421.041014
our story “Drowning
in water district confusion? Read voters
guide” (Sources Say,
April 3) is apt for the appalling
mess Ballot Measure 26-156 is.
The promoters, some of the
city’s biggest polluters and water
users, have concocted an ill-considered, confusing plan to do two
things: gut the city’s environmental programs by putting
them into the hands of those
who want to kill them; and transfer costs of water, sewer and
storm water programs from big
corporate water users onto individual households.
The measure clearly disenfranchises many voters in east
Portland who do not live in the
Portland School District; will actually result in increasing water
and sewer rates, not reduce
them; and will eliminate the
city’s “green” programs, such as
tree planting, protecting the
city’s watershed for human
health and ecosystem health,
and eliminate restoration efforts
on the Willamette, Johnson
Creek and other urban streams,
and areas like Forest Park and
the 160-acre Oaks Bottom Wildlife Refuge — the city’s first official refuge.
When in doubt, smart voters,
which Measure 26-156 has generated plenty of, it’s best to vote
“no” and work for sensible solutions with those we have elected
to represent us, the Portland
City Council. The councilors are
far more answerable and their
actions far more transparent to
the public than to a “shadow”
new utility consisting of people
supported by polluters and their
lobbyists that Measure 26-156
would create.
Vote “no” on Measure 26-156
to keep Bull Run, the city’s environment, your health, and decisions on utility rates where they
belong, within the city.
Mike Houck
Director, Urban
Greenspaces Institute
Northwest Portland
A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Memorial Tributes
Celebrate Their Life
Portland
832 NE Broadway
503-783-3393
Milwaukie
17064 SE McLoughlin Blvd.
503-653-7076
Tualatin
8970 SW Tualatin Sherwood Rd
503-885-7800
Placing an obituary is a final
keepsake of a loved one and provides a
memorial tribute to their life.
Traditional Funeral $$1,975
1,475
500
Immediate Burial $550
No Hidden Costs, Guaranteed
Privately Owned Cremation Facility
www.ANewTradition.com
In Loving Memory
The Pamplin Media Group offers both
paid tributes and death notices as a
service to the community.
To place a tribute, please go online to any
of our newspaper websites and fill out
our easy to use tribute form.
Robert Earl Collins
August 12, 1927
- April 1, 2014
Robert Earl Collins passed away
peacefully in his sleep surrounded by
loved ones at his home in Portland, Ore.
Robert was born Aug 12, 1927 in Toledo,
Ohio to Joseph Cecil & Exalena (Moffett) Collins.
In 1943, Bob attended a special program at the
University of Chicago for gifted high school
students. In 1945, he was drafted into the U.S.
Army and was stationed at Fort Lewis, Wash.
Following that, Bob resumed his studies at Oberlin
College in Ohio.
On June 18, 1949, Bob and Julia married in
Toledo, Ohio. The couple built their dream home
in Portland, Ore. in 1954, and raised three girls.
Bob taught high school biology at Gresham and
Centennial high schools, later earning an M.Ed
from Oregon State University, and an Ed.D.
from Ball State in Indiana. He was a professor of
biology at the University of Portland, and later
taught at Western States Chiropractic College
before becoming the Dean of Students.
He is survived by daughters, Coral and David
Tilton, Deborah and Michael Radcliffe, Victoria
and James Wise; four grandchildren; and one
great-grandchild.
He was preceded in death by his wife, Julia
Pinkerton Collins, whom he met at DeVilbiss High
School, in Toledo, Ohio.
An open house for Bob will be held in the near
future. In lieu of flowers, the family would like to
suggest donations to the scholarship fund at the
University of Portland or buy a drink in his honor
at his favorite restaurant, The New Copper Penny.
In Loving Memory
Virginia C. Hubbard Baird
Jan. 20, 1924 — April 4, 2014
Our mother, Virginia Crystal
Hubbard Baird, went to Heaven,
April 4, 2014. We are sure there was
applause, and shouts of joy as she entered into the gates of Heaven with her
Father, Mother, Son and other siblings to
greet her with open arms. Mom had fought the good
fight here on earth for the last three years against
MRSA infection and finally Parkinson’s. The MRSA
was supposed to take her, but the Lord saw differently, and then she finally succumbed to the after-effects of a fall due to Parkinson’s.
Mother had an unwavering faith in God, love for
her sisters, children, grandchildren, great- grandchildren, church and church friends. She was a member
of The McMinnville Church on the Hill (Nazarene
Church) since 1965. The Sheridan Church of the
Nazarene was started in the home of Virginia and
Cecil Baird and she was a charter member of that
church.
Virginia was born on January 20, 1924 in Yamhill,
OR to Roy and Crystal Hubbard. She graduated from
Willamina High School and proceeded to work for
what is now Hampton Lumber Mill during WWII,
then later worked for Champion Plywood Mill. During this time she met and married Cecil Baird of
Sheridan, OR. They moved to Sheridan where he
was a sawdust chip driver. David, Dennis and Susan
were born while they were in Sheridan and Virginia
worked in the kitchen at Chapman Grade School as
Asst. Cook. They then moved to Carlton and Virginia
went to work for Newberg Realty and Bill Page Construction running their offices to support the home
and her three children.
Virginia is survived by two children, David Baird
(wife Connie) of Centralia, WA; Susan Baird of
Newberg, OR whom Virginia lived with. She was
predeceased in death by her son Dennis Baird in
2000 from cancer and one great-grandchild Kyler
Baird in 2001. She is also survived by 9 grandchildren and 6 great-grandchildren with twins on the
way.
A Funeral Service to celebrate Virginia’s life and
home going will be held Saturday, April 12, 2014 at
1:30 p.m. at The Church on the Hill, 700 North Hill
Road, McMinnville, OR. A fellowship time with
family and friends of Virginia will follow at the
church with finger foods and beverages. Private Interment at Pike Cemetery in Yamhill, OR.
Please feel free to contact any of our
newspaper representatives with any
questions.
In Loving Memory
Michael Henry Mulkey
Ann Wardy
June 22, 1934 to April 2, 2014
March 24, 1938
- April 6, 2014
Michael H. Mulkey, 79, passed away Wednesday,
April 2, 2014 at Meadows Courtyard Retirement
Home in Oregon City, Ore.
Mike was born June 22, 1934 in Portland, Ore. to
Violet M. and Marche C. Mulkey. He graduated from
Molalla High School in 1952. Mike married Donna
M. Morris on June 9, 1956 in Silverton, Ore. They
both attended Oregon State University, and Mike
graduated in 1956. He then began his career with the
US Army. Mike served honorably for 20 years, then he
retired to Oregon City in 1977.
Mike became a Real Estate Broker, and also taught
real estate courses at Clackamas Community College.
He then represented First American Title Insurance
in both Beaverton and Oregon City for several years.
Mike enjoyed camping, fishing, traveling, playing golf,
singing, and family. He was a long time member of
Oregon City Christian Church. Mike was an avid
member of the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity since his
induction in 1953.
He is survived by daughters, Terri Rickard of Mt.
Pleasant, Iowa., Gail and Tony Fenton of Wilsonville,
Ore., and Michelle and Kirk Tolstrup of Oregon City,
Ore.; seven grandchildren; five great-grandchildren;
and had two great-grandchildren on the way.
Michael was preceded in death by his parents, his
loving wife, daughter Linda D. Mulkey, and son-in-law
Albert C. Rickard of Mt. Pleasant, Iowa.
A private burial will be held Thursday April 10,
2014 at Willamette National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, Michael asked that donations be
made to Oregon City Christian Church.
Arrangements by Hillside Chapel.
Longtime Sandy resident, Ann
Wardy, died following a long illness on
April 6, 2014. A Memorial Mass will be
held at St. Michael’s Catholic Church in Sandy on
Thursday, April 10, 2014 at 11:00 am. She was 76.
Ann Marie Wardy was born in Pendleton, Oregon
on March 24, 1938 to John and Tina (Doherty)
McLaughlin. She grew up in the Fairview and Sandy
area where she graduated from Sandy High School
before moving to the Bay Area of California. While
working at Circus Food in San Francisco, Ann met
William “Bill” Wardy on a blind date in 1962. They
married shortly after in Reno on Oct. 20 1962.
Together they lived in the Bay Area and other areas of
California before moving to Sandy, Oregon in
December of 1973 and never looked back.
She enjoyed reading and cooking, loved her
flowers and above all being a mother to her children.
Ann was always a big help in the kitchen at St.
Michael’s Catholic Church for dinners and gatherings,
was a member of the Optimist Club and cooked at
Camp Collins Outdoor School for many years.
Survivors include; husband, Bill Wardy of Sandy;
daughters, Martha Dobbs of Spring, TX and Christina
Roling of Gresham; son William O. of Dallas, TX;
brothers, Larry and Chuck; sister, Kay; 5 grandchildren.
Ann was preceded in death by her son John Patrick in
1971.
In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to
any Hospice organization of choice. Sandy Funeral
Home is handling the arrangements.
Harold Paul Schmidt
September 22, 1933 to April 4, 2014
The 4th of April 2014 is the
day that family, friends &
neighbors lost a truly
remarkable man. With heavy
hearts we share the news of the
passing of Harold Paul Schmidt.
Harold celebrated his 80th
birthday this past September
and was looking forward to a
57th June wedding anniversary
with his highly beloved wife,
Klara (Tast) Schmidt. His passing also left a son and
daughter-in-law, Harry & Coco, a daughter, Margie
and grandchildren and their spouses, Erich & Sarah,
Michael, Monika & Jeremy and Stephen. In addition
to these and other family members he is also survived
by a large circle of individuals that he shared his
wonderful humor, loving and joyful outlook with.
Born on the 22nd of September 1933 in Germany,
he came to America in 1952 and was drafted into the
Army in 1956. He met and married Klara while on
leave to Nebraska, he returned to El Paso, Texas with
her (where he was stationed) and there they began a
wonderful life together. After leaving the Army they
returned to Nebraska, then his job with Armours
brought them to Minnesota and ultimately to Oregon
in 1973.
He owned The Stork’s Nest Baby Boutique in
downtown Gresham for close to twenty years and has
been a longtime resident in the Willowbrook
neighborhood. His home there and his heart was a
welcome place for many individuals. He will forever
be remembered for his loving, friendly disposition
and his incredible ability to bring light and laughter to
all people and situations. To be in his presence was to
feel genuine love, acceptance and warmth.
There are no words to express the depth to which
he will be missed and remembered. We ask that God
watch over him in all His Grace and Glory. Rest in
Peace Dear Husband, Father, Grandfather and Friend.
James “Ed” Wyant
April 17, 1967 to March 31, 2014
473597.040814
412210.012413
495
SIMPLE CREMATION $$545
Ed passed peacefully in his sleep early Monday
morning, March 31. He was 46.
Ed was born to Mary Margaret and Lewis “Pat”
Wyant in Sturgis, S. D. As an infant his family moved
to Oregon. He was raised in Wilsonville and graduated
from West Linn High School in 1985.
He married Rhonda Lee in 1991. Together, they
had two children and started Ed’s excavating company.
In 1997, the family moved to Sherwood where they
raised their children and his love for the community
was apparent.
Involvements in which he was most proud included
coaching church league softball, teaching Sunday
school, as well as time and charitable commitments
to his daughters’ schools, St. Paul Lutheran Church
and School, Camp Serene Lutheran Retreat, and
Doernbecher Children’s Hospital. Ed enjoyed riding
his Harley and dirt bike, singing karaoke, playing the
piano and guitar, fishing, and golfing.
He is survived by his ex-wife Rhonda and
children Danielle and Breanna Wyant; mother Mary
Wyant; sister and brother-in-law Margaret and Doug
Haworth; brother and sister-in-law Jay and Jane
Wyant; nieces and their spouses, Shellie and Dylan
Digby and Sarah and Ryan Broyles and nephew and
his wife, Brandon and Aimee Haworth and many great
nieces and nephews. He was preceded by his father Pat
and brother John.
Services have been held at 2 p.m. April 5 at St.
Paul Lutheran Church, 17500 SW Cedarview Way,
Sherwood. Ed was laid to rest in the church cemetery.
A memorial fund has been established in his
name. Donations can be made at any Chase Bank
location in the name of James Wyant, account number
3026698778. Read more online at cornwellcolonial.
com.
NEWS A9
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
In Loving Memory
Robert Richey
Oct. 22, 1989 to April 5, 2014
P
lease come join us to celebrate the
life of an amazing person Robert
Richey. His service will be held at
the Estacada Community Center on 200
SW Lakeshore drive Sunday April 13 at
2pm. Robby’s spirit will forever remain
with us. To honor Robby’s unique taste in
clothes we will all be wearing bright colors
and mismatched socks. Please feel free to
join us in this small token of solidarity.
Florine McEwen
Ralph Carson Hodges
May 11, 1933 to March 30, 2014
June 3, 1931 — March 27, 2014
Ralph was born in Laurel, MT
to James Lee and Altha Belle
Hodges. He graduated high school
from Laurel, MT in 1949. He then
went on to attend college at Eastern Montana College of Education (MSU-Billings). He received his Masters in Education & Reading
Specialist. He joined the Portland school district
in 1960. He went on to receive his PhD in 1974
from the University of Oregon. He stayed with the
Portland school district until he retired in 1993.
He married Geraldine Brown in 1952 and they
had 4 children: Timothy, John Daniel, Cynthia and
Rebecca. They have 9 grandchildren, 6 greatgrandchildren and 3 great-great-grandchildren.
The family will be having a private memorial
service to reflect on the many joyous times that
were shared with Ralph.
In lieu of flowers, memorials may be sent to
Hospice, 900 SE Oak St., Ste. 202, Hillsboro, OR
97123.
Florine passed away peacefully in her home after a
brave battle with brain cancer. She was a loving wife,
mother, grandmother, great-grandmother, sister and
friend.
She kept a beautifully manicured garden and always
put others first.
One of 13 children in the Eisele family, her life was
filled with joyous family gatherings and celebrations.
She is survived by her sisters, Virginia Thurmond,
Ramona Philpot, Diane Bobillot and Sharon Vannoy;
her brothers Bob Eisele and Don Eisele; son Rick
McEwen and his wife Kristine; daughter Kristi
Holcomb and her husband Dave; grandchildren,
Candice (Paul), Kirsten (Kyle), Trevor (Gosia), and
Spencer; great-grandchildren Justin, Mackenzie,
Sophia and Olivia.
Married for 59 years to her beloved husband, Don,
she will be laid to rest beside him at Willamette Valley
National Cemetery.
A celebration of her life will be held in the near
future for immediate family.
In Loving Memory
Betty Buxton
October 1, 1916 to April 2, 2014
Longtime Sandy resident, Betty Buxton died
peacefully at her home on Wednesday, April 2, 2014. She
was 97.
She was born, Betty Moats on October 1, 1916 in
Kirksville, Missouri. She was raised in Blair, Nebraska
where she received her schooling. Shortly after graduating
from high school, Betty furthered her education at Wayne
State University in Nebraska where she received her
teaching degree. Betty then moved to California to live
near her sister before entering the U.S. Coast Guard in
1943. While serving in the military, Betty met her future
husband Lyle. After her honorable discharge in 1945,
they were married on April 23, 1946. They moved to
Oregon and made their home in Boring where they
owned and operated a country store. In 1958, they moved
to Estacada where they bought a farm and raised cattle. It
was in 1974, Betty and Lyle purchased Lee Meat
Company in Sandy. Along with their son Marc, they ran
Buxton Meat Company until retiring, but remained on
the farm. Lyle passed away in 2004, but Betty continued
living in the home with her son and daughter in law.
Betty enjoyed reading, flower gardening, sewing and
enjoyed working alongside her husband and son.
Surviving is her son Marc and wife Susie; 2
granddaughters, Kelly Lee and Dana Hill and 1 great
granddaughter, Kate Hill.
Sandy Funeral Home is handling arrangements.
Joan Deane Miller
Andrew Logan
Ritchie
June 21, 1931 to March 11, 2014
Logan passed away peacefully
with family by his side and with
comforting from Hospice.
Logan was born in Roblin, Manitoba,
Canada to parents Alexander, of Toronto
Canada and Helen Ritchie of Kinross Scotland. He
grew up with 3 brothers and 2 sisters on the family
farm. He had survived all of his siblings.
Logan became an aircraft machinist during WWII
and continued in this profession for Air Canada in
Winnipeg. Logan married Mary Evelyn Wolfe on June
9, 1945. They moved to southern California after the
births of their two sons, Norman and Ronald, where
he continued work as a machinist in the aerospace
industry. The family moved in 1961 to the Portland
area where Logan continued working as a machinist
until he retired at 62.
Survivors are wife, Evelyn Ritchie; sons Norman
Ritchie and wife Joli, and Ronald Ritchie and wife
Sandy; grandsons Brian and wife Jennifer, Daniel, and
Ray and wife Angela; and granddaughter, Robyn Deeb
and husband Ayman; great-grandchildren, Stephanie,
Mitch, Hayden, Clair, Bella, Carissa, Kaela, and
Heidi; and one great-great-grandson, Rylan.
A memorial Service was held Monday, March 31,
2014 at 2:30 p.m. at the activity room in Vineyard
Place, 4017 SE Vineyard Rd, Portland, OR 97267.
Joan Deane Miller was born in Bend, Ore. to
Clifford Deane and Violet L. Snell. She grew up in
The Dalles, Ore. and then graduated from Pacific
University with a degree in Education.
Joan spent many of her thirty years teaching at
Ickes Junior High School in Milwaukie, Ore. She
came home laughing every day with a new story to tell
about her day at school.
Joan was gracious and kind to everyone who
crossed her path. She spent the past 17 years in Baker
City, Ore. with her companion Doug and her dog
Molly living in sight of The Elkhorn Mountains. She
found great friendships which she cherished dearly
in her book club, garden club, and with her life-long
friends.
Joan is survived by her family; The Deanes, Henrys
and Millers; and her friends who are forever changed
by her kindness, love, humor, and humanity.
In lieu of flowers please make a donation to The
American Heart Association, 4380 SW Macadam
Avenue, Portland, OR 97239, www.heart.org, or give
blood, or do a favor for someone, or simply show
kindness to a stranger in honor of Joan Deane Miller.
There will be no service. We will celebrate her life in
June.
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year-round comfort.
A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
“LOCAL CONNECTIONS”
83 Too colorful
86 Pure delight
87 Sport with orange
balls, perhaps
/\QQH&KHQH\·V
predecessor
91 Kept under wraps
92 U.K. record label
93 Paper Mate rival
94 “Eww, spare me
the details!”
95 Panda Express
cooker
&DOLIRUQLD·V
Marina __ Rey
97 Toaster treat
99 Henchmen
101 Interpol home,
locally
103 Hand-crafted
belts, e.g.
108 Grocery load
111 “Carmen” aria
113 Kama __
114 Vision-distorting
condition caused
by a few too
many cold ones,
slangily
116 Close link
118 Baseball feature
By CC Burnikel| Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
13 Holy mlle.
Small part
14 Occasionally
Square one
awkward show of
Being aired
affection
Logical
connection hidden 15 Perching on
16 Hushed “Hey!”
in eight puzzle
6SXG·VEXGV
answers
21 Bhopal Shatabdi
123 Wild plum
Express stop
124 Support staff:
25 Flat rate?
Abbr.
27 Like most golf
125 Unwanted sprout
shots
126 Slugger who hit
29 Patch, as a lawn
his first home run
32 Bridge immortal
off Clemens
33 Assent showing
respeto
DOWN
36 Close tight
1 Steam, e.g.
37 Let go
2 Texas landmark
39 Detailed
3 Luggage clip-on
40 Yodo River city
4 Bites
41 Razor handle
5 Every other
42 “Big Brother” host
hurricane
Julie
6 Mishmash
43 Gambian-born
7 Name on a spine
“Roots” character
8 Tire pattern
45 Teaspoons,
9 They may be hot
maybe
10 “Lawrence of
47 Fusses in front of
Arabia” star
a mirror, say
-RKQ:HVOH\·V
48 Model/actress
relig.
Pataky
12 Words of disgust
119
120
121
122
50
51
52
53
Nantes night
Rte. finder
Apple product
Jazz legend
James
56 Sprouts-to-be
59 Scam artists
61 Berth place
65 Keep from drifting
away
66 Operation VIP
68 Dig find
70 Big name in rap
71 Bear hands
72 Trojan War epic
74 Jazz dance
76 Swabbing need
78 Gateway Arch
designer Saarinen
79 Smell bad
82 Made a
touchdown
84 Play for higher
stakes
85 Beg to differ
88 Like most
customer support
numbers
89 Powerful deity
0LG·V:RUOG
No. 1 tennis pro
Bobby
93 Chicken servings
97 Sport with horses
98 Nobelist Camus
99 High chair
100 Barflies
·V·V6HUELDQ
auto import
104 Quarterback
known for
kneeling
$ODPRJRUGR·V
county
106 Party poopers
107 Island group near
Fiji
108 Early lessons
109 Bona fide
110 Staff note
·µDQG·µ
Abbr.
112 “Poor me!”
115 Govt. property
agency
117 Redbox rental
Suduko
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Suduko
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
[email protected]
©2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
Puzzle 2
1PSUMBOET-PDBM/FXTQBQFS
rrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrrr
/PXQVCMJTIFEFWFSZ5VFTEBZBOE5IVSTEBZ
XXXQPSUMBOEUSJCVOFDPN]
CROSSWORD
Dad does crossword puzzles
to strengthen his memory.
Where are crossword puzzles to
help my 8 year old memory?
I have to take tests all the time.
484750.041014
4/10/14
447580.040614 Mkt
ACROSS
1 Like Narcissus
5 Tiny tiff
9 The pyramids, for
28-Across
14 Yawn
18 Two-time Italian
prime minister
Moro
19 Zero __
20 Troubled greatly
21 Affected
22 Rewards for Fido
23 Kitchen add-on?
,PDJLQDU\NLGV·
author
26 Missouri River city
28 Pyramid figures
30 Flies into a rage
31 NFL
commissioner
since 2006
33 [Like that!]
34 Scrub
35 Deems proper
38 “The Newsroom”
channel
41 “Oh no!”
