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Portland!
GREATER PORTLAND EDITION
FREELAND EYES
PLAYOFF RETURN
— SEE SPORTS, B1
PortlandTribune
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014 • TWICE CHOSEN THE NATION’S BEST NONDAILY PAPER • PORTLANDTRIBUNE.COM • PUBLISHED TUESDAY AND THURSDAY
Google plan leaves digital gap
Experience in Kansas
City sours some on
high-speed venture
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
To hear Mayor Charlie Hales and
other local elected officials tell it,
everyone will benefit if Google
brings its ultra-high speed broadband network to the region.
But when Google Fiber was first being installed in Kansas City a few years
ago, the company was criticized for reinforcing historic racial breakdowns,
with white neighborhoods getting service and traditional minority neighborhoods being left out.
“Originally, the way Google provided the service, there was a stark division between the historic haves and
have-nots,” says Rick Chambers, executive director of the Center Education
Foundation, a nonprofit organization
that raises money for schools with
large numbers of low-income students
in Kansas City, Mo.
Google officials say the split was not
intentional, but an inadvertent result
of how they let neighborhoods decide
whether they want service. They point
to research that shows there are many
reasons people don’t have — or want
— high-speed Internet access, including cost, perceived relevance, lack of
computer skills and worries about
identify theft.
“The challenges are quite complex,”
says Erica Swanson, Google’s digital
inclusion program manager.
To better overcome them, the
company has increased its efforts to
convince all potential customers about
the benefits of being online in this
digital age.
“We are doubling down and really
working with communities,” says
Swanson.
As part of that effort, Andrew Bentley, a Google digital inclusion specialist, recently came to Portland to learn
about the city’s community and other
organizations working to expand Internet access to more residents.
Among others, he visited the nonprofit
Free Geek computer reuse organiza-
See GOOGLE / Page 11
COURTESY OF KEITH MYERS/THE KANSAS CITY STAR
Trucks manned by Google installers line
up in a Kansas City, Kan., neighborhood.
Google’s plans for high-speed Internet
access have largely divided along racial
and income lines in Kansas City.
■ Three decades later, Terry Bowman still feels heat from BHS auditorium blaze
MAN ON
FIRE
M
arch 19, 1979, was the day Terry
Bowman burst into flames.
It was the week of spring break,
and all of the 1,710 students at Beaverton High School were gone when the
school’s auditorium/theater caught fire.
Bowman, a firefighter who worked for what
was then known as Washington County Fire
District No. 1, was on one of the engines responding to the four-alarm blaze.
Before the day was out, Bowman would be
severely burned in one of the worst survivable
accidents that a firefighter has
encountered in the last threeand-a-half decades among the
STORY BY
three fire districts that would
eventually merge to form Tualatin Valley Fire & Rescue, according to local fire officials.
He would suffer second- and third-degree burns
over 49 percent of his body. Several other firefighters suffered less severe injuries.
Still, 35 years later, Bowman clearly remembers the moment-to-moment incident as if it
were yesterday.
“You know when they say you have a big experience like that, it cements it well into your
mind,” Bowman, 72, says from his Rockaway
Beach home. “Yeah, I remember every bit of it.”
Normally, Bowman, who was then 36, would
have remained on the ground, operating the
aerial ladder. But that day he wanted to help
out, climbing up to the auditorium roof to hand
off a chainsaw to his fellow firefighters, so they
could ventilate the building.
While he had his heavy turnout trousers on
when he ascended the ladder, he didn’t have on
his turnout jacket, wearing only a short-sleeved
shirt.
The fire had been burning for several hours
RAY PITZ
COURTESY OF ERNIE METCALFE
Terry Bowman
displays the melted
helmet he wore when
he caught fire
battling a blaze that
destroyed the
Beaverton High
School auditorium on
March 19, 1979. This
photo was taken in
the early 1990s,
shortly before he
retired.
Lt. Al Edens (left), an unidentified firefighter (center) and firefighter Art Thurber were on the
roof of the Beaverton High School theater shortly before it collapsed. The late Capt. Ernie
Metcalfe shot this photo before climbing down to retrieve more air bottles.
at that point, and firefighters were searching
for its source, which ultimately would be traced
to a space between the auditorium’s roof and a
false roof underneath it. The cause would turn
out to be a light bulb touching a seat cushion.
Once he got there, Bowman fired up the
chainsaw and waited to see if anything else was
needed.
In 2011, former Beaverton Fire Department
Chief Oscar “Sox” Lee, who led the department
at the time, recalled telling his
men to “get off the roof! Get off
the roof!”
By that time, the firefighters at
the scene already sensed the roof
was about to collapse.
“I saw the smoke start coming
up from the seams between the
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Saltzman puts ‘workforce housing’ on agenda
■ On heels of unflattering
audit, council locks horns
on incentives
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
After being in charge of
the Portland Housing Bureau for about a year, Commissioner Dan Saltzman is
considering expanding its
priorities from primarily
low-income housing to include so-called workforce
housing for moderate-income families.
“There are a lot of needs for
housing in the community, including affordable housing for
working families near their jobs
and schools,” Saltzman says.
Saltzman is also preparing to
ask the City Council to set
guidelines for the bureau’s financing programs. The Portland city auditor recently re-
Portland Tribune
Inside
leased an audit saying it is
not clear how
the bureau decides which
project qualifies for which
program. And,
the audit says,
SALTZMAN the bureau will
only collect
about $54 million of its total
portfolio of $357 million in outstanding loans.
“This limits the opportunity
for PHB to invest in new projects
in the future, since most loans
— more than $300 million — will
be spent once rather than
loaned, recovered, and used
again for additional projects,”
according to the city audit.
Saltzman is not surprised so
“I haven’t clinched any deals yet,
but I might going forward.”
— Dan Saltzman, city commissioner
few loans will be repaid. The
bureau has been focused on investing in projects that provide
housing for the city’s most vulnerable residents. Many of the
loans are made to nonprofit organizations that develop or rehabilitate such projects. They
could not afford to keep their
rents low if they had to generate enough income to repay the
loans.
“We shouldn’t call them
loans if we know they’re not go-
ing to be repaid. We should call
them grants,” says Saltzman.
But more than that, Saltzman
says the bureau needs to know
which financing options should
be offered to each of the different kinds of projects it supports. Saltzman has scheduled
the bureau to appear before the
council to discuss the issue on
April 30.
Saltzman says his desire to
expand the range of projects
backed by the bureau will take
GLUTEN-FREE BEER MAN
— SEE LIFE, PAGE B8
longer, however. He says there
is a lot of support on the council
and in the community to prioritize low income housing projects. Commissioner Nick Fish,
who had the bureau before
Saltzman, was praised for coming up with city funds to help
build Bud Clark Commons during the height of the Great Recession. Located at 655 N.W.
Hoyt St., it offers 130 studio
apartments for the homeless,
including those with drug and
alcohol addictions.
Applicants must have an annual income that does not exceed 35 percent of the area’s
median family income for their
family size. Saltzman agrees
this population must be housed,
See HOUSING / Page 5
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The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Fire: Event video provides lessons for future
■ From page 1
roof and the parapet, and just
suddenly it back-drafted and
happened all at once, and I ran
for the edge,” Bowman recalls.
“I knew where the ladder was,
and I jumped through a wall of
flame.”
Engulfed in flames, he made
it onto the ladder. “At that point,
the roof started to come down
and pulled away from the (concrete block) walls and (went)
down.”
Because his hands and arms
were so badly burned, Bowman
couldn’t use them to navigate
down the ladder.
What would etch the memory
of the drama into everyone’s
brain was the fact a television
station cameraman and a daily
newspaper photographer captured everything on film.
When Bowman got to the bottom of the ladder on the west
end of the building, firefighters
sprayed him down with water.
His short-sleeve shirt was
burned off his body, a photo
shows him standing in obvious
shock, tended by fire officials as
the auditorium fire still raged in
the background.
Art Thurber, a retired firefighter with Beaverton Fire Department Station 267, was the
person Bowman handed the
chainsaw to.
“I was walking toward Terry
to get the chainsaw and that’s
when the roof first opened up
and got him,” Thurber says. “I
heard him scream. Then he was
gone. You couldn’t see him anymore because of the smoke and
the fire.”
Prior to the fire escalating,
Thurber, now 66 and a part-time
resident of Pacific City, decided
to walk the perimeter of the auditorium just in case he and his
fellow firefighters needed a
quick escape route. He discovered one at the north end.
Thurber says he remembers
Lt. Dave Asher saying some-
dent today, including the day
several Chemeketa Community
College students paid a visit to
the Progress Fire Station, where
he spent most of his career.
“They were in training for being (firefighters), and they said,
‘You know, it’s kind of a dangerous business. We just saw this
video of this guy that came
down the ladder on fire.’ And I
said, ‘Oh, that was me,’ and they
said, ‘Oh no, it wasn’t; this was a
young guy.’ “
Return to the scene
DAVID NIESLANIK COLLECTION; COURTESY OF THE BEAVERTON HISTORICAL SOCIETY
This is a shot of the theater following the devastating fire that gutted the facility. Firefighter Terry Bowman recalls that the fire caused steam to emit
from a drinking fountain near the theater and that a large glass window heated to the point that it exploded, throwing firefighters down a hallway.
thing to the effect that they had
run out of time. At that point, all
four of the firefighters on the
roof went to the north end and
jumped from the parapet to a
roof over the entrance of the auditorium. The last to jump off,
Thurber remembers the intense
heat he felt on his legs as he left
the main roof just moments before the roof collapsed.
Today, both he and Bowman
occasionally hunt and raft
together.
Thurber says he doesn’t often
think of that day, saying some
unpleasant memories you want
to block out.
“That was too close,” he says.
Long recovery
Bowman’s recovery would
take some time, he says. Doctors took grafted skin from his
legs, attaching it to his arms. In
addition, he had to wear special
gloves for two years and compression elastic around his
torso.
“I know what it’s like to wear
a girdle,” he jokes.
The suspenders holding up
his turnout pants and the chin
strap from his helmet protected
the skin underneath, so he still
has distinctive marks (less so on
his chin) to this day.
“It melted my glasses,” he
recalls.
He kept his helmet — deformed by the heat — as a souvenir to a long and painful
recovery.
Bowman recalled too, just
how long, hot and dangerous
the fire really was. A fellow firefighter later told him he witnessed steam coming out of one
of the school’s water fountains.
Also, a glass wall blew out during the fire.
“That was more like an explosion,” he says, noting that several firefighters were blasted
down the hall by the force.
Because of the video, fire departments across the country
still use it as part of training ex-
ercises to emphasize the importance of wearing proper protective equipment.
“It’s a bummer to be known
forever for a mistake,” Bowman
says.
In previous interviews, retired Chief Lee has talked about
how deeply Bowman’s injuries
affected him.
“That was one of the worst
days of my life when Terry was
burned,” Lee said in 2011.
One thing Bowman never
doubted was that he would return to firefighting, which he
did. Upbeat and positive by nature, Bowman can joke about
some of the aspects of his acci-
On fire, Terry
Bowman
descends an
aerial ladder in
this video grab
taken by a local
television
cameraman on
March 19, 1979.
He suffered the
worst survivable
burns ever
received by a
Tualatin Valley
Fire & Rescue
firefighter in the
area that
anyone can
remember.
Former
Beaverton
firefighter Terry
Bowman kept his
melted helmet
as a reminder of
that fateful day
in March 1979
when he nearly
burned to death.
Bowman is
retired and living
on the Oregon
Coast.
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Closer to home.
Bowman eventually went
back to look at the destroyed
auditorium.
Understandably, it took
awhile for him to regain enough
courage to once again climb
atop a tall structure again. From
that point on, he always made
sure he was one step closer to
the edge of the roof of any future building fires he fought.
Bowman would go on and retire more than 10 years later,
working along the way on the
fire district’s hazardous materials team.
Although his injuries were
serious, he said he didn’t suffer
any long-term health effects.
“I don’t have any problems,”
says Bowman. “Everything is
good and healthy.”
Today, with a contract with
the city of Rockaway Beach,
Bowman and his wife Marilou
run the management part of the
Nedonna Rural Fire Protection
District from their home, collecting taxes and making budgets for the special district.
They also run a neighborhood association and are actively involved in the local Lion’s
Club.
Despite his accident, Bowman has never had any regrets
about the career he chose, saying everyone is glad to see a
fireman.
“I was really happy being a
firefighter,” he says. “There is
no better job.”
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news A3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
PDXBriefly
C-SPAN honors middleschoolers for documentaries
The C-SPAN Bus comes to Portland
Tuesday, April 1, to honor nine middle
school students who were winners in
the C-SPAN StudentCam national documentary contest.
Students from the Beverly Cleary K-8
School in Northeast Portland will be
honored with the awards for their fiveto seven-minute video documentaries
on the most important issues facing
Congress in 2014.
Eighth-graders Henry Craddock,
Mackie Mallison and Daniel Gotkowitz
will collect second prize in the contest
for their documentary “Gun Control in
America.”
Third prize goes to eighth-grader Sylvia Fraser for her documentary “Mandatory Minimum Sentencing.”
Kieran Groh and Kazimiera NowinaSapinski received an honorable mention for their video “Women’s Wages.”
Students Madison Skye, Rebecca Zich
and Maggie Hekker also received an
honorable mention for their video
“What Should Congress do About
PTSD.”
For 21 years, the C-SPAN Bus has visited schools and universities across the
country promoting the cable channel’s
educational and political resources for
students and teachers.
TriMet, Lamar Advertising
replacing bus benches
TriMet is working with Lamar Advertising to replace bus benches around
the city.
The new benches along Line 75 were
installed as part of TriMet’s Ridership
Amenity Program, funded by Lamar
Advertising.
The second round of installations is
taking place now in North Portland
along the 4 and 44 bus lines. Bus Line 77
will be the next line to see new benches
installed after that.
The new leaners are similar to the
rails found at MAX stations, giving riders an alternative to standing in locations where benches will not safely fit.
TriMet agreed in November to an advertising contract with Lamar Advertising Co. to replace about 600 ad benches
with both benches and leaners. Advertising on transit property helps fund
transit service. Lamar guarantees TriMet between $3.2 million to $3.7 million
in revenue each year.
A woman-owned business in Vancouver, Wash., Decorative Metal Services
Inc., is fabricating all benches and leaners. Installation will continue through
December 2014 throughout the transit
district.
Beaverton hosts free tax
assistance for some
The city of Beaverton working with
AARP Tax-Aide and CASH Oregon, is
expanding its hours for the free tax assistance program available to area residents.
Beginning this week, volunteers will
be available on Mondays from 11 a.m. to
7 p.m. at the Beaverton Activities Center, 12500 S.W. Allen Blvd. Tax assistance is also available Tuesdays
through Fridays from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m.
and Saturdays from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
The annual program is coordinated
by the city’s Beaverton Cares program
in partnership with Creating Assets,
Savings and Hope (CASH) and AARP
Tax-Aide. Free tax assistance is available through April 15.
Earth Day Coalition joins city
parks celebration
The Portland Earth Day Coalition is
working with the Portland Parks Foundation for Portland’s largest annual
Earth Day celebration April 26 at Kenton Park.
Beverly Cleary School
eighth-graders (left to
right) Henry Craddock,
Mackie Mallison and
Daniel Gotkowitz will
be honored Tuesday for
their video on gun
control as part of the
C-SPAN StudentCam
documentary contest.
COURTESY PHOTO
Each year, the Portland Earth Day
celebration helps promote awareness of
environmental issues and Portland’s
sustainable businesses and organizations. The 2014 Earth Day celebration
will feature 100 businesses and organizations, a Kid’s Village with entertainment by Circus Cascadia, music produced by Abstract Earth Project, Soapbox Speakers’ Stage organized by
Speaking the Unspeakable, Health and
Wellness Village, Better Transportation
Fair and an effort to recycle all material
from the event.
Abuse probe forces Stars to
give up lottery machines
Stars Cabaret in Beaverton has
agreed to terminate its contract with
the Oregon Lottery as fallout from several mid-December arrests in connection with the sexual abuse of two
13-year-old girls at the business.
Lottery officials said March 26 that all
video lottery games were to be removed
from the Beaverton nightclub, 4570 S.W.
Lombard Ave., early this week. Stars
owners voluntarily ended the lottery
contract after meeting with state officials in early March.
Three men have been arrested in the
case involving the underage girls at
the Beaverton business. Beaverton police began a criminal investigation into
the sex trafficking in late September.
Two men were arrested in mid-December in connection with the abuse. A
third man was arrested near the end of
December.
Stars owners claimed they did not
know about the ongoing abuse at the
club.
“Even though the criminal investigation is continuing and we are not prejudging its outcome, we concluded that
there is a sufficient basis to terminate
our contract with the Stars Cabaret and
Steak House in Beaverton,” said Oregon Lottery Director Jack Roberts.
“This does not preclude a future Lottery contract at that location if management demonstrates that it has implemented policies that will prevent the
reoccurrence of the circumstances that
led to this termination.”
In a letter to lottery officials, Stars
owners did not admit to any wrongdoing at that location or any other location
in Oregon and stated that the company
expects to be vindicated. .
Magazine ranks Lewis &
Clark Law School No. 1
Lewis & Clark Law School’s Environmental Law Program tied for No. 1
in U.S. News & World Report’s 2014
annual rankings of law schools.
“We’re thrilled to receive this honor
once again,” said Robert Klonoff, dean
of the law school.
The environmental law program
has consistently ranked No. 1 or No. 2
in the U.S. News rankings for more
than 15 years.
In addition to the first-place finish
in the environmental law field, the law
school jumped to No. 72, and the parttime law program ranked No. 7 in the
2014 edition of “America’s Best Graduate Schools.”
Egyptologist will discuss
ancient animal mummies
Dr. Salima Ikram, an Egyptologist
with the American University in Cairo,
will talk about ancient Egyptian animal and dog mummies during a
Wednesday evening lecture at Portland State University.
Ikram’s lecture is at 7:30 p.m.
Wednesday, April 2, in Room 338 of
PSU’s Smith Memorial Student Union.
She is one of the world’s leading experts on mummification. Her lecture
will describe the different types of
burials of man’s best friend.
Ikram’s lecture is cosponsored by
PSU Middle East Studies Center and
the Oregon chapter of the American
Research Center in Egypt. It will kick
off the American Research Center in
Egypt 2014 National Conference April
4 to 6 in Portland.
Central Library hosts new
citizenship ceremony
Nearly two dozen people will become
new U.S. citizens at Multnomah County
Central Library April 18 as part of National Library Week.
Portland U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Service field office Director Evelyn Sahli will swear in 20 people during
the 11 a.m. ceremony.
The American Library Association
sponsors National Library Week each
April. This year’s theme is Lives Change
@ Your Library.
WebSurvey
Who should take the blame for the failure to launch Cover Oregon’s website?
Gov. John Kitzhaber
Oracle Corporation
66 people
25 people
The Oregon Health Authority
4 people
Cover Oregon staff
10 people
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A4 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
A LINK
THROUGH
THE BARS
Portland agrees
to withdraw plan
for butte tower
Representatives of
both cities working
on a compromise
■ Sherwood teen’s website helps children
cope with trauma of parents in jail, prison
SHERWOOD
By RAY PITZ
Pamplin Media Group
When Gabriella was only
11, her father was unexpectedly convicted of several violent crimes and incarcerated
in a maximum-security prison in Washington.
Devastated by the news, Gabriella, who has asked that her
last name not be used for this
story, recalls that hearing the
news was like traveling down a
long, dark tunnel that didn’t end.
“I was in shock for a good two
or three days,” she recalls of the
day she heard the news as a
sixth-grader at Edy Ridge Elementary School, saying it felt
like someone had dropped a
bomb.
What hurt her even more
was the fact she was so close to
her father, even though her
parents had divorced years
earlier.
It took awhile for Gabriella,
now a 16-year-old junior at Sherwood High School, to come to
terms with the harrowing ordeal,
and more specifically, to “grasp
the concept he was gone.”
School, a place where she
had always excelled (having
been promoted a grade previously and placed in talented
and gifted programs), became
a place where she could no longer focus on her studies.
Gabriella’s mother, Jamie
Palfrey, who had been divorced
from Gabriella’s father for
eight years at the time of her
ex-husband’s conviction, was
equally shocked when she discovered the seriousness of his
crime. She recalled that both of
them felt extremely isolated
with few places to find solace.
But the most terrifying aspect of it was that Palfrey wor-
ried her daughter wouldn’t be
able to return to any sense of
normalcy.
“I was the most scared I’ve
ever been in my life,” says Palfrey. “I was just struggling to
find resources... anywhere.”
Coming to terms
Initially feeling that everyone had a perfect life except for
herself, Gabriella eventually
sought counseling, something
that helped her tremendously
and got her back on track.
“Even if you are comfortable
with it, you find there’s not a
whole lot of people who (can)
relate to it,” says Gabriella.
As Gabriella began looking
into the issue of children who
have parents in prison, she discovered some sobering statistics, including the fact there
are 2.7 million children nationwide who have an incarcerated
parent, or roughly one in 30
students in every classroom.
“It’s astonishing how big of
an issue this is,” said Gabriella,
who is a varsity cheerleader at
SHS.
All the while, Gabriella and
her mother wanted to find
some way to provide resources
for children and teens who
have parents in prison.
So Gabriella decided to create a website, Children Affected
by Incarcerated Parents Inc.,
also known as C.A.I.P., dedicated to providing resources, education and support for youth
with an incarcerated parent.
“It provides an overview of
what they can expect emotionally and legally,” says Gabriella.
“I’m hoping this will tie everything together for children.”
Not only is C.A.I.P. an acronym for the website, but Gabriella likes it because it sounds
out the word “capes,” hopefully
conjuring up the image of a superhero for kids.
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: RAY PITZ
Finding out her father was in prison when she was 11 years old led
Gabriella to help other children who have incarcerated parents with a
new website: www.childrenaffectedbyincarceratedparents.org.
Stuffed animals for kids
Her website (caipkids.org)
provides a variety of resources
including books and websites
that may be helpful to young
people. There’s even a mood
chart so that children can track
their ups and downs related to
helping them cope with having
a parent incarcerated.
“It shows kids (that) everyday is not going to be the same,”
she says. “Really, the intention
is to take it to a therapist.”
The idea of the website is
that she hopes to connect with
other teens who are going
through similar internal struggles after a parent is sent to
prison. They can also put their
own story up online to share
with others, “which I think will
be really empowering,” says
Gabriella.
In addition, after talking to a
number of police agencies, Gabriella and Palfrey discovered
how many times children are
caught off-guard when a parent
is arrested. Taking a cue from
those police departments who
use stuffed animals to calm
frightened children after a
traumatic event, Gabriella purchased teddy bears that have
the C.A.I.P. logo silk-screened
on a cape that she personally
has sewn.
In addition, they hope to use
some of the donations to spend
on those children who need financial help with counseling
sessions to help them cope
with having a parent in prison.