44 Miss the mark
45 Bob and bun
46 Cold cube in
Cologne
47 Sign of life
49 Zeus or Thor
52 Job interview
subject
54 Bausch & Lomb
brand
55 Bitty bites
56 End of time?
57 Calendar rows:
Abbr.
58 Prank
60 Gave a darn?
62 Indulge, with “on”
/DPE·VODPHQW
64 Bitty bits
67 Utter
69 “Toy Story”
composer
Newman
71 Water__: dental
gadget
73 Us, in Cannes
75 Relevant, to
lawyers
77 Unlit?
80 1996 Olympic
torch lighter
81 Short-range
weapons
SOLUTIONS
Student Crossword Puzzles: Educational fun, one clue at a time.
Sample puzzles at www.studentcrosswordpuzzles.com
by Eugene Shaffer
SOLUTIONS
Answer
3/25
4/10
©2014 King Features, Inc.
4/10
CRYPTOQUIP
4/10
4/10
3/25
WHEN THOSE GUYS
TILLING THE SOIL
BECAME PLUMB
TUCKERED OUT,
THEY DECIDED TO
TAKE A PLOWER NAP.
Cryptoquip solution:
Published every Tuesday and Thursday
www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
447579.040614 Mkt
Reach over 200,000 weekly readers with your ad here
NEWS A11
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Another sign the recession
is over: gold-embossed toilet
paper, monogrammed in
24-carat-gold motifs for $200
per roll. If this catches on,
there may be a new gold rush
in the sewers of Lake Oswego.
•••
It’s the new rage, man-gagement rings now that Johnny
Depp is sporting one. It’s a
man’s engagement ring. If she
wears one, why not him? Reportedly, 5 percent of men are
now sporting the rings to show
off their status. After the wedding, they can put it in the jar
with all their other jewels.
•••
Climate change. What the
United Nations said: It will affect each and every one of us in
a profound way, threatening
our way of life. What we heard:
blah blah blah ... until the U.N.
added that climate change will
affect the delicate worldwide
Mark&Dave
UP IN THE AIR
supply of coffee. OK, now you
have our attention. The shortages could be so severe that
one day only the rich will be
able to afford a cup of joe. Oh,
wait, just saw the Starbucks
menu, it’s happening now.
•••
Anything is possible in Vegas, including a legal way to
join the Mile High Club. The
Love Cloud service takes you
and a guest (they don’t care
who — what happens in Vegas,
stays in Vegas) up in a Cessna
421 Golden Eagle outfitted romantically with a foam mattress and heart-shaped pillows.
The cost is $800 for a 40-minute
round-trip. So what will people
do with the other 30 minutes?
•••
Another new attraction in
Las Vegas is the High Roller.
It’s billed as the world’s tallest
The new Quantum DVR
boasts it can record 12 different
channels at once. If you need to
record 12 shows at any one
hour of the day, you need an intervention.
•••
Too much of a good thing?
There’s a new report that says
too much running is linked to
shorter lifespans. (Music to a
couch potato’s ears.) Mark’s
doctor told him running would
add years to his life. He was
right, Mark feels 10 years older.
•••
An Irish terrorist’s car bomb
literally blew up in his face
when he forgot to set the explosive device’s clock an hour
ahead for daylight-saving time.
It exploded an hour early, in his
hands. Must be what they
meant when doctors said daylight savings can be hazardous
to your health.
•••
The Arizona Diamondbacks
say the new 18-inch corn dog is
so popular they have run out.
The “D-Bat Dog” comes stuffed
with bacon, jalapenos, and
cheese and costs a whopping
$25 — the same as a co-pay to
see your cardiologist.
•••
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The White House says more
than 7 million people have
signed up for health care under
the Affordable Care Act. Many
waited years to find affordable
health care. It will probably
take that long to see a doctor.
•••
The Portland Bureau of
Transportation is considering
a new $8 to $12 monthly
“street fee” to pay for road
and safety improvements and
extended bus service to lowincome neighborhoods. The
word “fee” has replaced the
word “tax” in city lingo. But
$96 to $144 a year for something people feel they already
pay for? We think Portlanders
will appreciate the nice roads
when they drive their U-Haul
out of town.
Listen to Mark & Dave from 3 to 6
p.m. weekdays on AM 860 KPAM.
Like them on Facebook at facebook.
com/themarkanddaveshow.
Metro takes steps to meet emissions goal
Two Metro committees
host meetings in April and
May to help the regional
agency develop a plan to reduce greenhouse gases in the
Portland area.
Metro’s Policy Advisory Committee and the Joint Policy Advisory Committee on Transportation have until December to
send legislators preferred approaches to the issue. The Legislature requires the Portland area to significantly reduce its
greenhouse gas emissions from
cars and trucks by 2035.
Members of JPACT and
MPAC are invited to participate
in the joint meetings, which will
be held from 8 a.m. to noon Friday, April 11, and again May 30,
at the World Forestry Center’s
Cheatham Hall, 4033 S.W.
Canyon Road.
In a three-stage process, the
Metro Council is working with
the community to achieve sustainable and efficient land-use
and transportation strategies to
reduce the gases.
According to Metro, in 2005,
each person who commuted in a
car or a truck on average dispelled 4.05 metric tons of carbon
dioxide emissions. The state tar-
get for 2035 is 1.2 metric tons per
person, about a 40 percent decrease. Since 1990, the Portland
area has decreased emissions
per person by 26 percent; meanwhile, the national average has
risen by 12 percent.
During 2011’s first phase of
the project, MPAC (a committee
of residents and representatives who advise the Metro
Council) and JPACT (a panel of
elected officials and leaders of
transportation agencies) endorsed evaluation criteria and
guiding principles to facilitate
scenario development.
A total of 144 models were
tested and analyzed using
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This year, community and
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King City Lions Club
Call Brad today at 503.381.6239
and arrange for a pick-up of your
newspapers. Benefits King City
Lions Club charities.
468920.040914
484554.040314
P
ortland Public Schools
has approved plans to
move the first day of
school to the week before Labor Day — killing traditional end-of-summer family
vacations. Like most parents,
we ask, “Can’t they just call
those in-service days?”
•••
VETERANS
468239.041014
Gold-embossed toilet paper
makes wiping a rich experience
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
D ozens gather to
mull demand’s effect
on local philanthropy
Trib Info Box 0813
View legals online at: http://publicnotices.portlandtribune.com
PUBLIC AND LEGAL NOTICES
These notices give information concerning actions planned and
implemented by attorneys, financial institutions and government
agencies. They are intended to keep you and every citizen fully informed.
Space-reservation deadline for all legal notices is Thursday 10 am
one week prior to publication. Please call Louise Faxon at (503) 546-0752
or e-mail [email protected] to book your notice.
NOTICE OF BUDGET COMMITTEE MEETING
The David Douglas School District will hold a public meeting
to discuss the budget for the fiscal year July 1, 2014 to June 30
2015 on the following dates:
April 21, 2014 Budget Committee Meeting/Testimony
received. The purpose of the meeting is to
receive the budget message and to receive
comment from the public on the budget. Any
person may appear at the meeting and discuss the proposed programs with the Budget
Committee. Deliberation of the Budget
Committee will take place. Meetings may
conclude on April 21 if the Budget Committee
takes action to approve the 2014-15 Proposed
Budget.
April 23 &
Budget Committee Meetings, if and as needed
28, 2014
Public testimony will not be received at
these meetings. Meetings will conclude on
any of these dates if the Budget Committee
takes action to approve the 2014-15 Proposed
Budget.
All meetings will be held in the Board Room at 6:00 p.m
at David Douglas School District, 1500 SE 130th Avenue
Portland, Oregon. A copy of the 2014-15 Proposed Budget document may be inspected or obtained on or after April 18, 2014
at the David Douglas School District Business Office at 1500
SE 130th Avenue, Portland, Oregon between the hours of 8:30
am and 4:00 pm or online at http://www.ddouglas.k12.or.us (at
the Home page select District, then Business Operations, then
Financials). This notice is being posted at this website Pursuant
to ORS 294.426(5).
Patt Komar
Budget Officer
Publish 04/10/2014.
PT1262
PUBLIC NOTICE
One (1) 1997 Redman manufactured dwelling, Plate number
X239249, Home identification number 285325, Manufacturer’s
serial number 11823776, has been abandoned by Linda Mae
Yazzolino. Said property is located at 5200 NE 92nd Avenue
Space 30. Said dwelling shall be sold by private bidding, with
sealed bids, and “as is.” Bids shall be delivered to Sumner
Estates, LLC, 5200 NE 92nd Avenue, Space 29, Portland, OR
97220 at or before midnight (the end of the day) on the 13th day
of April, 2014. Purchaser must promptly purchase and remove
all property. For additional information, or to ask questions
please contact Bernice Disney at (503) 262-8276.
Publish 04/03, 04/10/2014.
PT1263
By PETER K ORN
The Tribune
M ore than 10 0 somewhat
anxious nonprofit fundraisers
gathered Friday at The A ssociation of Fundraising Professionals Oregon and S outhwest
Washington chapter conference at the M ultnomah A thletic Club to discuss what to do
about the $ 1 billion fundraising challenge from N ike’ s Phil
Knight to Oregon Health and
S cience U niversity.
Event organizer Kevin Johnson noted that the anxiety had to
do with the conference’s midday
agenda: “The Knight Challenge
& the OHSU Campaign: What
does it mean for philanthropy?”
The turnout was the largest
for such an event, according to
Johnson, a local fundraising
consultant. The $1 billion challenge from Nike co-founder
Knight, in which Knight stipulated that if the OHSU Knight
Cancer Institute can raise $500
million in two years he would
match the amount, is the largest
single matching grant of its kind
in U.S. history.
Already OHSU has secured
more than $86 million in private
commitments toward the match,
and more than a few of Friday’s
attendees were wondering
whether the Knight grant would
leave significantly less money
for the rest of the area’s nonprofits and charitable causes.
Johnson said the Knight challenge had the potential to create
“Again, the big
dogs get the
funding. Little
agencies die
out, even when
they are loved
by their
community.”
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funding difficulties for some of
the smaller organizations that
might find donors tapped out,
but many of the fundraisers said
that the Knight challenge might
become a rising tide that could
lift all their boats. New donors
will likely be identified, and Phil
Knight himself might be signaling his future philanthropy
could be on the rise.
“The philanthropy landscape
is beginning to change,” Johnson said. He told the conference
COURTESY OF OHSU
audience that they could not exOHSU’s K night Cancer Institute could benefi t from what might be the
pect to continue business as
usual and that if they were go- largest fundraising challenge in the nation. Other nonprofi t groups are
ing to survive, they likely would worried their donations will dry up because of the OHSU effort.
need to “pay more attention to
their business practices.”
were more likely to voice conOther fundraisers saw potenAttendees, who ranged from cern about the Knight grant, ac- tial in the Knight challenge. “We
the Oregon Humane Society to cording to the survey.
think it will raise, on a national
Meals On Wheels, spoke of poThose numbers suggest a level, Oregon as a philanthropic
tentially increasing collabora- high level of concern, according priority,” wrote one.
tion with one another in the fu- to Johnson.
Most Oregon nonprofits reture, though that almost never
“Fundraisers are a pretty op- ported increased fund raising in
extends to shartimistic lot,” he 2013 compared to 2012. Nearly
ing the names of
said.
one in five said their donations
donors. Johnson
At least one non- had increased greatly. Fewer
said it was unlikeprofit said major than one in 20 said it had dely OHSU would
donors had in- creased greatly.
share the names
formed them that
Reflecting on the conference,
of any new philanthey would no lon- Johnson said he was heartened
thropists it uncovger be providing by talk of possible collaboraers as part of
funds so that they tions, noting that in the past,
its fundraising
could contribute to nonprofits have occasionally
campaign.
the Knight chal- pooled resources toward a comIn advance of
lenge instead. “I mon goal, rather than simply
the meeting, the
think this is going compete for donors. An example,
organization comto drain resources he said, could be found in the
— anonymous from other social number of animal welfare nonmissioned a surrespondent to a survey of service sectors,” profits that came together in revey of local nonOregon nonprofi t was one survey cent years to change public attiprofits. When
fundraisers comment. Another tudes toward animal euthanasia.
asked whether the
Knight challenge
fundraiser wrote,
Business as usual, he said,
would, in fact, be “a rising tide “There is only so much private would not suffice given how
that lifts all boats,” 47 percent of funding to go around.” A third much philanthropy would now
fundraisers said it was unlikely said, “Again, the big dogs get the be focused on OHSU. “Shuffling
and 27 percent said they were funding. Little agencies die out, money around may not be an
neutral. Smaller nonprofits that even when they are loved by answer for our community,”
raised less than $500,000 in 2013 their community.”
Johnson says.
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NEWS A13
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Bike: Fest features 45 films from 14 countries
Bike-in movies
What: Filmed by Bike film festival
When: April 19, 20, 21, 22
Where: Clinton St. Theater, 2522
S.E. Clinton St., 503-897-0744
Tickets: $28 festival pass
includes access to all showtimes,
filmmaker Q&A sessions, storytelling event “Bikes in the Night Sky,”
awards ceremony and featurelength film, “Ciclo.” Or buy tickets
to each event, priced separately.
More: Visit filmedbybike.org
weren’t achieving that when we
were causing the delay on their
way home.”
Crotty found work on the
Ralph Nader presidential campaign in 2000, where everyone in
the bike world “was so fun and
positive,” she says.
It got her thinking, “How can
we do more fun stuff with our
bikes?”
Crotty looked to bridge the
gap between Critical Mass and
the Bicycle Transportation Alliance, the other network for cyclists at the time.
Bringing activism to Portland
They met over beers and put
Crotty isn’t a native Portland- on Bike Summer — a month of
er, but like many 30-somethings free activities — modeled after
(á la “Portlandia”), she came one in San Francisco.
here in the ‘90s with all sorts of
In August 2002, 5,000 bike encreative endeavors in mind.
thusiasts came out for bike-in
Raised in Chicamovies, family rides,
go, she studied phobike-repair worktography at the Unishops and other creversity of Ilinois at
ative events.
Champaign-Urbana.
The success of
As a sophomore in
that event led to the
1995, she helped
formation of Shift, a
start that city’s Critloosely organized
ical Mass ride, just
group of people
as the movement
who, like Crotty,
was spreading nawork to make cytionally.
cling fun, liberating,
The purpose of
empowering and
the ride was to “let
sustainable.
people know that
Their events in— Jonathan Maus, clude giveaways, sobikers have a right
to the road as much
BikePortland.org cial rides, educaas cars do,” she told
tional bike tours, art
the student newspaper at the bike parades and informationtime.
sharing meetings.
Then Crotty came to Portland
Bike Summer morphed into
and joined up with Critical Pedalpalooza.
Mass, which was a huge netOver the years she’s also
working ground for the cycling helped to found events includcommunity, but “the meetings ing the Worst Day of the Year
were so contentious and angry,” Ride (which had to cancel one
she recalls. “The goal was to get route this year due to a snowmore people on bikes, but we storm); the former Multnomah
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Ayleen Crotty says Portland’s bike culture sometimes takes itself too seriously, which is why she focuses on
“fun and fl air.” She helps organiz e and promote fun events on ORbike.com.
County Bike Fair, and the KBOO
Bike Radio Show.
She’s also been the site coordinator and marketing brains
behind iconic events including
Reach the Beach; the Mississippi Street Fair; the Portland Twilight Criterium; the Portland
Century; Petal Pedal; Tour de
Lab; Cirque du Cycling; The
Night Ride; Jackson’s Ride the
Gorge; Bike MS; Seattle Century; Ride Around the Sound; and
Ride to Defeat ALS.
Maus, the BikePortland editor,
says he’s made it his personal
goal to make room for more fun
events himself.
“Because I went more toward
the politics and seriousness of
news in a way, I sort of envy the
clear-eyed, happy approach,” he
says. “I wish I could get some of
that back. Because people like
her are keeping that fire burning, I can always participate in
the fun events and do that.”
“So many
people in this
town started
biking more
often because
those events
were their
gateway drug
into it.”
484741.041014
Portland’s iconic bike-centric
events including “Breakfast on
the Bridge,” “Midnight Mystery
Rides,” and “Filmed by Bike,” a
four-day film festival that kicks
off April 19.
As someone who lives to tell a
good story, the film festival in
particular, is close to Crotty’s
heart.
“I love the ‘wow’ factor, the element of surprise,” she says of the
films that are carefully screened
and selected by a 10-member
public jury. “It’s an artistic endeavor, curating this event. I love
creating an environment, giving
people an experience — it’s really intriguing to me.”
The springtime tradition at
the Clinton Street Theater this
year will feature 45 movies from
14 countries — all with the aim of
inspiring people to get out and
take an adventure on two wheels.
Crotty’s most recent personal
adventure was biking two
months solo across the U.S. last
fall — a trip she photographed
and will exhibit in a collection
called “Americana.”
“I got three-quarters of the
way around America, and (the
sites) were so great, but I
missed Portland,” she says.
Filmed by Bike this year will
be a bit different than in years
past.
As usual, it will kick off with a
street party on opening night.
There will be libations, music,
awards and films to inspire.
But unlike previous years,
the majority of the films will be
international: 65 percent hail
from countries including Latvia,
Israel, Greece, Singapore, Peru,
Ukraine, Slovania, Canada and
the U.K.
Just 11 percent will come
from Portland, which Crotty
feels is fine, because Portland
folks have contributed the bulk
in the past, so “now they’re taking a rest,” she says.
The festival — which contributes a portion of the proceeds to
the Portland nonprofit NW Documentary — also will feature
live storytelling and a “bike confessional” booth in which people
may unload some of their deepest and darkest feelings.
Crotty says she was inspired
by National Public Radio’s StoryCorps concept, which interviews and archives everyday
people’s stories.
“I feel like we’re capturing an
important time in bike history
in Portland and the U.S.,” Crotty
says.
The independent festival is
Portland’s answer to the New
York City-based Bicycle Film
Festival. That festival tours nationally (and stopped here in
March) but doesn’t attract the
same level of attention in Portland and was even canceled
here for a few years.
Crotty isn’t surprised, knowing that Portlanders prize local
people and events above all.
So how do films, street parties and funny costumes (or
wearing sometimes nothing at
all) translate to actual bike safety on the road? “It’s an interesting debate on the impact bunny
ears can have on safety — it’s a
really big impact,” says Jonathan Maus, editor of BikePortland.org, who’s watched the
bike scene change over the past
10 years.
“So many people in this town
started biking more often because those events were their
gateway drug into it. They
started riding, and the more
people riding, the more safe the
streets get.”
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A14 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Francesconi: M illion- dollar man again?
■ From page 1
counties, started blessing same-sex
marriage. Francesconi soon reversed himself and endorsed gay
marriage. He says he “realized the
Catholic Church was wrong,” and
now says he’s “ashamed” of his
initial stance.
Rather than being praised for going against his church, Francesconi
was criticized locally for being indecisive or politically opportunistic.
F riend to the worker and the poor
After his stint with the Jesuits,
Francesconi enrolled in the University of Oregon law school. He started
representing injured workers while
still in law school, and that became
the hallmark of his legal practice.
Francesconi had no desire to be a
corporate lawyer, preferring to represent people. He says he was no
John Edwards, the Democratic politician and trial lawyer who grew rich
winning massive settlements. “I represented a lot of workers,” he says.
“Most trial lawyers don’t represent
them because it’s not lucrative.”
But that earned him enough to
buy a house in Northeast Portland’s
affluent Alameda neighborhood.
In 1988, Francesconi marched with
progressive religious and labor leaders in a downtown protest on behalf
of janitors seeking to boost their $4
hourly wage for cleaning office towers. He later became a leader in the
Portland Organizing Project, a
church-led coalition that included
several Catholic congregations. The
coalition deployed aggressive community organization tactics to win
gains on behalf of poor, working
class and minority communities.
In 1992, Francesconi co-founded
the Youth Employment and Empowerment Project, enlisting many employers to hire several hundred
gang-affected youths from inner-city
neighborhoods.
Francesconi had a vision for using
the parks system to give more opportunities to youths in all parts of the
city.
In that first City Council race,
Francesconi also demonstrated a
prolific ability to raise campaign
funds, including from the business
community.
The parks guy
Francesconi made his mark on the
City Council overseeing Portland
Parks & Recreation for eight years.
“Jim has been one of the strongest
(parks) supporters that I’ve known,”
says Mike Houck, director of the Urban Greenspaces Institute, and a
leading Portland environmentalist.
Parks employees often relayed “he
was an excellent commissioner to
work for,” says Houck, who is offi-
and he helped President Preston
Pulliams raise money for scholarships and pass a massive $375 million bond measure in 2008.
On the campaign trail, Francesconi likes to haul out a map showing
poverty growing in the county and
moving eastward. “There needs to
be a revitalized economic development department” at the county,
with a focus on “the least,” he told
those Rockwood leaders.
Francesconi is advocating to raise
the minimum wage, and to leverage
county contracts to raise the pay of
people paid through those contracts.
Interestingly, he opposes any
move to reduce the small-business
owner’s tax paid to Multnomah
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: JIM CLARK
Jim F rancisconi, a candidate for Multnomah County chair, talked with supporters County — the same one he reduced
for city taxpayers. Francesconi arat a late March gathering at a private home in Gresham.
gues that the county has fewer
sources of income than the city and
cially neutral in the race.
neighborhood in late 2003 when he has dire needs now. At a house party
Francesconi reinstituted the city supported parking garages proposed in Gresham attended by many smallParks Board, which had been mori- by Richard Singer and then accepted business people, including some Rebund since 1913, Houck says. He cre- a $500 campaign contribution from publicans, Francesconi said bluntly
ated the Portland Parks Foundation Singer.
that he won’t support lowering their
to help raise money for the chroniBusiness owners rewarded Fran- county tax burden as small-business
cally underfunded bureau.
cesconi handsomely as he racked up owners.
As parks commissioner, Fran- a record $1 million war chest for the
Former Oregon House Speaker
cesconi led a successful ballot mea- mayor’s race. Elsewhere, that would Lynn Snodgrass, a conservative Resure campaign for a five-year parks have scared off all comers.
publican at that house party whose
levy in 2002, raising $48 million.
But former Police Chief Tom Pot- family owns a nursery business, disFrancesconi says his proudest ter, capitalizing on many Portland- agrees with his support for a higher
achievement was working with then- ers’ distrust of business, ran a low- minimum wage, and says she only
County Chairwoman Bev Stein to budget campaign touting strict lim- agrees with him about half the time.
create the SUN School program, its on campaign donations. Fran- But Snodgrass, like Francesconi a
which stands for Schools Uniting cesconi lost badly after he was por- devout Christian, calls him a “lone
Neighborhoods, in 1999. The collabo- trayed as pandering to business.
soldier” who understands the needs
ration between the parks bureau,
Jeans Gail says Francesconi’s new of business. “What we agree on is
county and public schools offers reputation was undeserved. “People very powerful.”
school-based recreation, enrichment running against him created that
To beat Kafoury, Francesconi is
courses and community services, perception because it was to their going to have to convince voters he’s
typically when the school day is over. advantage to get elected,” he says.
a candidate of reform who will bring
It wasn’t just the new ideas to the county, says Jim
The business guy
money issue and Fran- Moore, political science professor at
Kevin Jeans Gail,
cesconi’s tilt toward Pacific University. “People are not
Francesconi’s former
business, though. His going to remember him as a Catholic
chief of staff who has
personal style some- community activist,” Moore says. “If
known him 30 years,
times caused friction anybody remembers anything,” he
says his ex-boss has
with fellow city commis- says, it’s the ill-fated mayor’s race
never wavered in his
sioners and others. when “he spent $1 million and got
passion for attacking
Even supporters com- creamed.”
poverty. On the counplained about his tortuMount Tabor Neighborhood Associl, Francesconi
ous decision-making on ciation leader Paul Leistner still nurs— Mike Houck, matters before the City es bad feelings about Francesconi’s
pushed his colleagues
Urban Greenspaces Council. In his early handling of a disputed deal with Warto support creation of
Institute director years on the council, ner Pacific College involving Mount
a new urban renewal
district in Lents, one of
Santer recalls how sup- Tabor Park land (see sidebar.)
the city’s poorest neighborhoods. He porters feared Francesconi would be
“It seems like he’s trying to packalso was known as a friend of labor, swayed by the last person to lobby age himself and market himself,”
pushing in 2000 for a city Fair Wage him on an issue and change his Leistner says. “My tendency is to
ordinance, which required city con- position.
think he’s still the same person he
tractors to pay at least $9.50 an hour
was back then.”
to custodians, security staff and Out of the limelight
Zari Santner, the former parks
Francesconi went back to practic- bureau director, agrees Francescoparking attendants working under
ing law after the mayor’s race, but ni hasn’t really changed. But she
city contracts.
Francesconi pushed to create a remained active in public life. Gov. sees him as an inspiring champion
Small Business Council to advise Ted Kulongoski named him to the for youth, people of color and othcity leaders. He led a successful ef- Oregon State Board of Higher Edu- ers who need services from the
fort to lower city business taxes paid cation in 2006, where he’s helped county. Francesconi’s motivation is
chart new higher-ed policies for the not to seek power, she says. “It’s for
by small-business owners.
Northwest Portland residents state. Portland Community College helping, and he believes in public
charged Francesconi sold out their hired him as a consultant in 2005, service.”
“Jim has been
one of the
strongest
( parks)
supporters that
I’ve known.”
College land deal
still rankles
Tabor neighbors
E x- parks chief hoped for ‘ triple
win’; others saw unethical politics
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
S hortly after he left office, Jim Francesconi’ s
involvement in an ill-fated deal involving land
at M ount Tabor Park still angers neighbors.
Warner Pacific College, next to the park, wanted land for ballfields, and hoped to buy some of
the park land used for a nursery and maintenance yard. The college hired Francesconi, the
recently departed parks commissioner then in
private practice, to represent it in the potential
real estate deal.
When leaders of the Mount Tabor Neighborhood Association got wind of the deal, they accused the parks bureau of trying to do a secret
sale of park land without notifying the neighbors.
The deal fell apart.
Francesconi says he was trying to do the right
thing, which might have resulted in a “triple win.”
Warner Pacific could get the ballfields it wanted
for its students. Neighbors could get access to
those ballfields, which Warner agreed to make
available for public use. And the parks bureau
could get money to relocate its decrepit central
maintenance facility on Southeast Division
Street.
“The objective was right,” Francesconi says in
retrospect. “Maybe the fact that I got involved so
soon afterwards was probably a mistake.”
Zari Santner, former parks director, says the
bureau needs to be creative since it’s underfunded by the city. She says the city would have taken
the deal to the public once it was viable, but word
leaked out before that point.
“The community very rightfully felt that it was
a done deal without their discussion,” Santner
says. She doubts the city ever would have sold off
its park land, after an earlier bid by Fred Meyer
to buy park land next to its headquarters on
Southeast Powell Boulevard proved unpopular
with the public. More likely, she says, the bureau
would have agreed to share its land with the college, enabling the public also to use the ballfields.
Francesconi, to his credit, was concerned that
Warner Pacific might relocate to Vancouver because it was so tight on space near the park,
Santner says.
Though she acknowledges the bureau made
mistakes, she says it was communicating about
the deal with the Mount Tabor Neighborhood Association chair, but didn’t realize that person
wasn’t really representative of the neighbors’
concerns.
Paul Leistner, a longtime leader of the Mount
Tabor Neighborhood Association, remembers it
differently. He says the parks bureau was communicating with the association chair about the
Warner deal, but told him not to talk about it to
others.
“People just felt that was very unethical and
inappropriate,” he says. “It still seems like a backroom, closed-door deal.
“People are still angry about how that
happened.”
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NEWS A15
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
All in a name: Bland, Dull now tied to Boring
medic and fun’ with him hoping
the league will give the shire
more notoriety to international
tourists.”
The league refers to the
League of Extraordinary Communities, said Steve Wiege, vice
chairman of the Boring Community Planning Organization, and
was formed just for areas like
Bland Shire, a local government
area including several towns,
that want to associate with the
Boring brand but without affecting its favored relationship with
Dull. The Bland Shire Council
adopted a resolution at its Feb.
18 meeting to join the league.
“A couple of months ago Australia reached out to us,” Wiege
said. “We had done a lot of
work and had a good relationship with Dull, Scotland, and
had other inquiries from cities
with quirky names. We thought
why don’t we just do it a little
differently and came up with
the League of Extraordinary
Communities.”
Dull also belongs to the
league, but Boring’s relationship
with Dull won’t be watered
down, he said. Since Boring isn’t
incorporated, the community’s
relationship with Dull isn’t officially that of a sister city, he
BORING
Australia, Scotland,
Oregon towns link
to boost tourism
By BEVERLY CORBELL
Pamplin Media Group
The community of Boring
gets a lot of attention because
of its bland name, and now
the shire of Bland, Australia,
is hoping to capitalize on its
boring name as well.
The Daily Advertiser of W
agga Wagga, Australia, posted a
story in its Feb. 25 edition about
the relationship between the
two.
“A quirky new tourism partnership was recognized by the
Bland Shire Council in which it
will pair with U.S. Pacific-Northwest community Boring and the
small village of Dull in the Scottish Highlands in an effort to
boost visitors to the region,” the
article stated.
“Despite opposition, Bland
Shire Council mayor Neil Pokoney welcomed the new links,
saying the partnership was ‘co-
said, but serves much the same
function.
Although unincorporated
Boring is home to less than 8,000
people and Dull consists of only
about 20 homes, the pairing of
the two communities has received international attention,
just because of their names.
As a footnote to its story in
August 2013, a year after the two
communities officially “joined”
in June 2012, the London Daily
Mail reported, “the U.S. town
of Boring, Oregon accepted the
proposal of Dull to ‘pair’ their
municipalities, in an effort to
promote tourism in both places
as a play on their names.”
To an extent, it’s worked.
Last year, several Boring residents visited Dull, Wiege said,
and he hopes that people from
Dull can return the visit for this
year’s annual Boring and Dull
Festival to be held again on
Aug. 9, on Boring and Dull Day,
which he said has been declared a state, county and national holiday.
There was a holiday atmosphere at the first Boring and
Dull Day last year, which featured “an ice cream social in the
local park that featured a bagpipe player, a barbershop quar-
ment to town by adding a little
bit of Dull.”
Welcome to
Boring, where
there’s an
international link
with Dull,
Scotland, and
now Bland,
Australia. This
city sign is at
the Boring
Station Trailhead
Park,
PAMPLIN MEDIA
GROUP F ILE PHOTO
tet and a flag salute honoring
the two towns,” according to the
Daily Mail story.
With the headline, “Boring
was not Dull Aug. 9,” The Outlook reported, “More than 300
people gathered at Boring Station Trailhead Park, enjoying
free ice cream, several types of
music, visits with new friends
and neighbors, moments of levity and dedication to shared cultures and heritages. And the
rain.”
And after Karen Craig of
Gresham won a drawing at the
festival for a “nearly-all-expense-paid” tour of Scotland,
least one more tourist will be
headed to Dull. Craig said she
bought the ticket at the behest
of her mother and Boring native
Shirley Roth, who’s a fan of the
Boring and Dull Facebook page.
Even the Wall Street Journal
did a story on the two communities and interviewed Steve
Bates, chairman of the Boring
CPO, which heads up the festival. In an Aug. 8, 2013, article, a
WSJ headline writer had fun
with “Yawns Across the Water:
Boring Meets Dull in Oregon,”
and reporter Joseph De Avila
opened with another fun play on
words: “Stephen Bates has been
a Boring man for 36 years. Now
he has a plan to bring excite-
Boring golfers
Puns aside, the relationship
with the Scottish village is important, Wiege said, and the
Boring CPO keeps up with
events in Dull and reports on
them regularly at meetings,
“If any other town with a
unique name wants to become
part of us, we would invite
them to join the other group
(League of Extraordinary Communities),” he said. “It’s set up
not as strongly as we are
paired with Dull, Scotland, but
we can help promote each other’s communities.”
Boring also caught the interest of Anne Beeson of the Aberfeldy Golf Club in Scotland, located close to Dull. She wrote in
an email to Bates that the Ryder
Cup golf tournament will be
held in nearby Perthshire in
September and tossed out the
idea of having a small tournament at the Aberfeldy club before the Ryder Cup play begins.
“We though it might be fun to
have our own ‘international’ golf
day on 21st September just before the Ryder Cup begins,” she
wrote.
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■ Annual intergalactic battle helps Red Cross save lives Hales
tiptoes
toward
big ideas
Will mounted
patrol ride off
into the sunset?
Nonprofit group takes to TV to buck
Novick plan to cut police horse unit
One year in office,
mayor puts priority
on revenue, parks
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
Mayor Charlie Hales included
the agreement in the 2013-14
budget summary his office reSupporters of the Portland leased after the council apPolice Mounted Patrol are
proved it.
pushing back against two deThe Friends’ group had
velopments that threaten the raised the first $200,000 and was
future of the horse unit.
in the process of transferring it
First, Commissionto the city when
er Steve Novick proNovick made his proposed eliminating the
posal in a Feb. 3 memo
unit in next year’s
to the other council
budget.
members.
Then the Portland
“We didn’t know
Development Comanything about Commission declared the
missioner Novick’s
stable area at Centenproposal and the
nial Mills unsafe, forcproblems with Cening the horses to be
tennial Mills before
relocated to a farm in
they were announced.
Aurora. The unit has
It’s put us in a holding
been housed at the agpattern until we can
ing former flour mill
meet with him and
on Northwest Naito
Mayor Hales and
Parkway and Ninth
learn more about
Avenue since the PDC
what they’re thinkbought it in 2001.
ing,” says Bob Ball, a
The one-two punch
real estate developer
came as a surprise to
— Bob Ball, and reserve Portland
the Friends of the
police officer who
Friends of the
Mounted Patrol, a
serves on the Friends’
Mounted Patrol board
nonprofit organizaboard of directors.
of directors member
tion that thought it
Ball says he was
had struck a deal with
caught off guard by
the City Council that
Novick’s proposal beguaranteed the unit would con- cause of the council agreement.
tinue at least through the next
“I testified before the council
fiscal year.
and thanked them for agreeing
When the council considered to continue the unit for two
eliminating the unit in the cur- years, and nobody said they
rent budget, the Friends’ group weren’t agreeing to anything at
promised to raise $400,000 to that time,” Ball says.
keep it going over the next two
See HORSES / Page 13
years — $200,000 each year.
That’s a real Portland police car behind
“Grimm” actor David Giuntoli. When it
comes time to knock down a door or make
an arrest on the show, Portland police are
often used as consultants. Local cops say
they sometimes watch the show just to
see familiar faces and places, and for an
escape from reality.
TUESDAY EDITION
STORY BY
S
ure, in TV shows like “Law &
Order”, art imitates life. But
Portland police detective Sgt. Joe
Santos says sometimes on the job,
life imitates art.
A while back, a lieutenant was telling
him about a case that immediately brought
to mind a Morgan Freeman/Brad Pitt movie, Santos says.
“A brother killed his sister, and she was
rotting in the bathroom,” Santos says.
“And the brother was basically walking over her
decaying body for two
weeks to go to the bathroom. He was an obese
guy and laying on the
bed, and they went in to
clear the house and he
said, ‘I’m sorry.’
“And I was thinking,
‘Man, that really happened. That’s exactly like
— Brian the movie ‘Se7en.’ ”
Another case two
Schmautz,
ex-Portland weeks ago had Santos
police officer thinking about the popular Showtime series
“Dexter.” He was searching “the nastiest house in North Portland.” Garbage was strewn everywhere,
he says. “I’m walking into the kitchen and
stepping on pizza boxes full of rotting
pizza that’s green and slimy and moldy.
With every step I’m slipping around. I get
to the basement and there’s no power and
we find the bad guy hiding in a closet pretending to be asleep.
“It reminds me of every TV show I’ve
“You get
juries that
think, ‘Why
didn’t they
take DNA
on that car
prowl?’ ”
WATCHING
THE DETECTIVES
■ Cops find something to love, hate
in lineup of police TV programs
THURSDAY EDITION
“The mounted
patrol is very
popular and
versatile.
People love
the horses. ...
Why would the
council want
to get rid of a
program that
connects so
well with the
public?”
COURTESY OF SCOTT GREEN/NBC
PETER KORN
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
ever watched,” Santos says. “If it’s ‘Dexter,’
the crime scene is some beautiful modern
house that’s white with perfect blood
splatter. Our crime scenes are garbagefilled, single-wide trailers that a hoarder
lives in.”
Shootouts every day?
COURTESY OF NBC
“Let’s be careful out there” was Sgt. Phil
Esterhaus’ weekly roll call command on
“Hill Street Blues,” and a memorable one,
according to a number of Portland police
officers. Esterhaus was played by actor
Michael Conrad.
Everybody likes to look in the mirror at
least a little bit, right? So if you’re a cop,
that means you probably watch some cop
shows on TV, at least a little bit, right?
If nothing else, cops know that what the
rest of us see on TV and in movies influences what we think of them.
Surprisingly, none of the officers we put
the question to admitted to watching real-
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Portland Police Officer Benson Weinberger walks Diesel into the safe
portion of the Centennial Mills building where the Mounted Patrol
prepares for their shifts.
See DETECTIVES / Page 2
By JENNIFER ANDERSON
The Tribune
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Jeff Shang joins fellow neighbors at a volunteer work party for the Sabin Community Orchard last Sunday.
Grant funds paid for the addition of bee-friendly trees, plants and shrubs to the orchard last summer.
Portland Tribune
Next time you’re out and
about in Northeast Portland,
stop and smell the flowers.
That’s what the Sabin Community Association hopes you
will do on their Bee Friendly
Garden Tour, a program heading
into its third season this spring.
“This is about providing forage and native habitat” to bees
and other pollinators, says Diane
Benson, a neighborhood board
member and co-founder of the
project. “Bees need food, and all
of us can do that.”
In three years, the tour has
come to include 41 stops — 40
Story by Jim Redden • Photos by Jaime Valdez
Wars’ and ‘Star
Trek’ both have a
lot of fans who turn
out, and we always
have a lot of fun.”
The competition, similar to the Oregon vs. Oregon
State Civil War blood drive, has been
held three times in the past. It has been
won twice by “Star Wars” fans, which
is not surprising, considering the popular franchise has two active fan clubs in
the Portland area, both of which have a
lot of practice supporting charitable
events in authentic-looking, homemade costumes.
Most recently, more than a dozen of
them showed up to support the Salvation Army bell ringers outside of the
See BLOOD / Page 2
See HALES / Page 9
Pat downs likely
to increase as cops
take to the street
Murphy shines his flashlight inside and
sees three young black men. They aren’t
wearing gang colors or smoking dope.
On a crisp, clear Thursday evening They’re just sitting, engine off. Dale and
with the temperature outside hoverMurphy want to talk to them.
ing around freezing, Portland Gang
With Portland police rolling out the
Enforcement Team officity’s new hot-spot policing
cers Brian Dale and Patprogram, the unfolding
rick Murphy pull their
scene involving Dale and
squad car to the curb on
Murphy and the young
Southeast 119th Avenue. SECOND OF TWO STORIES men they are about to conA black two-door Honda
front is a microcosm of
Civic is a good four or five feet from
what criminologists say might be the
the curb — the result of either a hor- program’s defining moment.
rible parking job or someone intenThe evidence is clear that done right,
tionally half-blocking the street.
See POLICING / Page 11
As the officers walk toward the car,
Tech firms
seek a place
in economy’s
spotlight
Intel is well-known, but other
companies fly under the radar
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
TribSeries
TribTown
Portland teachers reached a tentative deal Tuesday.
Follow the story at portlandtribune.com.
THE FORCE IS
OUT FOR BLOOD
lood will
flow when
fans of
“Star
Wars” and “Star
Trek” rally their
supporters later this month.
At least that’s the hope for the upcoming American Red Cross blood
drive that pits supporters of the two
popular entertainment franchises
against each other to see who can turn
out the most donors. The Galaxy Blood
Drive is from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 28, at the donor center at
3131 N. Vancouver Ave.
“This is a great event for us,” says
Red Cross spokeswoman Daphne
Mathew. “Donations normally drop between Thanksgiving and New Year’s
because people are so busy. But ‘Star
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
residents’ homes plus the pub- do, but it’s not a way to save bees.
licly owned Sabin Community You’ve got to get these flowers
Orchard, at Northeast 18th Ave- out there,” says Mace Vaughan,
nue and Mason Street.
another co-founder of the Bee
Each stop has a “Bee Friendly Friendly Garden Project who is
Garden” sign, funded by the the pollinator program director
neighborhood association. There for Portland’s Xerces Society for
are maps and a telephone hot- Invertebrate Conservation.
line that provides
Vaughan hapinformation about
pens to live six
each site. Hundreds
blocks from Benof people throughson in the Sabin
NORTHEAST
out the city and subneighborhood. The
urbs have come to
third co-founder of
check it out.
the project is Tim Wessels, a pioNow the Sabin neighborhood neer in the field and a master
would like to inspire other neigh- beekeeping instructor at Oregon
borhoods to create a similar State University, president of the
project of their own.
Portland Urban Beekeepers, and
They’ll hold a public forum founder of Bridgetown Bees, an
March 19 to share their experi- effort to breed a winter-hardy
ences and suggestions for how to Portland queen bee.
start a bee-friendly garden.
Serendipitously, Wessels, too,
They’ll answer questions about lives in Sabin.
plant types, outreach, pesticides
The project started, Benson
and more.
“Beekeeping is a fun thing to
See BUZZ / Page 12
DEAL MIGHT AVERT A STRIKE
Online
BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY B
Portland Tribune
Inside
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAMIE VALDEZ
Gang Enforcement Team officer Patrick Murphy — after asking
permission — pats down a young black man who had been sitting in a
parked car on Southeast 119th Avenue. Officer Brian Dale looks on.
WHAT’S LOCAL FOOD?
SELECTING STALLS FOR THE JAMES BEARD PUBLIC MARKET.
— SEE SUSTAINABLE LIFE SECTION
There are more high-tech companies in the
Portland area than Intel — and many of them
are desperately trying to get that message
out.
“There’s a ton of world-class companies in the
Portland region, but the word hasn’t gotten out
on that,” says Sam Blackman, co-founder and
CEO of Elemental Technologies, a Portland-based
company working on ultra-high definition signal
transmission technology.
According to Blackman, the lack of awareness
See TECH / Page 10
“Pamplin Media Group’s pledge is to
deliver balanced news that reflects the
stories of our communities. Thank you
for reading our newspapers.”
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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Sabin residents raise
awareness about
pollinators, habitat
Darth Vader and his Imperial Stormtroopers stop holiday shoppers in their tracks outside Macy’s (above).
Jedidiah Maxwell of Canby has his picture taken with Queen Apailana (right).
Police say conversation a priority; others
say random stops are recipe for trouble
It’s the bees’ needs, and Sabin has it
Portland Mayor Charlie
Hales pledged Friday to pursue a new tax
measure to
pave city
streets in
2014, as well
as funding to
build out the
city’s parks
system.
Hales also
told the Portland Tribune “I don’t feel
editorial
a need to
board that
he’s exploring look at a
a major reno- map of the
vation of Veterans Memo- city and
rial Coliseum, come up
hoping to pigwith new
gyback on the
World Indoor visions at
Track & Field the
Championships coming moment.”
— Mayor
to the Oregon
Charlie Hales
Convention
Center in 2016.
(See related
story, Page A8.)
Hales gave himself a “B”
grade for his first year in office,
but said he succeeded in setting
a tone of “collegiality and plainspokenness” at City Hall.
One example: he’s making no
bones about the need for a new
revenue source to pave dozens
of miles of the city’s gravel and
mud streets.
“There’s no point in kidding
you, or kidding ourselves,” he
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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09PT4
A16 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
PDXUPDATE
Museum ex hibit:
Lincoln’s legacy
The Oregon Historical Society
Museum opens an exhibit on
Saturday highlighting Abraham
Lincoln’s presidency.
The exhibit, “2 Years, 1 Month:
Lincoln’s Legacy,” focuses on the
time between Jan. 1, 1863, when
Lincoln signed the Emancipation Proclamation, and Jan. 31,
1865, when Congress passed the
13th Amendment to the Constitution banning slavery.