Taking a tour of the Dougy
Center in Portland, a home
that provides support for
young people who have experienced a death of someone
close, Gabriella’s long-term
hope is to build a similar home
where children with incarcerated parents can go and seek
counseling.
“That’s the long-term goal,”
Palfrey says.
Meanwhile, Gabriella continues to have the normal life of a
teen. She most recently sat on
the Mr. Bowman Pageant Committee, the high school’s annual fundraiser that raised more
than $56,000 for Doernbecher
Children’s Hospital this year.
Maintaining a 3.75 GPA, her
future plans are to attend an
Ivy League school where she
hopes to study pre-med and
someday become a physician.
Palfrey said she’s proud of
how far her daughter has come
and the fact that she wants to
help others by going public
with her story.
“I’m just so proud of Gabriella today,” she says. “She’s the
strongest person I know.”
working on a resolution.
Thanks to that increased
communication, Chambers
says he believes a final agreement on the tower is in the
works and that a compromise
application should be submitBy BEVERLY CORBELL
ted in a few weeks.
Pamplin Media Group
“Both sides are increasingly
confident we will find a way to
Portland agreed late last accomplish public safety goals
week to withdraw its applica- without having a tower above
tion to place a 140-foot commu- the tree canopy,” he says.
nications tower on the top of
There’s no question that the
Gresham Butte.
communications system needs
Portland had
to be upgraded,
filed a land-use
Chambers says.
application last
“Part of it houses
year that includthe nerve center
ed the tower proof the operation,
posal with Gresha n d wh a t eve r
am’s planning
terms both sides
department. Maagree to needs to
ny people in
be improvements
Gresham, includand upgrades,
ing Mayor Shane
and we’re workBemis, objected
ing to do that and
because the towp r e s e r ve
the
er would extend
beauty of the
above the tree
butte.”
line.
In a statement,
Portland’s ini— Shane Bemis, Bemis says he altial land-use apGresham mayor so appreciated
plication for the
the increased cotower, submitted early last operation between the two
year, called for a structure to cities. “While we have not yet
replace an existing 40-foot arrived on the exact alternatower in the 1100 block of tive at this point, I am fully
Southwest Blaine Court. confident that the coming
Gresham planners remanded weeks will bring forth an exthe application last summer, cellent option, and I am persaying it was incomplete.
sonally committed to helping
The tower proposal has us get there. I fully appreciate
been opposed by the Gresham Mayor Hales and his top-level
Butte Neighborhood Associa- staff, especially Fred Miller,
tion, and Gresham’s elected who have rolled up their
officials.
sleeves in recent weeks and
Eric Chambers, Gresham’s committed to finding a cresenior manager in the Office of ative solution,” Bemis said.
Government and Management, “Withdrawing their applicasays a January lunch meeting tion is a tangible milestone,
between Portland Mayor Char- marking their commitment to
lie Hales and Bemis led to even regional cooperation and findfurther collaboration between ing a compromise.”
the two city staffs.
Bemis adds that Gresham is
One thing that came out of “very committed to the public
the meeting was Hales’ deci- safety value of the emergency
sion to make the tower issue a dispatch upgrade project, and
focus for his new chief admin- we are eager to team up with
istrative officer, Fred Miller, Portland now that the objecChambers says, and Miller has tionable option is off the
been “a great partner” in table.”
“Withdrawing
their application
is a tangible
milestone,
marking their
commitment
to regional
cooperation
and finding a
compromise.”
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news A5
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
City wrestles with historic house dilemma
hurt if they went to play in the
for the value of the community.”
house.
Exposed to nature
With those safety concerns in
When Worcester looks at the
mind, the city decided to begin
house, he doesn’t see much
dismantling the Field’s Bridge
room for opportunity. What he
farmhouse next month. The
does see is a second floor that
plan, according to Parks and
can’t be accessed due to fire
Recreation Director Ken
damage; broken windows left
Worcester, is to install a park
and right; overgrown vines runshelter in the home’s place, with
ning up the outside walls.
a similar roofline and perhaps
The city bought the property
some of the farmhouse’s original
for its park land, not the farmmaterials. Interpretive panels
house, and Worcester thinks the
detailing the house’s history will
house has overstayed its welalso be placed at the property.
come.
“That’s the plan,” Worcester
“You’ve been watching this
says. “But we don’t know if it will
house rot for all these 17 years
work out yet.”
— why would you just bring this
Danny Schreiber, a member of
up?” Worcester says. “If there
the new West Linn Historical Sowas a great swell of community
ciety, thinks the farmhouse has
support, it probably should have
more than enough historic sighappened a long time ago. We
nificance to merit saving. “I hate
tried to dig that up, and it didn’t
to see it go,” Schreiber says.
happen.”
“Once you lose a piece of history,
And even if there was more
you can’t bring it back. You can’t
Pamplin Media Group: VERN UYETAKE
support, Worcester says the fisave everything, but when we
have a chance, we should at least Constructed between 1890 and 1910, the Field’s Bridge farmhouse is one of the oldest buildings in West Linn. nancial burden of fixing the
The city says it has become dangerous and plans to tear it down next month.
house would outweigh any pohave a conversation about it.”
tential benefits. “It becomes cost
Value of the community
flood of 1996 and other events,”
“We sent them out to the cade ago,” Schreiber says. prohibitive for what use it would
In the city’s eyes, the time for Worcester says. “Neighbors who neighborhood associations,” “Things have changed since have generated,” Worcester
conversation has come and worked on the park said the Worcester says, “to see if there then.”
says.
gone.
house wasn’t a good fit for the was any last-ditch effort, if anySchreiber, for his part, thinks
Schreiber, who himself lives in
Since the city of West Linn ac- park.”
one wanted to utilize the house a historic 100-year-old home in the property was in good condiquired it in late 2001, no one has
But Worcester and other park or move it — some kind of project the Willamette neighborhood, tion before the city acquired it,
lived in the farmhouse. The parks planners decided not to bring other than something that would believes that the Field’s Bridge and it has only fallen apart in
and recreation department start- the house down at that time, for cost the city a ton of money.”
farmhouse would fetch a “pretty recent years due to lack of
ed plans to build Field’s Bridge fear of disrupting the park conThe city received three propos- good amount of money” on the care.
Park in 2002, and from that point struction process.
“It’s probably very dangerals, but Worcester says each cen- open market.
on, the house’s future became a
In 2007, the city put out a re- tered around revitalizing the
“We have had houses in the ous,” Schreiber says. “But then
nagging question.
quest for proposals in search of house to be lived in, which the city neighborhood that people have again, they’ve left it completely
“At that time, the house was anyone who might want to revi- was not interested in pursuing.
spent millions to renovate,” Sch- exposed to nature. There was
pretty well dilapidated from the talize the home.
“But that was (almost) a de- reiber says. “Old homes do good never any attempt to restore it.
WEst Linn
Citing concerns, city
to dismantle Field’s
Bridge farmhouse
By PATRICK MALEE
Pamplin Media Group
In March 1984, the historic
Field’s Bridge farmhouse
at 50 S.W. Borland Road
was thought to be in “good”
condition.
A Clackamas County Cultural
Resource Survey made that determination after formally evaluating the property, which was
estimated to have been built between 1890 and 1910. When the
survey was conducted, the classic two-story Victorian house
had recently been annexed into
West Linn, but was still years
away from becoming city property. The windows and white
paint job were intact, the Doric
porch columns still standing
strong.
The home surveyed in 1984 is
nearly unrecognizable now due
to a lack of upkeep as well as
weather damage and the simple
passage of time.
Last September, West Linn
City Manager Chris Jordan said,
“I think the big bad wolf taking a
blow at (the house) would bring
it down.”
City Councilor Mike Jones
worried that children might be
Housing: Report backs moderate-income projects
■ From page A1
but says even families earning
80 percent to 120 percent of the
area’s median family income
are having trouble finding affordable housing in Portland
these days
According to the federal government, the median income in
the Portland area is $48,580 for
an individual and $69,400 for a
family of four.
Saltzman recently commissioned a study on workforce
housing by Amy Edwards, a
limited duration employee at
the bureau with a background
in private financing. Titled
“Tools and Strategies for Facilitating Middle Income Housing
Development,” it was delivered
to his office Thursday.
The study said there is a clear
need in Portland for more housing for families supported by
construction workers, paramedics, graphic designers, teachers
and social workers. It found the
city offers a range of incentives
for housing serving families
earning up to 60 percent of the
area’s median family income,
but only limited incentives for
families earning up to 80 per-
cent and nothing above that.
“Subsidies exist for affordable housing, and the capital
markets provide for market rate
development, but no incentives
exist for middle income housing,” according to the study.
The study found that some
other cities already provide incentives for workforce housing,
including Austin and San Jose.
Saltzman says he will use the
study to help prepare a proposal for the council to consider in
the future. It could include extending such existing incentives as property tax and system development charge waiv-
ers to workforce housing.
“I don’t think I can convince
the council to support building
housing for those at the 120
percent level at this time, but
I’m hoping to get agreement on
at least 80 percent,” says
Saltzman.
Biggest boom
Saltzman is so convinced the
city has a shortage of moderately affordable housing that he
is the only member of the council to publicly support Mayor
Charlie Hales’ controversial
proposal to consider waiving
system development charges
for developers willing to build
market rate housing in the Old
Town/Chinatown area. Hales
believes waiving the city charges for streets, parks and the like
would encourage the construction of new housing with at least
some affordable units.
And Saltzman says he is
talking to developers about including affordable units in new
housing projects.
“We’re in the midst of the
biggest boom in multifamily
housing construction in many
years,” says Saltzman, referring to the numerous apartment buildings under construc-
tion or recently completed in
various parts of town.
State law prohibits the city
from requiring developers to
include affordable units in their
projects, but Saltzman says the
city has incentives it can offer
to encourage them, such as
property tax waivers.
“I’ve been meeting with
developers to remind them
about the incentives. I haven’t
clinched any deals yet, but I
might going forward,” says
Saltzman, who lists the conversations to date as involving Hoyt
Street Properties, Key Development and Unico Properties.
Stop Greed—Return Compassion
We believe that the large, steadily increasing income gap between TriMet’s top-level managers and
TriMet’s front line workers is toxic. It has killed these managers’ compassion and empathy for employees,
passengers and the community. It has created a pattern of self-serving behavior in which executives and
a handful of top technical people continue to receive over-budget salary increases while the majority of
workers – union and non-union alike – sees no raises at all.
ANNOUNCING
AT TRIMET TODAY
Over 70 Managers
In May 2013, KOIN News reported that more than
70 managers at TriMet were receiving over $100,000
each in annual wages for a 40-hour work week.
The number of such managers has grown.
$100,000+
Revive the
@ TriMet
479948.040214
The General Manager
receives $222,309 in
annual wages for a
40-hour work week.
$222,309
The lowest paid worker at TriMet
receives $28,063 in annual wages
for a 40-hour work week.
The average TriMet
front line worker retiree
receives $1550/month
in pension after years of
$28,063
HEALTHDESTROYING
LABOR.
TriMet’s General Manager’s wages are:
paid full time worker.
1195%
more than
the annual pension of the average
Amend the TriMet Charter and State
Statutes to reduce the total compensation
income gap between the highest and
lowest paid TriMet employees to no more
than 400%
Revive th
e
792%
more than
the annual wages of TriMet’s lowest
A Citizens’ Petition to the TriMet Board,
Governor Kitzhaber and Our State
Legislators. This petition calls on these
leaders to:
retired bus operator.
@
Tr i M e t
THIS TOXIC SITUATION HAS PARALYZED
THE HEART OF TRIMET.
YOU CAN HELP REVIVE IT.
To sign the
petition go to
TRANSITVOICE.ORG
{ insight }
A6 INSIGHT
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Portland
Tribune
Founder
Dr. Robert B. Pamplin, Jr.
PRESIDENT
J. Mark Garber
Managing editor/
Web editor
Kevin Harden
vice president
Brian Monihan
Advertising Director
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Associate Publisher
Vance Tong
CIRCULATION
MANAGER
Kim Stephens
creative
services manager
Cheryl DuVal
PUBLISHING SYSTEMS ManagER/WEBMaster
Alvaro Fontán
News writers
Jennifer Anderson,
Peter Korn, Steve Law,
Jim Redden
FEATURES WriterS
Jason Vondersmith,
Anne Marie DiStefano
SPORTS EDITOR
Steve Brandon
SPORTSwriters
Kerry Eggers,
Jason Vondersmith,
Stephen Alexander
Sustainable Life
Editor
■ Google’s
proposal could
put the pedal to
the metal as local
economy speeds up
Steve Law
Copy editor
Mikel Kelly
Art direction
and DESIGN
Pete Vogel
Photographers
Jonathan House
Jaime Valdez
insight
page editor
Keith Klippstein
PRODUCTION
Michael Beaird, Valerie
Clarke, Chris Fowler,
contributor
Rob Cullivan
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Portland, OR 97222
503-226-6397 (NEWS)
The Portland Tribune
is Portland’s independent
newspaper that is trusted
to deliver a compelling,
forward-thinking and
accurate living chronicle
about how our citizens,
government and
businesses live, work
and play. The Portland
Tribune is dedicated
to providing vital
communication and
leadership throughout
our community.
OURVIEW
By Denny Doyle and
four other mayors
A
s elected officials, we deal
with a multitude of critical issues every day. Who can we
work with to help boost local
job creation efforts? How do we encourage innovative entrepreneurs to locate
in our region? How best can we create
an infrastructure that supports our citizens in their day-to-day lives?
In a world that is driven by information and innovation, access to knowledge is an indispensable part of that infrastructure. This is not a new concept:
Andrew Carnegie believed that the single best path out of poverty was access
to knowledge, so he built libraries.
Today, access to high-speed Internet
is a critical part of our communities’
ability to prosper. In fact, we have
seen in multiple cases around the
country that high-speed broadband
access can be one of the single largest
determinants of a community’s ability
to leverage technology for economic
and civic good.
That is why we are pleased that
COURTESY OF JOHN SLEEZER/THE KANSAS CITY STAR
Google Fiber installation trucks parked in a Kansas City lot recently after working in Kansas and Missouri neighborhoods. Portland-area
mayors say the new high-speed Internet connection could boost the region’s economy.
High-speed broadband
builds communities
After Kansas City became the first Google Fiber city,
the area attracted so many new entrepreneurs and techfocused jobs that the metropolitan area is now regularly
referred to as “Silicon Prairie.”
Google Fiber has announced their interest in coming to each of our cities.
We’re long past the days when dialup access to the Internet was sufficient. In the 21st century economy, the
pace of business and the increasing
demands of society require fast, efficient, affordable broadband access.
In an evolving economy such as
ours, new jobs — from health care to
manufacturing — require fast access
to information and the ability to efficiently collaborate from multiple locations. Because of changes in how and
where we work, we have a need for
speed that extends beyond the con-
fines of an office. Google Fiber will
bring this speed, and will bring another high-speed Internet option to consumers. When multiple options exist
in the economy, consumers win.
For entrepreneurs and start-up
companies, broadly distributed access
to ultra-high-speed Internet is a necessity. Without it here in our region, entrepreneurs will look elsewhere; with
it, we can become a magnet for innovators. After Kansas City became the
first Google Fiber city, the area attracted so many new entrepreneurs
and tech-focused jobs that the metropolitan area is now regularly referred
At TriMet, we have a long history of not
only meeting the letter of the law but the
spirit of the law.
to as “Silicon Prairie.”
Finally, our future leaders’ success
in the digital economy requires giving
students access to digital learning
tools, video-rich learning exercises
and online courses taught by the
world’s best and brightest. For too many of our students, home access to the
Internet is constrained by limited resources and slow speeds — and sometimes is not available at all. Google Fiber will help change that.
As the mayors of Beaverton, Gresham, Hillsboro, Lake Oswego and Tigard, we are excited about the prospects of taking a giant leap forward in
our cities’ technological and information infrastructure. We will work hard
to help make it happen.
Beaverton Mayor Denny Doyle is joined
by mayors Shane Bemis of Gresham, Jerry
Willey of Hillsboro, Kent Studebaker of Lake
Oswego and John Cook of Tigard in submitting this column.
WEHEARDIT
“I like how we’re playing.”
— Portland Trail Blazer coach Terry Stotts on the team’s recent victories
“Both sides are increasingly confident we will find
a way to accomplish public safety goals without
having a tower above the tree canopy.”
Portland Tribune
editorial board
J. Mark Garber
president, Portland
Tribune
and Community
Newspapers Inc.
503-546-0714;
[email protected]
commnewspapers.com
Kevin Harden
managing editor,
Portland Tribune
503-546-5167;
[email protected]
portlandtribune.com
Submissions
The Portland Tribune
welcomes essays on topics
of public interest.
Submissions should be no
longer than 600 words
and may be edited.
Letters should be no
longer than 250 words.
Both submissions should
include your name, home
address and telephone
number for verification
purposes. Please send
submissions via e-mail:
[email protected]
portlandtribune.com. You
may fax them to 503546-0727 or send them
to “Letters to the Editor,”
Portland Tribune, 6605
S.E. Lake Road,
Portland, OR 97222.
— Eric Chambers,
Gresham’s Office of Government and Management,
on the city of Portland’s withdrawal of an application
for a 140-foot radio tower on Gresham Butte
Fix out-of-whack property tax system
MyVIEW
Jessica Vega Pederson
O
regon’s property tax
system creates winners and losers, and
most of us in East
Portland are on the losing side
(Inequities tax some Rose City
neighbors, March 20).
Property taxes can be a considerable financial burden for
homeowners but are necessary
to fund the crucial services
needed by our communities —
public safety, schools, roads, libraries and more. The problem
with Oregon’s tax system is that
it is inherently unfair and creates a hidden subsidy for certain property owners while
shifting the burden of paying
for local services to others.
A recently released North-
west Economic Research Center report, prepared at the request of the League of Oregon
Cities, “Oregon Property Tax
Capitalization: Evidence from
Portland,” highlights these arbitrary inequities and describes
what a difference such flukes
can make to home prices.
The report looks at the relationship between property taxes paid and the housing market,
and comes to a disturbing conclusion: the system is not equitable, and some people pay less
in taxes and then benefit from a
higher selling price when they
sell their homes.
I represent families living in
East Portland, an area that happens to contain homes with
some of the lowest average sale
prices in the city. According to
the NERC study, my constituents are on average paying taxes on 77 percent or more of
their homes’ market value.
However, this is not true for
I represent families living in East Portland, an area
that happens to contain homes with some of the lowest
average sale prices in the city. According to the NERC
study, my constituents are on average paying taxes on
77 percent or more of their homes’ market value.
other parts of Portland. Under
Oregon’s tax system, taxes are
largely based on a property’s
market value in the mid-1990s.
Since property values have
grown unevenly since then,
inequities in property taxes
have emerged, particularly
in parts of inner North, Northeast and Southeast Portland,
where values have increased
significantly.
In neighborhoods like Boise,
Eliot, King, Humboldt, Sabin
and Woodlawn, homeowners
enjoy a considerable advantage
— on average, residents in
these neighborhoods pay taxes
on only 19 to 43 percent of their
homes’ value. According to the
report, these homeowners enjoy the benefits of the system
not once, but twice: they pay
less in taxes, and they see that
discount help grow the market
value of their homes. In fact,
property owners selling similar
homes in different neighborhoods can attribute between
$9,300 and $45,000 of potential
sale price to the whimsies of
Oregon’s property tax system,
according to the report.
Meanwhile, East Portland
neighborhoods have considerable but basic needs, such as
funding for sidewalks, street repairs and other city services.
The idea that we’re giving essentially a property tax break
to a doctor living in North Portland and no relief to a workingclass family in East Portland
seems inherently unfair, but
this is exactly what’s going on.
The property tax relief our system provides is not targeted. It
is arbitrary, imbalanced and
unfair.
We need to take a hard look
at our property tax system and
start to right these inequities.
Updating our system so that is
more equitable for all Oregonians should be a priority for
us all.
Jessica Vega Pederson is a first-term
state representative for House District 47, which encompasses much of
East Portland between Interstate 205
and 162nd Avenue.
news A7
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Author: Survival depends on calm action
Lake Oswego
At 90, Frank Heyl
is still helping
people who get lost
By CLIFF NEWELL
Pamplin Media Group
Nobody ever intends to get
lost. That is why it is so hard
to prepare for.
That being the case, it is fortunate that people like Frank
Heyl are around to help them.
A 90-year-old veteran of
World War II and a former
Lake Oswego resident for more
than 50 years, Heyl wrote the
book on survival. Literally. His
book “Why Some Survive,” cowritten with Richard O. Woodfin Jr., is full of case studies and
analysis of survival stories.
Heyl recently shared the high
points of his nearly 70 years of
knowledge at the meeting of
the Lake Oswego Adult Community Center’s Learning and
Technology Group.
The book, “Why Some Sur-
vive,” can be ordered on Amazon
.com.
Survival was never so fun as
in Heyl’s humorous yet insightful presentation, full of wise
suggestions and wonderful anecdotes. He got off to a strong
start by showing the audience
the very same clipboard he was
given by an officer one day
while he was serving the the
U.S. Air Force during World
War II. Heyl’s main task was
helping to ferry 15,000 planes to
Russia, but he was given another job.
“The clipboard read ‘Safety
and Emergency Procedures.’ I
told him, ‘I don’t know anything about that.’ He said, ‘You
can read can’t you?’ ”
Heyl suddenly was a survival expert, and he continued to
be one in the Korean War. Finally, the brass decided he
should learn something about
survival.
“Everything was in reverse,”
Heyl said. “I should have gone
to survival school first.”
However, he made up for lost
time by attending just about every kind of survival school under the sun. After retiring from
Author Frank
Heyl told a Lake
Oswego Adult
Community
Center audience
that preparation
helps people
survive in
difficult, and
often hopeless,
situations.
Pamplin
Media Group:
VERN UYETAKE
the service, he continued being
a rescue pilot and survival instructor in civilian life, putting
in 10,000 air hours searching
for people who were lost. He
became a survival expert of the
highest level.
Then, 55 years after being
handed the clipboard, Heyl was
told, “Why don’t you write a
book?” Heyl could even draw
from personal experience. As a
small child in Portland, he became lost once while shopping
with his mother on the sixth
floor of Meier & Frank.
“I yelled and screamed until
I was back with my mother,”
Heyl fondly recalled.
But today, he says yelling
and screaming won’t help if
you are lost in the wilderness.
It is even worse when you try
to walk your way out of getting
lost. Heyl said he has seen too
many cases when that kind of
action led to death. He says it is
much wiser to build a fire, get
in a shelter right at the spot
you are lost and try to do something to signal your plight, especially to a search plane flying
overhead.
The Heyl list for survival
items is: survival medicine;
shelter and clothing; heat from
an external force; food and water. He also recommends carrying not just one knife but two
(one a pocket knife and the
other a 4-inch knife that fits in
a sheath), Diamond matches
(because of their high sulphur
content) and fire starters.
There are also many intangibles involved with survival.
“All of the people who survived had a great will to live,”
Heyl said. “It also helps to pray
a lot.”