“This incredible exhibit offers
a unique opportunity to better
COURTESY OF THE OREGON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
understand one of America’s A snare drum played at Lincoln’s funeral procession in 18 6 5 by William
greatest leaders and what was Henry Brooks, a Union soldier and future Portland resident, will be
certainly the most challenging part of the Oregon Historical Society ex hibit on Lincoln’s presidency.
time in our nation’s history,”
Andrews, president of Melvin
says OHS Executive Director
In addition, the exhibit inKerry Tymchuk.
cludes several Civil War-era cos- Mark Properties, joined the
The exhibit features rare doc- tumes worn by actors in Steven board in August 2008 and was
uments and artifacts from the Spielberg’s Academy Award- elected chairman of the fivemember commission in July
Mark Family Collection, the Sha- winning movie, “Lincoln.”
pell Manuscript Foundation and
The show also features a 2009.
Despite a stagnant real estate
the holdings of the Oregon His- touch-screen video game, “Lintorical Society. The exhibit has a coln’s Challenge,” which lets market, Andrews oversaw completion of key
first printing of the Emancipa- visitors test their knowledge of
development
tion Proclamation, signed by America’s 16th president and
projects, inAbraham Lincoln; a House of the Civil War.
cluding the reRepresentatives official copy of
To kick off the exhibit, actor
development
the 13th Amendment, personally and Lincoln portrayer Steve
of the Burnsigned by then-members of Con- Holgate will give his “Town
side Bridgegress and U.S. senators; military Hall” program at 11 a.m. and 2
head and the
uniform shoulder straps worn by p.m. Saturday.
opening of
Gen. William T. Sherman; the
new homes for
pen that President Lincoln used
ANDREWS the Oregon
in 1862 to sign the Act of EmanciCollege of Oripation for the Territories; and
Portland Development Com- ental Medicine and the Portland
pieces of fabric from both the
coat that Lincoln was wearing mission Chairman Scott An- office of the Federal Bureau of
and the seat in which he was sit- drews said last week that he Investigation. Under Andrews’
ting the night he was assassi- will leave the commission at the leadership, PDC continued its
end of his term, in July 2014.
commitment to enhancing the
nated at Ford’s Theater.
Andrews to leave post
on PDC board
quality of life for Portland residents, with investments in
neighborhood parks such as
Dawson Park and The Fields
Park, as well as the east-side
Portland Streetcar, and MAX
Green and Orange lines.
Andrews is the second-longest serving board chairman,
behind PDC’s founding board
chairman, Ira Keller.
F BI honors Portland’s
Second Chance Program
Portland’s Second Chance
Program by Big Brothers, Big
Sisters Columbia Northwest
last week received the FBI
Director’s Community Leadership Award.
Tami Wallis,
Second Chance
program manager, accepted
WALLIS
the award from
FBI Director
James Comey during an April 4
ceremony at FBI headquarters.
Second Chance is a program
that pairs adult mentors with
youths ages 12 to 17 who are involved in the juvenile justice
system.
Each year, the FBI’s 56 field
divisions choose one person or
organization to receive the Director’s Community Leadership
Award. Volunteers who work
with the Second Chance program at Big Brothers, Big Sisters
commit to meeting with their
matched youth at least three to
four times a month for at least an
18-month period.
Since Big Brothers, Big Sisters
established the Second Chance
program in 2010, it has supported more than 43 Portland-area
young people. The program is
seeing improvements in those
children in terms of social confidence (up 67 percent), scholastic
competence (up 100 percent),
educational expectations (up 100
percent), grades (up 50 percent),
and parental trust (maintained
or up 83 percent).
Jail lobby kiosk
streamlines deposits
The Multnomah County
Sheriff’s Office has enabled the
TouchPay jail lobby kiosks in
the county to receive cash/credit/debit deposits for inmate
trust accounts, in addition to
the Securus Advance Connect
payment services.
The sheriff’s office is working
on the new jail kiosk program
through its agreement with Securus Technologies and a partnership with TouchPay Holdings LLC. TouchPay kiosks are
installed in the lobbies of both
the Multnomah County Detention Center and the Multnomah
County Inverness Jail.
An additional TouchPay intake cash-handling kiosk will
automate the county’s offender
booking deposits. The intake kiosk will count offenders’ coin
and cash in bulk during the
booking process, relieving MCSO staff from having to manually count the money.
Zoo construction
unearths old ex hibit
Construction workers at the
Oregon Zoo unearthed last
week an enormous chunk of
history, excavating and removing the Eisenhower-era concrete moat that had encircled
the zoo’s elephant habitat from
its 1959 opening until about 20
years ago.
The 8-foot-deep moat, which
hadn’t been seen since an early-’90s remodel at the zoo, remained intact beneath tons of
earth in what was formerly the
elephants’ east sand yard. Concrete will be salvaged for reuse as structural fill for part of
the $57 million Elephant Lands
project.
In late March, construction
crews began laying groundwork for what will be known as
Forest Hall, a spacious, stateof-the-art indoor portion of the
habitat. It will have a vast, sunlit arena housing one of the
largest, most innovative indoor
elephant spaces in the country.
Adjacent to Forest Hall, a
spacious new indoor holding
area — with three 1,600-squarefoot stalls for elephant care —
will replace the zoo’s current
holding area, which, like the
long-buried moat, dates to
1959. Together, the two facilities will sit on 32,000 square
feet, with a roof reaching up to
36 feet at its highest point.
Both indoor spaces will be
filled at least 4 feet deep with
sand to cushion and protect the
elephants’ feet.
3 DAYS ONLY! Friday-Saturday-Sunday. AT ALL STORES!
George Morlan Plumbing Supply
SPRING CLEARANCE SALE!
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2 Handle Faucet
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25”x22”. 12” deep bowl.
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High Arc Faucet
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1 piece designer styling.
1.6 gallon flush.
White. #200532693
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Ultra Faucets.
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59
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MAAX Soaking Bath
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Fairmont “Tuxedo”
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$
Designer Faucet
Wing handles.
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29.95
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Bath Accessory Set
Oval China Lavatory
1.6 gallon flush.
Round bowl.
White vitreous china.
Positve flush action.
#200528807
+ 200528815
MSRP: $159.50
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Taymor Florence 4 piece set.
24” Towel Bar, Towel Ring,
Paper Holder
and Robe Hook.
Chrome.
#220153345
MSRP:$34.35
Reg: $24.25
20”x17” oval.
Self rimming.
4” center drilled.
Faucet extra.
White china.
#200305069
MSRP:$68.35
Reg: $47.85
59!
$
Seat extra.
BLANCO Kitchen Sink
“The Valea”
SILGRANITE.
80% quartz.
32” x 19” size.
#200621874.
MSRP: $450
Reg: $333.00
Economy Toilet
259!
$
TOTO Washlet Seat
Disposer Air Switch
Luxury Shower Head Albert Hall Lavatory
A spa experience
in your home!
Adjustable,
rain-style shower.
#210700246
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MSRP: $73.00
Reg: $54.05
349! $39.95
Stainless Sink
Toto Drake II Toilet
299!
$
Basket Strainer
Chrome basket.
No rust PVC body.
Positive seal.
For kitchen sinks.
#30030137
9
Albert Hall Toilet
Traditional styling. White.
Modern 1.28 gallon flush!
#200606425+200606433
MSRP: $533.45
Reg: $373.40
Traditional styling. White.
26’x19” #200531727
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119.95
$
Faucet
extra.
29.95
$
$ .95
69.95 $299
$
$
Faucet extra.
1 HP Disposer
Grinds waste completely.
Permanent magnet motor.
Quiet technology!
FRANKE #200592424
MSRP: $419.00
Reg: $377.10
Controls disposer
from the sinktop!
No extra wiring.
#210283483
MSRP: $101.
Reg: $80.80
The ultimate luxury!
Warm water cleansing
spray. Elongated rim.
Fits most toilets.
With heated seat.
#200573918
MSRP: $649.
Reg: $512.75
Double Cyclone™ flush.
Elongated bowl.White.
Seat extra. #200510312
MSRP: $569.00
Reg: $421.00
14.95
$
Pullout Spray Faucet
Seat
extra.
199.95
$
Hot Water Dispenser
190º steaming hot
water. 40 cups/hr.
#20076878.
MSRP: $278.67
Reg: $139.00
Pullout spray spout.
1 or 3 hole
mount.
Chrome. #210701803
MSRP: $90.00
33”x22”
7” deep bowls.
BLANCO.
#200560921
MSRP:$160
Reg: $119.
69.95
$
129!
$
59!
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PLUS! A BIG SELECTION OF ONE-OF-A-KIND CLOSEOUT ITEMS ON SALE!
Selection varies at each store, so HURRY! Cash & Carry prices. Bring your van, pickup or trailer.
TOTO Aquia II Toilet
TOTO Ultramax II
Designer 1 piece style.
1.28 gallon flush.
Elongated. White.
#200510738
MSRP: $773.00
Reg:$572.05
DUAL-MAX™ flush.
0.9 or 1.6 gal. flush.
Elongated. Seat extra.
#200504177. MSRP: $573.
Reg: $424.05
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White Cast Iron Sink
25” x 22” size.
White enamel.
4 hole drilled.
#200341995.
MSRP: $279.00
Reg: $223.20
195
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Slow-Close Seat
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Tough white plastic.
Elongated bowl.
# 200586122
MSRP: $66.33. Reg: $49.75
39
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MADE IN USA!
Jacuzzi Whirlpool
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Left drain: #200602470
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MSRP: $1226.
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Jacuzzi J345 Spa
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IN TIGARD
PFISTER Faucet
6595
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Single handle
lavatory faucet.
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mounting option.
Chrome. #210356405
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PANASONIC
80 CFM flow.
1.4 sones
#42012783
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TOTO
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Water Filter System
Fits under sink cabinet.
Reduces chlorine taste
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#310117879
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Cartridge
extra.
39.95
$
159
Clawfoot Bathtub
$
59!
Pfister Wheaton Faucet
Traditional styling.
Pulldown spray head
w/Soap Dispenser.
Chrome. #210748079
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$
Vintage styling by Albert Hall.
Quality cast iron holds the heat!
60” x 30” x 19” size. White.
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Bathroom Fan
189
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Petite Pedestal
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27 Jacuzzi Jets
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Pfister NIA Faucet
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w/Soap Dispenser.
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Neptune Oval Bath
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SE PORTLAND
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541-330-1777
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*Note: Bend, Warrenton and Lincoln City stores CLOSED SUNDAY.
Sale prices valid through Sunday, April 13, 2014. All items limited to stock on hand. Photos for illustration purposes. Actual items/finish may vary. See store for details. Oregon CCB #2734.
483944.041014
SPRING SALE HOURS: FRIDAY & SATURDAY: 7:30AM TO 6:00PM • SUNDAY: 9:00AM TO 5:00PM*
BREAD & BREW: DAVENPORT’S SEAFOOD AND ELEGANCE — Page 2
Weekend!Life
SECTION B
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014
SALLIE FORD
BAND
PHOTOS COURTESY OF SOUL’D OUT MUSIC F ESTIVAL
■ Annual Soul’d O ut fest brings dozens of acts covering wide range of genres
MUSIC FILLS HEARTS, SOULS
ACROSS CITY
FRUITION
N
ow in its fifth year, the
shows next week.
Soul’d Out Music Festival
For a complete schedule and
has grown into one of the ticket info, check out souldout
most eclectic and interfestival.com.
esting sonic events our music-rich
town hosts.
April 10
Thirteen venues will feature 33
Alhambra Theatre, 4811 S.E.
performers, from hip-hop to indie
rock, Thursday, April 10, through Hawthorne Blvd., hosts an all-ages
show at 8 p.m. with
Sunday, April 20.
CunninLynguists, JA cursory glance
STORY BY
Live, Sadistik, Nemo
reveals a sweat-inAchida and Son Real.
ducing lineup includThe critically lauded
ing Questlove of The
Kentucky hip-hop
Roots, Slick Rick, Little Dragon, CunninLynguists, Lalah trio, CunninLynguists were among
Hathaway and Ruben Studdard and the first 21st century stars in hiphop, and have consistently put out
Diana Krall.
Other performers include Pink quality product that has kept their
Martini and The Oregon Symphony, fan base loyal.
Meanwhile, if you want to hear
John Scofield’s Uberjam, Unknown
Mortal Orchestra, The Orb, Ural what Rickie Lee Jones would sound
Thomas & the Pain, Caravan Palace like if she was Japanese and sang
with three Swedish guys, check out
and Jeni Wren.
Here’s a day-by-day look at variSee F ESTIVAL / Page 3
ous shows. We’ll look at other
ROB CULLIVAN
GUITAR SHORTY
JOE LOUIS WALKER
THESHORTLIST
Tommy Davidson
The renowned comedian, going
back to his days on “In Living Color” and recently on Showtime in
“Chocolate Sundaes,” appears in
Portland. He’ll be joined by Sonmore, Bill Bellamy and Tony Rock.
He’ll likely do spot-on imitations of
Sammy Davis Jr. and President
Obama.
8 p.m. Thursday, April 10, 7:30
and 10 p.m. Friday-Saturday,
April 11-12, Helium Comedy Club,
1510 S.E. Ninth Ave., heliumcomedy.com/portland, $15-$22
‘ Rocco’
White Bird concludes its “Uncaged” season with the U.S. premiere of the work by Dutch choregraphers Emio Greco and Pieter C.
Scholten. It’s based on the famed
Luchino Visconti 1960 film, blending boxing and dance, and it’ll be
performed in a boxing ring at the
Newmark Theatre.
8 p.m. Thursday-Saturday, April
10-12, Newmark Theatre, 1111 S.W.
Broadway, whitebird.org, $30, $20
student/senior
A- WOL Dance Collective
The dance group returns with
its superhero series “Zip Zap
ZOOM” and “Zip Zap DOOM” —
aerial entertainment inspired cre-
atively by comic books, staged in a
warehouse setting resembling the
blueprints of Gotham City.
“ZOOM,” 8 p.m. Thursday-Friday, April 10-11, 5 and 8 p.m. Saturday, April 12; “DOOM,” 8 p.m.
Thursday-Friday, April 17-18, 5 and
8 p.m. Saturday, April 19; A-WOL
Warehouse Theater, 2303 N. Randolph St., awoldance.org, $13-$30
‘ Appointment with gOD’
Boom Arts presents contemporary theater from Uganda, with a
workshop play by Deborah Asiimwe that tackles the U.S. visa process from an African perspective.
Among the collaborators is Ghanian drummer Alex Addy of the
Obo Addy Legacy Project. It’s directed by Emily Mendelsohn of
New York.
7:30 p.m. Friday-Saturday, April
11-12, 2 p.m. Sunday, April 13, Lincoln Hall Studio Theatre/Portland
State University, 1620 S.W. Park
Ave., boomarts.org, $12
Pink Martini
The popular Portland group
and singer China Forbes team
with the Oregon Symphony, conducted by Carlos Kalmar, as well
as special guests The Von Trapps.
Pink Martini will perform selections from their recently released
CD, “Dream a Little Dream,”
which they collaborated on with
the Von Trapp family.
7:30 p.m. Friday-Sunday,
April 11-13, Arlene Schnitzer Concert Hall, 1037 S.W. Broadway,
orsymphony.org, starting at $35
Live Wire! Radio
Fresh off news of its affiliation
with Public Radio International,
the stage/radio variety show welcomes actor/writer Wil Wheaton
(“Star Trek: The Next Generation”
and “The Big Bang Theory”),
novelist Po Bronson, author Kevin
Young, and musical acts Ayron
Jones and the Way and Black
Prairie.
7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 12,
Alberta Rose Theatre, 3000 N.E.
Alberta St., livewireradio.org, $20,
$25 at door
Sunday, April 26 and 27). “Celebrate” includes company premieres “Petal” (Helen Pickett) and
“Cor Perdut” (Nacho Duarte), as
well as “The Lost Dance” (Matjash
Mrozewski).
7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday,
April 17-18, 2 and 7:30 p.m. Saturday, April 19, 2 p.m. Sunday, April
20, 7:30 p.m. Thursday-Friday,
MISC.
Scrapbook Convention
It’s everything scrapbooking at
the Oregon Convention Center, put
on by Creating Keepsakes magazine.
10 a.m.-6 p.m. Friday, April 11,
9 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, April 12,
Oregon Convention Center, 777
N.E. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd.,
ckscrapbookevents.com, $10 at
door, $13 two-day pass
NW Pet & Companion F air
Exhibitor booths and pet adoption are two of the highlights of
the 13th annual event. Pets are
welcome.
10 a.m.-5 p.m. Saturday, April
12, 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Sunday, April
13, Expo Center, 2060 N. Marine
Dr., nwpetfair.com, free, $8 parking
Oregon Ballet Theatre
Fans of ballet — or, perhaps, any
kind of dance — in Portland will
be attending to see the final performances of longtime principal
dancer Alison Roper in “Celebrate.” Each show will include “Alison Wonderland,” a multimedia
tribute to Roper. Her retirement
performance will be April 26. Roper leaves after 18 seasons with
OBT. The School of Oregon Ballet
Theatre also will perform at the
Newmark (1 p.m. Saturday and
April 24-25, 7:30 p.m. Saturday,
April 26, Newmark Theatre, 1111
S.W. Broadway, obt.org, $25-$142
F ilmed by Bike
COURTESY OF JONI KA BANA/OBT
Oregon Ballet Theatre is preparing
for “Celebrate” and its big send- off
for longtime principal dancer Alison
Roper ( above) .
The 12th annual film festival is
filled entirely with bike-themed
movies — 45 of them.
April 19-22, Clinton Street Theater, 2516 S.E. Clinton St., FilmedBy
Bike.org (check for films and times),
$10 per show, $25 unlimited entry
Portland!Life
B2 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
At Davenport, fish makes you smart
Bread&Brew
A biweekly restaurant
or bar review
COURTESY OF RED BULL SCHLITTENTAG
SUPERIOR CRAFT
BEAUTIFUL TRANSFORMATIONS
QUALITY MATERIALS
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Portland's Largest Showroom
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ccb 174813
young-and-son.com
BEFORE
McCoyMillwork.com
TRIBUNE PHOTOS:
JONATHAN HOUSE
Seafood is a highlight
at Davenport. ... Just
about everything at
Davenport is elegant in
a matter- of- fact,
slightly brainy way.
sauce made with walnuts, parsley and garlic. The sweet-andbitter quality of walnuts was a
fine fit for both the duck and
potatoes.
But the crowning touch for
this dish came about partly by
chance.
The cocktail menu at Davenport is small and classic: they
mix a mean martini and one of
the best Negronis in Portland,
but my date wanted something
new. There was a brief discussion with the waitress, who
was then seen consulting with
the bartender. He sent back a
ruby mixture full of cherries, a
cocktail that didn’t just make
sense with what was on the
plate, but truly added to it.
There was only one thing for
dessert. We ordered it.
It was a semi-freddo layered
with almond cake and bits of
praline. It was Italian in its unsugary, marzipan subtleness,
and more reminders of the
Mediterranean came from
bright apricots tinged with
cardamom.
Like just about everything at
Davenport, it was elegant in a
matter-of-fact, slightly brainy
way. This is a restaurant that is
upscale and yet relaxed, confident without bluster, and intensely local without being
gimmicky. I would definitely
bring visitors here to give them
a true sense of how good Pacific Northwest bistro cuisine can
be. But don’t wait for a special
occasion — just go, and enjoy
yourself.
4 to 10 p.m. Tuesday-Saturday, closed Sunday-Monday,
2215 E. Burnside St., 503-2368747, davenportpdx.com, entrees $16-$18
[email protected]
and on Facebook at Bread & Brew
Bits&Pieces
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Muy Guapo!
The fellows from Muy G uapo, who competed in the 2013
Long Beach Red Bull Flugtag
event in their Mexican pro
wrestling-themed garb and
riding a bull craft, built themselves a sled shaped like a
wrestling ring and won the
Red Bull Schlittentag event recently at Mt. Hood SkiBowl.
The Muy G uapo Sliders, as
they called themselves, had the
best combination of fastest time
and most creative presentation
— so they took first place in an
event that featured 24 teams
and their sleds racing down the
snowy slopes at SkiBowl. The
same guys also took part in the
2013 Schlittentag, and have
been involved in a couple past
flugtag events in Portland.
The team Breaking Rad
came in second place with the
most creative craft of the day —
they wore “Breaking Bad”-inspired gear and raced on a sled
fashioned out of blue barrels.
Third place went to Axes Of
Evil, which had the fastest
time on the course at 9.4 seconds in their Portland Timbers-themed craft. The crowd
chanted “PTFC” as the craft
went down the hill.
‘ Something Wicked’
The last film starring the late
Brittany Murphy, “Something
Wicked,” which was filmed in
Oregon, will be shown at Regal
Entertainment G roup theaters
in Portland starting Friday,
April 11. It premiered in Eugene. The movie will be shown
at the following Regal theaters
in the Portland area: Fox Tower
Stadium 10, Lloyd Mall 8, Division Street Stadium 13, Bridgeport Village Stadium 18 and
IMAX (Tigard), Movies on TV
Stadium 16 (Hillsboro), Cascade
Stadium 16 IMAX and RPX
(Vancouver, Wash.). For info
and tickets: REG movies.com.
The movie summary from
Regal: In this hauntingly seductive thriller, a young couple embarks upon their honeymoon
against the chilling landscapes
of the Pacific Northwest. But
when tragedy strikes, gruesome
secrets from their past collide
with sinister forces of the present to ensure this couple does
not live “happily ever after.”
Murphy died in December
2009 at age 32 from what was reported as pneumonia, anemia
and possible overmedication.
‘ And the Oscar Goes To ...’
Fathom Events and Turner
Classic Movies presents the
documentary about the history
of the Academy Awards. The
details: 2 p.m. Sunday, April 13,
2 and 7 p.m. Wednesday, April
16, Clackamas Town Center
with X D, 12000 S.E. 82nd Ave.;
Fox Tower 10, 846 S.W. Park
Ave. Tickets are available at
FathomEvents.com.
See
online
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Fresh new
classifieds
every day –
300950.021209
M y new favorite restaurant is Da venport, and my
new favorite fish is smelt.
Rarely served in restaurants, and with an extremely
limited season, Columbia River
smelt are usually discussed by
historians and biologists, not
food writers. Smelt are oily,
pungent fish — a friendlier version of a sardine. In the wrong
hands I could see them tasting
pretty awful.
At Davenport they’re roasted and served whole, their delicate flesh turned slightly
smoky. Chef Kevin G ibson may
be the first person in smelt’s
venerable history to serve
them with sauce gribiche, a
chunky French condiment
made with hard-boiled eggs
and capers. It was a perfect
match.
Years ago, G ibson was the
founding chef at Castagna,
which is still going strong, but
in a different direction. Now a
destination for modernist cuisine, Castagna used to be
known as an understated, almost austere chapel to superhigh-quality local and seasonal
products, before that was a cliché . I still remember a Caprese
salad served there at the height
of the tomato season of 2004.
Seafood is a highlight at Davenport, including the halibut in a shellfi sh broth ( above) . Chef K evin Gibson,
G ibson moved on to Evoe,
the mighty little lunch counter formerly of Castagna, also cooks smelt — roasted and served whole with sauce gribiche, a chunky F rench
condiment made with hard- boiled eggs and capers.
inside Pastaworks on Hawthorne, and bided his time.
This winter he opened up shop trast Washington and Massaof calamari, was grilled and
but a few stand out as what, in
in the former June restaurant
chusetts shellfish. All the oysserved in toothsome chunks
a pinch, you could consider enspace on East Burnside Street. ters were exquisitely fresh,
swimming in salbitxada, a Cat- trees: braised chicken with
The space hasn’t changed
briny and luxuriant, but the
alan sauce made with mild pep- mushrooms and potatoes,
much, but it’s more well-uphol- West Coast oysters were better. pers and almonds. It takes a
shepherd’s pie with sheep’s
stered, with a warmer feel and
A simple presentation added to certain kind of insight to sense milk cheese, and grilled duck,
less noise. There’s natural
their charm — a plate with a
the kinship between the cuttle- which is not to be missed.
wood everywhere, and gentle,
napkin, a scattering of ice, a
fish and almonds — and there
Rare and red, the duck
tempered lighting — no exwedge of lemon and a small
also was insight at work in the
breast had some of the mineral
posed filaments, here, thank
white pile of shaved horseradpairing of surprisingly spright- quality of a steak, but with the
you very much.
ish. It was brilliant with the
ly chard and ricotta dumplings fine grain and satin smoothOverall, seafood is a highoysters, bringing out the best
with velvety chicken broth.
ness of birds. It was accompalight at Davenport.
in them and ending their run
The menu at Davenport
nied by crisped Charlotte potaA half-dozen oysters offered
with an exclamation mark.
consists entirely of small and
toes (a sweeter, yellow variety)
a chance to compare and conCuttlefish, with the firmness medium-size shareable plates,
and walnut aillade, a French
479849.031314
By ANNE MARIE DISTEF ANO
The Tribune
The Davenport
restaurant ( left)
features a wide
open dining
area, with lots of
clean lines and
light. It’s a new
restaurant that
is elegant,
upscale and
relax ed, an
ex ample of a
top- end Pacifi c
Northwest
bistro.
The Muy Guapo Sliders of Portland
had the best creativity and speed
among Red Bull Schlittentag
competitors.
all day and night!
www.portlandtribune.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
503-620-SELL(7355)
Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
LiveMusic! Festival:
13 venues,
33 artists,
11 days
LIFE B3
said? If you haven’t seen him doing his latest gig on “The Tonight Show,” you’ve heard him
on “Late Night with Jimmy Fallon” or heard his live-hop group
breaking ground back in the day.
He comes to the Alhambra to
play DJ at 10 p.m. ($20).
Meanwhile, combining modern sounds with gypsy jazz and
swing, France’s Caravan Palace
promises to put on a fretsfriendly show at Roseland Theater, 8 N.W. Sixth Ave., along
with Bombino and Medium Troy
with The Bohemian Dub Ensemble ($20).
By ROB CULLIVAN
Pamplin Media Group
April 11
Shakin’ all over
F unny girl
Bohemian country queen
Amanda Richards not only
sings her heart out and picks
guitar, she’s also pretty dang
funny. Just check out “Ballbuster” on YouTube, which may
be one of the funniest knocks
on passive-aggressive men ever written. The Grammy-nominated songwriter’s 2011 release, “Play Dead,” earned her
an Independent Music Award
for Best Concept Album, and
you can catch her with The
Good Long Whiles from 9 to
11 p.m. every Tuesday this
month at the Laurelthirst, 2958
N.E. Glisan St. Free. Info: 503232-1504, laurelthirst.com.
Q uick hits
■ Singer-songwriter Katie
Herzig just released her new
album, “Walk Through Walls,”
and if you don’t know who she
is, you’ve heard her tunes on
such shows as “Gray’s Anatomy” and “Drop Dead Diva.” She
has a girl-meets-woman voice
and a soft-classical sensibility.
She shares the stage with Amy
Stroup at the Doug Fir Lounge,
830 E. Burnside St. at 8 p.m. Friday, April 11. $13. Info: 503-2319663, dougfirlounge.com.
■ From promotion: “Kithkin are a Cascadian youth
tribe out to spread the hidden
knowledge of the forests.
Through its performances,
Kithkin hopes to confront
crowds about the impending
‘end of things’ through witchee
rhythms and chaotic sorcery.”
Cool, we’re in! Mercy Graves
and Adam Brock 4 join in the
fun at 8 p.m. Saturday, April 12,
at The Blue Monk 3341 S.E.
Belmont St. $5. Info: 503-5950575, thebluemonk.com.
SLICK RICK
PHOTOS COURTESY OF SOUL’D OUT MUSIC F ESTIVAL
April 11
Star Theater, 13 N.W. Sixth
Ave., hosts a great night of jazz,
funk, rock and all sounds in between when John Scofield’s
Uberjam headlines at 9 p.m. One
of the last living links to jazz’s
post-war golden era, Scofield famously played with Miles Davis,
not to mention Charlie Mingus,
McCoy Tyner and Chick Corea.
Scofield makes jazz you can actually dance to and is refreshingly accessible, unpretentious
and, dare we say ... fun! Meanwhile, Seattle punk-jazz saxophonist Skerik introduces his
latest project Bandalabra, which
features Andy Coe on electric
guitar, Evan Flory-Barnes on upright bass, and Dvonne Lewis on
drums. Bandalabra is intended
to conjure the sounds of “Fela
Kuti meeting Steve Reich in
rock’s backyard.” Cool.
April 12
On March 1, Portland rapper
Greg Poe, aka Illmaculate, decided to cancel his scheduled
performance at the Blue Monk
to protest what he considered
the excessive number of cops, as
well as a fire marshal. His action
ignited a debate about alleged official bias against hip-hop culture as well as racism and discrimination in Portland. Illmaculate will mark the release of
“Clay Pigeons,” his newest CD at
Alhambra, on April 12, and says
he’s currently exploring discussions about the controversy with
Portland’s Independent Police
Review Board, as well as the police and other officials.
“There just has to be a landscape created where we can have
these shows in a positive outlet
without overt and cumbersome
shows of authority,” he says.
Illmaculate adds his latest CD
“is my best piece of work to date.
It’s more a reflection of every
facet of my life over the past
year.” His latest output tackles
social issues and self-reflection.
“I’m exploring my own depths.”
Seattle’s Nacho Picasso, along
with Cassow, Load B, Cool Nutz
and DJ Fatboy join Illmaculate’s
bill along with Sandpeople. The
cost: $12 in advance, $15 day of
show.
Meanwhile, much acclaimed
Portland indie rocker Sallie Ford
joins Rick Bain & The Genius Position and Three For Silver for a
show at Star Theater ($15). Formerly of The Sound Outside,
Ford is bringing her relatively
new all-female band to the stage.
“I was just going to do a side
project with them, but it ended
up working up so well that it’s a
full-time thing,” she says.
She stresses that the decision
to disband The Sound Outside
was mutually made by all members. Her new band delves into
surf, new wave and other genres,
in addition to her patented rootsy sound, Ford says.
ILLMACULATE
“These particular women I’m
playing with are very special,”
she adds. “We do some harmony
stuff, and everyone is very excited about it.”
She also notes the band is
working on a new album with
producer Chris Funk of the Decemberists.
“He and I collaborated on the
new sound of this band, bringing
in more straightforward rock elements, a more crunchier punk
rock sound,” she says.
April 13
Portland’s premiere “little orchestra,” Pink Martini, presents
its classy combination of classical, Latin, jazz and pop with the
Oregon Symphony at three 8:30
p.m. all-ages shows Friday
through Sunday, April 11-13 ($35
to $127). Schnitzer Hall, 1037
S.W. Broadway.
Sunday also will see Malian
singer-actress Fatoumata Diawara (aka Fatou) take the stage
at the Star Theater with her
Western African music, which
combines traditional and contemporary influences in a percussive, melodic and haunting
mix. Saratone shares the bill ($18).
April 14
Credited with influencing
both Jimi Hendrix and Buddy
Guy, Guitar Shorty will satisfy
your blues hunger with Dovedriver, at Mississippi Studios,
3939 N. Mississippi Ave., with
this 9 p.m show ($17 in advance,
$20 day of show).
April 15
Tinariwen includes Touareg
musicians from the Sahara Desert region of northern Mali. Members of this band have fought in
war, learned music in peace, and
created some of the most soulful,
poetic folk rock on the planet.
Few, if any, bands on Earth have
the kind of story Tinariwen has.
Their 2011 album “Tassili” was
recorded in the Algerian desert
and won a Grammy for “Best
World Music.” They share the
stage with U.K. folk-Latin-roots
band The Melodic. 9 p.m. Tuesday, April 15, at the Aladdin Theater, 3017 S.E. Milwaukie Ave. ($25
in advance, $30 day of show).
The same night, Jeni Wren, a
founding member of Portland’s
Shy Girls, brings her sexy soul
music to the Doug Fir, 830 E.
Burnside St. Gritty Portland R&B
band Brownish Black joins the bill
($10 in advance, $12 at the door).
What can we say about Roots
drummer Ahmir “Questlove”
Thompson that hasn’t been
Your knit headquarters!
Try us for Fashion Knits,
in Rayon, Cotton & Poly
Yoga Knits, Swimwear.
Great selection!
BEAVERTON:
Easter
Brunch
UPCOMING EVENTS
484717.041014
484795.041014
9701 SE McLoughlin . 503 /786 -1234
5th & Western Ave . 503 /646 -3000
TRY AN ELECTRIC BIKE
484469.040814
SAT, APR. 12
FRI-SUN, MAY 16-18
SAT, MAY 17
FRI, MAY 30
CONNECT WITH US!
Celebrate Easter
Join us on Sunday April 20,
for a special Easter brunch.
Reservations required, call
503-281-2500.
10am-1pm
$29 per adult
$15 per child (4-12)
SE 39th & SE Powell, Portland, OR / 503.719.7678
* expires 4/30/14
SCAN WITH SMARTPHONE
OPEN DAILY • SPECIAL ORDERS WELCOME
PORTLAND:
The easy, fit alternative to driving. Climb hills easier. Pedal faster and
farther with power assist when you need it. E-Bikes for all purposes.
www.CynergyEbikes.com
DJs The Hood Internet hail
from Chicago and specialize in
mashing up indie rock and hiphop and will share the stage with
Portland pop rockers Pictorials
at 8 p.m. at Holocene, 1001 S.E.
Morrison St. ($12 in advance, $15
day of show).
April 16
KNITS!
ELECTRIC SMILE.
FREE HELMET OR LOCK with e-bike purchase *
April 20
Portland’s first choice for quality fabric since 1918
ELECTRIC BIKE.
LOVE YOUR RIDE
Joe Louis Walker has more
than a score of records under his
own name and has played on numerous others. With a voice like
Elmore James and a pronounced, somewhat angular guitar style that echoes another
Walker — T-Bone — as well as
Otis Rush and B.B. King, Walker
has forged a distinct sound also
rooted in what he calls the blues’
“cousin from the same tree” —
gospel music. Walker takes the
stage at 8 p.m. at Jimmy Mak’s,
221 N.W. 10th Ave. ($13, $17).
The Michael Moore Quartet
features Moore, a saxophonist,
clarinetist and composer, who
jams American jazz and Dutchimprovised music traditions. His
quartet features pianist Harmen
Fraanje, bassist Clemens van
der Feen, and drummer Michael
Vatcher at 7 p.m. in the Mission
Theater, 1624 N.W. Glisan St.
($20 in advance, $25 at the door).
Lalah Hathaway and Ruben
Studdard bring jazz and soul to
the Crystal Ballroom, 1332 W.
Burnside St., at 8 p.m. Pianistvocalist Hathaway, the daughter
of Donny Hathaway, has spent
more than 20 years in the business putting out mature music
and recently snagged a Grammy,
Two words say it all — Slick
Rick! The gentleman rapper
with the Jamaican-British roots
grew up in the Bronx, revolutionized hip-hop with his storytelling skills, went to jail on an
attempted murder rap, became a
model inmate, and eventually
was pardoned by New York Gov.
David Paterson. He brings his
revitalized roadshow to the Alhambra at 9 p.m. ($20).
Meanwhile, Brooklyn’s Pleasure Drones features Will Bernard on guitar, keys and electronics, Jeff Hanley on bass, keys
and electronics, and Eric Kalb on
drums and electronics. All three
cats have stellar pedigrees, including Grammy nominations,
and members have worked with
Tom Waits, Sharon Jones and
Branford Marsalis, among others. They bring their trippy
funky vibe to the Goodfoot, 2845
S.E. Stark St. at 9 p.m. ($8 in advance, $10 at the door).
483955.040114
April 15, 2 2, 29
April 17
April 19
©2014 Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc. All Rights Reserved. Preferred Guest, SPG, Sheraton
and their logos are the trademarks of Starwood Hotels & Resorts Worldwide, Inc., or its affiliates.
484791.040814
Every now and then a band
writes a perfect single. Such is
“Void You Out” a snarling punkthrash tune with clearly enunciated vocals from L.A.’s Off!, who
let you know how insignificant
your objections to the Rude
World Order are. Off! consists of
Circle Jerks/Black Flag singer
Keith Morris, Burning Brides
frontman Dimitri Coats, Redd
Kross bassist Steven Shane McDonald, and Rocket From The
Crypt/Hot Snakes drummer
Mario Rubalcaba.
Off!, Cerebral Ballzy, NASA
Space Universe , 7 p.m. Friday,
April 11, Hawthorne Theatre,
1507 S.E. 39th Ave. $13.50 in advance, $15 at the door. All ages.
Info: 503-233-7100, hawthorne
theatre.com.
Little Dragon, which shares a bill
with Unknown Mortal Orchestra
at the Wonder Ballroom, 128 N.E.
Russell St. Integrating synthtrip-hop with avant-garde soul,
Little Dragon is about as contemporary sounding as it gets.
Meanwhile, Portland-meetsAuckland UMO likes their prog
rock psychedelic and will provide an excellent complementary sound to Little Dragon.
Manchester, England, singersongwriter Daley sports a strong
tenor which he puts to good use
on his soul, R&B and pop tunes.
You can hear him at the Star
Theater at 10 p.m. ($12).
467972.040814
Off! tur ns on
■ From page 1
April 18
423534.050913
Just in time for the slew of
earthquakes hitting our region,
Portland’s Shook Twins are
promoting a haunting new,
gypsy-flavored folk single
called “Shake” off their latest
studio album, “What We Do.”
It’s all pre-apocalyptic and prophetic. If Judgment Day has a
soundtrack, this song is on it.
The Shook Twins consist of
identical twins Katelyn and
Laurie Shook, bassist Kyle Volkman and multi-instrumentalist
Niko Daoussis. With every release, these soulful gospelswing sisters get better and
better and should be in show
business pretty much till the
walls come tumbling down.
Shook Twins, Steve Poltz, 9
p.m. Friday April 11, Mississippi Studios, 3939 N. Mississippi Ave. $30 VIP, $15 general
admission. Info: 503-288-3895,
mississippistudios.com.
along with Snarky Puppy, for
“Something.” Meanwhile,
“American Idol” Studdard has
put out a string of gold and platinum records.
TICKETS CAN BE PURCHASED AT THE RQ BOX OFFICE, ALL PARTICIPATING SAFEWAY & TICKETSWEST OUTLETS, ROSEQUARTER.COM
OR BY CALLING 877.789.ROSE (7673). FOR MORE INFORMATION PLEASE VISIT ROSEQUARTER.COM.
FOR GROUP DISCOUNTS CALL 503.963.4400. FOR SINGLE EVENT SUITE RENTALS, CALL 503.963.3993
B4 LIFE
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
www.Community-Classif ieds.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Business
Opportunities
PLACEMENT INFORMATION
Telephone: (503) 620-SELL (7355)
Fax: (503) 620-3433
E-Mail:
[email protected]
Address:
6606 SE Lake Road, Portland, OR 97269
Office Hours: 8 am - 5 pm
Lost & Found
Business
Opportunities
HELP BRING DAISY
HOME!
$1000 REWARD!!!
LOST YORKSHIRE
TERRIER MIX:
ATTENTION
READERS
Help
Wanted
PUBSTAFF!
Help
Wanted
COMPUTER:
INFRASTRUCTURE
MANAGEMENT
PRINCIPAL
Xerox is looking for an Infrastructure Management
Principal in Hillsboro, OR
to ensure the smooth operation of Xerox client data
network(s) in order to provide
maximum
performance and availability for
the system. Send resume
to,
Recruiting,
Xerox,
Mailstop:
R382-LV301,
1303 Ridgeview, Lewisville, TX 75057, attn:
870-N.
Machine Operator
US Pipe Fabrication is hiring now. To apply go to
www.uspipe.com click on
jobs, click on view all &
click on Portland-Machine
Operators.
McMenamins Mall 205 is
now hiring PUBSTAFF!
Qualified apps must have
an open & flex sched including, days, eves, wknds
and holidays. We are looking for applicants who have
prev exp related exp and
enjoy working in a busy
customer service-oriented
enviro. We are also willing
to train! We offer opps for
advancement and excellent benefits for eligible
employees, including vision, med, chiro, dental
and so much more! Please
apply
online
24/7
at
www.mcmenamins.com or
pick up a paper app at any
McMenamins location. Mail
to 430 N Killingsworth,
Portland OR, 97217 or fax:
503-221-8749.
Call
503-952-0598 for info on
other ways to apply.
Please no phone calls or
emails to individ locs!
EOE.
Need a new employee?
Advertise it in the
classifieds. Call now!
Call 503-620-7355
DELIVERY DRIVER
IMMEDIATE START!!!
Brentwood Corp, in Molalla, is seeking experienced
driver to deliver product. Responsible for loading product, making deliveries, maintaining records, &
receiving COD payments. Must have clean driving record, pass DOT Drug & Physical screenings & great customer service skills; 2-3 yrs driving experience a must.
Competitive wage, excellent low-cost employee benefits
package, 401(k) & more!
ASK ABOUT OUR NEW HIRE BONUS!
Apply in person at 453 Industrial Way | Molalla or
FAX: 503-759-7263.
Hiring Telephone Interpreters for
Arabic, Korean, Mandarin, Russian, Vietnamese
You will enjoy a satisfying career, while making a
difference in people’s life! Excellent proficiency in English and second language with strong listening and
comprehension skills are required.
•Pay: $17 •Location: 707 SW Washington,
Portland, OR. •Hours: 5 am to 8 pm shifts
We offer: •Part or Full Time positions •Paid orientation
•Paid benefits (medical, dental, vision, 401(K), FSA,
others) •Paid on-going training •Bus pass
To Apply: Click http://goo.gl/6JUZmQ to view the job
description, then click the “Apply Online” button.
Join our team of talented
language professionals today!
OPEN UNTIL FILLED —- EEO/AA
PLANT MAINTENANCE TECHS, DIESEL MECHANICS, EQUIPMENT OPERATORS (Scappoose)
Come be a part of the CalPortland team.
CalPortland has served the construction industry since
1891 we understand how great people help to make
great companies.
• Aggregate production/maintenance exper. and equipment operation preferred. • Welding and fabrication exp
preferred. • Familiar w/MSHA reg plus •Millwright type
exper. • Excellent benefits/pay, 401k option, Vacation,
Holidays. Apply at 34885 N. Honeyman Rd.,
Scappoose or email [email protected]
www.calportland.com
M/F/D/V
Radio Advertising Sales
KPAM 860 and Sunny 1550, two locally-owned radio
stations, are seeking representatives who are
motivated, high integrity sales people who enjoy a
challenge, creative thinking and a desire to help others
grow their local businesses. Candidates must have
good phone skills, listening skills, strong desire to win
and make a good living. If you have knowledge of
broadcast, marketing, and social media, it’s a plus. We
offer excellent benefits and good compensation plans
in a locally owned and employee focused environment.
We are an equal opportunity employer.
Please send resume to:
General Sales Manager
Email: [email protected]
No phone calls please
Contact Cindy
206-910-5102.
PLEASE NOTE:
Abbreviations destroy the
intent of your advertisement. Your advertisement
should be attractive and
easy to read. Let us help
you put together your advertisement. Call us today
at:
503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
Advertising Marketing Consultant
Community Newspapers has an immediate opening for
a full time Advertising Marketing Consultant. The
successful candidate must be self-motivated, possess
the ability to multi-task, work in a fast paced
environment and meet deadlines. You will work with
existing customers as well as seek out new business.
You will be driven, like to work with people and have a
desire to be successful. Sales experience preferred but
not necessary.
Our marketing consultants meet with local businesses
to develop marketing plans and strategies to grow their
business.
This position reports to the Advertising Director at the
Gresham Outlook. We offer an above average base
salary, generous commission plan and benefits
including medical, 401(k) plan, vacation and more.
A valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle with
insurance is required.
If you are looking for a an opportunity with a growing
company that values its people and has a strong community service ethic, please submit your resume to:
Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director, The Gresham
Outlook, 1190 NE Division, Gresham, OR 97030 or
email your resume to: [email protected]
__________________________________
• Director of Nursing-15K retention bonus and
relocation assistance
• Resident Care Manager-10K retention bonus
and relocation assistance
Previous experience in long term care is required.