You don’t even have to believe in God to pray. Heyl told
the story of an agnostic who
got lost and survived. When
the non-believer subsequently
filled out a form about his ex-
“All of the people who
survived had a great will
to live.”
—Frank Heyl
perience, he first mentioned
that he was an agnostic. He
later mentioned he prayed
when he got lost. Heyl was
flabbergasted.
The agnostic explained,
“They told us to try anything if
we got lost. It worked.”
Heyl says amen.
The combination of prayer
and smart preparation are usually enough to save you. But
Heyl has also seen some tragedies in his long career. One
time a man he knew became
lost in the wilderness and died.
Heyl wondered why.
“I had put together a survival kit for him,” he said. “They
found it in the trunk of his car.”
No one will ever catch Frank
Heyl unprepared. He’s a
survivor.
“I’ll soon be 91,” he said. “I
plan on being around a long
time.”
Columbia City retreats from gun regulations
Columbia City
City Council says
outdated rules run
afoul of gun rights
By MARK MILLER
Pamplin Media Group
Columbia City officials
have blocked the mayor of the
small town of his authority to
ban weapons from its streets
in the event of an emergency.
The March 20 decision by the
City Council met with applause
from a large crowd of gun rights
supporters.
The controversy focused on
an obscure section of Columbia
City code — adopted by the City
Council in November 2005 as
part of a larger ordinance on
emergency procedures in the
city — began when City Attorney Harold Olsen informed the
council in early March that a
provision allowing the mayor to
ban “the sale, carrying, or possession of any weapons or explosives of any kind” in public during a state of emergency appeared to conflict with state and
federal law. Olsen said he had
received complaints from both
gun rights advocates and gun
control proponents about the
provision.
During the meeting, Olsen
set out a draft ordinance
amending the 2005 section of
code to specify that the mayor
can only prevent the possession and carrying of a loaded
firearm in public during a state
of emergency — and establishing a long list of people exempt
from such a decree, including
active and retired police offi-
cers, holders of concealed-carry licenses, people hunting or
fishing legally, members of the
military acting in an official capacity, and people authorized
by the chief of the Columbia
City Police Department to carry loaded guns in public,
among others.
But he also offered another
option: full repeal of the
provision.
“This would be my recommendation, or my own personal opinion, as to the one we
should go with,” Mayor Cheryl
Young said of the latter option.
Columbia City Police Chief
Mike McGlothlin said repealing the offending part of code
would not affect his departmental operations. The vast
majority of charges from Columbia City police arrests, he
said, are for violations of Oregon state law, not municipal
Columbia City
Mayor Cheryl
Young (centerright) reads an
ordinance at a
March 20 meeting
of the City Council
of Columbia City.
She recommended
a full repeal of a
section of the
municipal code
adopted in 2005
that City Attorney
Harold Olsen
(right)
described as
unconstitutional.
Pamplin
Media Group:
MARK MILLER
code — and state law already
makes it illegal for people to
carry loaded guns in public
without the proper authorization or permit.
“It’s already covered under
state law, so it’s kind of redundant to have it in our city
(code),” Young said.
A8 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
TribunePuzzles
The Crossword Puzzle
“HERBAL TEASE”
89 Aladdin’s monkey
90 California’s Big
__
91 Patio-brewed
beverage
93 Many IRA payees
95 Stimpy’s sidekick
96 Incense hung in
two places?
103 Sushi tuna
104 Part of MYOB
105 “Nerts!”
106 Poetry Out Loud
org.
107 Working like a
dog
111 Prevent
113 Razzle-dazzle
117 Getting by with a
loaner herb?
122 __ acid
123 Groundbreaking
Reagan
appointee
124 Showed disdain
125 Forms
126 Positively
charged particles
127 Leather treaters
DOWN
1 Cactus League
By Robin Stears | Edited by Rich Norris and Joyce Nichols Lewis
spring training city
2 Native
Oklahoman
3 Half up front?
4 Biological ring
5 Goes with one’s
gut
6 “Yay, team!”
7 Maidenform buy
8 Swamp
9 The “R” in
Edward R.
Murrow
10 Eastern
nursemaid
11 McCartney title
12 San Diego-toAlbuquerque dir.
13 “What’s the
Frequency,
Kenneth?” band
14 Jorge’s halfdozen
15 Bollywood strings
16 Urgent come-on
17 Prefix with
-aholic
18 Boxer’s attire
19 Olympian warrior
24 Always butting in
25 Old electronic
display source
30 Weatherman’s
line
32 They’re history
33 Murphy __
34 Blast furnace
refuse
36 Honest
37 “The Wizard of Id”
co-creator Johnny
38 Tossed in, as a
losing poker hand
39 Radar’s soda
brand
40 Byron’s words
before “’Tis
but the truth in
masquerade”
41 Probate concern
42 Snitched
43 Flotsam or
Jetsam in “The
Little Mermaid”
47 Beach resort
strolling spots
50 Jefferson, for one
51 MP3 holders
53 As a rule
54 Temper
56 Earn a blessing?
57 __ around:
wasted time
58 Wing it
59 Weighed down
63 Euphoric
65 Music for
15-Down
66 Lobby brightener
67 Characterized by
twinkling
70 Put the __ on:
quash
73 Criticizing harshly
75 U.K.’s longest
river
76 Country singer
David Allan __
77 Polo VIP
79 Gentrification
target
81 “You betcha!”
82 Viscount’s
superior
83 Third man?
84 Kicks
86 Warrior
companion of
19-Down
92 Credit checker
Experian, pre1996
94 Equal-ize?
97 Gorge
98 Safari sights
99 Moon of Uranus
100 Pyle portrayer
101 Leave out of the
freezer
102 City SW of Essen
107 Bridge feat
108 Chauffeured car
109 Voracious
110 Gunk
111 Villain on Crab
Key
112 Symbol on a staff
114 Ancient harplike
instrument
115 AKC part: Abbr.
116 Nugent and
Turner
118 ATM maker
119 Heckle
120 Fort Erie’s prov.
121 Letters from your
parents?
Sudoku
Answers
Puzzle 1
Puzzle 1
Sudoku
Puzzles
Puzzle 2
Crossword
Answers
4/01/14
Puzzle 2
©2014 Tribune Media Services, Inc.
[email protected]
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Mrplywoodinc.com
Granddad says doing crossword
puzzles makes him sharper.
Wonder if there are crossword puzzles
to help make my math skills sharper?
www.selfpublishedbookpromotion.com
Sample puzzles at www.studentcrosswordpuzzles.com
by Eugene Shaffer
Solutions
©2014 King Features Syndicate - terrystickels.com
CROSSWORD
©2014 King Features, Inc.
Student Crossword Puzzles:
Educational fun, one clue at a time.
484720.040114
480263.030414
ACROSS
1 Pricey sweaters
8 They remove bad
marks
15 Vertebral bones
20 “__ Flame”:
Bangles ballad
21 One in the
running
22 Blood of the gods
23 Observation
about sprouting
aromatic plants?
26 Elementary
fivesome
27 Roo’s refuge
28 Soul-searching
events?
29 XIII x IV
31 __-mo replay
32 “Washboard”
muscles
35 __ y Plata:
Montana motto
36 “Yes, I’m positive
this seed is
in five-spice
powder”?
43 Period relative
44 Trifle
45 Ultimate goal
46 Easy target
48 Where It.’s at
49 Alphabet trio
51 Chinese tea
52 “Sideways”
co-star Paul
55 “We should whip
up some pickle
flavoring”?
60 Proceed (from)
61 Mythical sea
nymphs
62 Yield to gravity
64 2005 Nobelwinning dramatist
65 Tears down, in
Dover
68 Broadband letters
69 Hägar creator
Browne
71 Can’t forgo
72 Bear witness
74 “My country, __
...”
76 Every garçon has
one
78 Pasture critters
80 Like something
even better than
a pungent herb?
85 Black-and-tan
terrier
87 Center of gravity?
88 “__ rang?”
SOLUTIONS
4/01
Answer:
CRYPTOQUIP
4/01
©2014 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
WHEN AN EAGER
KITTEN STALKS A
PUPPY TIRELESSLY, I
SUPPOSE YOU COULD
SAY THE CAT COWS
THE DOG.
Cryptoquip solution:
©2014 King Features Syndicate, Inc.
Published every Tuesday and Thursday
www.portlandtribune.com | 503.684.0360
447579.040614 Mkt
Reach over 200,000 weekly readers with your ad here
news A9
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Forest Grove schools, family Mercer Industries to ‘wind
down’
window
facility
duel with special ed lawsuits Closure of 88-year-old
Forest Grove
By NANCY TOWNSLEY
Pamplin Media Group
Attorneys have filed a pair
of dueling lawsuits involving a
student in the Forest Grove School
District’s special education program in federal district court in
Portland.
The first, brought by the parents of
the student, a Forest Grove High
School senior, asks the district to pay
$54,552 in attorney’s fees and court
costs related to due process complaints filed in 2011 and 2013, both alleging the district had not provided
their daughter a “Free and Appropriate Public Education” under federal
law and had interfered with their ability to “meaningfully participate” in
her education.
In the lawsuit, filed March 18, the
parents are identified only as “C.O.
and R.O.”
Ruling on the 2013 complaint to the
state superintendent of public instruction and the Oregon Department of
Education last December, state administrative law judge (ALJ) Joe Allen sided with the parents, saying the
district had violated the federal Indi-
viduals with Disabilities Education
Act in the case of the student.
After multiple breakdowns, communication between the parties has
occurred only through legal counsel
the last several years.
The other lawsuit, filed by the Forest Grove district March 18, appeals
the ALJ’s decision in the 2013 complaint, saying that the student — who
started attending classes in Forest
Grove as a sixth-grader — received
special education services due to autism and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder diagnoses and was on
track to graduate in June with a modified diploma and would qualify for
extended special ed services through
the district until she turns 21.
The parents’ 2011 complaint has
been “appealed and cross-appealed,”
district officials say, and awaits a decision by Judge John Acosta in U.S. District Court.
Diane Wiscarson of the Wiscarson
Law firm in Portland filed the lawsuit
on behald of the parents. Nancy Hungerford and Richard Cohn-Lee of Hungerford Law firm in Oregon City filed
the appeal on behalf of the district.
Forest Grove school officials have
been in court over special educationrelated matters more than once in the
past decade. The most notable lawsuit
— in which the parents of a former
district student known as “T.A.” sued
the district for IDEA violations —
twice reached the U.S. Supreme
Court.
In 2009, the nation’s highest court
ruled 6-3 in favor of T.A.’s parents,
agreeing with them that the Forest
Grove district owed them tuition reimbursement for their son, who had
never received special ed services
from the district. The parents alleged
the district should have qualified the
student, now in his 20s, under IDEA.
Instead, they pulled him from the district and enrolled him at a private
school in central Oregon.
The landmark case — which has its
own Wikipedia page, called “Forest
Grove School District v. T.A.” —
bounced between Oregon and Washington, D.C., for nine years before a
federal appeals judge ruled in 2012
that the district was not responsible
for paying the parents’ legal bills or
reimbursing them for tuition expenses they accrued after enrolling their
son at Mount Bachelor Academy, a
therapeutic boarding school near
Prineville.
That school closed in 2009 in the
wake of a state investigation into allegations of emotional abuse and sexual
role-playing at the facility.
operation will affect
70 employees
By SHANNON O. WELLS
Pamplin Media Group
After 88 years of business, Beaverton’s Mercer Industries, manufacturer of Mercer Windows, plans
to wind down manufacturing operations at its Southwest Denney
Road facility and close by this
summer.
Citing lingering effects of the Great
Recession, which saw a drastic slowdown in housing and commercial construction, the closure of the plant will
affect approximately 70 employees, including management, sales staff and
production workers.
Staffing will be adjusted to complete
existing orders, after which the plant
at 10760 S.W. Denney Road will close,
said Dan Boverman, Mercer’s chief restructuring officer. He and a member
of the Mercer family shared the news
with employees at a Monday morning
all-staff meeting.
The announcement included a revamped severance policy in which employees will receive one week of pay
for each year of service, from a mini-
mum of two weeks to a maximum of
eight weeks.
Founded in 1926 as Mercer Steel, the
privately held Mercer Industries most
recently manufactured commercial
and residential vinyl and aluminum
frame window and door products, with
an emphasis on energy efficiency, safety and innovation, noted Jim Rauh, the
company’s business relations liaison.
The company’s board of directors
commissioned a third-party business
and financial analysis of its manufacturing and sales operations that concluded an “orderly winding down of
operations” was the only course of action to preserve remaining value in the
organization’s assets, which include
several proprietary window design
technologies.
The company hopes to sell the manufacturing assets, but cannot continue
normal operations during the search
for a qualified buyer, noted Boverman,
who was brought on board to advise
the company and help manage the operation’s shutdown.
The company is not declaring bankruptcy and carries almost no debt.
Mercer will honor its sales, warranty, supplier, employee and other
commitments.
While the possibility exists of another window company acquiring Mercer’s business and assets, nothing of
that sort has been announced yet.
MemorialTributes
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The Pamplin Media Group offers both paid tributes and death notices as a service
to the community.
To place a tribute, please go online to any of our newspaper websites and fill out
our easy to use tribute form.
Please feel free to contact
any of our newspaper
representatives with any
questions.
In Loving Memory
Gladys I. Goodrich
October 29, 1929
- December 25, 2013
Gladys I. Goodrich, age 84, of
Tigard, Ore., passed away on Christmas
2013.
She was a loving wife to Gus Mohr and
beloved mother to Sandi Singleton, John Goodrich Jr.,
and Bob Goodrich; grandmother of seven and greatgrandmother of four.
Gladys was preceded in death by first husband,
John “Jack” Goodrich; and brothers, Arvid, Russell
and Leroy Ellson.
The story and celebration of her life will be
honored at 1 p.m., Sunday, April 13, 2014, at the
Summerfield Clubhouse, 10650 S.W. Summerfield
Drive, Tigard, OR.
We hope you will join us to help celebrate her
most special life. In lieu of flowers, donations to
Gladys’s favorite theater, Broadway Rose Theatre,
www.broadwayrose.org or 503-620-5262 would be
appreciated.
In Loving Memory
Joan Helena Meriwether
November 12, 1922
- March 22, 2014
Joan Helena Meriwether, born
November 12, 1922 in Indianapolis,
Marion County, Indiana, passed
peacefully on March 22, 2014 in
Corvallis, Benton County, Oregon.
Joan devoted her energy, faith and love to her family
and the Mormon church. After graduating high school,
Joan met Paul Wesley Meriwether and embarked on
a marriage that would last 53 happy years and take
her from Indianapolis to New York City, Norwalk,
California, and Gresham Oregon, where they lived
for 15 years. Joan worked to model the morals of her
faith—but would always crack a smile at her husband’s
salty humor. She had a stubborn streak and wasn’t
one to hold back her opinions. But she was immensely
proud of her children, grandchildren, and greatgrandchildren, and supported them in all they did.
Joan was passionate about genealogy and delighted in
gardening. She loved pearls, big band music, and would
unabashedly take seconds on dessert. She was preceded in death by her husband and her
daughter, Linda Louise Meriwether Hammer. She is
survived by her children, Patricia Ann Ward (OK),
Michael Paul Meriwether (OR), Amy Carol Roessner
(NV), John Curtis Meriwether (OR), and Mark Wesley
Meriwether (ID); 13 grandchildren; and 24 greatgrandchildren.”
Mary Virginia “Ginny” Hill
Van Orman
Mary Virginia Hill Van Orman, 91, passed away on
Thursday, March 20, 2014.
Ginny was the daughter of the late Matthew and
Clara Hill of Portland, Ore. In addition to her parents,
she was preceded in death by her sisters, Rita Henry,
Catherine Harding, Anne Boehm, Clara Conlon and
Ruth Ferguson.
She was a devoted member of Sacred Heart Catholic
Church. For several years she enjoyed greeting guests
and serving refreshments at the downtown Brevard,
N.C., Fourth Friday Gallery Walks.
Survivors include her husband, Clarence “Clint”
William Van Orman; one son, Scott and Karen Van
Orman; two daughters, Errin Charles Jones, Joan Van
Orman and husband Bruce Siulinski; two sisters, Helen
Darling and Monica Lindner; three grandchildren,
Melissa Van Orman and husband Mark Bussow,
Jennifer Van Orman Yurges and husband Joshua and
Laura Van Orman; two great grandchildren, Letta
Virginia and Nella Rosalie Yurges.
In addition to her parents, she was preceded in
death by her sisters; Rita Henry, Catherine Harding,
Anne Boehm, Clara Conlon and Ruth Ferguson.
On line condolences may be left at www.
moodyconnollyfuneralhome.com
Moody-Connolly Funeral Home and Crematory is
in charge of the arrangements.
Carol Ann (Malm) Rothgeb
June 18, 1936 to March 19, 2014
Carol Ann Rothgeb, 77, of
Oregon City, Ore., passed away
Wednesday, March 19, 2014.
Carol was born June 18, 1936
in Los Angeles, Calif. Her family
then moved to Siebert, Colo. She
graduated in 1953 from Seibert
High School and shortly after
that married Raymond Malm.
They had a son, Michael, and
a daughter, Sheryl. In 1958, the
family moved to Hayward, Calif.
After the marriage ended, Carol and her daughter
Sheryl moved to Oregon. In 1977, she married Gary
Rothgeb, and the family was expanded with the addition
of his children, Gary, Sheri and Laurie.
Carol worked for the phone company, Grant’s in the
Oregon City Shopping Center and she was the first Jury
Coordinator in the Clackamas County Courthouse.
She is survived by her brother William Wold of
Pleasanton, Calif.; son, Michael Malm of Saint Ann,
Mo.; daughter, Sheryl Malm of Lake Oswego, Ore.;
step son, Gary and Kelly Rothgeb, of West Linn, Ore.;
step daughters, Sheri Daniels of West Linn, Ore., and
Laurie and Clarence Baker of Rockwall, Texas: step
grandchildren, Tony, Terry, Cody, KellyJane, Jessica,
Ryan, and Jessica’s daughter, Alexa.
Carol was preceded in death by her husband Gary
Rothgeb.
A private burial was held Wednesday, March 26,
2014 at Willamette National Cemetery.
In lieu of flowers, family asks that a donation be
made in Carol’s name to a preferred charity of her choice
- Cancer Society, Red Cross, Mercy Corps, Northwest
Medical Teams, Humane Society, or Salvation Army.
Arrangements were made at Hillside Chapel in
Oregon City, Ore.
In Loving Memory
Madelon Margaret
(Burcham) Hill, 95,
June 19, 1918
to March, 25 2014
One of 1,078…
Madelon Hill passed away peacefully on the
morning of March 25, 2014 surrounded by her family.
The matriarch of the Hill family, she was born in Des
Moines, Iowa, and graduated from St. Mary’s College
in Notre Dame, Ind., where she developed an interest
in aviation. Returning to Des Moines, she attained her
private pilot license – against the wishes of her father
– as WWII began. Learning of a new Army Air Corps
program, the Women Airforce Service Pilots (WASPs),
and demonstrating her direct and pro-active nature, she
applied directly to the Chief of Staff for the Army, General
George Marshall, who forwarded her letter recommending
her for evaluation for acceptance into the program.
A leader for the women of the Greatest Generation,
she truly was a pioneer, as she completed U.S Army Air
Corps military pilot training and became one of only
1,078 women to successfully became qualified and rated
WASP’s. She became a rated instrument and training pilot
for the men being sent into combat overseas, becoming
qualified in many of the military aircraft of the time,
including the B-17 and B-26. Stationed at Las Vegas
Army Field, she met her future husband, best friend and
lifelong companion, Jack V. Hill, whom she married just
prior to his deployment to the Pacific Theater as a combat
B-29 pilot. They were married for almost 69 years until
Jack passed away in January of 2013.
A guiding hand, motivator and inspiration to her four
children, her two sons, Marty and Tom, shared her passion
for aviation and graduated from the US Air Force Academy
and US Naval Academy respectfully and both went on to
become fighter pilots in their services. Daughter Margaret
married an Air Force fighter pilot and is a Certified Medical
Assistant (CMA) in Bend, Ore. Daughter Nancy became a
long time, highly respected science teacher at Mountain
View High School in Bend, Ore.
In addition to being survived by her children, she
enjoyed being the grandmother to six grandchildren,
Bryan, Lauren, Bradley, Catherine, Douglas and Mathew
who preceded her in death; and six great-grandchildren,
Caitlyn, Mya, Brayden, Gavin, Ethan and Mathew.
Madelon lived a full, amazing, interesting and exciting
life, full of adventures and firsts for women of her
generation, and carved an inspirational legacy and path for
others to follow. She will be missed by all who knew her,
but especially by her family.
At present no service is scheduled and in lieu of flowers
it is requested donations be forwarded to the Oregon
Ve t e r a n s ’
Home or to
the Partners in
Care Hospice
House in Bend,
Ore.
Please
sign our online
guestbook
at
www.
niswongerreynolds.com
A10 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
You’ve flown the flag. now what?
In the months since September 11th, 2001,
we have all witnessed a powerful resurgence of
the American spirit. But now, in a climate of new
threats, it’s clear that patriotism alone is not
enough. We must also learn to protect ourselves
and our families against future terrorist attacks.
There are three steps toward readiness.
These steps are fairly simple and inexpensive.
And they work.
MAKE AN EMERGENCY SUPPLY KIT
In a sturdy container like a plastic trash can or
duffel bag, pack the items you and your family may
need in an emergency and set them aside.
Your kit should contain 72-hours’ worth of
supplies: A gallon of water per person, per day. A
three-day supply of non-perishable food. A firstaid kit. Clothes, sleeping bags and toilet articles.
Flashlight, extra batteries, scissors, plastic sheeting, duct tape. Also, a battery-powered radio is
essential. Be sure to write down the frequencies
of radio stations in your area that will broadcast
emergency announcements.
It’s also helpful to have a second, smaller kit
with a few essential items, something you can
grab in a hurry in case you’re asked to leave your
home for a few days.
MAKE A FAMILY COMMUNICATIONs PLAN
If your family knows where to go and what to
do in an emergency, they’ll save time and remain
calm. Here’s what your plan should contain: The
name and phone number of out-of-state relatives to
contact. ( Long-distance calling may be easier than
local calling.) A family meeting place near your
home and another one away from the neighborhood. An evacuation plan using alternative routes.
A designated room in your house in case authorities instruct you to “shelter-in-place.”
BE INFORMED
If there’s a terrorist attack on your city, local
authorities will broadcast information as quickly as
possible concerning the nature of the emergency
and what you should do next. Be sure to keep
listening for updates. What can you do right now? Get
information, educate yourself and your family. For
more details on emergency preparedness, visit our
website at www.ready.gov. Or get a free brochure
by calling 1- 800-BE- READY (1- 800-237-3239).