We offer competitive salary and benefits package
including paid medical benefits for single or family during your introductory period beginning day one of
employment, an excellent area and regional support
system and advancement opportunities.
Interested candidates can apply on-line at
www.extendicare.com/jobs
EOE
✵
It is illegal for companies
doing business by phone to
promise you a loan and
ask you to pay for it before
they deliver. For more information, call toll-free
1-877-FTC HELP. A public
service
message
from
Community Classifieds and
the Federal Trade Commission.
Machinery & Tools
Horses
PORTLAND:
2 plots at
Lincoln Memorial Park.
Located at the hilltop section. Nos. 1 and 2, Row
287. Easy access. Valued
at $11,990 but will sell for
$6,000 for pair. We will
pay required transfer fee of
$500. | (503)913-4063
PLANER:
10’’
Ryobi
planer, new blades, $140.
Call 503-543-8443 or
503-543-3997.
PREMIUM
BAGGED FINE
SHAVINGS
PORTLAND: Two plots at
The Grand Army of the Republic Pioneer Cemetery
on SW Boones Ferry Rd.
Metro has valued at these
plots at $3,395 each.
Selling price $5K for pair.
(503)245-4105.
PREMIUM Double Vault at
The Portland Memorial
SE 14th & Bybee Court
Main Entrance, 5th Floor
$6,800
(503)234-2974
VAULT: 2-person, The
Prayer section, South Corridor, tier 4, vault 2. Portland Memorial Mausoleum,
6705 SE 14th Ave, Portland,
OR
97202.
$5,000/obo. 503-989-5577.
Firewood/
Heating Supplies
Health & Fitness
$2500 Automatic Gate
Up to 16 feet w/ Remote
Phone: (503) 830-1119
Web:
www.eiffelfab.com
PRO FORM 730
SI Treadmill - $150.
Schwinn stationary
exercise bike - $50.
Lateral Thigh trainer - $25.
All items rarely used
and look new!!
Will take Best Offer
Call Mark- (503)784-2574
Cemetery Lots
LINCOLN
MEMORIAL
PARK: Beautiful location in
the Mt. View area, grave
site #1, lot 104. No longer
needed, asking $5,900
(includes transfer of deed).
Please call 360-718-1891
before 9pm.
To place your
Classified advertisement,
call 503-620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
400+ Sales
Portland’s LARGEST
Garage Sale w/Antiques
Sat, April 19th: 8-5. Adults
$5, Kids Free
Portland EXPO Center
2060 N Marine Dr
www.portlandgsale.com
BANKS ESTATE SALE
FRI: 9-4 SAT: 8-4 &
SUN: 8-12
19260 NW Turk Rd
Advertising Sales Representative
Man Cave plus!!!
PART-TIME, FLEXIBLE HOURS
We’re looking for a “people” person with a great
personality and at least two years of advertising sales
experience – someone with a proven record of sales
success. We also seek a strong prospector – someone
who’s not afraid to make a lot of cold calls. Selected
candidate will have an account base, but will also be
expected to grow business substantially.
Excellent interpersonal skills, strong organizational
abilities, computer skills, and the ability to stay focused
on success are also important. This individual must be
a team player with a positive attitude.
In return, we offer a competitive salary plus
commission, a solid benefit package and the
opportunity to grow with us. For more information,
please forward a resume with cover letter and salary
history to: [email protected] or fax
to (503)620-3433.
______________________________________
PRESS OPERATOR
• 8’ blade on 30’ tower
- or • 6’ blade on 22’ tower,
Completely rebuilt
and ready to pump.
Call 503-348-2378, Mulino
SNOW TIRES: 4 on rims,
P205-70R-15,
from a Suburu Outback.
$20 each.
(503)625-2177 - Sherwood
Miscellaneous
Wanted
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
Lawnmowers
MURRAY RIDING LAWN
MOWER:
One owner, 32’’, 17.5hp,
automatic transmission.
$475/OBO | (971)409-0981
14% All Livestock
‘Valley Blend’
$9.75 / 50 lbs.
$379 / ton
KING FISHER FEED
(503)829-8060
GET
FAST
RESULTS
THROUGH
THE CLASSIFIEDS
CALL NOW!
CALL
503-620-SELL
Pets & Supplies
AUSTRALIAN
LABRADOODLES
LIFELONG COLLECTOR
pays cash for GERMAN &
JAPANESE war relics.
Helmets, swords, flags etc.
(503)288-2462 | Portland
Recreation
WINCHESTER, lt. green,
16’x9’, Canvas Tent with
flooring. Includes manual,
all tent stakes & posts.
Very good condition.
$300 / OBO
(503) 810-6398
Medium, multi-gen,
puppies ready to go
next week.
Guardian Home Needed
for a female, medium
size, training well started,
great temperament, calm
yet playful puppy.
Check out our Guardian
Home program on on our
Website at:
trailsendlabradoodles.com
(503) 522-5210
facebook.com/trailsendlabradoodles
[email protected]
Health Care
Equipment
TILT WHEEL CHAIR,
Hoyer lift, Geriatric chair,
potty chair, suction device
& more, Best Offer.
(503) 288-1997
Hay/Straw/Feed
Food/Meat/Produce
B & P HITZ FARM
Apples, Potatoes,
Walnuts, Filberts,
Jam & Syrups.
Stand open 1:30 - 5:30
Closed Monday
503-982-9307
14070 Wilco Hwy
Woodburn
bphitzapples.com
BLACK CATS... BLACK
CATS!!! looking for a
home.
Bonded pair of
sweet gentle rescued black
cats.
Loving, intelligent,
comical and teachable. Do
well with other cats. Playful but not frenetic. Approx.
10 months old. Neutered
male and spayed female.
Shots. Seeking committed
indoor home with cat
lovers.
Adoption fee
waivable for the right
home. Call 503-638-7500
BONNEY:
CAPTAIN JOHN’S
FISH COMPANY
Please submit resume to:
[email protected] or fax to
503-546-0718
______________________________________
Come join the Pamplin Media Group, the area’s largest
newspaper organization. We are seeking a part-time
newspaper advertising sales representative to sell print
and digital advertising services for our popular monthly
publication, The Regal Courier in King City.
We’re looking for someone who enjoys talking with
people, learning about their businesses, and helping
them to succeed. The selected person will manage a
defined sales territory, working with local businesses
on marketing strategies. Outside sales experience is a
must (media sales preferred), along with the ability to
manage multiple priorities in a fast-paced environment.
This is a developed territory with existing business.
This position requires great interpersonal skills, a
knack for organization, math ability and computer skills.
Reliable transportation and proof of insurance are
required.If you’re looking for new challenge, flexible
hours and a fun work environment, this may just be the
opportunity for you! For more information, forward a
resume with cover letter to:
[email protected]
______________________________________
Water pumping windmills
from Iowa farms.
FREE HAULING OF
SCRAP METAL
(503) 729-9164
Apparel/Jewelry
$5.85 per 9 cuft bag. $6.75
11 cuft bag. Delivery and
quantity discounts
available.
K Bar D Enterprises
(503) 806-0955
ANTIQUE WINDMILLS
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
COMIC BOOKS WANTED
Private collector seeks
comics from the ‘40s-’70s.
Appraisals given, cash pd.
(503) 528-1297
GORGEOUS 3.5 CARAT
TOTAL WEIGHT,
WEDDING RING SET,
Size 7, $3500 OBO.
(360) 846-3270
Miscellaneous for
Sale
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
LIVING ROOM
FURNITURE:
RECLINER COUCH and
Recliner, chocolate brown,
$250/obo. ARM CHAIR,
dark tan leather, $50. RECLINERS: 2, La-Z-Boy,
tan, $75/pair. XBOX 360,
20 gig, bad DVD Rom,
$50. All for $300. Milwaukie area. Call for details:
503-933-6304.
Antiques/Collectibles
SHOPSMITH BAND SAW:
Needs new tires. $100.
Call 971-212-3827
OLD GROWTH Doug Fir:
Dry & seasoned,
$200/cord.
Delivery available.
Call for details:
(503) 807-7201.
Subscription Sales
Community Newspapers circulation department has an
excellent part-time sales opportunity available.
This is an ideal opportunity to make great money in
your spare time.
You will sell newspaper subscriptions for our
award-winning publications at kiosk and festivals
throughout the metropolitan area. If you have excellent
communication skills, the drive to succeed and ability
to work independently this could be the perfect position
for you.
Regular part-time (primarily Friday, Saturday &
Sunday but some weekday work is available).
Hourly wage plus excellent commission.
Sales experience preferred.
Provide own transportation & ability to lift up to 25lbs.
Background check & drug screen required.
We’re on the grow and currently seeking an
outgoing, dynamic individual to join the Portland
Tribune advertising sales team.
Riverside Nursing and Rehabilitation Center located in
Centralia, WA has openings for experienced
RN Nurse Managers.
Loans
REPORTER
The Times serving Tigard, Tualatin and Sherwood is
looking for an enthusiastic full-time reporter interested
in writing for a suburban weekly newspaper. This
reporter would cover the Tualatin community, which
offers a rich array of interesting stories to delve into
from breaking news, features and profiles to
investigative, enterprise stories and government
reporting. He or she will also serve as the feature writer
for the Living Here section that runs in both The Times
and Beaverton Valley Times.
The ideal candidate will have a four-year degree in
journalism and newspaper reporting experience. Strong
writing and editing skills are a requirement, as is the
ability to meet deadlines and manage several projects
at one time. We are looking for a team player with a
passion for accuracy, a sense of curiosity and the
proven ability to turn out a large volume of compelling
news content each week.
Please email a letter of interest, resume and at least
three samples of your published work to Christina Lent,
managing editor, at [email protected]
No phone calls please.
To learn more about our newspaper, visit
www.tualatintimes.com or check out our Facebook
page at facebook.com/tigardtualatintimes.
__________________________________
Advertising Sales Consultant
Portland Tribune
RN NURSE MANAGEMENT OPPORTUNITIES
COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
Daisy, 10-12lbs, Missing
since Feb 6 when owner
killed in multicar crash on
I-5 near exit 11 (N of Vancouver WA) Family desperately wants her to be
found. Last seen Mar 12th
in the Ridgefield area.
Due to the quantity and
variety of business opportunity listings we receive, it is impossible for
us to verify every opportunity
advertisement.
Readers respond to
business opportunity
ads at their own risk. If
in doubt about a particular offer, check with the
Better Business Bureau,
503-226-3981 or the
Consumer Protection
Agency, 503-378-4320,
BEFORE investing any
money.
Family-owned Canby
retail business for sale,
specializing in graphic
design for team gear &
corporate apparel,
letterman jackets, screen
printing, heat press,
embroidery, promotional
products, and decals.
Located at 249 NW 2nd
Street. Please contact
Owners Brenda at
(503) 266-6283 or Jason
at (503) 806-2448 to
arrange a meeting to
discuss this exciting
opportunity!
Visit our website at:
www.ultimateteam
spirit.com
Cemetery Lots
ESTACADA:
MULTI-FAMILY
MOVING/GARAGE
SALE
297 N BROADWAY
FRI-SAT: 9-5
GRESHAM
ESTATE SALE
268th Street
(Past Boring Golf Course,
follow signs from Hwy 26 &
Kelso Rd.)
FRI-SAT: 10-5
Modern rolltop desk &
chair, recliner, sofa, 6 occasional chairs, Ethan Allen dining set, tilt-top table,
small oriental rugs, queen
bed & dresser, 2 TVs,
linens, china, glassware,
Flo Blue bowl & pitcher,
books, patio furniture,
barbecue, miscellaneous.
Caution:
Driveway is one lane!.
GRESHAM-97080:
MULTI-GENERATIONAL
GARAGE SALE!
1840 SW 17th ST
FRI & SAT, 9-5p
OREGON CITY
ESTATE/GARAGE SALE
17888 S Greenfield Drive
11th-12th-13th 10am-5pm
Country Village Estates,
Oregon City, 97045
go online to get directions
OVERLOOK- PTLD
ESTATE SALE
April 12 & 13th, 10am-4pm
3938 N. Massathusetts,
Ptld, 97227, 60 years
accumalation, Everything
Must Go! Cash only! No
early birds & no sign up
FRESH, organic seafood,
no preservatives. Halibut
half-priced in all stores
$8.99/lb - 10 lb. min. Most
stores are $18-$22/lb. Our
price is cheaper because
we buy in bulk & sell in
bulk. Also Sea Bass, Ling
Cod and whole Salmon.
Halibut filet, big chunks.
From Alaska, Pacific
Ocean & Iceland.
Pick Up in Forest Grove 3705 Pacific Hwy.
(beside parking lot of
O’Reilly’s Auto Parts)
(503)369-1037
She might be old, small in
build and picky about what
she eats but Bonnie Blue
has a Heart of Gold and a
precious personality that
asks only for a lap and loving. She has recently volunteered to be a Compassionate Care Cat. The
adoption fee for Bonnie is
$40 - or free if you are a
senior citizen. Microchip,
worming and flea treatment, current vaccines, vet
exam and free 30-day
insurance offer are included. Cat’s Cradle, call
503-312-4296.
PORTLAND:
MOVING SALE
FRI & SAT, 9-4p
SUNDAY, 9-2p
Furniture, books, records,
etc. All must Go!
SW BOONES FERRY
RD & ARNOLD ST
(Follow the signs.)
TIGARD:
BIG CHURCH
Tigard United
Methodist Church
9845 SW Walnut
Place
(Behind Jiffy Lube on 99W)
Thu 4/10 - Sat 4/12: 9-4
Books, clothing,
collectibles, crafts, hshold
goods & toys.
www.tigardumc.com
Proceeds benefit Mission Projects
for women & youth.
APPAREL/JEWELRY
WE BUY GOLD
The Gresham Outlook is accepting applications for a
press operator for our 12-unit Goss Community press.
Evening shift, working four tens. Saturday, Sunday,
and Thursday nights off. Full-time position with
benefits. The ideal candidate will be familiar with set
up, running, and maintenance of a web press. Two plus
years of experience preferred. Must be able to lift 70
lbs. Background check and drug screen required.
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
Send resume to [email protected]
EOE.
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
The Jewelry Buyer
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
Sell your
puppies
here!
503-620-SELL (7355)
www.community-classifieds.com
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE ✵ 503-620-SELL (7355) ✵ 8:30AM - 5:00PM ✵ WWW.COMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS.COM
LIFE B5
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Pets & Supplies
Pets & Supplies
BORED BORIS
ORLEANS:
Five year old neutered
male
black
and
tan
bloohound mix, had been
with his family since he
was a puppy, owner
moved to an apartment
and
could
not
keep
him.Fine with family cat,
other dogs on walks and at
veterinarians. Lonely and
confused at the pound.
Seeking foster or foster to
adopt. Trainer and rescue
involved. Foster homes always needed. For more information
call
503.625.4563;
E-mail
[email protected]
CINDY LOU:
Good Samaritans
NEEDED!
Elderly lady moved to Assisted Living and left 3
lovely cats behind. They
all need adoptive families! Siamese, Tabby &
one black w/white spots.
Please call Paul 503-266-3493 - Canby
HIGHTOPS:
Apartments for Rent
Acreage/Lots
Orleans always has a
smile on his face because
he is a perpetually happy
and friendly cat. Orleans’
happiness will be complete
once he has a place to call
home. Visit Cat Adoption
Team’s Sherwood shelter
to find out if Orleans is the
new cat for you:
14175 SW Galbreath Drive
503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday.
Call
Community Classifieds
and place a
Marketplace ad to sell
your overstock items FAST
-Reasonable Rates
- Quality Readers
-Quick Results
Call (503) 620-7355
www.communityclassifieds.com
PEDAL:
FRANCIE
Active, playful, smart, loyal,
7 year old tan and black
spayed female German
Shepherd, Francie is lonely
without a family. She loves
to play fetch and catch
balls, good at nose work,
seeking
foster
or
adopter.Terrific personality.
Comes with free nose
work training lessons as a
gift. Trainer and rescue involved. For more information, call 503.625.4563 or
E-mail:
[email protected]
PUBLISHER’S
NOTICE
VISTA NOEL
62 New Homes!!
$0 Down!
100% Financing Avail.
Starting at $229,950
OPEN SUNDAYS, 1- 4
Contact Jason Shuler
All
real estate advertised
herein is subject to the
Federal Fair Housing
Act, which makes it illegal to advertise any preference, limitation or discrimination based on
race, color, religion, sex,
handicap, familial status
or national origin, or intention to make any
such preferences, limitations or discrimination.
State law forbids discrimination in the sale,
rental or advertising of
real estate based on
factors in addition to
those protected under
federal law. Oregon
State law forbids discrimination based on
marital status. We will
not knowingly accept
any advertising for real
estate which is in violation of the law. All persons are hereby informed that all dwellings
advertised are available
on an equal opportunity
basis.
Acreage/Lots
(503)783-2445
JOHN L SCOTT, Sandy
Homes with Acreage
CANBY/AURORA:
SHOP PROPERTY
$385,000
40’ X 60’ insulated shop
and heated 3-car garage
flank a multi-level home
built for entertaining.
Large decks on east and
west sides, walls of windows and soaring vaulted
ceilings bring the outdoors in - Car guys &
gals, you need to see
this one!
RMLS# 14188582
Marybeth Kostrikin
Equity Oregon R.E.
675 NW 1st Ave, Canby
(503)706-1263 Cell
[email protected]
NETARTS
ACREAGE FSBO
Pedal is female cat with
medium grey with a few
flecks of light orange fur,
and a white spot on her
tummy. Pedal will be 3
years old in June 19th,
2014. She is fixed and
uses the litter box. Pedal
and her sister Tigger are
adoptable as a pair. They
are bonded and have lived
only with each other.
Please
contact
catscradlerescue.com and
under the word ADOPT
complete a no-obligation
application. This will be
sent to the owner for her
return call. You can call
Marilyn at 503-312-4296
for further information.
SUGAR:
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $747, 2 Bed: $895!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
PRICES SLASHED!!
Peaceful Whiskey Creek
Road location north of
Cape Lookout. On the
‘’3 Capes Scenic Loop’’
• Three adjoining buildable land parcels avail:
2.2 acres - $45,000.
3 acres - $55,000.
7.59 ac - $125,000.
• Public water, phone,
cable, elec. at street.
• Septic required for
vacant lots.
Contact Scott for info:
503-662-7204,
Sugar is sweet, curious,
and everything nice. Sugar
is content to explore on her
own, but she is not averse
to a little cuddling. If you’re
interested in the independent and calm Sugar, stop
by Cat Adoption Team’s
Sherwood shelter:
14175 SW Galbreath
Drive 503-925-8903
catadoptionteam.org
Tuesday-Friday, 12-7 pm;
Saturday-Sunday, 12-6
pm; Closed Monday.
TIGGER:
JACK RUSSELL
TERRIERS: 3 females,
tri-colored. Born 2/21/14.
$350 per puppy.
541-544-3334
JUNIPER:
View forest from living room.
Palisades Condominiums
A quiet, comfortable 2bd,
condo, nestled in an old
growth forest of Sitka & fir.
On a hill above ‘’Roads
End’’ area. Vaulted ceilings, lvrm w/fireplace, dining area w/slider to covered balcony. All furnished
includes draperies. Parking available, convenient
kitchen, close to beach,
lake, golfing, casino &
shopping. Built in 1981 &
seldom used. Very good
condition, never rented.
Outstanding HOA board.
Price reduced. Call owner:
(503)299-4602
Farms
Tigger is a female cat with
white trimmed face, sleek
fur, black and grey striped
Siberian type cat who is
my close, cuddly companion. She is 3 years old in
June 19th, 2014. Tigger is
shy around strangers, she
loves to play with her sister
Pedal, chase furry balls or
bells, get into bags and
boxes. She is fixed and
uses the litter box. The
Adoption fee for both sisters will be negotiated with
the owner. To adopt this
cat please go to our
website at www.catscradle
rescue.com and under the
word ADOPT complete the
application.
WYATT:
AURORA:
Certified
Farm
1 bdrm/1ba: $747
2 bdrm/2ba: $895
3 bdrm/2ba: $1028
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
ESTACADA
$898,000
Includes 2 legal residences & excellent outbuildings. Established income stream for 20
years, 20 acres perfected
irrigation rights, Class 1
Latourell silt loam soil.
This place is dialed in and
immaculate.
View Virtual tour at:
www.visualtour.com/show
.asp?t=3289841&prt=100
03
RMLS# 14446119
Find
it!
Equity Oregon R.E.
675 NW 1st Ave, Canby
(503)706-1263 Cell
[email protected]
Wyatt knows just how to
use his adorableness to
get attention from admiring
humans. Wyatt may be shy
at first, but as soon as he
warms up to new people,
he’s
rolling
over
for
belly-rubs in no time. Wyatt
is ready for visitors at the
Washington
Square
PetSmart: 8825 SW Cascade Ave / 503-644-3091 /
catadoptionteam.org / Sat
and Sun, 12 am-4 pm.
BUILDING MATERIALS
Rooms to Rent
CHRISTIAN Lady seeks
room in SE Portland, no
drugs/alc. Ask for Karen,
503-760-0732.
Ultra Glide Classic, 33,750
miles, always been garaged. Extra clean! Performance exhaust. Must sell
due to health issues.
$12,900/obo.
Gresham
area. 503-349-6691.
Storage/Garage
Space
HONDA Goldwing
GL1100, 1983: 82K miles,
$800. Call, 503-348-5587
GARAGE OR STORAGE
New 10X20 concrete floor,
$97.50, Milwaukie nr Oak
Grove Fred Meyer, or
5X10, $24.99.
503-257-4524 or
www.topnotchhomes.net
Pickups
CLACKAMAS:
Mfgd Home, ‘77 WEST
WIND, 3 BDRM, 2 BTH,
55 + park, 1340sf, buy for
$26,500 or rent for $1050/
month. Call 503-657-9171
for info.
FACTORY SPECIAL
IS BACK!!!
15’ INVADER Open Bow
Boat and trailer in good
shape, 4 cylinder 50hp
Mercury outboard needs
repair. Could be minor fix
or can make money by
parting it out, $800 or Best
Offer.
Estacada
area.
Please call Jon at:
503-502-7338.