Part of a campaign from the U.S. Department of Homeland Security and The Advertising Council. Photo courtesy of Henryk Kaiser/eStock Photo/PictureQuest.
news A11
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Google: Officials focus on equity of access
peared, Feb. 20 on Newsweek’s
website, had the headline, “Is
Google making the digital dition, the Internet-oriented pro- vide worse?”
grams at the Multnomah CounKansas City was the first
ty Library and a group at Port- metropolitan area where
land State University studying Google installed its broadthe best ways to teach computer band service, which offers a 1
skills.
gigabite Internet option. Ac“Portland really has a unique cording to news reports,
mix of programs teaching com- when Google came to Kansas
puter literacy,” says Bentley.
City in 2011, the company di“Delivering free and equal vided the cities spanning the
access to technology and re- Kansas-Missouri border into
lated opportunities is a key geographic areas called “fivalue for us,” says county li- berhoods.” To qualify for serbrary spokesman Shawn Cun- vice, each area needed to hit a
ningham. “There’s a growing certain percentage of predivide between those with ac- paid registrations, ranging
cess and those without it. from 5 percent to 25 percent
We’re determined to keep that of households. The ranges
issue in focus as technologies were based on population
evolve. The ongoing discus- density, which affects the cost
sion around Google Fiber is of installing the cables in each
one way we can
area.
lend our voice
The $10 pre-paid
and our trusted
registrations took
role in the complace online, paymunity to ensure
able with a credit
that the broadest
card. When the
set of needs is bedeadline expired in
ing considered
September 2012,
and met.”
critics said the
Even so, Hales
map of fiberhoods
is
concerned
was largely divid— Dana Haynes, ed by income and
about the possibilspokesman for Mayor racial lines. They
ity of inequitable
Charlie Hales compared it to the
Google Fiber access in Portland.
so-called Troost
His spokesman, Dana Haynes, Wall, a historical racial divide in
says that if Google decides to the city.
install its system in Portland,
“Troost Avenue has traditionthe city will monitor the roll- ally divided Kansas City along
out plans and may intervene to racial lines, and that’s the way
increase access if necessary.
the original map of the qualify“The digital divide is a huge ing service areas looked, too,”
issue for us. That’ll be one of the says Chambers.
key things we watch for,” says
According to Chambers and
Haynes.
Liimatta, once Google realized
The city is working to pro- what was happening, it made or
duce information about the per- supported numerous efforts to
mitting process and existing bridge the divide. They included
telecommunications infrastruc- door-to-door sales drives in fiture for Google by May 1. The berhoods with low registracompany will then decide tions. Google also backed rewhether to offer its service in cruitment campaigns by comPortland and 34 other cities by munity-based organizations,
the end of the year. They in- such as Connecting for Good,
clude Beaverton, Gresham, where Chambers serves on the
Hillsboro, Lake Oswego and board of directors.
Tigard, where officials are also
By February, Google said that
compiling information for 180 of the 202 Kansas City fiberGoogle.
hoods had qualified for service.
They include 17 of the 20 with
The Troost Wall
the lowest median incomes.
Internet service is no longer a
But Liimatta doesn’t think
luxury but a necessity, says Mi- much has changed. “Basically,
chael Liimatta, president of households that already had InConnecting for Good, a non- ternet service got faster Interprofit organization that works net service.”
to increase Internet access for
Chambers does not blame
low-income people in Kansas Google for what happened.
City, Mo.
“Google didn’t create the digi“You need Internet service to tal divide. It was here a long
apply for jobs, access health time before they arrived. But
care and social services, even they didn’t overcome it, either,”
get insurance these days. You says Chambers.
just can’t leave a large percent
Despite the controversy in
of your population behind,” says Kansas City, Google plans to use
Liimatta.
the same strategy as it expands
Google’s experience in Kan- into other cities. It includes a
sas City is well documented. It low-cost incentive that allows
has been covered by the local households to receive free
media and in such national pub- broadband serve for at least
lications and news websites as seven years for a $300 installaWired and Newsweek. One of tion fee.Google officials say
the most recent stories that ap- there are many reasons people
■ From page A1
“The digital
divide is a huge
issue for us.
That’ll be one of
the key things
we watch for.”
COURTESY OF GOOGLE FIBER
A Google Fiber showroom in Kansas City displays services that many people could get with the new high-speed Internet access being installed in
both Kansas City, Kan., and Kansas City, Mo.
Who are you anyway?
Where do you come from?
What will happen to you?
Looking for answers? Here is the book you need.
Open the doors to a new beginning where you can play
the game of life with confidence and success.
SCIENTOLOGY
Check out the Crossword
Puzzle in this week’s
BY L. RON HUBBARD
Mark
and
Dave
are
back!
Google Public
Affairs Officer
Darcy Nothnagle
announced the
company was
considering
bringing its
high-speed
broadband
service to
Portland during
a City Hall press
conference with
Portland City
Commissioner
Dan Saltzman
(left) and
Beaverton
Mayor Denny
Doyle and
Portland Mayor
Charlie Hales
(right).
TRIBUNE PHOTO
JONATHAN HOUSE
Tryon Creek Wastewater Treatment Plant
Facilities Plan Update
TRYON CREEK CAC MEETING
The citizen advisory committee
(CAC) updating the Tryon
Creek plant facilities plan has
scheduled a meeting to finalize
its recommendations.
The public is invited to attend.
FACILITIES PLAN OPEN HOUSE
After its next meeting,
the CAC will hold a public
open house to share its
recommended facilities plan
update and hear community
feedback.
Wednesday, April 9
4:00 p.m. – 6:00 p.m.
Thursday, April 24
5:00 p.m. – 7:00 p.m.
Portland Building,
Pine Rooms, 10th floor
1120 SW 5th Ave, Portland
Oswego Pointe Condominiums,
Riverside Room,
5065 Foothills Dr, Lake Oswego
Becky Tillson, Environmental Services
503-823-2827 l [email protected]
483790.031314
287683.010108
www.portlandtribune.com
PRICE: $20.00
Church of Scientology Dept P01
309 SW 3rd Avenue, Portland OR 97204 | (503) 228-0116
[email protected] • www.portland-scientology.org
nesses and neighbors helping
neighbors,” she says.
Liimatta agrees. “Everybody’s
got to be involved,” he says.
FOR MORE INFORMATION
www.portlandoregon.gov/bes/TCWTP
A NEW SLANT ON LIFE
Just get it, read it, try it. You’ll never be the same again.
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Swanson says communitywide
efforts are needed to overcome
such trends. “It has to be cities,
community organizations, busi-
Guy Graham, City of Lake Oswego
503-635-0270 l [email protected]
WT 1403
456686.120313
Love to do Puzzles?
residents say they do not use
the Internet, significantly more
than those living in urban or
suburban areas (14 percent).”
483976.040114
do not have broadband Internet
access, however. Among other
things, they repeatedly cite a
September 2013 Pew Research
report on reasons adults do not
use the Internet.
The report found that 15 percent of Americans 18 or older do
not use the Internet or email.
The leading reason, at 34 percent, was relevance, with respondents saying they are just
not interested, too busy or consider it a waste of time. The second reason was usability, with
concerns including a lack of
computer skills and worries
about hackers and viruses. The
third reason, at 19 percent, was
price, including the cost of a
computer.
Then again, many of the responses broke down along demographic lines, including race
and income levels.
“As in previous surveys, Internet use remains strongly
correlated with age, education,
and household income,” according to the Pew report.
“One of the strongest patterns
we see regarding Internet use
is by age group: 44 percent of
Americans ages 65 and older
do not use the Internet, compared with 17 percent of the
next-youngest age group
(adults ages 50 to 64). A similar
proportion (41 percent) of
adults who have not graduated
high school are offline, as are
24 percent of Hispanics and 24
percent of those in households
earning less than $30,000 per
year. And 20 percent of rural
3 to 6 pm
Monday-Friday
A12 NEWS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
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■ Annual intergalactic battle helps Red Cross save lives Hales
tiptoes
toward
big ideas
Will mounted
patrol ride off
into the sunset?
Nonprofit group takes to TV to buck
Novick plan to cut police horse unit
One year in office,
mayor puts priority
on revenue, parks
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
That’s a real Portland police car behind
“Grimm” actor David Giuntoli. When it
comes time to knock down a door or make
an arrest on the show, Portland police are
often used as consultants. Local cops say
they sometimes watch the show just to
see familiar faces and places, and for an
escape from reality.
COURTESY OF SCOTT GREEN/NBC
WATCHING
THE DETECTIVES
STORY BY
PETER KORN
S
ure, in TV shows like “Law &
Order”, art imitates life. But
Portland police detective Sgt. Joe
Santos says sometimes on the job,
life imitates art.
A while back, a lieutenant was telling
him about a case that immediately brought
to mind a Morgan Freeman/Brad Pitt movie, Santos says.
“A brother killed his sister, and she was
rotting in the bathroom,” Santos says.
“And the brother was basically walking over her
decaying body for two
weeks to go to the bathroom. He was an obese
guy and laying on the
bed, and they went in to
clear the house and he
said, ‘I’m sorry.’
“And I was thinking,
‘Man, that really happened. That’s exactly like
— Brian the movie ‘Se7en.’ ”
Another case two
Schmautz,
ex-Portland weeks ago had Santos
police officer thinking about the popular Showtime series
“Dexter.” He was searching “the nastiest house in North Portland.” Garbage was strewn everywhere,
he says. “I’m walking into the kitchen and
stepping on pizza boxes full of rotting
pizza that’s green and slimy and moldy.
With every step I’m slipping around. I get
to the basement and there’s no power and
we find the bad guy hiding in a closet pretending to be asleep.
“It reminds me of every TV show I’ve
“You get
juries that
think, ‘Why
didn’t they
take DNA
on that car
prowl?’ ”
■ Cops find something to love, hate
in lineup of police TV programs
Mayor Charlie Hales included
the agreement in the 2013-14
budget summary his office reSupporters of the Portland leased after the council apPolice Mounted Patrol are
proved it.
pushing back against two deThe Friends’ group had
velopments that threaten the raised the first $200,000 and was
future of the horse unit.
in the process of transferring it
First, Commissionto the city when
er Steve Novick proNovick made his proposed eliminating the
posal in a Feb. 3 memo
unit in next year’s
to the other council
budget.
members.
Then the Portland
“We didn’t know
Development Comanything about Commission declared the
missioner Novick’s
stable area at Centenproposal and the
nial Mills unsafe, forcproblems with Cening the horses to be
tennial Mills before
relocated to a farm in
they were announced.
Aurora. The unit has
It’s put us in a holding
been housed at the agpattern until we can
ing former flour mill
meet with him and
on Northwest Naito
Mayor Hales and
Parkway and Ninth
learn more about
Avenue since the PDC
what they’re thinkbought it in 2001.
ing,” says Bob Ball, a
The one-two punch
real estate developer
came as a surprise to
— Bob Ball, and reserve Portland
the Friends of the
police officer who
Friends of the
Mounted Patrol, a
serves on the Friends’
Mounted Patrol board
nonprofit organizaboard of directors.
of directors member
tion that thought it
Ball says he was
had struck a deal with
caught off guard by
the City Council that
Novick’s proposal beguaranteed the unit would con- cause of the council agreement.
tinue at least through the next
“I testified before the council
fiscal year.
and thanked them for agreeing
When the council considered to continue the unit for two
eliminating the unit in the cur- years, and nobody said they
rent budget, the Friends’ group weren’t agreeing to anything at
promised to raise $400,000 to that time,” Ball says.
keep it going over the next two
See HORSES / Page 13
years — $200,000 each year.
By STEVE LAW
The Tribune
“The mounted
patrol is very
popular and
versatile.
People love
the horses. ...
Why would the
council want
to get rid of a
program that
connects so
well with the
public?”
Darth Vader and his Imperial Stormtroopers stop holiday shoppers in their tracks outside Macy’s (above).
Jedidiah Maxwell of Canby has his picture taken with Queen Apailana (right).
BEAM ME UP, SCOTTY B
THE FORCE IS
OUT FOR BLOOD
Story by Jim Redden • Photos by Jaime Valdez
ever watched,” Santos says. “If it’s ‘Dexter,’
the crime scene is some beautiful modern
house that’s white with perfect blood
splatter. Our crime scenes are garbagefilled, single-wide trailers that a hoarder
lives in.”
COURTESY OF NBC
“Let’s be careful out there” was Sgt. Phil
Esterhaus’ weekly roll call command on
“Hill Street Blues,” and a memorable one,
according to a number of Portland police
officers. Esterhaus was played by actor
Michael Conrad.
See DETECTIVES / Page 2
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Portland Police Officer Benson Weinberger walks Diesel into the safe
portion of the Centennial Mills building where the Mounted Patrol
prepares for their shifts.
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JONATHAN HOUSE
Jeff Shang joins fellow neighbors at a volunteer work party for the Sabin Community Orchard last Sunday.
Grant funds paid for the addition of bee-friendly trees, plants and shrubs to the orchard last summer.
Portland Tribune
Next time you’re out and
about in Northeast Portland,
stop and smell the flowers.
That’s what the Sabin Community Association hopes you
will do on their Bee Friendly
Garden Tour, a program heading
into its third season this spring.
“This is about providing forage and native habitat” to bees
and other pollinators, says Diane
Benson, a neighborhood board
member and co-founder of the
project. “Bees need food, and all
of us can do that.”
In three years, the tour has
come to include 41 stops — 40
Murphy shines his flashlight inside and
sees three young black men. They aren’t
wearing gang colors or smoking dope.
On a crisp, clear Thursday evening They’re just sitting, engine off. Dale and
Murphy want to talk to them.
with the temperature outside hoverWith Portland police rolling out the
ing around freezing, Portland Gang
city’s new hot-spot policing
Enforcement Team offiprogram, the unfolding
cers Brian Dale and Patscene involving Dale and
rick Murphy pull their
Murphy and the young
squad car to the curb on
Southeast 119th Avenue. SECOND OF TWO STORIES men they are about to confront is a microcosm of
A black two-door Honda
what criminologists say might be the
Civic is a good four or five feet from
the curb — the result of either a hor- program’s defining moment.
The evidence is clear that done right,
rible parking job or someone intentionally half-blocking the street.
See POLICING / Page 11
As the officers walk toward the car,
residents’ homes plus the pub- do, but it’s not a way to save bees.
licly owned Sabin Community You’ve got to get these flowers
Orchard, at Northeast 18th Ave- out there,” says Mace Vaughan,
another co-founder of the Bee
nue and Mason Street.
Each stop has a “Bee Friendly Friendly Garden Project who is
Garden” sign, funded by the the pollinator program director
neighborhood association. There for Portland’s Xerces Society for
are maps and a telephone hot- Invertebrate Conservation.
Vaughan hapline that provides
pens to live six
information about
blocks from Beneach site. Hundreds
son in the Sabin
of people throughNORTHEAST
neighborhood. The
out the city and subthird co-founder of
urbs have come to
the project is Tim Wessels, a piocheck it out.
Now the Sabin neighborhood neer in the field and a master
would like to inspire other neigh- beekeeping instructor at Oregon
borhoods to create a similar State University, president of the
Portland Urban Beekeepers, and
project of their own.
They’ll hold a public forum founder of Bridgetown Bees, an
March 19 to share their experi- effort to breed a winter-hardy
ences and suggestions for how to Portland queen bee.
Serendipitously, Wessels, too,
start a bee-friendly garden.
They’ll answer questions about lives in Sabin.
The project started, Benson
plant types, outreach, pesticides
and more.
“Beekeeping is a fun thing to
See BUZZ / Page 12
Portland teachers reached a tentative deal Tuesday.
Follow the story at portlandtribune.com.
Tech firms
seek a place
in economy’s
spotlight
Intel is well-known, but other
companies fly under the radar
By JIM REDDEN
The Tribune
TribSeries
TribTown
DEAL MIGHT AVERT A STRIKE
Online
See HALES / Page 9
By PETER KORN
The Tribune
Portland Tribune
Inside
TRIBUNE PHOTO: JAMIE VALDEZ
Gang Enforcement Team officer Patrick Murphy — after asking
permission — pats down a young black man who had been sitting in a
parked car on Southeast 119th Avenue. Officer Brian Dale looks on.
WHAT’S LOCAL FOOD?
SELECTING STALLS FOR THE JAMES BEARD PUBLIC MARKET.
— SEE SUSTAINABLE LIFE SECTION
There are more high-tech companies in the
Portland area than Intel — and many of them
are desperately trying to get that message
out.
“There’s a ton of world-class companies in the
Portland region, but the word hasn’t gotten out
on that,” says Sam Blackman, co-founder and
CEO of Elemental Technologies, a Portland-based
company working on ultra-high definition signal
transmission technology.
According to Blackman, the lack of awareness
See TECH / Page 10
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The Tribune
See BLOOD / Page 2
Police say conversation a priority; others
say random stops are recipe for trouble
It’s the bees’ needs, and Sabin has it
Sabin residents raise
awareness about
pollinators, habitat
Wars’ and ‘Star
Trek’ both have a
lot of fans who turn
out, and we always
have a lot of fun.”
The competition, similar to the Oregon vs. Oregon
State Civil War blood drive, has been
held three times in the past. It has been
won twice by “Star Wars” fans, which
is not surprising, considering the popular franchise has two active fan clubs in
the Portland area, both of which have a
lot of practice supporting charitable
events in authentic-looking, homemade costumes.
Most recently, more than a dozen of
them showed up to support the Salvation Army bell ringers outside of the
Pat downs likely
to increase as cops
take to the street
Shootouts every day?
Everybody likes to look in the mirror at
least a little bit, right? So if you’re a cop,
that means you probably watch some cop
shows on TV, at least a little bit, right?
If nothing else, cops know that what the
rest of us see on TV and in movies influences what we think of them.
Surprisingly, none of the officers we put
the question to admitted to watching real-
lood will
flow when
fans of
“Star
Wars” and “Star
Trek” rally their
supporters later this month.
At least that’s the hope for the upcoming American Red Cross blood
drive that pits supporters of the two
popular entertainment franchises
against each other to see who can turn
out the most donors. The Galaxy Blood
Drive is from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 28, at the donor center at
3131 N. Vancouver Ave.
“This is a great event for us,” says
Red Cross spokeswoman Daphne
Mathew. “Donations normally drop between Thanksgiving and New Year’s
because people are so busy. But ‘Star
Portland Mayor Charlie
Hales pledged Friday to pursue a new tax
measure to
pave city
streets in
2014, as well
as funding to
build out the
city’s parks
system.
Hales also
told the Portland Tribune
“I don’t feel
editorial
a need to
board that
he’s exploring look at a
a major reno- map of the
vation of Veterans Memo- city and
rial Coliseum, come up
hoping to pigwith new
gyback on the
World Indoor visions at
Track & Field the
Championships coming moment.”
— Mayor
to the Oregon
Charlie Hales
Convention
Center in 2016.
(See related
story, Page A8.)
Hales gave himself a “B”
grade for his first year in office,
but said he succeeded in setting
a tone of “collegiality and plainspokenness” at City Hall.
One example: he’s making no
bones about the need for a new
revenue source to pave dozens
of miles of the city’s gravel and
mud streets.
“There’s no point in kidding
you, or kidding ourselves,” he
— DR. ROBERT B. PAMPLIN JR.
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Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Winterhawks
The Victoria (48-20-1-3, 100
points) vs. Portland (54-13-2-3,
113 points), best-of-seven Western
Conference playoff series starts 7
p.m. Friday at Memorial Coliseum
and 7 p.m. Saturday at the Moda
Center, and continues next week
on Vancouver Island.
n The Royals swept Spokane
(outscoring the Chiefs 16-7) and
Portland swept Vancouver (outscoring the Giants 19-7) in round one.
n Victoria won three of four
games against Portland during the
regular season — all by 3-2 scores,
and all three in different ways. It
was 3-2 on Nov. 9 in overtime, 3-2
Jan. 4 in regulation and 3-2 Jan.
10 in shootout. The Hawks beat
Victoria 2-1 on Jan. 11, which
started the team’s epic 21-game
winning streak and wins in 32 of
33 games.
“It should be a great series,” says
Mike Johnston, Portland general
manager and coach. “We’re two very
evenly matched teams.”
n The Royals might have the best
goalie tandem
pair in the WHL,
with starter Patrik
Polivka (28-12-02, .915 save percentage, 2.56
goals against)
and Coleman
Vollrath (20-8-11, .928, 2.29).
PETAN Polivka started
and played every
game against Spokane.
Johnston says the Royals have
good skaters, too.
“They have four really good lines,
some depth up front,” he says, “and
six experienced defensemen. They’re
deep throughout their lineup.”
Although scoring 100 fewer
goals than Portland in the regular
season (238 to the Hawks’ 338),
the Royals had six players with 20
or more goals, led by Austin Carroll
with 34.
Brandon Magee led a list of
seven players with 47 or more
points, finishing the regular season
with 25 goals-42 assists-67
points. “Magee is really slick with
the puck,” Johnston says.
The Royals excel at defense.
They allowed 181 goals, second
fewest to Edmonton (179) and
fewer than Kelowna (182). “They
play a little bit more of a defensive
game,” Johnston says.
n Portland center Nic Petan, on
the Royals: “They’re a hard-working
team, tough to play against. It’s
going to be a hard round, for sure.
“They’ve got some skill up front.
We just have to take advantage of
their defensemen, because they’re
big and rangy. We have to use our
speed and skill. Nothing that
makes us afraid.”
n Portland has been clicking in
every phase of the game. How can
the Hawks be better?
“There’s always room for
improvement,” Petan says.
“Sometimes our defensemen are
not moving the puck quick enough
or the forwards are turning over the
puck. Those are two things that
would set our team back.
“All around, we’re a solid team.
We’re a skilled team. We have a lot
of maturity on our team, and I
think we’re the hardest-working
team in the league.”
Johnston agrees, saying the
breakout from the defensive zone
and passing in the offensive zone
remain keys.
n The other WHL second-round
playoff series have been set. It’s
Kelowna-Seattle in the West and
Edmonton-Brandon and Medicine
Hat-Kootenay in the Eastern
Conference. Kootenay upended
favored Calgary and coach Mike
Williamson, 4-2.
n Former players sometimes
move back to Canada to play university hockey. (Adam Rossignol,
for example, might go the college
route). By playing in the WHL, players become eligible for college
scholarships, and many continue
their careers (and education) north
of the border; Canadian universities allow such participation, U.S.
universities do not.
Kurtis Mucha, a former
Winterhawks goaltender, recently
led the University of Alberta Golden
Bears past the Saskatchewan
Huskies 3-1 to capture the
Canadian Interuniversity Sport
championship.
Mucha, 24, holds the WHL
record for most games (245) and
most minutes (13,786) by a goaltender. He played most of his
career in Portland before being
traded to Kamloops; he then
played some in the pro East Coast
Hockey League.
He’s also been noteworthy for
suiting up for the Edmonton Oilers
for a game against the Ottawa
Senators on March 4. A trade left
the Oilers without an emergency,
backup goalie; Mucha signed a
one-day NHL deal and sat on the
bench.
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Trail Blazers center Joel Freeland defends Orlando Magic shooting guard Victor Oladipo during a game in early January at Moda Center. Freeland, who has been sidelined since
Feb. 11 with a sprained knee ligament, has pushed back his probable return until the NBA playoffs.