Cars For Sale
BEAUTIFUL RED
‘67 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE, Mostly
original, 289 engine, AT,
white top, console &
Much More! $25,000
(503) 366-1788
Very low mileage, excellent
condition
Sec 8 OK
Call for details:
971-832-8146.
WrightChoiceHomes.com
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
503-652-9446
Moving ~ Make Offer!
Must see to appreciate!
Please leave message &
phone number & we’ll
return the call.
We will get you
the most for your RV!
Here at Northwest RV we
have a large budget for
advertising that targets
buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
but across the country,
even Canada!
6492 Portland Road NE
503-393-3663 | Jasmine
Utility Trucks
& Vans
TOYOTA TACOMA 2008:
4X4, SR5. $17,500 . 4 cylinders, 5 speed, Good
mileage,
Access Cab,
Outlaw custom rims, New
Yokohama tires, New tags
expire Feb. 2016, Tow
package, 115,000 hwy miles, no off road, Original
owner, title in hand, CD
player,
Electric
windows/Air, Snow chains
never used, No dealers.
Call 503-577-1279
CARGO VAN &
EQUIPMENT
Retirement Sale!!!
New commercial
powerwasher with lots of
equipment & 15’ Cargo
Van. Will sell part or all.
This equipment is high end
and the truck has had one
owner. McMinnville area.
Call for more information:
541-730-0121.
RV’S & TRAVEL TRAILERS
30’
5th
Wheel,
‘’Big Country’’ by Heartland 2009:
Heavy Duty Rear Carrier, Large Collapsible Steps
w/Handrail, Aluminum Mag Wheels, Sleeps 5, Table
seats 6, 3 slide outs, Corian Counter Top, Furnished
small appliances, Shower, Pots, Pans, Dishes.
Oregon City area. $31,000
Get your vacation plans ready!
Call Tom today while it’s still available!
503-320-3784.
Building &
Remodeling
Chimney Services
Fences
BIRDS CHIMNEY
SERVICE
1-800-CHIMNEY
Cleaning & Repairs
503-653-4999
CCB# 155449
FENCES, DECKS & Paver
Patios. Install, Repair &
Remove. Pressure Washing. Debris, Asphalt, Dirt &
Concrete removal. CCB#
118609, 503-734-7172.
SELL your unwanted items in
the classifieds. Call today.
503-620-SELL
JAMES F.
WIEDEMANN
CONSTRUCTION
Remodeling, Windows,
& Doors, Decks,
Fences, Sheds. 20 yrs
exper. L/I/B CCB
#102031.
503-784-6691
James Kramer
Const.
Locally since 1974!
Kitchen, bath, walls,
ceilings, additions,
counters, cabinets,
decks, drywall, tile,
granite, windows and
doors, etc.
Reasonable.
CCB#11518. Jim
503-201-0969,
503-625-5092.
NEED YARD HELP?
See the Classified
Service Directory!
To place your ad,
call (503) 620-SELL(7355).
Cleaning/Organizing
Landscape
Maintenance
Handyman/
Handywoman
GARCIA
MAINTENANCE, LLC
Mowing, weeding, trimming, blackberries, hauling, year-round maintenance.
One-time cleanups for all seasons. E-mail:
[email protected]
503-774-2237
GET READY FOR
SPRING!!!
HANDYMAN MATTERS
Locally owned, nationally
recognized. Specializing in
small to medium jobs
#191473
WestPortland.HandymanMatters.com
503-621-0700
YEAR AROUND
SERVICE
•Mowings $25 & up.
•Trimming •Pruning:
Hedges, shrubs, fruit &
ornamental trees.
•Thatch •Aerate •Bed work
•Fertilize •Bark
•Maintenance programs
Affordable rates!
Call Dave, (503) 753-1838
Hauling
Debi’s PROFESSIONAL
HOUSECLEANING
I’m Here to Serve YOU!
29 years experience
•Organizing •Pet Care
•Senior Help •SW area.
Reasonable Rates
503.590.2467
Quality Cleaning!
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B6 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
Grimble likes
the climate as
OSU builds team
Miami transfer
expected to compete
for starting D-line
By K ERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
CORVALLIS — Dylan
Wynn and Jalen Grimble go
way back, to their time playing as seniors for high
school powers — Wynn for
De La Salle in Concord, Calif., Grimble for Bishop Gorman in Las Vegas.
“We beat them, barely,” says
Wynn, an offensive guard and
defensive end at De La Salle.
“Jalen gets salty when I mention it. The most tiring game
I’ve ever played in, I think.
They were good. He was good.”
“I remember it,” says Grimble, a tight end and D-end at
Bishop Gorman. “I’m biased
about that game. I thought
they cheated us. California
refs. I’ll leave it at that.”
Wynn and Grimble are all
good now, defensive linemen
playing together at Oregon
State. Wynn is a senior mainstay end and an honors candidate entering his fourth year
as a starter. Grimble is a junior
transfer from Miami who sat
out last season in Corvallis and
is now trying to earn a spot in
the rotation at tackle.
“I’d be disappointed if he
doesn’t,” Wynn says. “He’s an
explosive player, a real athlete
who I think is going to be a
presence for us next season.”
Coach Mike Riley believes it,
too. He thinks Grimble has the
capabilities to earn a starting
job before the Beavers open the
season Aug. 30 against Portland State at Reser Stadium.
“His athletic ability and size
put together is pretty interesting,” Riley says. “As a scout
team player for us last year, he
gave our offensive line a lot of
trouble. I can get about a
90-percent accurate picture on
what a scout-team player’s
next step might be. I had a very
good feeling about Jalen.”
Defensive line coach Joe
Seumalo is a harder sell. Seumalo, who tosses around compliments like manhole covers,
squints when asked what he
likes about Grimble.
“He gets to class on time,”
Seumalo says. “He smiles a lot.
I like his smile. That’s about it.”
Does Grimble possess any
physical skills?
“Sure he does,” Seumalo
says. “I have to find a way to
bring them out. Because right
now, I don’t see it. He has to
play better than the guys in
front of him. He hasn’t shown
me anything yet.”
Grimble smiles when relayed Seumalo’s comments.
“Coach Joe is a great coach,”
he says. “I love the way he
coaches. He gets on you, but he
motivates you. I’m looking forward to moving forward and
learning from him. He has
taught me a lot since I’ve been
here, but there’s so much more
I can pick up on, that I can improve on. I’m expecting him to
show me the way.”
After nearly a year in Corvallis, Grimble is convinced
Riley is the premier head coach
in the country.
“I can’t imagine anyone better,” Grimble says. “Coach Riley is different. He gets on you
without yelling or cussing. He
motivates you. Sometimes
players need to be yelled at,
and he does it sometimes, but
the way he does it amazes me.
You come out of that situation
feeling better about yourself
than when you went in.”
Grimble looks the part at 6-2
and 305 pounds, 15 pounds bigger than when he had a role in
the D-line rotation at Miami as
a true freshman in 2012. Grimble says the only reason he
sought a transfer was because
he wanted to return to the
West Coast to be closer to his
mother, Amy, who was having
health problems at the time.
“She’s my pride and joy,” he
says. “It just got to me. The
coaches in Miami, they under-
stood. They did everything in
their power to help me get
home. It was unfortunate I had
to leave, but everybody there
respected my decision, and
Coach Riley was good enough to
give me a place to play football.”
When Miami gave his release, Grimble contacted every
coaching staff in the Pac-12.
Luckily for Oregon State, Seumalo was the first to respond.
“It was destiny,” Grimble
says. “Coach Joe told me to
take a (recruiting) trip. I went
home (to Las Vegas) for two
days, flew up here, fell in love
with the school, and I didn’t
leave. Every school in the Pac12 reached out except Stanford,
but I didn’t need to look anywhere else.”
“I asked him, ‘Why us?’ ”
Riley says. “I know he had lots
of choices. He said he did his
research and thought this
would be a good place.
“He knows what he’s looking
for. It’s neat. I really like him.
He’s smart, has a great family
background. I love his parents.
I’m proud to have him.”
Sitting out last season was
difficult.
“It tested me a lot,” Grimble
says. “Through the first few
weeks, it was tough. After the
first game, I talked to my dad,
who said, ‘There’s nothing you
can do about it.’ It wasn’t what
I wanted to hear. I wanted every out to fix it, but there was
no way around it.
“But I found my way through
it through the practices. I figured if I came
out to win
Monday and
win Tuesday
and Thursday
and Friday,
and on Saturday, if the team
wins, I helped.
If we didn’t
GRIMBLE win, I didn’t do
my job in practice. The result on the field was
a reflection of what I did during
practice that week.”
Grimble says the transitional period will pay off in the long
run.
“Honestly, sitting the year
out made me grow up a little
bit,” he says. “Observing and
catching on and being the new
guy, I was pretty isolated. But I
look at it as a blessing, and I’m
really excited Coach Riley has
given me another opportunity
to play football.”
Jay Locey’s, OSU’s football
chief of staff, was surprised after a conversation last fall in
which Grimble told him about
a book Miami coaches gave
him: “Five Dysfunctions of a
Team.” Grimble brought it to
practice and handed it to
Locey.
“Jalen was using its concepts, so I was curious what it
was about,” Locey says. “He
gives it to me to read, and it
has ‘Jalen Grimble’ neatly
handwritten on a book cover
he’d put on it, like it was something you’d want to hold onto
forever. Tells you a little about
Jalen. Thoughtful kid with intellectual desire. Leadership
potential.”
Grimble says the book has
become almost like a bible to
him.
“It’s about a business setting, and the first couple of
chapters you’re like, ‘How does
this relate to football?’ ” he
says. “As you go further, you
understand. It’s about deciding
conflict and building trust and
things like that. Really good
stuff.”
Grimble would love to be a
starter, but he is setting his initial goals at a different level.
“The biggest thing I can do is
help this team in any way possible — whether on special
teams or defense, or as a motivator on the sidelines if I’m not
playing,” he says. “Whatever I
can do push this team over the
hump to get to the Rose Bowl.
My one job is to help this team
win, and that’s really what I
want to do.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
VikingWatch
Portland State goes to
Greeley, Colo., this week for
three Big Sky softball games
against Northern Colorado
(noon Friday doubleheader,
noon Saturday game).
The Vikings have dropped six
conference games in a row, by a
55-29 combined count.
Catcher Kayla Norrie is back
from a shoulder injury, third
baseman Crysta Conn hit her
fifth home run of the season last
week at Southern Utah, outfielder Aubrey Nitschelm has a fivegame hitting streak and shortstop Alicia Fine went 5 for 7 as
the leadoff hitter the last two
games, extending her hitting
streak to four games.
StatusReport
Pro
Timbers: Portland gave up a
penalty kick in last week’s 4-4
draw with Seattle at Providence
Park. That is four PKs allowed in
the five matches; the Timbers gave
up five all last season.
Coach Caleb Porter says it’s
“maybe some questionable calls”
and “maybe it’s why we are in that
situation and why we aren’t stopping guys and moving our feet
instead of diving in and putting the
ref in a position to make a call.”
■ Midfielder Diego Chara can
be a phenomenal player from box
to box. A scorer? Not so much. At
least not in his first three years
with the Timbers. Chara scored two
goals in 2011 and none in 2012
or 2013.
“He gets forward quite a bit,”
Porter says. “He’s missed some
chances over his career.”
Saturday, though, Chara scored
twice on solid shots.
“That’s part of my game that I
wanted to work on,” he says. “I
want to take the opportunity to go
forward at times, but also keep the
right balance of getting back.”
■ Kenny Cooper, the Timbers’
leading scorer in 2011, found himself on the other side of the bitter
Cascadia Cup rivalry Saturday.
“It gives me a unique perspective. I feel very privileged to be a
part of it. The atmosphere that
fans create on both sides is amazing,” said Cooper, who scored in
the third minute for Seattle.
Although he now is an enemy of
Timbers fans and was welcomed
by an onslaught of boos, Cooper
had nothing but positive things to
say about the Timbers organization
and supporters.
“I look back with such great
memories,” he said. “I am very
grateful and appreciative of the
way they treated me when I was
here.”
When Cooper was on the team,
the Timbers finished sixth in the
Western Conference and failed to
make the playoffs. Two years later,
the team made it to the conference finals.
“I’m not surprised,” Cooper said.
“They have a lot of guys who were
here when I was here, guys with
good character, good work ethic.
And, with the fan base that they
have behind them, they’re a tough
team. They seem to have come a
long way from when I was here.”
Thunder: Portland’s Arena
Football League team has a new
receiver, Alvance Robinson, 5-9
and 175 pounds. He played for
coach Matthew
Sauk in 2011
and 2012 with
the AFL Utah
Blaze. Robinson
is joining the
team this week
after being
acquired in a
trade with the
ROBINSON Pittsburgh
Power.
“He’s a small, quick wideout
with good hands,” Sauk says. “He
knows my offense and understands what I expect. He’s a fifth
wide receiver for us. He’s going to
come in and do well.”
■ Sauk liked his defense in last
week’s 44-34 road loss to the Los
Angeles KISS, a fellow AFL expansion team. Portland came up with
six sacks and allowed 37 points, a
low number by AFL standards (one
KISS touchdown came on an interception return).
“I feel like, if you give up 52, you
should be winning,” Sauk says.
“We’re giving up 49 but unfortunately scoring only 35. Two drives,
is the way I look at it. If we can
score on two drives in the first
quarter, we’re basically about
even.”
■ Sauk had concerns about his
team’s ability to concentrate last
week as the KISS, owned partly by
rock stars Gene Simmons and
Paul Stanley, celebrated the team’s
first home game. But focus wasn’t
a problem for the Thunder.
“Our guys did great,” Sauk
said. “There were a ton of distractions, and we were forced to go
out (for warm-ups) a half-hour
earlier than usual, then sit an
hour before we were allowed
back on the field.”
Sauk said the new turf field at
the Honda Center in Anaheim,
Calif., was good, “and they had a
good crowd (12,000). They’re
based more toward adults than
kids. I think you’ll see more families and young people at our home
games.”
The most puzzling thing, he said,
was that “they didn’t have us out
for the national anthem. To me,
that was disrespectful to us and
the country.”
Leonard: Court time tough to get
■ From page 8
it’s not going to change. We’re
not practicing much this time of
year, so he’s not going to get
minutes on the practice floor to
show anybody he’s better than
the guys playing ahead of him.”
That hasn’t stopped Leonard
from putting in the time before
practice and games, just in case.
“It’s important to stay ready,
mentally and physically,” says
Leonard, averaging 2.4 points
and 2.7 rebounds in 8.9 minutes
a game. “Not only being a young
player but a young big. It’s been
tough.
“Last year, I had a few more
minutes than what I maybe deserved. The minutes were just
there for me. This year, I got
hurt early, Joel played well and I
was out of the rotation. That was
tough from the get-go.”
“He has handled it well,”
Stotts says. “He continues to
work hard. He’d like to play. Like
we’ve told all the young guys,
you never know when your
number will be called. He’s staying ready, but there are certain
times when frustration sets in.
That’s human nature.”
It’s at the defensive end
where Leonard needs the most
work. At times, he is a foul machine during his limited time on
the court. His instincts with
help defense are lacking. Part of
it is his youth (he turned 22 in
February) and dearth of experience. Leonard didn’t play organized basketball until his freshman year in high school. He averaged five minutes a game as a
freshman at Illinois before blossoming into a star as a sophomore, warranting the Blazers
taking him with the No. 11 pick
in the 2012 draft.
“There are a lot of things defensively,” Stotts says. “You rely
on your big guys to help, whether in pick-and-roll situations or
penetration, discouraging shots
at the rim. The goal is that
he’s able to react without thinking. That takes time; it takes
experience.”
So it’s a Catch-22. Leonard
needs time on the court during
games to get better. He can’t get
time unless he shows improvement.
All the while, Leonard has become a whipping boy for the
Blazer faithful, who have belittled him on social media and
sports talk shows and through
website posts.
Asked how he feels he has
been treated by Portland fans
this season, Leonard pauses for
a long time, searching for the
right word.
Mixed?
Short pause. “Mixed,” he
agrees, seemingly reluctantly.
Another pause.
“I’ve shut down social media
for a reason,” he says. Before he
did that, “I heard it all (on Twitter). I’ve heard, ‘F you, I hope
you tear your ACL.’ I’ve heard,
‘You’re a bust.’ That’s the reason I don’t look at that stuff anymore, and I probably won’t during a season. It’s just not worth
it. I don’t ever listen to that stuff
or buy into it, because mentally
I have to stay locked in and confident in myself, or that will just
kill me.”
Leonard deleted the Twitter
app on his phone and says he
doesn’t get on his computer to
see what’s out there.
“I don’t read any more articles, either,” he says. “I don’t listen to talk radio. You should
never get too high or too low.
Social media and people talking
about you will do it.”
He means bring on the lows.
Leonard doesn’t want to
sound as if he has a thin skin. He
admits, though, that he resents
some of the implications of his
critics.
“It’s only been two years (in
Meyers Leonard
has had his
moments on
offense, but it’s
defense he’ll be
working on the
most this
summer and
with the Trail
Blaz ers in the
Las Vegas
Summer League.
TRIBUNE F ILE PHOTO:
CHRISTOPHER
ONSTOTT
the NBA),” he says. “I really only ence things and be on the court.
played one year of college. I I have to be a good teammate, be
played some as a rookie but very a good person, keep working
little this year. What do people hard.”
Leonard is aware of his major
really know about me?
“It’s tough to really say what I shortcomings.
“My defense is something I
want to say, because I still respect people’s opinion and what wish was more improved and
they have to say. But they don’t better — like Robin’s,” he says.
Leonard hopes the process
know me. They don’t where I
come from. They don’t know will begin in earnest this sumwhat I’ve been through. They mer. Immediately after the seahave no idea how hard this game son, he’ll stop off at the home he
is. I just want to remain confi- bought for his mother in Robindent, and in a good way, prove son, but his time spent there and
at his Lake Oswego
those
people
condo will be short.
wrong.”
He’ll play for PortLeonard takes a
land’s entry in the
deep breath and
Las Vegas Summer
continues.
League, stay for
“I’ve always
Tim Grgurich’s
tried to find the
f ive - d ay c a m p
best in people,” he
there, then spend
says. “I was hated
most of late July
in high school beand August in Los
cause people were
Angeles, scrimjealous. Fans from
maging in NBA
opposing colleges
pick-up games at
are going to try to
the Clippers’ trainget at you. There
ing facility.
are always going
— Meyers Leonard
Hughes will be
to be people at my
dispatched to L.A.
college who didn’t
think I was good enough. Same to spend time with Leonard
there.
thing now.
“We can put him in a scenario
“I don’t ever try to disrespect
people, or say they don’t know where two guards are coming at
what they’re talking about. But him at once for three to four secin some ways, they don’t. onds, in pseudo-transition, and
at him full speed,” Hughes says.
They’re not in my shoes.”
Leonard doesn’t contend he is “Meyers must contain him withgetting screwed. He under- out getting beat off the dribble.
stands his body of work so far He needs a lot of work on that.
He knows that.”
has been disappointing.
At any time during the pickup
“I was the 11th pick,” he says.
“I know 100 percent I haven’t games at the Clippers’ facility,
had the year or, so far, the career Leonard might face a James
people wanted me to have. That Harden or a Carmelo Anthony
will fuel me this summer and or a Darren Collison.
“If he can (help) guard those
through the rest of my career, to
guys, he can guard anybody,”
be the best I can be.
“I’ve always been able to over- Hughes says. “You can’t hide any
come things. It’s going to be on weaknesses there. You get exme to prove to the coaching staff posed as a player, but it makes
I want to improve, that I want to you better. It’s take-no-prisoner
get better, that I’m willing to ball. You either stand your
work as hard as I can. It hasn’t ground or you get embarrassed.”
Leonard knows a good attitude
been easy, but it’s not like people
think — I put my work in. For will be essential to his growth.
“I have to keep my head up,”
me to get better, I have to experi-
“I really only
played one year
of college.
I played some as
a rookie but very
little this year.
What do people
really know
about me? ”
he says. “This year has been
humbling for me. This league is
a monster. There’s a reason
there are only 375 players. It’s
the best league in the world.
“I’ve had to learn positioning
on the court, how to guard in
the post, how to use my body
and bump people to score. It’s
been a hard transition for me.
It’s not as easy as what people
think. They say, ‘He’s 7 feet and
athletic.’ Well, that doesn’t do
the trick.
“But I believe in myself. I
know the coaches do, and my
teammates do. I just have to continue to work and try to prove to
these guys I can be a help. I’m
still young, which isn’t an excuse, but I have to learn. I have
to understand the game better.”
Leonard tells a story about his
best friend’s cousin back in Robinson, who recently was rushed
to the hospital emergency room
with bleeding on the brain, the
result of a tumor.
“He’s had 70 percent of the tumor cut out of his brain stem,
which was blocking spinal fluid,” Leonard says. “But he’s doing better. It’s a miracle. And I
think, ‘Look at the life you have
right now. Even through the
tough times you’ve had, what a
blessed position to be in.’ ”
Hughes still thinks Portland’s
gamble on Leonard will pay off.
“The reality is, the kid was
drafted on potential, as a young,
athletic, good-shooting big
man,” the Blazer assistant says.
“Nobody knew what his talent
level would be in the NBA. They
didn’t know how it carried over.
There was a risk involved.
“I thought it was good value,
and I think he’s going to be good.
He’ll work hard enough, he’ll accrue the information and he’ll
develop. It may not be as fast as
he wants, or the public wants, or
as I want. But as long as he has
the heart and drive, which I
think he does, and given the
chance, he’ll be fine.”
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
SPORTS B7
The Portland Tribune Thursday, April 10, 2014
header starts at noon PT.
Saturday, April 12
Thursday, April 10
Winterhawks: Portland vs. Victoria,
Game 5, Moda Center, 7 p.m.
Friday, April 11
Blazers: Portland’s final regularseason road game takes the team
to Utah, 6 p.m. PT (KGW 8).
College baseball: Portland opens
a West Coast Conference series with
San Diego at Joe Etzel Field, 3 p.m.
College softball: Portland State
goes to Greeley, Colo., for a threegame Big Sky series against
Northern Colorado. Today’s double-
Winterhawks: Game 6 of the
Portland-Victoria playoff series, if
necessary, will take the Hawks to
British Columbia, 7 p.m.