Freeland eyes playoff return
I
n recent weeks, Joel
Freeland has told those
who asked that he hoped
to return to active duty
with the Trail Blazers over
the final week of the regular
season.
That would give Portland’s
second-year center/forward
— who suffered a sprained
medial collateral ligament in
his right knee on Feb. 11 — at
least a couple of games to
prepare for the playoffs.
On Sunday night, before
the Blazers’ 105-98 victory
over Memphis, Freeland all
but closed
More online out that possibility.
Read other
“I’m pointKerry Eggers
columns during ing for the
the week at portland playoffs,”
tribune.com
the 6-11,
KerryEggers
on sports
250-pound Brit said. “Any
time before that is pretty
much out of reach. I’ll just
have to see when it starts to
feels better.”
So the goal of returning for
the April 13 game against
Golden State, or the April 16
regular-season finale against
the L.A. Clippers, is gone?
“I’m still hoping,” he said,
“but I think that’s a stretch.”
Freeland said he is taking
his recovery and rehabilitation “day by day.”
“I’m approaching the seven-week mark,” he said. “It’s
frustrating me a little bit. I
still feel something in there
and a little bit of instability.
“There’s no pain, it’s just
loose. It’s much better than
when I first started feeling it.
But now, I’m ready for it to be
gone. It should have gone
sooner rather than later.”
Freeland is shooting daily
and working out with assistant coaches, but is limited in
what movement he can do. He
hasn’t yet returned to the
Blazers’ infrequent practice
sessions and isn’t sure when
he’ll be able to run full-speed.
“Lateral movements still
“There’s no pain, it’s just loose. It’s much better
than when I first started feeling it. But now, I’m
ready for it to be gone. It should have gone sooner
rather than later.”
— Joel Freeland, Blazers center/forward, on his sprained right knee ligament
get me,” Freeland said.
“Running backward is OK.
Running forward isn’t too
bad, but I still can’t go 100
percent.”
Freeland was only a bit
player a year ago, averaging
2.6 points and 2.3 rebounds
in 52 games as a rookie. He
earned a rotation role as a
5/4 in training camp this
season and ran with it, averaging 3.3 points and 3.9
boards in 51 games while
backing up Robin Lopez and
LaMarcus Aldridge before
the injury.
The Blazers were 36-15
when Freeland was injured.
Since then, they’ve gone 1212. Freeland’s absence isn’t
the only reason, but it hasn’t
helped.
“That’s quietly been ... I’m
See EGGERS / Page 4
Hollins keeps life, NBA in perspective
Kerry Eggers
L
ife is uncomplicated for
Lionel Hollins these
days.
The former Trail
Blazers guard and NBA head
coach is working as a studio analyst for NBA-TV and hosts a
two-day-a-week NBA talk show
on Sirius radio.
“I’ve been so blessed,” says
Hollins, whose contract was not
renewed by the Memphis Grizzlies after last season. “I get to
see my kids more often. Recently saw my grand baby in Arizona. I’m reading books again.
Went grocery shopping the other day. I get to spend a lot of
on the nba
time on my charity. Get to support the charities of other people who have supported mine
over the years.
“The freedom to not be in a
gym, at practice, in a meeting ...
I’ve had an opportunity to enjoy
what life is all about again.”
Hollins will be in New York
City tonight to watch the youngest of his four children, Austin,
play what could be his final
game for Minnesota. Austin Hol-
lins, a 6-4 senior guard, is the
No. 2 scorer and assists leader
for the Golden Gophers, who
face Florida State in the NIT
semifinals at Madison Square
Garden. Austin had a careerhigh 32 points in Minnesota’s 8173 quarterfinal victory over
Southern Mississippi.
“He’s had a nice year,” the senior Hollins says. “I’m excited
for him. He’s a good kid. You like
to see people who do it the right
way get rewarded. It’s not always that way.”
Though Hollins has enjoyed
his time away from coaching,
don’t get the wrong idea. Hollins
would have
liked nothing
more than to
have been on
the bench with
the Grizzlies
when they
played Portland
at the Moda
Hollins Center on Sunday. He’d love
to be coaching Memphis, or another team, when the playoffs
arrive in a couple of weeks.
“Of course,” Hollins says
when asked if he’d like to return
to the coaching ranks. “I miss
coaching. What I miss is the
teaching ... the development of
the team and the players. ... the
players working together and
watching them grasp it mentally, and then have them go out
and do it physically.”
Hollin pauses, then adds,
“Don’t take this the wrong way. I
mean no disrespect to Dave Joerger (his successor as Memphis coach). But anybody (the
Grizzlies) hire, if he lets the
players play the way they want
to play, they’re going to win.
They know how to win. When I
got there, they didn’t know how
See NBA / Page 4
Reynolds’ call: Tigers
over Nationals in WS
Fox Sports analyst sees
fierce AL East, better M’s
By KERRY EGGERS
The Tribune
Harold Reynolds’ new gig starts
Saturday, when he teams with Joe
Buck and Tom Verducci for Fox
Sports’ telecast of the 1 p.m. Los Angeles-San Francisco game at Dodger
Stadium.
Reynolds recently signed on to take
the place of the retired Tim McCarver in
the booth alongside Buck. The Corvallis
native and former All-Star second baseman with the Seattle Mariners will work
eight regular-season games for Fox
Sports as well as the All-Star Game and
the entire postseason.
Reynolds will continue to serve as
studio analyst for MLB Network’s “MLB
Tonight” show Monday through Friday
from 7 to 10 p.m.
Reynolds took time last week for a
question-and-answer session with the
Portland Tribune.
Portland Tribune:
How strong is the
American League East,
with the New York Yankees, Boston, Baltimore,
Toronto and Tampa
Bay? Are any of its
teams not a contender?
Reynolds: Paritywise, it could be the
REYNOLDS closest race ever. Every
team in that division
has the potential to win 90 games. You
don’t come across that, ever.
Of course, they play each other 19
times, so somebody is going to get beat
COURTESY OF MEG WILLIAMS
See REYNOLDS / Page 3
Second baseman Robinson Cano comes to the Seattle Mariners with a 10-year contract.
B2 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
PrepWatch
Baseball and softball are off
to promising starts at Central
Catholic High.
The baseball team, young but
experienced, took a 3-1-1 record
into the week. The softball squad,
which also has a mix of key
seniors and seasoned youth, is
rolling at 6-0.
n On the baseball diamond, the
Rams return eight starters, but have
only four seniors on their roster.
Senior leaders include Holden
Oglesbee and Anthony Brink, and
coach Dan Floyd says both junior
Cole Stringer and sophomore
catcher Ronnie Rust are among
his Division I prospects.
Junior Gabe Scanlon, Oglesbee
and Rust were second-team allMHC players a year ago, and
Stringer made the all-MHC first
team.
“A number of underclassmen
will end up playing college baseball, and some of them have
unlimited ceilings,” Floyd says.
Central Catholic posted victories
of 3-2 over Grant, 3-0 versus
Tigard and 5-3 against Dallas, and
finished in a 4-4 tie with
Beaverton.
The Rams’ sophomore lefthander, Sam Muskat, tossed a
two-hitter, with 13 strikeouts and
two walks, against the Tigers. Rust
fueled the offense in that game
with two triples. He also scored
all three runs and stole a base.
The Rams’ next five games are
away, including a Thursday clash
at West Linn and a Saturday doubleheader at Mountain View. After
an April 10 game at Jesuit, MHC
begins with an April 14-17 threegame series with Centennial.
The Rams made it to the second round of the 6A playoffs last
year, winning at Tualatin 3-2
before losing at Lake Oswego 7-5.
Injuries plagued the Rams, who
wound up 15-13 after placing
third in the MHC behind first-place
Reynolds and runner-up Barlow.
“This is a very good team that
hits the ball well and runs the
bases aggressively,” Floyd says.
“The season will come down to
defense and pitcher. Those are
areas where we have to improve, if
we’re going to have a chance at
making a run in the state playoffs.”
n On the softball field, Central
Catholic won its opener 1-0
against Jesuit, then outscored
Putnam, Beaverton, Hermiston,
Grant and Forest Grove by a combined 53-8.
Coach Sara Stauffer’s third
Rams club is showing good pitching and defense and especially
hitting.
“At Jesuit, we hit the ball well,
just right at people,” Stauffer says.
Since then, “our coaching staff
has been very, very happy with the
offense. We know if the bats are
there, we’re going to at least contend for” a Mt. Hood Conference
title.
The Rams finished 21-8 last
season. They took third in the
PDXSports
Tuesday, April 1
PAMPLIN MEDIA GROUP: DAN BROOD
Central Catholic High sophomore Sam Muskat delivers a pitch against Tigard.
MHC at 10-5, trailing winner
Barlow and David Douglas. The
Rams got to the 6A quarterfinals
before falling to eventual state
champion North Medford 10-0.
Only two players graduated from
that 2013 team, and the returning
corps includes pitcher Katie
Barron and catcher Brittney
Duronslet, four-year starters.
“Katie is just smokin’ it by people; the batters haven’t caught up
to her yet,” Stauffer says. Barron
also has improved her control, the
coach says. The Rams, for
instance, hit 30 batters last season. This year, Barron is 5-0 with
an 0.93 ERA, with only four hit
batters to go with 55 strikeouts
and 29 walks in 32 innings.
Duronslet “has a cannon for an
arm,” Stauffer says, “is a good
leader, knows how to play the
game, knows Katie and can hit for
power.”
The infield includes sophomores Ashley Doyle at first base,
Jessie Nagae at second, Alexis
Newby at shortstop and Kylee
Hupmhreys at third, where freshman Grace Dooney also can step
in. All four of the infield sophs
were on the varsity last season.
Newby and Humphreys can serve
as back-up arms on the mound.
Doyle is on a tear, leading the
team with a .632 average, three
home runs and nine RBIs.
In the outfield are senior Hailey
Frilot in center, senior Koratney
Speidel in left or right, and senior
Abby LeDoux.
Juniors Taylor Maxwell (designated player) and Paris Sykes
(utility) add to the experience and
depth.
The Rams have a big week
ahead, facing three solid clubs.
CC is at Glencoe on Wednesday,
at home against Clackamas on
Thursday and at Sandy on Tuesday,
April 8.
Then comes the 15-game MHC
season, with Reynolds and possibly every team looking improved
from 2013.
“We don’t have a game where
we can take it easy,” Stauffer says.
“It’s going to be really fun and
competitive.”
Cole Stringer
takes a cut for
Central Catholic
in the Rams’
preseason
victory at
Tigard.
PAMPLIN MEDIA
GROUP: DAN BROOD
Oregon’s largest source
of local news.
Blazers: Portland had Monday
off before taking on the faltering
Los Angeles Lakers at Staples
Center. The Lake Show and Utah
Jazz are basically at the bottom
of the Western Conference
— how times have changed. Tipoff is 7:30 p.m. at Staples
Center (TNT).
College baseball: Oregon
State plays the Portland Pilots at
Joe Etzel Field, 3 p.m. ... Oregon
is in Spokane, Wash., to face
Gonzaga, 6 p.m.
College softball: UC Santa
Barbara visits the Oregon Ducks,
3 p.m. doubleheader.
Prep baseball: West Linn and
Lincoln are scheduled to play at
Sckavone Stadium, 4 p.m. ... In
4:30 p.m. games, Central
Catholic is at McMinnville, Grant
visits Wilsonville, Barlow is at
Jesuit, Aloha takes on host
Parkrose, La Salle is at Valley
Catholic, Knappa is at Portland
Christian, and Gaston is at
Portland Lutheran/Portland
Waldorf.
Prep softball: Nonleague
games continue with Franklin at
Wilsonville, Lincoln at Jesuit,
Hermiston-Grant at Wilshire Park
and Lake Oswego-Benson at
Buckman Field, all 4 p.m.;
LaSalle-Roosevelt at Delta Park,
4:30 p.m., and Cleveland at
Liberty, 5 p.m. ... Knappa is at
Portland Christian, 4:30 p.m.
Prep girls golf: The PIL 5A girls
at Rose City, 3 p.m.
Prep boys golf: Lincoln competes at Pumpkin Ridge, 1 p.m.
Prep boys tennis: PIL matches
at 4:15 p.m. are Madison at
Wilson, Franklin at Cleveland
and Roosevelt at Benson.
Prep girls tennis: Wilson is at
Madison, Franklin is at
Cleveland, and Benson goes to
Roosevelt, all 4:15 p.m. ... St.
Mary’s Academy has a girls
match at David Douglas, 3:30
p.m.
Prep boys lacrosse: Wilsonville
and Grant vie at Delta Park, 7
p.m. ... La Salle is at Newberg, 8
p.m. ... Central Catholic visits
Southridge, 8 p.m.
Prep girls lacrosse: Southridge
and Central Catholic have a
nonleague game at Milwaukie,
5:30 p.m. ... Lakeridge and St.
Mary’s Academy do battle at
Buckman Field, 6 p.m. ...
Cleveland goes to Hood River
Valley, 7 p.m. ... Westview and
Grant meet in a nonleague
game at Delta Park, 7:30 p.m.
SERVING CENTRAL OREGON SINCE 1881
OFFICIAL NEWSPAPER OF CROOK COUNTY
50 CENTS
PRINEVILLE, OREGON, FRIDAY, MAY 3, 2013
VOL. CXXXI — NO. 43
Jason Chaney
Central Oregonian
As more and more reports of
health complications due to head
injuries surface, people have
ratcheted up efforts to protect athletes who suffer concussions.
The Oregon Senate is trying to
further that effort and recently
passed a bill with overwhelming
support that would require youth
sports leagues to recognize and
respond to possible concussions.
However, some worry that the
law could leave youth sports
coaches and other officials open to
potentially expensive lawsuits, and
deter them from continuing the
sport.
Oregon Senator Doug Whitsett
(R-Dist. 28) was one of just two
lawmakers who opposed the bill
amid civil liability concerns.
“I think that concussions are a
real concern,” he said. “My
concern, the way that bill is
written, is there are no violations
or any criminal act (citations) for
not following the rules of the new
law. The civil liability to me would
just be wide open . . . The bill is
See SB 721, page A8
LON AUSTIN/CENTRAL OREGONIAN
If Senate Bill 721 passes, youth sports organizations such as
Bend Parks and Recreation youth football, would be required
to detect and respond to concussions.
School
district
budget
season
begins
The Pamplin Media Group’s 24 newspapers offer more
original, local news from more places than any other
news source in Oregon. For the most comprehensive
news of YOUR community, visit portlandtribune.com
463672.011614
Bill may force concussion safety education
■ SB 721 would require
youth sports coaches and
officials to detect and
respond to concussions,
which could make them
legally liable to civil suits
SPORTS BIRTHDAYS
April 1, 1964
Kevin Duckworth
(died Aug. 25, 2008)
The former Blazers center,
born in Harvey, Ill., spent 198793 with Portland, one of his five
NBA stops from 1986-97. He
was voted the league’s most
improved player in 1988 and
earned All-Star Game berths in
1989 and 1991.
April 1, 1981
George Wrighster
(age 33)
The former Oregon Ducks tight
end was born on this day in
Memphis, Tenn. He was a fourthround draft pick of the
Jacksonville Jaguars in 2003
and caught 94 passes for 850
yards and nine touchdowns in
six seasons with the club.
April 1, 1988
Robin Lopez
(age 26)
The Blazers’ current starting
center was born in North
Hollywood, Calif., and played for
San Joaquin Memorial High in
Fresno.
OREGON SPORTS HISTORY
April 1-2, 1968
n The Cleveland Indians say
they’ll keep their Triple-A farm
club in Portland, and not move
the team to Tucson, Ariz., despite
the imminent addition of Seattle
to the American League. Indians
GM Gabe Paul says that even if
5,000 to 10,000 Portlanders go
Wednesday, April 2
to Seattle for MLB games, it
College baseball: Portland trav- won’t hurt Beavers attendance
els to Seattle University for a 4
— and might even whet the
p.m. game. ... Oregon ends a
appetites of Rose City diamond
two-day jaunt to Gonzaga with a fans. “Baseball is like eating
3 p.m. game against the
peanuts,” Paul says. “The more
Bulldogs.
you eat, the more you want.”
College softball: UC Santa
n The Portland Adanacs are
Barbara plays a makeup game at gearing up for their inaugural
Oregon State, noon. ... Lewis &
pro indoor lacrosse season this
Clark makes up two Northwest
summer at Memorial Coliseum.
Conference games with Puget
n The Portland Interscholastic
Sound, traveling to Tacoma,
League baseball season gets
Wash., for a 1 p.m. doubleheader. underway, with Cleveland (secPrep baseball: In Portland
ond in the state in 1967), talInterscholastic League 5A
ent-laden Madison and Grant
games, Franklin is at Roosevelt,
the top contenders.
and Benson meets Cleveland at
The head coaches are Ole
Sckavone Stadium, both 4:30
Johnson, Benson; Jack Dunn,
p.m. ... Also at 4:30 p.m., Grant Cleveland; Walt Buckiewicz,
plays at McMinnville, Wilson is
Franklin; Roy Harrington, Grant;
at Sherwood, Milwaukie is at
Mike Kelley, Jackson; Andy
David Douglas, and Parkrose
Pienovi, Jefferson; John Ryan,
plays at Centennial.
Lincoln; Dick McClain, Madison;
Prep softball: Newberg is at
Vince Pesky, Marshall; Stan
David Douglas, 4:30 p.m. ...
Bozich, Roosevelt; Robert
Hillsboro plays at Parkrose, 5 p.m. Wendel, Washington; and Bob
Prep girls golf: PIL teams tee
McFarlane, Wilson.
Thunder
Central Oregonian
off at RedTail at 3 p.m. ...
Central Catholic and St. Mary’s
Academy play in a Mt. Hood
Conference event at Gresham
Golf Course, 1 p.m.
Prep track and field: The PIL
varsity relays meet starts at
3:45 p.m. at Cleveland. ... The
Three Rivers League relays,
which include Grant, is 4 p.m. at
Oregon City.
Prep boys tennis: Wilson plays
at Grant, 4:15 p.m.
Prep girls tennis: Grant meets
Wilson at Gabriel Park, 4:15
p.m. ... Cleveland is at Lake
Oswego, 3:30 p.m. ... St. Mary’s
Academy is at Oregon Episcopal
School, 4:30 p.m.
Prep boys lacrosse: Lincoln is
at West Linn, 8 p.m. ... OES travels to Tualatin, 8 p.m.
Prep girls lacrosse: OES and
Central Catholic collide at
Milwaukie, 7:30 p.m. ... Wilson
is at Lincoln, 7:45 p.m.
The plan is for quarterback
Nathan Enderle to get his first
start and for ex-Oregon Duck
star Darron Thomas to come off
the bench when the Portland
Thunder visit the Los Angeles
KISS at 7 p.m. Saturday at
Honda Center in Anaheim, Calif.
“I’d like to see Nathan start
this week and see what he can
do, and give him a fair opportunity,” Thunder coach Matthew
Sauk says.
Both Portland QBs have been
spotty as Arena Football League
rookies, and the expansion
Thunder are 0-2 after losing at
home to San Jose 64-34 and to
Iowa 40-36
last week.
“Nathan
played better in
our first game;
Darron played
better in our
last game,”
Sauk says. “I’d
just like to see
ENDERLE
more consistency, and cut
down on our turnovers. In this
(arena) game, the guy who
doesn’t throw an interception
ends up being a starter.”
Enderle, a 6-4, 215-pounder
from the Idaho Vandals, has
completed 16 of 34 passes for
195 yards and three touchdowns with two interceptions.
Thomas, 6-3, 215, has con-
nected on 30 of 58 for 260
yards with four TDs and three
picks.
Sauk says he would like to
see Thomas use his mobility
more than he did in the first two
games.
“He’s concentrating so
much on being
a throwing QB
in the pocket,
but I’d like to
see him scramble a bit more,”
the coach says.
THOMAS
Sauk points
to Spokane
Shock QB Erik Meyer, who last
year passed for 4,667 yards and
112 touchdowns, with only 11
interceptions, in 18 regular-season games.
“Meyer moves very well in the
pocket to create space to throw,”
Sauk says.
n The KISS, also a first-year
AFL club, are owned in part by
KISS rockers Gene Simmons
and Paul Stanley. The KISS are
1-1 going into their home debut,
“and they probably should be
2-0,” Sauk says, noting that L.A.
led the Orlando Predators 56-40
after three quarters before losing their opener 69-63 in overtime in Florida.
Steel Panther, another band,
will play at halftime Saturday on
the team’s silver field.
“I’m sure the KISS will be
doing crazy stuff, and there’ll be
loud music. It’ll be interesting to
see what our concentration level
is,” Sauk says.
sports B3
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Reynolds: Cano will make
‘huge difference’ for Seattle
up down the line. But it’s a
loaded division, no doubt
about it.
The Yankees have gotten
back in it. A year ago, they
didn’t spend as much money
and sort of wrote off the season. This season, they’re
loaded up.
When the Yankees are good,
it affects eve r yb o dy i n
baseball. The
Yankees have
made a statement, “We’re
ELLSBURY
coming after
you.” That forces everybody
else to reload, too.
Tribune: What kind of an impact will Jacoby Ellsbury have
with the Yankees? What kind of
a season do you expect from
him?
Reynolds: He’s going to be
great. Yankee Stadium is going
to be maybe even better for him
than Fenway Park was, because
of the short porch in right field.
He’s a guy who pulls the ball a
lot. That’ll help him.
The big key for Jacoby is
health. There’s no question
about his ability. If he stays
healthy, he’ll put up an All-Star
year. if he gets hurt again, you
worry about him.
Tribune: Michael Pineda, the
former Seattle Mariners pitcher
who has missed the last two seasons dealing with a labrum tear
in his pitching arm, has won the
fifth spot in the Yankees’ rotation. What kind of a season can
he have?
Reynolds: I watched Michael
throw (during spring training)
in Florida. It was the best I’ve
seen him. He looked like he did
in Seattle, throwing free and
easy, the ball exploding out of
his hand. He’s in shape, and he
has that great size. I don’t
know what he’s going to do after being out so long, but I was
very impressed with what I
saw.
Tribune: Atlanta has lost
starters Kris Medlen and Brandon Beachy, both to Tommy
John surgery. Can the Braves
cover for them and be a playoff
team again?
Reynolds: It’s going to be
difficult, it really is. Before
those injuries, you could pencil them in with the (Washington) Nationals at the top in the
NL East. Now the Braves definitely drop down a notch. But
getting Ervin Santana is a big
help.
Plus, it’s not always how you
start. They have the potential in
the minors to make moves.
You’ll see them continue to try
to build that club through the
season.
And a positive about the
Braves, B.J. Upton, Dan Uggla
and Jason Heyward have all hit
well this spring. I don’t see them
having down years like they did
last year. B.J. tried to be too
much of a people pleaser, changing his swing and so forth, and
fell into a rut. I think he’s mentally back.
Tribune: What difference will
Robinson Cano make in Seattle?
Reynolds: A huge difference.
The thing about Cano, when you
see him every day, you recognize how great a player he is.
I’m not convinced the Mariners have enough around him
right now, but you can’t look at
this as a one-year deal. He
signed a 10-year contract. We’ll
have to see how the club performs around him the next
couple of years.
The crazy thing, with all the
injuries Texas and Oakland
have suffered, the Mariners find
themselves in the AL West race.
They have the pitching. They
could be competitive right out of
the gate.
The Rangers have lost their
whole rotation, plus (second
baseman) Jurickson Profar and
(catcher) Geovany Soto. The
A’s have lost Jarrod Parker and
A.J. Griffin. That leaves the
Mariners and the Angels as the
two teams that are relatively
whole.
Tribune: What do you know
about Mariners pitching prospect Taijuan Walker?
Reynolds: Love him. He hurt
his shoulder early in training
camp and didn’t throw a lot. I
think he’ll start the season in
the minors but be up by late
April or May. This kid’s ceiling
is incredible. He’s an athlete.
He’s only 21, but he’s going to be
one of those special pitchers
who comes along once in a generation. He has a fastball in the
mid-to-high 90s, a nice curveball and changeup. I don’t think
he has the stuff Felix (Hernandez) did at that age, but that
same kind of presence.
Tribune: Offer names of two
or three other rookies who you
think could make an impact this
season.
Reynolds: I like Nick Castellanos, Detroit’s young third
baseman. He’s
going to hit
with high average and power,
and he’s playing his natural
position.
I think in
Boston’s Xander Bogaerts,
you’re looking
ZUNINO
at the next
great shortstop
in baseball. He has the potential
to hit 20 home runs and play every day at short.
Seattle catcher Mike Zunino
has a chance to be another Buster Posey. I don’t know if he’ll hit
like Buster, but he can catch and
SUPERIOR CRAFT
throw and control a game. He’ll
have a big impact for that team.
Tribune: How good is Max
Scherzer, who won the Cy
Young Award last season with
an almost unbelievable 21-3 record? Can he replicate the kind
of season he had with Detroit?
Reynolds: He has the ability
to. I watched him throw a bullpen session the other day. His
confidence oozes. That’s the one
thing that stands out. His stuff is
electric. Now he has the confidence to go with it.
Tribune: What do you expect
from the Dodgers’ Yasiel Puig
this season?
Reynolds: I love him. If they
can keep him out of trouble,
he’ll be something special. He’s
going to drive you crazy. One
day he’ll be throwing to the
wrong base or taking unnecessary chances on the base paths.
The next day he’s hitting a ball
500 feet, and you’re amazed.
That’s the story with Puig.
The question will be how soon
he learns to play the complete
game of baseball, but they’re going to try to build the franchise
around him.
Tribune: The Dodgers have a
payroll of $235 million, knocking
the Yankees from the top spot in
baseball for the first time in 15
years. Will they get their money’s worth?
Reynolds: I think they will.
The question is, will they win
the World Series? I don’t know
about that. But with the roster
they have, they are putting a
product on the field that people
want to see. They have a chance
to win the NL West and go deep
in the playoffs. That brand is
worth watching again. They’re
getting their money’s worth, no
doubt.
Tribune: Who do you like to
get to the World Series? Pick a
Series champion.
Reynolds: I have the Nationals and the Tigers going to
World Series, with the Tigers
winning it all.
The Nationals are a deeper
club than the Dodgers. They
have a bench that can handle
the injuries that happen with
every club. They can go deep
into the minor leagues for talent with players other teams
are going to want. They’re sitting in a good position to keep
that machine going.
The reason I like the Tigers
is the experience of having
been (to the AL championship
series) last year, to the Series
two years ago, and the way
they’ve done it the last couple
of seasons. With Scherzer and
(Justin) Verlander and Miguel
Cabrera, they have guys who
have been there. The experiences they’ve had make them
ready to be champions. I think
they’ll win it this year.
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
BEAUTIFUL TRANSFORMATIONS
University of
Portland senior
Ratan Gill goes
for a return in
his No. 2 singles
victory, 6-2,
6-3, on Friday
against Saint
Mary’s. The
Pilots, who won
6-1, are 3-0 in
the West Coast
Conference and
were 9-4 overall
heading into this
week.
COURTESY OF
TEVE GIBBONS
StatusReport
Pro
Blazers: Pundits had Portland
free-falling out of the NBA playoffs
just one week ago, forgetting all
about LaMarcus Aldridge, as well
as the up-and-down nature of just
about every team in league history
short of the 72-10 Chicago Bulls of
1995-96. Now the Blazers are
48-27 and still No. 5 in the
Western Conference with just seven
regular-season games remaining,
starting tonight at the L.A. Lakers.
Winterhawks: It’s VictoriaPortland in the WHL Western
Conference semis. The best-of-seven series has games 1 and 2 at
Portland, Friday and Saturday.
Victoria won the season series 3-1
(one win in regulation, one in OT,
one in a shootout), but the Royals
and Hawks haven’t seen each
other since Jan. 11. The series winner is likely to face Kelowna, which
had the league’s best regular-season mark and is favored against
Seattle in the other West semi.
Timbers: Four matches into the
34-game MLS season and the
Timbers (0-2-2, 2 points) have yet
to gain a lead. Darlington Nagbe
came up lame during last week’s
2-1 loss at Western Conference
leader FC Dallas (3-0-1, 10). But
the attack, the team says, is ready
to explode, and the fans would do
just that with a victory on Saturday,
when the hated Seattle Sounders
(2-2-0, 6) visit Providence Park at 3
p.m.
Thorns: We have learned that
women’s soccer preseason games
between pro and college teams are
nothing like men’s soccer preseason games between pro and
college teams. The men’s games
tend to be reasonably close, but
last week the Thorns tuned up for
their National Women’s Soccer
League title game with two picnic
outings, feasting on Arizona 10-0
and ASU 5-0 in sunny Tucson.
Portland scored in the first three
minutes of each game. The Thorns’
season opener is April 12 at the
expansion Houston Dash.
Thunder: Portland’s expansion
Arena Football League team ranks
last out of 14 teams in touchdowns (10) and next-to-last in
yards (223.0 average) and pass
efficiency after two games. The
Thunder (0-2) play the first-year
L.A. KISS (1-1) at 7 p.m. Saturday
in Anaheim.
Mariners: Seattle has a much
revamped team as it sets out to
improve on various 2013 marks,
notably the 71-91 record, a batting
average (.237) that ranked 29th in
the major leagues and a run total
(624, 3.9 per game) that was
22nd in MLB. The M’s, who were
36-40 vs. the rest of the AL West
last year, complete their opening
series at the L.A. Angels tonight
and Wednesday, then visit Oakland
for four games before the home
opener at Safeco Field, 7 p.m.
Tuesday, April 8, also vs. the Angels.
College
Baseball: In the Pac-12,
Washington (8-1), UCLA (6-3),
OSU (5-3) and Oregon (5-3) are
setting the pace. ... Portland is 0-9
in the West Coast Conference and
5-22 as it plays host to the
Beavers at 3 p.m. today.
Softball: Oregon (6-0), UCLA
(8-1) and ASU (6-3) lead the Pac12. OSU is 2-4. ... Portland State is
1-4 in the Big Sky after dropping
two games at home to North
Dakota. Northern Colorado (3-0),
Sacramento State (4-1) and Idaho
State (2-1) are the top three.
Track and field: Oregon won 12
events at the Aztec Invitational on
Saturday, with Boru Guyota from
Jefferson High first in the men’s
800 meters in 1:50.22. Sam
Crouser threw the javelin an NCAAleading 247-5. Sophomore Jenna
Prandini ran a world-leading 22.98
in the women’s 200, one of eight
wins by UO freshmen or sophs. The
Ducks (ranked No. 2 for women,
No. 4 for men) are at Hayward
Field on Saturday for a 1 p.m. dual
meet against Arizona (No. 9
women, No. 16 men).
Football: PSU will play Saturday,
Sept. 6 at home against Western
Oregon, after opening Aug. 30 at
OSU. The Vikings are at Washington
State on Sept. 13. ... Spring practices
are underway in the valley, with spring
games set for May 3 at Oregon (11
a.m., Autzen Stadium) and Oregon
State (1 p.m., Reser Stadium). ...
PSU’s first spring workout is April 14.
The spring game is May 18.
480284.031114
■ From page B1
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B4 SPORTS
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
NBA: Coach still pulling for team
option for a fourth year at a rehave to deal with every day.
ported $2 million per season. A
“It’s not just numbers. I’m
coach with the credentials and
dealing with emotions and egos
experience of Hollins — or that
and sensitivities and insecuriof George Karl, who was interties. It’s easy to say these guys
viewed for the job to replace Hol- need to play so many minutes
lins — would have commanded
and this group is the best group
at least twice that figure.
to have on the floor at the particThe bottom line is very impor- ular time. It’s not cut and dried
tant to Pera and the new owner- like that.
ship group. Money surely played
“I want to be perfectly clear, I
a part in Hollins’ demise, but
have no problems with analytthere were other issues.
ics. I expressed that to manageIn the weeks that followed
ment here. If there is a sophistiHollins’ ouster, other reasons
cated mechanism to help us win,
emerged through “inside sourc- I’m all for it. But there has to be
es.” That Hollins couldn’t accept a balance. I don’t think basketanalytics and the advanced
ball is as numbers-oriented as
scouting metrics that are bebaseball, for instance. A coach
coming increasknows who he can
ingly in use in pro
count upon at difsports. That he
ferent times during
clashed with John
a game. It’s why I
Hollinger, the onetrusted Zach (Rantime Portland residolph) to walk up
dent who is an anthere and make
alytics devotee
free throws at the
hired last season
end of a game. It’s a
by the Grizzlies as
feeling that has
vice president/
nothing to do with
basketball operanumbers. The extions. That Hollins
periences a coach
bellyached about
has cannot be disthe midseason
carded completely.”
trade that sent
Hollins played
small forward Rufor the great
dy Gay to Toronto
Jack Ramsay in
for Tayshaun
Portland.
Prince, a deal that
“I once asked
save the Grizzlies
Jack how he demillions in future
cides to choose
salary. That Holsomebody to run a
lins was having inplay for at the end
creasing problems
of a close game,”
communicating
Hollins says. “He
with his players.
said, ‘I look at evThere is some
erybody’s eyes
truth to all of this.
when they’re comHollins is an olding toward me (for
school coach, a
the timeout). The
strong personality
— Lionel Hollins player looking me
who has developed
in the eye and
a coaching style
wants the ball is
through the years based on a
the person I’m going with.’ I
high level of expertise and intuplayed with players who could
itiveness about his players and
have great games, but when it
how to put together a team.
comes down to the last shot,
There was an incident with Hol- they don’t want that weight.”
linger at practice, during which
Hollins was against the trade
Hollins loudly objected to his in- of Gay, an important piece to the
terference with a player. Hollins
Grizzlies’ success.
says he spoke with Hollinger af“But I didn’t speak out on the
terward and that both men apol- trade,” Hollins contends. “I was
ogized to each other. (Hollinger
asked a question. I said I hated
did not return a phone message.) to trade Rudy. We were winning,
“I have no problems with
and it was the best team we’ve
John,” Hollins says. “I have no
had, with him on the floor. With
problems with analytics. The
(Pera and Levien), it was ecoonly problem I have is with the
nomics. I understand small-maridea there’s just one way to do
ket economics. Champagne
things. You look for every adtaste, bare budget. They chose
vantage and whatever tools you to go that way because it saved a
can utilize to help your team be
lot of money.
better. Part of that is having re“If you want to make a decilationships with the players I
sion, be up-front and tell every-
to win.”
Hollins puts himself in the
category of a guy doing it the
right way, but not getting rewarded. And he has a point.
When he took over the Memphis job in January 2009, the
Grizzlies had lost 126 of 175
games over the previous 2 1/2
seasons under Tony Barone and
Marc Iavaroni.
Gradually, Hollins built a winner, from 40-42 his first full season in 2009-10 to 46-36 to 41-25 in
the strike-shortened 2011-12
campaign to 56-26 in 2012-13, advancing to the Western Conference finals before being ousted
by San Antonio.
Within 10 days, Hollins — who
had worked his final season as a
lame duck on the final year of
his contract — was gone. How
could it happen?
Hollins fell victim to a change
in ownership and management.
Former owner Michael Heisley
sold the club to a group led by
California tech billionaire Robert Pera, now 36. Jason Levien,
an attorney and former sports
agent who had worked in the
front office of the Sacramento
Kings, became CEO and managing partner of the Grizzlies.
Levien took over the basketball
operations from Chris Wallace,
who remains the club’s vice
president/general manager in
title only.
“It seemed like they had their
minds made up when they came
in,” Hollins says. “They had an
agenda of how they wanted to
do things, and what they wanted
to spend. I didn’t fit into that.
“I can accept that. It’s their
prerogative. But when you look
at the big picture, you say, ‘Wow,
you’ve had some pretty good
success.’ If I were at FedEx, for
instance, I wouldn’t fire the employees who made it successful.”
The night the Grizzlies were
eliminated from the playoffs,
Hollins and his then-agent, Warren LeGarie, met with Levien for
2 1/2 hours.
“When I walked out of there, I
thought I was coming back,”
Hollins says.
Levien offered no public explanation, issuing only a statement that the club had decided
to go in a different direction and
thanking the coach for his work
with the franchise.
Joerger, who had been an assistant with Memphis since 2007
and had served 4 1/2 years under Hollins, was signed to a
three-year contract with a team
“I once asked
Jack (Ramsay)
how he decides
to choose
somebody to run
a play for at the
end of a close
game. He said,
‘I look at
everybody’s
eyes when
they’re coming
toward me (for
the timeout).
The player
looking me in
the eye and
wants the ball is
the person I’m
going with.’ ”
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COMMUNITY NEWSPAPERS | PORTLAND TRIBUNE YOUR TOWN, YOUR PAPER.TM
body why. That’s fine. But don’t
try to say it’s because of a young
player’s inefficiency. That’s not
why you traded him.”
It would appear Pera and
Levien were uncomfortable with
Hollins — a man nearly twice
their age — and more comfortable with Joerger, 39. And also
more comfortable with the salary he is making.
“Again, that’s OK,” Hollins
says. “But don’t put out there
that they got rid of the coach because he doesn’t communicate
well, he’s too hard on players,
that they want to create a
friendly culture. That’s all propaganda. Just say, ‘His numbers
were too high for what we wanted to pay.’ “
Hollins is reluctant to speak
on the subject. Only with prodding from a reporter he has
known since 1977 is he willing to
reveal such thoughts.
“For a while, it was very
hard to accept,” he says. “For a
while, I was in a depressed state.
When something like that happens, you blame yourself. You
wonder what you could have
done differently.
“At some point, you come to
grips with it. It had nothing to
do with me. They made that decision because that’s the decision they wanted to make.”
Hollins says he has found
himself pulling for the Grizzlies
as the season has moved on.
“I’m happy for Zach, Tayshaun, Mike Conley, Marc Gasol,
Tony Allen,” he says. “All those
guys I’ve coached, I’m excited for
them. I would be wrong to root
against them having success. I
would even be wrong to root
against the Grizzlies to have success. I’ve been fired before. Life
is too short to be miserable.”
After being fired, Hollins interviewed for vacancies with
Denver and the Los Angeles
Clippers.
“With the Nuggets, I don’t
think I was high on their radar,”
he says. “If Doc (Rivers) had
stayed in Boston, I think I’d have
been the Clippers coach. Doc
was the better fit, and he’s a
great coach. They made a good
hire there.”
Hollins says he chose not to
pursue an assistant coaching job
in the NBA. “I’ve been a head
coach the last five years,” he
says.
Would he take a head coaching job in college? “It would
have to be a really good opportunity,” he says.
Does Hollins think he’ll get
another NBA head-coaching
job?
“I have no idea,” he says. “I
think I will, but with certainty?
No. I have confidence I will, yes.
But we’re in a crazy business.”
Hollins has a new agent, Steve
Kauffman, and a portfolio that
merits another head-coaching
job.
“I’ve had several coaches I
know ask, ‘How in the world can
Lionel not have a job?’ “ Kauffman says. “It’s the hardest thing
to predict, because you don’t
know how many jobs will be
open. There could be as few as
two or three. Among the veteran
coaches — nothing against the
other guys — Lionel is generally
rated a more desirable commodity. If a team goes in that direction, he has a very good chance
to get a job.”
Hollins is one of the bright
minds in the business. Yeah,
he’s old-school, but so are Karl
and Gregg Popovich and Rick
Adelman. Hollins knows how to
win, and there’s an owner out
there who will want his expertise and know-how and be willing to pay it.
My bet is, Hollins’ life is about
to get complicated again.
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO: JAIME VALDEZ
Joel Freeland of the Trail Blazers shoots over Sacramento’s Chuck
Hayes. Freeland says he has been a little frustrated with the length of
his recovery time from a sprained knee ligament, which has kept him
off the court for the past 23 games.
Eggers: Positive
attitude pays off
■ From page B1
searching for the right words
here,” Portland coach Terry
Stotts said. “We’ve missed his
energy, his toughness, his intelligence on the court.
“His game complements
(that of) L.A. and Robin, and
Thomas (Robinson’s), too. He
defends each position. He can
make the perimeter jump shot.
He can go inside and outside.
He plays extremely hard. He’s
one of those guys, when he’s
on the court, you know he’s
out there.”
Assistant coach Dale Osbourne indicates there are few
players he has enjoyed working with more than Freeland.
“Joel is always positive,” Osbourne said. “Everything
we’ve asked him to do as a
staff, he’s done. He’s a worker.
His attitude has paid off for
him in the long run. He never
complains. He’s been a team
guy from the beginning. He’s a
great all-around person, and
he’s been an important player
for us.”
Freeland admitted to having difficulty dealing with the
injury and his time away from
the court.
“It’s not been good, especially when you know you could
be helping the team,” Freeland said. “It’s the first time
I’ve ever had a real injury and
been out for an extended period of time. It’s a learning process, just something I’m going
through for the moment.”
Freeland said he is trying
to stay patient under the
guidance of Chris Stackpole,
the Blazers’ first-year director of player health and
performance.
“I don’t want to rush back if
it will cause me problems in
the future,” Freeland said. “I’m
going to wait on Chris’ opinion, and the doctors’ opinion,
and go from there.”
Freeland seems positive the
knee won’t require off-season
surgery.
“It will heal up by itself,” he
said. “It just takes time.”
A commodity Freeland and
the Blazers have precious little
of right now with the postseason fewer than three weeks
away.
[email protected]
Twitter: @kerryeggers
When healthy,
Blazers big man
Joel Freeland,
blocking a layup
attempt by
Miami’s Dwyane
Wade, gives
Portland a
variety of
positives, coach
Terry Stotts
says, including
energy,
toughness,
intelligence on
the court and
defense.
TRIBUNE FILE PHOTO:
JAIME VALDEZ
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390492.062311 PT
■ From page B1
Classifieds B5
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Place your ad by calling (503) 620-SELL (7355)
www.Community-Classif ieds.com
Your Neighborhood Marketplace
Help Wanted
Job Opportunities
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Help
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Fax:
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NEED HELP
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E-Mail:
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Address:
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Call Mindy!
503-546-0760
Office Hours:
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for ad rates, general
information or help
writing your ad in any one
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exper. • Excellent benefits/pay, 401k option, Vacation,
Holidays. Apply at 34885 N. Honeyman Rd.,
Scappoose or email [email protected]
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M/F/D/V
REPORTER
The Times serving Tigard, Tualatin and Sherwood is
looking for an enthusiastic full-time reporter interested
in writing for a suburban weekly newspaper. This
reporter would cover the Tualatin community, which
offers a rich array of interesting stories to delve into
from breaking news, features and profiles to
investigative, enterprise stories and government
reporting. He or she will also serve as the feature writer
for the Living Here section that runs in both The Times
and Beaverton Valley Times.
The ideal candidate will have a four-year degree in
journalism and newspaper reporting experience. Strong
writing and editing skills are a requirement, as is the
ability to meet deadlines and manage several projects
at one time. We are looking for a team player with a
passion for accuracy, a sense of curiosity and the
proven ability to turn out a large volume of compelling
news content each week.
Please email a letter of interest, resume and at least
three samples of your published work to Christina Lent,
managing editor, at [email protected]
No phone calls please.
To learn more about our newspaper, visit
www.tualatintimes.com or check out our Facebook
page at facebook.com/tigardtualatintimes.
__________________________________
Advertising Marketing Consultant
Community Newspapers has an immediate opening for
a full time Advertising Marketing Consultant. The
successful candidate must be self-motivated, possess
the ability to multi-task, work in a fast paced
environment and meet deadlines.You will work with
existing customers as well as seek out new business.
You will be driven, like to work with people and have a
desire to be successful. Sales experience preferred but
not necessary.
Our marketing consultants meet with local businesses
to develop marketing plans and strategies to grow their
business.
This position reports to the Advertising Director at the
Gresham Outlook. We offer an above average base
salary, generous commission plan and benefits
including medical, 401(k) plan, vacation and more.
A valid driver’s license and reliable vehicle with
insurance is required.
If you are looking for a an opportunity with a growing
company that values its people and has a strong community service ethic, please submit your resume to:
Cheryl Swart, Advertising Director, The Gresham
Outlook, 1190 NE Division, Gresham, OR 97030 or
email your resume to: [email protected]
__________________________________
Subscription Sales
Community Newspapers circulation department has an
excellent part-time sales opportunity available.
This is an ideal opportunity to make great money in
your spare time.
You will sell newspaper subscriptions for our
award-winning publications at kiosk and festivals
throughout the metropolitan area. If you have excellent
communication skills, the drive to succeed and ability
to work independently this could be the perfect position
for you.
Regular part-time (primarily Friday, Saturday &
Sunday but some weekday work is available).
Hourly wage plus excellent commission.
Sales experience preferred.
Provide own transportation & ability to lift up to 25lbs.
Background check & drug screen required.
Please submit resume to:
[email protected] or fax to
503-546-0718
______________________________________
Advertising Sales Representative
PART-TIME, FLEXIBLE HOURS
Come join the Pamplin Media Group, the area’s largest
newspaper organization. We are seeking a part-time
newspaper advertising sales representative to sell print
and digital advertising services for our popular monthly
publication, The Regal Courier in King City.
We’re looking for someone who enjoys talking with
people, learning about their businesses, and helping
them to succeed. The selected person will manage a
defined sales territory, working with local businesses
on marketing strategies. Outside sales experience is a
must (media sales preferred), along with the ability to
manage multiple priorities in a fast-paced environment.
This is a developed territory with existing business.
This position requires great interpersonal skills, a
knack for organization, math ability and computer skills.