(CSNNW).
Timbers: Chivas USA comes to
Providence Park for an MLS clash
with Portland, 7:30 p.m. (KPDX 13).
Thorns: Portland’s second
National Women’s Soccer League
season begins with a road game
versus the expansion Houston
Dash, 5 p.m. PT.
Thunder: The first-year Arena
Football League Portland team visits the expansion Los Angeles KISS
at the Honda Center in Anaheim,
Calif., 7 p.m. (CBS Sports).
Basketball: The 17th annual
Nike Hoop Summit is at Moda
Center for a game between the
World Select Team and the USA
Basketball Junior National Select
Team, all playMore online ers 19 or
See complete younger. Tip-off
PDX Sports at is 4 p.m.
Women’s
portlandtribune
football: The
.com.
Portland
Fighting Fillies meet the Portland
Shockwave at Milwaukie High,
5 p.m.
Run: The 5K Hills for Humanity
run/hike is a fundraiser for the Free
Health Screening Fair and
Southwest Community Health Clinic.
Registration is $20.
College baseball: San Diego at
Portland, 1 p.m.
College softball: PSU and
Northern Colorado play a single
game at Greeley, Colo., noon.
Sunday, April 13
Blazers: Portland plays host to
Golden State at Moda Center, 6
p.m. (CSNNW).
College baseball: The PortlandSan Diego series concludes at UP, 1
p.m.
Monday, April 14
Winterhawks: If necessary,
Game 7 between Portland and
Victoria will be at the Moda Center,
7 p.m. (CSNNW).
MLB: T emporary home considered
■ From page 8
their home games during the
2013 season. Lashbrook’s idea is
to get Hillsboro Ballpark big
enough that the club could
make a go of it there until a new
stadium in Portland could open.
The city of Hillsboro signed
an agreement with the Hops’
ownership group for a 20-year
lease, with the team paying rent
of $150,000 a season. Lashbrook
believes a major-league owner
could provide revenue to help
Hops’ ownership pay off the
bonds and continue to operate
the Class A club while the major-league club also plays its
home games at the stadium.
“You can do some day/night
doubleheaders so you do not displace the Hops,” Lashbrook says.
After meeting with the stadium
architects, “I’m convinced we
can get (Hillsboro Ballpark) big
enough to make it work.”
Hillsboro Stadium — a multiuse facility primarily used for
Hawks:
N ew duties
boost resume
■ From page 8
left to be a pro minor-league
coach, Johnston hired another
assistant coach and moved Bardsley into the assistant GM role.
“I’m doing a lot of the same
role as before,” he says, “but
even more so working closer
with Mike on everything, from
the administrative to the team
to the hockey side. This year,
I’ve been doing a lot of scouting,
but also spending a lot of time
watching our prospects, getting
an evaluation of where they’re
at, which players we think are
ready to make the jump into our
lineup next year and getting information from families about
high school football — abuts
Hillsboro Ballpark along the
third-base line. The temporary
seating, Smith says, would be
built behind home plate, along
the first-base line and in the
outfield bleachers. Suites
would be added along the firstbase line.
“There’s enough room there
to get it all done,” Smith says.
“We can get creative. The way
to work with an architect is, you
tell me what you want. Don’t
ask me what you can get. Demand. They’re very creative,
smart people. They’ll figure
something out.”
Lashbrook has not yet met
with the couple that runs the
Hops, president Mike McMurray and his wife, Laura, who
serves as the club’s chief financial operator. A financial agreement would have to be laid out,
“but our research shows, this is
doable,” Lashbrook says.
A consultant on Lashbrook’s
project is Larry D’Amato, a faculty member at Sports Manage-
their thoughts of coming to
Portland.”
His responsibilities now also
include player transactions. He
worked on various issues surrounding the acquisition of
Mathew Dumba from Red Deer,
and the defenseman’s move
from the NHL to Portland, and
the trade with Lethbridge for
veteran goalie Corbin Boes.
Bardsley recently watched
Hawks prospects Kieffer Bellows and Garrett Wait play in
Minnesota. He attended the
USA Hockey nationals in Green
Bay, Wis. He also scouts prospects for the WHL bantam
draft, and he’ll spend time
watching 15-year-old players at
the Canadian provincial camps.
Bardsley realizes that he has
a great mentor in Johnston, who
has coached in Canadian college ranks, with Hockey Canada
and as an NHL assistant and
has been highly regarded in the
hockey community for his
teaching ability.
“Mike has been tremendous,”
ment Worldwide now retired
after serving 35 years as a major-league scout. The Tualatin
resident believes Hillsboro Ballpark would work, and that the
A’s would be wise to make a
move to Portland.
“They can’t go past 2015 in
Oakland,” D’Amato says. “The
A’s are displaced (at the Oakland Coliseum). They’re going
to have to go some place. This is
an ideal situation, at least for
three years, as a temporary fix
until the ballpark is built in
Portland.
“They’re not going to be able
to move to San Jose. They have
a ballpark that is inadequate.
They received $30 million revenue-sharing (in 2013), and the
other major-league clubs aren’t
happy about that. They’re looking for a resolution. There are
owners out there who would be
delighted to buy the club (from
the A’s). This is the situation
they’re looking for.”
Hillsboro Ballpark is situated
off Highway 26 west of Portland.
Bardsley says. “I’m very lucky
to work for Mike. I love every
minute of it.
“I try to get as much information as I can from Mike — how
he wants to build his teams, his
coaching philosophy. He has an
amazing mind of how games
should be played, how to interact with players and staff. He
challenges staff and players in a
professional manner that motivates you. And, he leans on you.
When he’s busy with his team
and coaching, I’m kind of the
eyes and ears for prospects and
guys up for the (bantam) draft. ...
“I have to be held accountable, if he’s asking a question or
for advice, I have to give him my
honest opinion, and I want to
make sure I’m as accurate as
possible.”
It’s suggested that everything
Johnston touches turns to gold
(except for the general manager/
head coach’s well-publicized suspension by the WHL last year for
improper player benefits). He
has brought in high-caliber play-
Light rail runs from the Portland area to Orenco, a two-mile
shuttle away. A temporary ballpark seating 15,000 to 20,000 is
less than ideal for a prospective
major-league owner, “but it’s
enough to make things work on
the short term, until we can get
the stadium built in Portland,”
Lashbrook says.
Lashbrook says if an agreement can’t be worked out in
Hillsboro, he will consult with
ownership of Volcanoes Stadium in Salem-Keizer, home of
another team in the Class A
Northwest League.
“We think it works better at
Hillsboro, though,” he says.
“There is so much money involved to make this work at reducing the bond and enhancing
the stadium, we think politicians and owners will be interested. We’re going to get this
thing moving. Anything can
happen in 15 months.”
Eggers: N o. 2 ,0 0 0 on
tap for Blazer ‘ captain’
■ From page 8
the former head coach at
Southern Cal. She currently
works as a sideline reporter
for TNT’s NBA broadcasts.
■ Rich “Captain” Patterson,
a veteran producer for Blazer
Broadcasting, will work his
2,000th Trail Blazer radio
broadcast Sunday when Portland plays host to Golden
State at the Moda Center.
Patterson, 51, began working Blazer games during the
1992 playoffs and hasn’t
missed a full game since.
“There have been five
games where I haven’t done
the entire broadcast,” Patterson says. Three times to attend concerts — Paul McCartney twice, Ringo Starr once —
and twice for illness.
The David Douglas High
and Mt. Hood CC grad, who
grew up a Blazer fan, is believed to have the oldest full
recording of a Blazer radio
broadcast — Portland vs. Milwaukee from October 1972.
“I held an old portable Panasonic cassette deck up to my
two-inch clock-radio speaker,”
Patterson says.
There have been many
highlights over 22 years.
“The championship series
with the Bulls in 1992,” he
says. “I was new to the job
and constantly thinking,
‘Don’t screw this up.’
“The game Mike Rice got
ejected. Eddie Doucette comes
back on the air and says,
‘Folks, you won’t believe what
happened.’ Eddie had laryngitis and had to work the second half by himself.
“Listening to Brian Wheeler
off the air during the fourthquarter meltdown in the Western Conference finals against
the Lakers in 2000. There was
a time when I could record
Wheels off the air. I saved a
tape one season. Wheels had a
Super Bowl party. We played it
during halftime. (Current Lakers coach) Mike D’Antoni was
there and said
listening to
that was a lot
better than the
Super Bowl
halftime entertainment.”
Patterson
says his wife
“is jokingly
PATTERSON
jealous of me. I
have my dream
job — getting paid to do something I grew up loving.”
Patterson expects to extend
his streak to 3,000 before he
retires.
“It’s 10 to 12 more years,”
he says. “I’ll only be 63. I’ll
still be spry.”
■ Word is Tournament Golf
Foundation — which runs
Portland’s LPGA tournament
— has a five-year agreement
with a sponsor, which would
be a very good thing. TGF
President Tom Maletis denies
it, but says he expects something to be announced “in the
next week to three weeks.”
The former Safeway Classic
is on the LPGA calendar for
Aug. 28-31. It’s expected to be
held at Columbia Edgewater
Country Club, though no deal
is signed there, either.
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
Why Mr. Formal? Beause it is the best!
ers, developed stars and the
Winterhawks have captured
three consecutive Western Conference titles, the 2013 WHL title
and stand as one of the league’s
favorites again this year. The
Hawks are playing Victoria in
the WHL playoffs.
Bardsley agrees that Johnston has done some amazing
things here.
“He’s had a tremendous
amount of history in the game.
He’s seen everything,” Bardsley
says. “He’s an inspiring person,
so well-spoken.”
Three Portland hockey management men — Garry Davidson, Grant Armstrong, Green
— have moved to better positions in recent years. Will Bardsley get his chance elsewhere?
For now, it’s an exciting position to be in — assistant GM for
one of junior hockey’s best
teams.
“I’m seeing team success,
player success and personal
success,” he says. “It’s been fun.
I’m so happy with where I’m at.”
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PRO
COLLEGE
Blazers
Portland
LAMARCUS ALDRIDGE — The
DAVID PERRY, track and field
All-Star PF sparked wins against
the Lakers and Pelicans with a
combined 56 points and 33
rebounds.
— The senior from Boulder,
Colo., ran the 4th-fastest
10,000 in UP history
(28:42.35) and placed 8th at
the Stanford Invitational.
Winterhawks
first MLS goals since 2011,
scoring twice in Portland’s 4-4
home draw with the Seattle
Sounders.
Thunder
JANELLE LINDVALL, softball
275-pound former North
Carolina Tar Heel had 3 of
Portland’s 6 sacks in a 44-34
loss at the L.A. KISS.
The junior C/RF had 6 RBIs, 2 triples
and was 4 for 7 in the Roughriders’
3-game PIL 5A sweep of Franklin.
HIGH SCHOOL
JACK SAMPSON, Cleveland
— Soph C from Stevenson
Ranch, Colo., got Ducks on their
way to 2-1 series win over No. 1
UCLA, going 3 for 3 with an HR
and 5 RBIs in the 9-7 opener.
baseball — The junior’s 3-hit CG
beat Benson 4-1 in their PIL 5A
opener. In 2 starts, he totaled
17 K’s in 14 IP, with 3 ER. He
also was 2-5 at the plate.
Oregon State
DONTE PAIGE-MOSS — The 6-3,
ROOSEVELT BASEBALL
MATTHEW CLOWES, track and
field — The junior from England,
with little competition, posted
the 2nd-fastest NAIA 800 of the
year (1:52.91) in a dual meet
at Willamette.
— A senior from McKenzie High
in Vida, she qualified for the Big
Sky meet with PSU’s No. 2 alltime 10,000 (34:49.18) in the
Stanford Invite.
Oregon
DIEGO CHARA — The MF got his
BRANDON REDEAU
Concordia
SARAH DEAN, track and field
starred in Portland’s 8-2 Game
1 WHL playoff win over Victoria
with 2 goals and 1 assist.
Timbers
HANNAH DAL PRA, softball — A
5-6 sophomore 2B from
Phoenix, Ariz., she went 5 for 8
with 4 RBIs and 2 runs as the
Pios swept host Puget Sound
7-4, 7-5 at Tacoma, Wash.
Portland State
MATHEW DUMBA — The D-man
BEN WETZLER, baseball — The
senior LHP from Clackamas
beat Stanford 4-1, tying OSU’s
all-time career win mark of 30
and improving to 6-0 this year
with a Pac-10-low 0.32 ERA.
ABIGAIL MATSUSHIMA, Grant
lacrosse — The junior co-captain
has played defense and goalie
in a 2-0 season start, and been
named to a national team.
ROB HUNT, Oregon Episcopal
School lacrosse — A sophomore, Hunt won 17 of 24
faceoffs and collected 9 ground
balls in a 12-9 defeat of
Lincoln.
JOHN NIZICH, Central Catholic
track and field — The senior
threw the javelin a state-leading
192-4 at the Laker Classic
Invitational, the 5th-best U.S.
prep mark in 2014.
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PAGE B8
THURSDAY, APRIL 10, 2014
KerryEggers
■ Blazers’ center prospect wants to erase
D N P/ C D notations from his memory
Little-used, secondyear big man Meyers
Leonard has been in a
Catch-22 with the Trail
Blazers during their
run to an NBA playoff
berth.
LEONARD
SHOOTS FOR
HIS CHANCE
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO:
CHRISTOPHER ONSTOTT
B
sioned rising to such level in an
organization.
It’s simply been a steppingstone sort of thing. He started
out as part of the Junior Hawks’
bantam team.
“I wasn’t sure where it was
going to take me,” he says. “It’s
certainly been a great ride.
“Especially when Mike took
over, there was so much going
on, you’re trying to adjust, and
what’s my role? Am I still going
to be here? It
was out of my
control. Mike
got comfortable with me
and started to
trust me, and
things became
clearer. Now I
see where I’m
BARDSLEY headed and I
certainly have
goals. My current goal, obviously, is to help the Portland
Winterhawks have success.”
Johnston already has talked
to Bardsley, 42, about moving
forward and looking for a GM
position at some point.
“Mike says teams want people from successful organizations,” Bardsley says.
Starting as a Hawks area
scout, Bardsley became director of player personnel in 2007,
under the previous ownership
regime. When Gallacher
bought the team in 2008-09,
Johnston retained Bardsley as
an advance scout, and he later
became director of hockey operations. When Travis Green
See HAWKS / Page 7
See EGGERS / Page 8
I
KERRY EGGERS
Bardsley prepares
to take next career
step to WHL GM
W ilson grad learning
at the right hand of
a proven winner
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: CHASE ALLGOOD
The Hillsboro Hops drew big crowds for Class A baseball in their maiden season of 2013. Now a group is
looking at whether Hillsboro Ballpark could be expanded enough to serve as a temporary home for a major
league team.
Could MLB team hop to
new home in Hillsboro?
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
Lynn Lashbrook took his
pursuit of major league baseball in Portland to another
level on Monday.
Lashbrook, president of
Sports Management Worldwide, visited Hillsboro Ballpark
and met with the architects
who drew up plans for the Class
A Hops’ 4,500-seat stadium,
which made its debut last June.
The mission was to determine if enough temporary seating could be added to increase
the capacity so the stadium
could serve as an interim facility for the Oakland A’s, if they
would choose to move, while a
permanent stadium in Portland
is built.
The vision of Lashbrook and
Portland architect Barry Smith
is to build a 38,000-seat stadium
where Veterans Memorial Coliseum now stands in the Rose
Quarter.
Lashbrook’s report left Smith
feeling optimistic about the possibilities at Hillsboro Ballpark.
“I think we can get it to a ca-
News on
a variety
of sports
names
ouncing between subjects as we begin another busy sports
week ...
■ Wonder how athletic directors of the southern
schools feel when they see
Washington, Oregon State,
Washington State and Oregon
at and near the top of the Pac12 baseball standings.
My guess is they probably
understand how hard it is to
recruit players at schools such
as Southern Cal, Arizona, California and Stanford because
of all the good weather.
■ Clyde Drexler is a married man.
The Hall of Famer and Trail
Blazer legend and second wife
Tonya were wed in a ceremony in Houston in early March.
Drexler, 51,
has been divorced from
his first wife,
Gaynell, for
several years.
He met Tonya,
a physical
trainer,
through pal
DREXLER
Dominique
Wilkins a couple of years ago.
I met Tonya — who is 36 — at
a barbecue I attended at Clyde’s
estate adjacent to the posh Royal Oaks Country Club in January. She’s a quiet but lovely
woman — and I was sworn to
secrecy by
Clyde not to
More online
write about
Read other
her.
Kerry Eggers
It’s out
columns during
there now,
the week at portland
and I’m hap- tribune.com
py Clyde is
happy.
“She’s a really nice woman,
so I’m excited,” Drexler told me
this week. “I told her she’s stuck
with me now. Life is good.”
■ I visited Harry Glickman
at the Rehabilitation Institute
of Oregon on Saturday.
Pleased to report the retired
Blazer president — who suffered a stroke on March 7 — is
coming along quite well in his
rehabilitation.
Glickman, who turns 90 on
May 13, greeted Bill Schonely
and me quickly and warmly,
with a firm handshake as we
entered a room in which he
was working with a specialist
in regaining movement in his
left leg.
Harry’s mind is 100 percent.
We chatted about the Final
Four and the Blazers and how
he was getting along.
“They’re treating me well
here,” he said. “The food is
even pretty decent.”
Glickman has been appreciative of the many phone
calls he has gotten from
friends, including former
Blazers Terry Porter and Bill
Walton.
“Couldn’t get Bill off the
phone,” Glickman joked.
Glickman has full movement
in his upper extremities and in
his right leg. He is working to
regain strength in the left leg
so he can walk again.
“I don’t want to be in a
damn walker,” he said.
On Tuesday, he moves to
the Robison Jewish Health
Center, where he will continue
his therapy.
■ Schonely was in Norristown, Pa., last week to attend
the funeral of his brother Jim
Schonely, who died March 23
at the age of 78.
■ One source says Cheryl
Miller is a candidate for the
University of Portland women’s basketball coaching job
vacated by the retirement of
Jim Sollars. Miller, sister of
Reggie Miller, is a member of
the Naismith Hall of Fame and
t’s 3:45 p.m., nearly 3 1/2
tation as a rookie last season. In 17
hours before the Trail
1/2 minute a game, Leonard averBlazers’ recent game against aged 5.5 points and 3.7 rebounds
Phoenix at the Moda Center. and showed glimpses of enough
Only one player is already out promise that he might become a
shooting — Portland center Mey- starter at some point in the not too
ers Leonard.
distant future.
Working with assistant coach
But with Joel Freeland’s develNate Tibbetts, Leonard roams the opment, the acquisition of Robin
perimeter, taking jump shot after Lopez and Thomas Robinson and
jump shot. The 7-1 second-year through his own inconsistent
pro sinks 10 in a row from the cor- play, Leonard has been banished
ner. He knocks down 12 straight to a ride-the-bench role this seafrom the elbow. He makes 15 con- son. Injuries to an Achilles’ tensecutive shots from the free throw don and ankle slowed him during
line. Then he drains 20 of 25 3-point training camp and the preattempts.
season, and by the
Forty-five mintime Portland
STORY BY
utes later, as players
opened the regufrom both teams belar season Oct. 30
gin to join him on
versus Phoenix,
the court for preLeonard was sitgame workouts, Leonard is fin- ting and watching.
ished. It’s a refrain played over
Twice Stotts has given him
and over throughout the course of an opportunity in the rotation
a long NBA season.
— during a 10-game stretch
“There’s a misnomer going from late December to early
around that Meyers doesn’t work January, then for a 12-game
hard,” says Kim Hughes, the assis- period in March. Neither time
tant coach who spends the most was Leonard’s play solid enough
time with Leonard. “He puts in as to merit a continuance.
much time as anybody.”
“It’s a combination of several
Another refrain: Leonard things,” says the 6-11 Hughes,
doesn’t play in the Blazers’ loss to whose pro career included four
the Suns. Forty-one times this sea- teams and six seasons in the NBA
son going into Wednesday night’s and old American Basketball
game versus Sacramento, the Rob- Association. “Meyers hasn’t
inson, Ill., native had sat the bench played to the level the coaches
for an entire game while healthy. want him to, but he isn’t getJust another DNP/CD — did not ting the number of minutes he
play, coach’s decision. Leonard needs to grow as a big man. We’re
played four first-half minutes Sun- not in the position to give him minday against New Orleans, sinking utes, because we’re in a playoff
his only shot on a soft floater and run.
grabbing two rebounds, but it was
“He has to deal with it and
only a short taste of action.
work through it, because
It’s been a come-down for LeonSee LEONARD / Page 6
ard, a member of Terry Stotts’ ro-
Supporters trying to
pave way for A’s to
relocate in Portland
ON SPORTS
pacity of between 15,000 and
20,000,” Smith says.
The idea is to create a temporary facility to house the A’s for
the two- to-three-year period
during which a permanent stadium is constructed in Portland.
The lease of the A’s at Oakland Coliseum expires after the
2015 season. The club is looking
for a 10-year extension, but
there are all sorts of problems
involving the NFL’s Oakland
Raiders, who share the coliseum, and city leaders, who are
struggling to decide what to do
in the future.
The A’s averaged 22,000 for
See MLB / Page 7
The Portland Winterhawks’
success since 2008-09 can
largely be attributed to Mike
Johnston, the head coach
and general manager, and his
boss Bill Gallacher, the owner. And, of course, the players have won the games on
the ice.
But others have been doing
their duties, too, including Matt
Bardsley, who has worked his
way to become assistant general manager under Johnston.
Back in the day, Bardsley
helped find talents such as Paul
Gaustad and Brandon Dubinsky, and scouted and helped
draft the likes of Brad Ross and
Ty Rattie. Bardsley also has
been involved in prospect scouting and advance scouting, and
the Winterhawks’ list player
scouting since the team’s ownership change.
He now sits one step away
from being a Western Hockey
League general manager — his
stated goal — and Bardsley remains forever grateful for the
impact Johnston has made in
his life.
The 1989 Wilson High graduate — one of two Portland-area
employees on the hockey side,
along with assistant coach Kyle
Gustafson, a Centennial High
grad — says he never envi-

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