Reliable transportation and proof of insurance are
required.If you’re looking for new challenge, flexible
hours and a fun work environment, this may just be the
opportunity for you! For more information, forward a
resume with cover letter to:
[email protected]
______________________________________
Help Wanted
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COMMUNITY CLASSIFIEDS
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Family-owned Canby
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letterman jackets, screen
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Visit our website at:
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The Portland Police
Bureau has in its physical
possession the unclaimed
personal property described below. If you have
any ownership interest in
any of that unclaimed property, you must file a claim
with the`Portland Police
Bureau within 30 days from
the date of publication of
this notice, or you will lose
your interest in that property. Satisfactory proof of
lawful ownership must be
presented before property
will be returned; such proof
may consist of an accurate
description of the unclaimed property.
Various bicycles,
audio/video equipment,
cameras,
jewelry, computer equipment, personal items,
money, auto accessories,
tools, sporting goods and
other
miscellaneous items.
To file a claim or for
further information,
please contact:
Property & Evidence
Division, Portland
Police Bureau
2619 NW Industrial Way,
Suite B-4
Portland, Oregon 97210
(503) 823-2179
Published 01/02/14
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to soccer moms.
Successful, retail, retro
video game store in
Beaverton, Ore.
FOR SALE
• Solid sales.
• Impressive inventory.
• Includes all equipment and furniture.
$169,000.
(707) 367-6191
FOUND: DOG - 3/23/14,
at 57th & SE Malden St.
Tan & white, female, Chihuahua mix. Contact Rachel via Multnomah Co.
Animal Services, Case
#FR21186, to claim. Must
claim by 9/19/14. She will
be legally surrendered after that date.
LOST CAMERA: Nikon
D5100, left at Willamette
Elementary School playground in West Linn on
March 15th. Our son's 1st
year of life is on this camera, please call with any
information, 503-267-4552.
Antiques/Collectibles
ADOPT: A loving, established couple with close
family dream of a home
filled with the sounds of a
child. Please contact at
855-884-6080;
COMIC BOOKS WANTED
Private collector seeks
comics from the '40s-'70s.
Appraisals given, cash pd.
(503) 528-1297
Apply online at
www.westwardseafoods.com
select ''employment'' and then select requistion
number 14-0027
YOU MUST ATTEND
the above mentioned presentation to be considered
for employment as well as complete application.
CONCESSION Trailer:
''Top-of-the-Line''
Asking $38K
Call (406)253-9123
Add'l info & photos:
[email protected]
VAULT:
2-person,
The
Prayer section, South Corridor, tier 4, vault 2. Portland Memorial Mausoleum,
6705 SE 14th Ave, Portland,
OR
97202.
$5,000/obo. 503-989-5577.
OLD GROWTH Doug Fir:
Dry & seasoned,
$200/cord.
Delivery available.
Call for details:
(503) 807-7201.
Furniture/
Home Furnishings
HOUSEHOLD ITEMS
New 3 piece sectional
(new), Chair & Ottoman,
Antique Desk, Maytag
large capacity Washer &
Dryer (new). Must Sell!
503-982-4238.
MATTRESS &: BOX
SPRING: Clean, Sealy
Posturepedic, King size,
$150. (781) 472-9847
PORTLAND SE
HUGE CHURCH
Apparel/Jewelry
GORGEOUS 3.5 CARAT
TOTAL WEIGHT,
WEDDING RING SET,
Size 7, $3500 OBO.
(360) 846-3270
BIGGER & BETTER
THAN EVER!!!!
GE ELECTRIC STOVE
30'' wide,White,
Self-cleaning oven.
Very good condition!
$175. | (503)982-5085
$200 WROUGHT IRON
RAILING
Phone:
(503) 830-1119
Web:
www.eiffelfab.com
Closet space cramped?
Sell those items today
in the classifieds.
Call now!
Call 503-620-SELL
Hiring Telephone Interpreters for
Arabic, Korean, Mandarin, Russian,Vietnamese
PRO FORM 730
SI Treadmill - $150.
Schwinn stationary
exercise bike - $50.
Lateral Thigh trainer - $25.
All items rarely used
and look new!!
Will take Best Offer
Call Mark- (503)784-2574
Health Care
Equipment
TILT WHEEL CHAIR,
Hoyer lift, Geriatric chair,
potty chair, suction device
& more, Best Offer.
(503) 288-1997
MURRAY RIDING LAWN
MOWER:
One owner, 32'', 17.5hp,
automatic transmission.
$875 | (971)409-0981
Machinery & Tools
•Pay: $17 •Location: 707 SW Washington,
Portland, OR. •Hours: 5 am to 8 pm shifts
We offer: •Part or Full Time positions •Paid orientation
•Paid benefits (medical, dental, vision, 401(K), FSA,
others) •Paid on-going training •Bus pass
PLANER:
10''
Ryobi
planer, new blades, $140.
Call 503-543-8443 or
503-543-3997.
HUGE
Miscellaneous for
Sale
To Apply: Click http://goo.gl/6JUZmQ to view the job
description, then click the “Apply Online” button.
Join our team of talented
language professionals today!
OPEN UNTIL FILLED --- EEO/AA
C O M M U N IT Y C AL E N D AR
Saturday, April 5th: 7am-3pm
Wilsonville High School Gym
6800 SW Wilsonville Road
High quality items! Lamps, Chairs, Furniture,
Clothes, Books, Toys, Sports equipment and
Much, Much MORE!!
OREGON CITY:
**Proceeds to go to Soul'd Out for their trip to NYC
for the National A Cappella Competition.
A P PAR E L / J EW E L R Y
WE BUY GOLD
Saturday, April 5, 2014
9am - 12pm
Abernathy Grange
15745 Harley Avenue
Sterling Flatware -Silver-Pocket Watches
Pre-Purchase Tickets ~ $5
Tickets at the Door ~ $6
Proceeds will go towards a trip with the OCHS
Marching Band
For More information or to purchase tickets in
advance, Call 503-785-8995
YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD MARKETPLACE
✵
The Jewelry Buyer
ANTIQUE
TOY
SOLDIERS. Several hundred
available.
British/American/German
$5 - $10
Call Tom at 503-282-7139
M-Fri. 9:30-5 Sat 10-4
✵
8:30 AM - 5:00 PM
Food/Meat/Produce
B & P HITZ FARM
Apples, Potatoes,
Walnuts, Filberts,
Jam & Syrups.
Stand open 1:30 - 5:30
Closed Monday
503-982-9307
14070 Wilco Hwy
Woodburn
bphitzapples.com
Horses
PREMIUM
BAGGED FINE
SHAVINGS
$5.85 per 9 cuft bag. $6.75
11 cuft bag. Delivery and
quantity discounts
available.
K Bar D Enterprises
(503) 806-0955
Hay/Straw/Feed
14% All Livestock
'Valley Blend'
$9.75 / 50 lbs.
$379 / ton
KING FISHER FEED
(503)829-8060
Pets & Supplies
*BARKLEY*
The flying mop
Six year old, 85 pound, joyful, loyal, spirited, independent neutered male.
White Great Pyrenees/
mystery dog mix, howls
when the telephone rings
(maybe he thinks it is for
him).
Good
company
around the house. Loves
walks so much he prances
to the door like the
majordomo heading a
weekend parade. Somewhat protective of his food
and bed. Seeking someone as unique and wonderful as he is. Home visit required. For more info,
503.625.4563;
[email protected]
AKC YORKSHIRE
PUPPIES:
Parti colors; 10 weeks.
Dewormed.
$1,750, FEMALE.
$1,550 MALE.
John (503) 995-9023.
BLACK CATS... BLACK
CATS!!! looking for a
home.
Bonded pair of
sweet gentle rescued black
cats.
Loving, intelligent,
comical and teachable. Do
well with other cats. Playful but not frenetic. Approx.
10 months old. Neutered
male and spayed female.
Shots. Seeking committed
indoor home with cat
lovers.
Adoption fee
waivable for the right
home. Call 503-638-7500
BONNEY:
SKEEBALL GAME:
Vintage, full size, original
wood balls. Everything
works + 20,000 tickets.
A Man Cave must! $1,200.
503-543-3824
Miscellaneous
Wanted
CASH for DIABETIC
TEST STRIPS
Help those in need.
Paying up to $30 per
box. Free pickup.
Call Sharon:
5 0 3. 6 7 9. 3 6 0 5
20th N.E. Sandy PDX 503-239-6900
www.jewelrybuyerportland.com
503-620-SELL (7355)
RIFLE:
.44 Calibur Marlin Rifle.
Model #1894, lever action,
$400/obo. 360-751-8655.
Lawnmowers
You will enjoy a satisfying career, while making a
difference in people’s life! Excellent proficiency in English and second language with strong listening and
comprehension skills are required.
WILSONVILLE:
Sporting Goods
Household goods,
glassware, Fabulous
furniture, tools, lots of
new & old toys, books,
clothes & collectibles.
Health & Fitness
Building Materials
• Custom built,
• Commercial,
• 7 ft. Ceiling,
• Fully insulated,
• Interior toilet,
• Hood with fire
suppression system.
• All equipment incl.
• Adapts to any food.
• Used only 9 months.
PORTLAND:
2 plots at
Lincoln Memorial Park.
Located at the hilltop section. Nos. 1 and 2, Row
287. Easy access. Valued
at $11,990 but will sell for
$6,000 for pair. We will
pay required transfer fee of
$500. | (503)913-4063
SAVAGE MEMORIAL
PRESBYTERIAN
CHURCH
139th & SE Mill
(Between Stark &
Division)
April 4th & 5th: 9 - 4
www.jennandjonadopt.info
Expenses paid.
Business
Opportunities
WE BUY GOLD, SILVER,
AND PLATINUM
Located at 1030 Young
Street inside the Young
Street Market in
Woodburn. Free testing
and estimates.
Monday-Friday: 2-6 p.m.
WE PAY MORE
Northwest Gold and
Silver Buyers
503-989-2510
Garage/Rummage
Sales
Appliances
Housing, all meals, and laundry are provided by
WSI at no cost to the employee.Transportation
from
Seattle to Dutch Harbor is paid by the company.
Upon completion of the season, travel back to Seattle is paid by the company. Work begins in June
2014. Lots of overtime.
LINCOLN
MEMORIAL
PARK: Beautiful location in
the Mt. View area, grave
site #1, lot 104. No longer
needed, asking $5,900
(includes transfer of deed).
Please call 360-718-1891
before 9pm.
Complete, FULL size, with
ornate, black wrought iron
head and foot. Like new!
$95.00 | 503-622-6760
520-241-2522
COMIC BOOK
COLLECTION:
For more information, call
Ronnie at 503-804-8766.
100 Columbia Street
Vancouver,WA 98660
Miscellaneous
Wanted
WROUGHT IRON
BEDFRAME
Personals
Red Lion at the Quay
Cemetery Lots
Firewood/
Heating Supplies
Lost & Found
LOCATION:
We’re on the grow and currently seeking an
outgoing, dynamic individual to join the Portland
Tribune advertising sales team.
We’re looking for a “people” person with a great
personality and at least two years of advertising sales
experience – someone with a proven record of sales
success. We also seek a strong prospector – someone
who’s not afraid to make a lot of cold calls. Selected
candidate will have an account base, but will also be
expected to grow business substantially.
Excellent interpersonal skills, strong organizational
abilities, computer skills, and the ability to stay focused
on success are also important. This individual must be
a team player with a positive attitude.
In return, we offer a competitive salary plus
commission, a solid benefit package and the
opportunity to grow with us. For more information,
please forward a resume with cover letter and salary
history to: [email protected] or fax
to (503)620-3433.
Announcements/
Notices
[email protected]; or
JROTC Program
PANCAKE BREAKFAST!!!
Advertising Sales Consultant
Portland Tribune
Business
Opportunities
LIFELONG COLLECTOR
pays cash for GERMAN &
JAPANESE war relics.
Helmets, swords, flags etc.
(503)288-2462 | Portland
She might be old, small in
build and picky about what
she eats but Bonnie Blue
has a Heart of Gold and a
precious personality that
asks only for a lap and loving. She has recently volunteered to be a Compassionate Care Cat. The
adoption fee for Bonnie is
$40 - or free if you are a
senior citizen. Microchip,
worming and flea treatment, current vaccines, vet
exam and free 30-day
insurance offer are included. Cat's Cradle, call
503-312-4296.
✵ WWW .C OMMUNITY -C LASSIFIEDS .COM
B6 Classifieds
Pets & Supplies
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
Pets & Supplies
TIGGER:
Homes with Acreage
PRICE REDUCED
OREGON CITY:
HOME, BARN,
OUTDOOR ARENA
PASTURE & POND
BORDER COLLIES:
Imported Foundation
Breeding. Working &
Obedience CH. Outstanding pedigree's. Lifetime &
Health Guarantees.
$ 500 - $ 700.
360-691-5340
CINDY LOU:
Hello, how do you do? I'm
Cindy Lou, a petite and
dainty chocolate Pomeranian. You’ve heard the
saying, good things come
in small packages… well,
I’m living proof of it. I’m a
sweet
and
loving,
all-around great companion who is looking to share
my love with you! Please
call 503-292-6628 or visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
CODY
Tigger is a female cat with
white trimmed face, sleek
fur, black and grey striped
Siberian type cat who is
my close, cuddly companion. She is 3 years old in
June 19th, 2014. Tigger is
shy around strangers, she
loves to play with her sister
Pedal, chase furry balls or
bells, get into bags and
boxes. She is fixed and
uses the litter box. The
Adoption fee for both sisters will be negotiated with
the owner. To adopt this
cat please go to our
website at www.catscradle
rescue.com and under the
word ADOPT complete the
application.
View forest from living room.
Palisades Condominiums
A quiet, comfortable 2bd,
condo, nestled in an old
growth forest of Sitka & fir.
On a hill above ''Roads
End'' area. Vaulted ceilings, lvrm w/fireplace, dining area w/slider to covered balcony. All furnished
includes draperies. Parking available, convenient
kitchen, close to beach,
lake, golfing, casino &
shopping. Built in 1981 &
seldom used. Very good
condition, never rented.
Outstanding HOA board.
Price reduced. Call owner:
(503)299-4602
Farms
AURORA:
Born January 1st.
Certified
Farm
Organic
AKC, shots & wormed.
$1200 each.
(707) 954-1538
Gracie Rollo
Named for a caramel chocolate, Gracie is a spayed 6
year old female strawberry
blond Chesapeake Bay
Retriever mix seeking a
quiet lifetime loyal companion or family.Reserved at
first with strangers, Gracie
is sweet, mellow, cuddly,
loves to play fetch. Devoted to those who love
her. Trainer and rescue involved. For more info call
503.625.4563
E-mail
[email protected]
$349,000
Bedroom Ranch with attached 1 bedroom studio,
great 36' x 60' stall barn
with 24' x 12' stalls and
run-outs,large all-weather
arena. Property is completely fenced, with RV
dump and pull-through
parking. Five minutes to
shopping mall.
RMLS #14077725
Marybeth Kostrikin
Equity Oregon R.E.
675 NW 1st Ave, Canby
(503)706-1263 Cell
[email protected]
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
LINCOLN CITY-NW:
GERMAN SHEPHERD
PUPPIES!!
CANBY: 55+ 2000 Skyline
52' home, was $34,900,
now only $29,900.
Must sell
JandMHomes.com
503-577-4396
WrightChoiceHomes.com
Coast/Mountain
Property
Cody is a jolly funny playful
happy 8 year old neutered
male golden cocker spaniel
who lives to retrieve and
play ball. When not playing
ball he just wants to sit on
your lap; In excellent
health, current on innoculations, great with other
dogs,ignores cats, loves
people. Knows sit, down
and "high five". Trainer and
rescue involved. For more
information contact
[email protected]
and 503.625.4563. Fosters
for all breeds and sizes always needed.
Manufactured
Homes/Lots
$898,000
Includes 2 legal residences & excellent outbuildings. Established income stream for 20
years, 20 acres perfected
irrigation rights, Class 1
Latourell silt loam soil.
This place is dialed in and
immaculate.
View Virtual tour at:
www.visualtour.com/show
.asp?t=3289841&prt=100
03
RMLS# 14446119
Marybeth Kostrikin
Equity Oregon R.E.
675 NW 1st Ave, Canby
(503)706-1263 Cell
[email protected]
HIGHTOPS:
CLACKAMAS:
Mfgd Home, '77 WEST
WIND, 3 BDRM, 2 BTH,
55 + park, 1340sf, buy for
$26,500 or rent for $1050/
month. Call 503-657-9171
for info.
FACTORY SPECIAL
IS BACK!!!
NEW HOME 3 bdrm, 2 ba
$54,900 finished on site
JandMHomes.com
(503) 722-4500
MILWAUKIE: Recent remodeled 1 bdrm, reasonable space rent, in Sr park.
$16,500/obo. 4400
SE
Roethe Road, #25.
503-327-4522
!~VIDEO’S~!
Pictures & details
Oregon’s friendliest and
Most informative website
Huge selection of
MANUFACTURED &
MOBILE HOMES.
Family Owned Since 1992
503-652-9446
wrightchoicehomes.com
Real Estate Auctions
WOODBURN:
Sale of Abandoned
Manufactured Home
and Personal Property
One 1973 Redman Mfd
Home - Plate X95533 &
misc personal property including but not limited to:
Misc Hshold items have
been abandoned by Agafia
Orozco. The home is located at 1999 Jansen Way
#30 - Woodburn, OR
97071. Sale shall be by private bidding with sealed
bids. Bids to be delivered
to Park Manager @ 1999
Jansen Way (Office) no
later than 5:00 PM April 8,
2014. Minimum bid shall
be $3,600 and does not include unpaid taxes, to be
paid by purchaser. Please
contact Carol for more information and/or questions
at 503-982-0110.
NEW AFFORDABLE
HOMES HAVE
ARRIVED!
Starting at $69,995.00
FREE Rent special*
Community Features:
Pool/Playground/Billiard
Room/Gym
CAL-AM HOMES AT
RIVERBEND MHP
13900 SE HWY 212
Clackamas OR 97015
(503)658-4158
www.Cal-Am.com
(EHO) EXP 02/28/14
*Call for details
THE TRIPLE WIDE
STORE
View many floor plans.
2400sf MODEL HOME ON
DISPLAY
503 722 4500
JandMHomes.com
Houses for Rent
HILLSBORO:
Modern Downtown
Hillsboro Apartment.
W/D in unit. Free
Water/Sewer/Garbage,
across from MAX. *Income
Restrictions Apply.
City Center Apts,
160 SE Washington St.
503.693.9095
Gslcitycenter.com
OREGON CITY:
Remodeled 3 bdrm, 2ba,
1,375sf, all applces, lg fncd
yard, lg storage shed, lg 2
car garage, pet neg w/dep,
$1,600/mo + $1,000
refundable deposit to move
in! 503-572-0526.
Cars For Sale
Storage/Garage
Space
TUALATIN:
GARAGE OR STORAGE
New 10X20 concrete floor,
$97.50, Milwaukie nr Oak
Grove Fred Meyer, or
5X10, $24.99.
503-257-4524 or
www.topnotchhomes.net
1 bdrm/1ba: $747
2 bdrm/2ba: $895
3 bdrm/2ba: $1028
Water, sewer, garbage
paid. Full size W/D in
every apt. Pool, hot tub,
fitness center & clubhouse.
Professional on-site mgmt.
Beautiful, quiet, residential
neighborhood. $35 App
Fee. Call Today!!!
Wood Ridge Apartments
11999 SW Tualatin Rd
503-691-9085
www.gslwoodridge.com
503-887-2639
LEXUS SC300 1993:
In great running condition.
No dents, no accidents.
$3,900/OBO
Serious buyers only
Come out & test drive it!
503-841-3426 or
[email protected]
LINCOLN TOWN CAR
1984:
Very low mileage, excellent
condition
Moving ~ Make Offer!
PONTIAC Grand Prix SE,
2000: 3.1liter V6. 24 mpg.
New transmission, AC PW
PB Cruise CD, Clean,
reliable. 127K. $3,300.
Call 253-219-2109.
Antique & Classic
Autos
Houses for Rent
'71 CHEVELLE: $10,000
'35 PLYMOUTH: $2,500
Call Ronnie for more
information.
503-804-8766.
Pickups
CHEVY Tahoe LS 1999:
4x4, 5.7L, Automatic, 174K
miles, $4,200/OBO. Newberg area. Call after 5pm,
503-852-6075.
Boats/Motors/
Supplies
ESTACADA
Beautiful 1, 2 & 3 bdrm,
laundry hook-up, kitchen
appliances. Storage
shed. Includes water
and sewer!
15' INVADER Open Bow
Boat and trailer in good
shape, 4 cylinder 50hp
Mercury outboard needs
repair. Could be minor fix
or can make money by
parting it out, $800 or Best
Offer.
Estacada
area.
Please call Jon at:
503-502-7338.
RENT TO OWN
$975/MO!
DONALD: North Marion
Schools, 3 bdrm plus den,
poss 4th bdrm, wood cabinets, tile, breakfast bar,
morning room, oval tub.
Cars For Sale
JandMhomes.com
503-516-8858
TOYOTA TACOMA 2008:
4X4, SR5. $17,500 . 4 cylinders, 5 speed, Good
mileage,
Access Cab,
Outlaw custom rims, New
Yokohama tires, New tags
expire Feb. 2016, Tow
package, 115,000 hwy miles, no off road, Original
owner, title in hand, CD
player,
Electric
windows/Air, Snow chains
never used, No dealers.
Call 503-577-1279
TOYOTA Xtra cab, 1988:
4WD,
winch,
canopy,
moonroof. Mechanic's Spe
cial. $1,200. 503-625-0399
Sell it today
in the
Classifieds.
BEAUTIFUL RED
'67 MUSTANG
CONVERTIBLE, Mostly
original, 289 engine, AT,
white top, console &
Much More! $25,000
(503) 366-1788
AURORA:
30' FIFTH WHEEL:
Homebuilt by professional
builder. Slideout for living
room/dining room, front
bedroom, rear kitchen,
bath, propane heat, stove,
water heater, tinted windows, basement storage,
holding tanks, rubber roof,
tube frame, tandem axles.
Sold as is. Located in Dayton, Oregon. $4,800.
Please email if interested:
[email protected]
ITASCA 1998, 35' Ford
V10. One slide out. Twin
roof air, backup camera.
Generator, new tires, 2 tvs,
flat screen DVD and VHS.
$22,900. 503-648-0089 or
503-523-8030
LET US TURN YOUR
RV IN TO $$$$$
Northwest RV offers one
of the best consignment
programs around. We
have an outstanding reputation for being #1 at
customer service.
Our specialty is -
Selling your RV!
We sell all types of RV'S.
Our consignment program is free of charge
and there are no hidden
fees.
We will get you
the most for your RV!
ASK ABOUT OUR NO
DEPOSIT OPTION
www.gslwestridgemeadows.com
GRESHAM:
$99 1st FULL MONTH!!!
Quiet, Cozy, Affordable!!!
1 BDRM: $650
2 BDRM: $750
W/D hkup, private patio,
extra storage, close to
everything, on-site laundry,
pool & MORE!
PGE-WEATHERIZED
MEYERS SQUARE
2800 SE 1st Street
503-667-9161
Very clean, 114K mi, 4dr,
AT, no accidents, clean
title. Excellent condition.
Great Car!!! $2,550.
Please leave message &
phone number & we'll
return the call.
email for details
503-630-4300
PORTLAND NW:
1 Bed: $747, 2 Bed: $895!
Free Water/Sewer/Garb!
Spacious open floor plans
include full size W/D. Professional on-site mgmt.
Lush landscaping, Outdoor
Pool, Year round spa,
LARGE Patio w/storage.
*Income and Student
Restriction Apply.
*Pets Welcome!
Westridge Meadows
18476 NW Chemeketa Ln
503-439-9098
CHEVY Cavalier 1997:
Call for details:
971-832-8146.
Sec 8 OK
Apartments for Rent
RVs & Travel
Trailers
Must see to appreciate!
[email protected]
MOLALLA:
1997 3 bdrm, 2 ba, immaculately maintained manufactured home in an HOA
Park. The price includes
ownership of the land (Lot)
that the home is sitting on.
Kitchen includes stove,
D/W & refrigerator, skylight, carport with storage,
large covered deck. No
smoking, No pet home.
$129,500. Call to schedule
a walk through today!
Loren: 503-348-8809 or
Call
Toliver
Estates:
503-829-3193, leave a
message we will get back
to you.
Apartments for Rent
Here at Northwest RV we
have a large budget for
advertising that targets
buyers of all ages! We
advertise not just locally
but across the country,
even Canada!
6492 Portland Road NE
503-393-3663 | Jasmine
FAX
Your classified ad :
(503) 620-3433
24 Hours per day
Call 503-620-SELL
(503-620-7355)
For personal
assistance, call
(503) 620-SELL(7355)
community-classifieds.com
B U I L I D I N G M ATE R IAL S
One level home 3 bdrms, 2
ba, separate living & family
room. Fenced backyard.
Master suite w/jet tub and
seperate shower. Gas fireplace. Stainless Steel appliances. $1,600/mo. No
pets. Call 503-330-6495.
RV S & T R AVE L T R AI L E R S
30’ 5th Wheel, ‘’Big Country’’ by Heartland 2009:
Heavy Duty Rear Carrier, Large Collapsible Steps
w/Handrail, Aluminum Mag Wheels, Sleeps 5, Table
seats 6, 3 slide outs, Corian Counter Top, Furnished
small appliances, Shower, Pots, Pans, Dishes.
Oregon City area. $31,000
Get your vacation plans ready!
Call Tom today while it’s still available!
503-320-3784.
Homes for Sale
Service Directory
ESTACADA:
JUNIPER:
Hello, I'm Juniper, the
adorable little lady with
long tortoiseshell fur with
the big golden eyes and
big heart! I'm alert and curious, and some people
even think I look like a cute
little owl. I like to be up
high so I can see all of my
domain. I'm coming out of
my shell and would love a
quiet home filled with love.
Please call 503-292-6628
or
visit
our
website:
www.animalaidpdx.org for
more information.
PEDAL:
Pedal is female cat with
medium grey with a few
flecks of light orange fur,
and a white spot on her
tummy. Pedal will be 3
years old in June 19th,
2014. She is fixed and
uses the litter box. Pedal
and her sister Tigger are
adoptable as a pair. They
are bonded and have lived
only with each other.
Please
contact
catscradlerescue.com and
under the word ADOPT
complete a no-obligation
application. This will be
sent to the owner for her
return call. You can call
Marilyn at 503-312-4296
for further information.
Home & Professional Services
Cleaning/Organizing
VISTA NOEL
62 New Homes!!
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(503)706-1263 Cell
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I'm Hightops, the handsome boy with the cute little tail! My grey and white
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In addition to being adorable, I'm also a loving and
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Mowing, weeding, trimming, blackberries, hauling, year-round maintenance.
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Abbreviations destroy the
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Portland!Life
The Portland Tribune Tuesday, April 1, 2014
MovieTime
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Strong plot propels ‘Veronica Mars’ Bits&Pieces
BOOK REVIEW
New mystery
requires no TV or
movie knowledge
THE BIG SCREEN
Notable new releases:
■ Last week
“Noah”; “Cesar Chavez”;
“Sabotage”; “The Lunchbox”
■ This week
April 4:
“Captain America: The
Winter Soldier” (Marvel), PG13, 136 minutes
Our patriotic hero faces a
new threat from a Cold War
foe, “Winter Soldier” from the
Soviet Union.
Stars: Chris Evans, Scarlett
Johansson, Robert Redford,
Samuel L. Jackson
Director: Anthony Russo,
Joe Russo, Joss Whedon
“Island of Lemurs: Madagascar 3D” (WB), G, 39 minutes)
It’s a documentary about Dr.
Patricia C. Wright’s quest to
help the island’s endangered
lemurs.
Stars: Morgan Freeman, Patricia Wright
Director: David Douglas
“Finding Vivian Maier”
(IFC), not rated, 83 minutes
The documentary examines
the extraordinary life of the
prolific photographer.
Stars: John Maloof, Phil Donahue, Mary Ellen Mark
Director: John Maloof, Charlie Siskel
Also: “The Raid 2” opens at
Cinema 21.
■ Next week
April 11: “Rio 2”; “St. Vincent”; “Draft Day”; “Under The
Skin”; “Jodorowsky’s Dune”;
“The Unknown Known”
LIFE B7
By STEPHEN ALEXANDER
The Tribune
When I told my fiancée
Sarah that I was going to read
a book based on the “Veronica Mars” TV show and movie,
she rolled her eyes. I understood her skepticism. Books
based on TV shows or movies
are usually not worth the paper they are printed on and
are certainly not worth extra
paper to review them.
Yet, “Veronica Mars: The
Thousand Dollar Tan Line”
(Random House, $15.95) was different. The book is collaboratively written by Rob Thomas,
the creator and writer of the
“Veronica Mars” TV show and
the movie, and Jennifer
Graham, a Reed College alumnus. It is a strong mystery that
could stand on its own even
without the TV show and movie.
A bit of the backstory on the
“Veronica Mars” phenomenon:
It began as a TV show in 2004
about a teenage private eye.
It became a cult
classic, but ran
only
three
years before it
was canceled,
plotlines unfinished. In 2013 a
Kickstarter
GRAHAM
campaign netted more than
$5 million in donations from
fans to get a movie made. The
movie, which picks up 10 years
after the series ended, was released earlier this month.
Stephen King described the
character of Veronica Mars as
“Nancy Drew meets Philip Marlowe,” and the book remains
true to most of what made the
show and the movie captivating.
The book picks up a few
months after the movie left off
with Veronica running her father’s P.I. company. It is spring
break in the fictional town of
Neptune, Calif. Amidst the decadent partying, a girl goes missing. With the inept Neptune
sheriff unable to handle the investigation, Veronica is called in
to unravel the mystery, which
becomes more complicated as
the story progresses.
The book is far darker than
either the series or the movie,
taking on a deliciously noir tone.
Veronica’s life is in peril on several occasions. The language is
much coarser than could be
heard on TV or in a PG-13 movie.
One of the best things about
the show was the dialogue.
While the book tried to make
Veronica witty, it fell short. In
fairness, perhaps the reason the
dialogue in the show and movie
was so entertaining was the
adorably sassy way the lines
were delivered by Kristen Bell,
who played Veronica. (As a side
note, Bell narrates the audiobook, and it would be interesting to hear whether she is able
to bring the dialogue to life).
That said, the book makes up
for the dialogue by
getting inside Veronica’s head in a way the
show and movie never
could have. The thirdperson voice Thomas
and Graham have developed for Veronica
is pitch perfect.
After the show
and movie spent so
much time focusing
on Veronica’s relationship with her on-again/offagain boyfriend Logan Echolls,
it was disappointing that the
book left him by the wayside.
Logan, on military duty, ap-
pears just twice in video chats
with Veronica. However, the
book does include cameo appearances by fan favorites
such as Wallace Fennel (Veronica’s best friend), Weevil
Navarro (the former biker
gang leader with a heart of
gold) and Dick Casablancas
(the goofy frat boy).
Computer genius “Mac” takes
on a large role. Veronica’s relationship with her father is not
quite as interesting as it was in
the show or movie, but it serves
its purpose. The book also
brings back a character from
Veronica’s past. And while I will
not spoil the surprise, Veronica’s relationship with the character becomes the
emotional axis on
which the story
turns.
The best thing the
book has going for it
is the plot. Had the
show and movie never existed, the story
could stand on its own
in the world of P.I.
mysteries.
“Marshmallows” —
what Mars fans call themselves
— will love it and it’s a good
enough story to turn someone
unfamiliar with Veronica Mars
into a Marshmallow.
Beer: Brewer vows to persevere in business
■ From page B8
“It turned out the landlady I
rented this place from may have
been a little bit of a scammer,”
McIntosh-Tolle says.
“So the building was in default, which was not revealed,
and then it went into foreclosure, which she didn’t tell us
about, and we found out when
there was a notice on the door,
just ... plastered on to the front
of the door that there were new
owners.
“Fortunately, the new landlords who bought the place at
foreclosure auction held all of
our leases to be valid anyway;
they didn’t make an issue of
that, but it took a month and a
half to get a new signed lease
from them, which meant that
all of my licensing came to a
HOME RENTALS
The top 10 digital movie purchases based on consumer
transaction rate, by Rentrak:
1. “The Hunger Games:
Catching Fire”
2. “12 Years A Slave”
3. “Gravity”
4. “Frozen
5. “Thor: The Dark World”
6. “Captain Phillips”
7. “Blue Jasmine”
8. “Nebraska”
9. “Bad Grandpa”
10. “Ender’s Games”
Other favorites recently:
“Last Vegas”; “The Counselor”
Source: Rentrak Digital
Download Essentials Industry
Service
sudden freeze, because the
feds needed a signed copy for
the alcohol tax and trade bureau, the OLCC needed a
signed copy for their brewpub
licensing — everything depended on getting a signed
copy.”
Unable to provide the Oregon Liquor Control Commission or Alcohol Tax and Trade
Bureau with a signed lease,
McIntosh-Tolle says, “that was
this big delay, and it was very
nerve-wracking at first.”
Just recently, he says, several other problems have arisen,
including the building’s sewer
line turning out to be privately
owned and not legal, and the
building’s required premises
isolation valve on the water
line, which his former landlady
had assured him was in place,
did not actually exist.
“I have to pay to install one.
It’s $570 for the inspection fee
for it — not actually the valve,
which you have to hire some
one to install,” McIntosh-Tolle
says. “I would prefer to just
trust people.”
In early March, McIntoshTolle encountered what was
possibly the brewery’s most
hampering, and certainly its
most bizarre, obstacle yet.
International Building Code
requires the landing on each
side of a door to be the same
height and continue in the direction of travel for 44 inches before
there is a step up or down, he
explains.
“Basically, the door is not OK
the way it is, and there is no
way to change it,” he says. “I
didn’t build the door; it is the
same as it has always been, but
it does mean that I am not al-
lowed to have the public enter
my space.”
McIntosh-Tolle says he is
looking into whether he can
sell beer to passers-by through
a doorway onto the sidewalk.
Whatever comes of that, he
says, “the plan at this point is
to produce three types of ale in
22-ounce bottles that’ll be sold
mostly wholesale — so, to bigger bottle shops, gluten-free
restaurants, specialty restaurants, bars — things like that,
places that want real local
product or gluten-free product
and sell at some retail.”
And someday, he adds, he
hopes to open his own brewpub. For now, though, “my goal
is really just to make beer that
happens to be gluten-free,” he
says. “It’s strictly gluten-free,
but the point is to make good
beer.”
By JASON VONDERSMITH
The Tribune
Thousands to arts
The Oregon Arts Commission, supporting its multiyear
Sustaining Oregon’s Arts program, has awarded $237,500 in
capacity building grants to 17
Oregon arts groups.
The grants range from
$3,100 to upgrade Triangle Productions’ office equipment to
$24,500 for the Salem Arts Association capital campaign.
Support went to the following
Portland companies: All Classical Public Media Inc. ($22,400 to
support its move to Hampton
Opera Center); Chamber Music
Northwest ($22,300 for system
upgrade); Friends of Chamber
Music ($10,000 for relocation to
Hampton Opera Center); Literary Arts ($20,000 to support lecture archives); Newspace Center for Photography ($7,900 for
financial management upgrade); Portland Opera Association Inc. ($22,300 for website for
50th season); Triangle Productions; and Young Audiences of
Oregon and Southwest Washington ($15,300 for technical upgrades).
A big loss
Speaking of The Bite, the
longtime event lost one of its
supporters recently when
Terry Amato, one of its marketing people, died of cancer.
Amato, 61, also was involved
in the Wooden Shoe Tulip Festival, Portland Bridal Show and
Special Olympics Polar Plunge.
Amato was born in Portland,
raised in the city and attended
Jesuit High School and Portland State University.
New album
Portland-based The Dandy
Warhols have released their
first-ever live album, “Thirteen
Tales From Urban Bohemia:
Live At The Wonder” — recorded at The Wonder Ballroom during the band’s 13th
anniversary tour of the album
“Thirteen Tales From Urban
Bohemia,” which produced the
hit “Bohemian Like You.”
The band is going on tour in
the U.S., Europe and Australia
through August, starting April
23 in San Francisco. For info:
dandywarhols.com.
DOC SPOTLIGHT
A significant movie happening on the horizon:
Care to learn more about
how Big Oil has impacted our
world? The Hollywood Theatre, 4122 N.E. Sandy Blvd., will
be showing the documentary
“Big Men,” April 5 and 6 (tickets $6 check hollywoodtheatre.
org for times). It’s a fast-paced
documentary through the
world of African oil deals,
eavesdropping on meetings
where the fate of billions of dollars has to sometimes go
through the terror of armed
militants who’ve given up on
the money trickling down. The
film follows explorers of Dallas-based oil company Kosmos
Energy, which discovered and
developed the first commercial
oil field in Ghana.
emergence of Multnomah Whiskey Library, which has proven to
be extremely popular.
Bootlegger’s, featuring cocktails based on higher-end whiskeys, scotches and other spirits,
along with a small-plate appetizer menu with items such as
meatballs, bruschetta, meat-andcheese platters and oysters, is
certainly a twist on Central Beaverton’s well-established nightlife options.
Bootlegger’s rustic, old-Westlike ambience comes courtesy of
a tin and wood-beamed ceiling,
tables on wooden whiskey barrels, old Mason jar lights with
vintage Edison bulbs and wooden stools with leather seats.
While the decor featuring vintage photos of speakeasys and
news clippings of infamous 1920s
mobsters Al Capone and Lucky
Luciano further the Prohibitionera theme, it’s the drinks that
drive the point home.
“The drink menu is Prohibition themed,” says Knutsen,
who’s worked as a bartender at
Broadway Saloon for four years.
“We’re going back to classic
drinks that people don’t do a
whole lot of now. Old fashioneds,
sidecars, Manhattans, things
you don’t see as much. Our juices are fresh squeezed and the
bitters homemade.”
Doug Carpenter, Todd’s cousin, who helped bring Bootlegger’s to life, says about 100 different bottles will reside behind the
simulated coal-via-black barn
wood bar.
“Just whiskey will be about a
third of that,” he says, noting the
bar will also be defined by what
it doesn’t have. “It’s hard to find
a bar to go in and have a conversation where there’s not a TV
screen or video poker in the
background.”
McQuade sees Bootlegger’s as
fitting in with city leaders’ plans.
“It helps create more of a
draw into the old town Beaverton area,” she says. “There’s
more reason to come down here.
It’s a quaint area, kind of a hidden secret.
“We can’t compete with downtown Portland,” she adds. “This
is just something different, with
a fun spin to it. We just wanted to
have fun doing it. We have a lot
to share with everybody.”
DENTAL CARE FOR THE WHOLE FAMILY
$100 OFF
*FOR NEW PATIENTS
On Your 1st Visit
(on any service)
503.257.3033
DR. CAROTHERS DENTAL OFFICE
10101 SE Main St., Suite 3009, Portland
503-257-3033 • www.drdavecarothers.com
DR. DAVID N. CAROTHERS,
DDS, PC
*Mention this ad when setting up appointment.
April 26th @ 9:30am ◆ PARADE ◆ FAIR ◆ CRUISE-IN
© 2013 Peanuts Worldwide LLC
484776.040114
te
Save the da
■ From page B8
483955.040114
UPCOMING EVENT
Whiskey: Fancy cocktails served
480285.031114
Info on a local documentary:
“Off the Rez”
With the NCAA Women’s
Tournament going, and Shoni
Schimmel’s Louisville reigning
as one of the best teams, it’s a
good time to download the movie about the Schimmel family,
namely Shoni, who played two
years of prep basketball at
Franklin High in Portland after
living most of her life on the
Confederated Tribes of the
Umatilla in Eastern Oregon. It’s
available on iTunes; it’s been in
the top 10 among downloaded
documentary films recently.
Making Memories!
82nd Avenue of Roses Parade
Eastport Plaza
Yamhill &
to
82nd & Boise
SE 82nd
Announcement Booth @ PCC
FREE
classic car cruise-in ◆ community fair
pony rides ◆ live music ◆ clowns
A light-hearted look at Charles Schulz’s
exploration of the natural world.
Delighting us all through May 4
483951.040114
DISCOVERY MUSEUM
www.82ndavenue.org ◆ 503-774-2832 ◆ 503-771-3817 ◆ www.eastportplaza.com
www.worldforestry.org
Portland!Life
PAGE B8
TUESDAY, APRIL 1, 2014
Daniel McIntosh-Tolle stands outside his brewery-to-be, Moonshrimp Brewing, at Southwest Barbur Boulevard and 22nd Avenue. A Portland native, McIntosh-Tolle vows to make his business happen — at least selling his
gluten-free beer — despite many logistical hurdles.
HEALTHY
BEER?
■ Grassroots brewer Daniel
McIntosh-Tolle fights red tape
to open gluten-free brewery
W
hen you have a dream,
sometimes everything just
falls into place, and other
times everything just falls
apart. Daniel McIntosh-Tolle, owner and
founder of startup beer-maker Moonshrimp Brewing, has experienced a little
of both, and he is determined to make
his dream come true.
A lifelong Southwest Portland resident
and Wilson High School graduate,
McIntosh-Tolle, 29, was never a big beer
drinker during his time at Lewis & Clark
College, but about six years ago he started getting caught up in Portland’s beer
culture. Around that same time, he was
diagnosed with celiac disease, a chronic
nutritional disorder caused by faulty absorption of gluten in the intestines.
Since gluten is a substance found in
wheat and other grains, and beer is made
from barley, beer is anathema to people
with the celiac ailment.
“I was just starting to get into beer and
enjoy the craft beer movement when diagnosed, and it was like, ‘No more beer,’”
McIntosh-Tolle says. However, “a friend
of mine who used to live on Barbur (Boulevard) made me a batch of gluten-free
beer. That got me interested in homebrewing.”
It was his wife who suggested that he
start a gluten-free brewery — though it
took a while for him to come around to
the idea.
“My first response to her was, ‘No,
that’s crazy.’ It just seemed insane, like,
‘Me, start a brewery?’ ” McIntosh-Tolle
recalls. “And then a month later I went up
to her and I went, ‘I think I should start a
brewery!’ and she said, ‘Yeah, I know.’”
McIntosh-Tolle’s quest to fulfill his
Brewing gluten-free beer is not a novel concept, but it’s something near and dear to Daniel
McIntosh-Tolle’s heart — brewing a beer he can consume, as someone who has battled celiac
disease.
Story by Drew Dakessian
Photos by Vern Uyetake
dream of owning his own business serves
as evidence of what can happen to even
the most enthusiastic.
McIntosh-Tolle spent the next five
years laying the groundwork for this endeavor, known as Moonshrimp Brewing.
Now living in Southwest Portland’s Maplewood neighborhood, he leased a space
in the nearby Multnomah neighborhood
at 8428 S.W. 22nd Ave., off Barbur, and
then on May 20 of last year launched a
monthlong campaign on the crowdfunding website Kickstarter.
“I’m not sure I did everything in the
right order,” he says. “I got this place first
and signed the lease and had it locked
down before I started the Kickstarter
campaign, so I could say I have a place,
which helped the Kickstarter be successful, but meant I was paying rent over
time.”
Premature rent paying turned out to be
the least of his problems.
See BEER / Page B7
“It’s strictly gluten-free, but the point is to make good beer.”
—Daniel McIntosh-Tolle, owner and founder of Moonshrimp Brewing
RAISING THE BAR
Bootlegger’s Whiskey Bar to bring lounge-feel to Beaverton
By SHANNON O. WELLS
Pamplin Media Group
Sandcastle dreamin’
COURTESY OF CANNON BEACH SANDCASTLE CONTEST
Eager contestants are starting to plan and design what they want to build in the milestone event of the
Cannon Beach Sandcastle Contest. It’ll be the 50th year of the contest on June 21 — an event that had an
ignominious beginning after the March 1964 Alaska earthquake that created a tsunami that hit the
Northwest coast. Cannon Beach flooded and Ecola Creek bridge washed away, and residents started the
sandcastle contest as a way to move on from the devastation. Professional sand sculptures and skilled
amateur teams, families and children take part. For more information, visit cannonbeach.org or “Cannon
Beach Sandcastle Contest” on Facebook.
When plotting a new watering hole next to
a popular bar you already own, the winning
formula is one that draws in brand-new customers while also enticing regulars to check
out what’s happening next door.
With Bootlegger’s Whiskey Bar, located to the
left of Broadway Saloon at 12434 S.W. Broadway
St. in Beaverton, it seems Carla McQuade and her
business partners Todd Carpenter
and Karmen Knutsen, have their
creative juices flowing in the right
direction. The cozy, dimly lit, Prohibition-themed lounge, which they
plan to open in early April, offers a
decisive alternative to the more
boisterous, pub-like environs of
Broadway Saloon, the downtown
Beaverton mainstay McQuade
has run for two years.
McQuade and Carpenter, her
domestic partner, purchased the
space next door that most recently housed Potter’s Christian
Church and a travel agency before that. The two spaces have
separate entrances, but share a
storage area in the back.
“We had to rent it out anyway,” McQuade says.
“We thought, ‘What are we gonna do with this
area?’ It’s got a storefront. How about something
quaint, like a whiskey bar? Something new to the
Beaverton area that’s cozy and friendly.”
The idea marinated for nearly a year.
“We talked about it and kind of sat on it for a
while,” she says. “Then we finally decided to move
on it.”
The Bootlegger’s owners started remodeling
last summer, and it was essentially complete by
late December. A miscommunication with city of
Beaverton building inspectors, however, required
some plumbing and wiring projects to be
disassembled and reworked.
Now waiting on word from
city officials, McQuade is
hopeful the new venture
will open its doors soon.
“I kind of always wanted
to complement the
Broadway (Saloon),” she
says. “We have a lot of
people leave next door
because there’s nowhere
to sit. It’s something
unique.”
Portland has seen the
See WHISKEY / Page B7

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