Face Jugs Introduction

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Face Jugs Introduction
FACE JUGS
AND
JUGHEADS
AN
AMERICAN
CERAMIC
TRADITION
Face jugs are
sometimes
called
Jugheads.
Face jugs
were first
made in the
early 1800's
by slave
potters in
the
American
South.
Face Jugs
are attributed
to a number
of slaves
working as
potters in the
Edgefield
District of
South
Carolina and
pottery
families
living in
North
Carolina.
Slaves turned
pots, pushed
wheels, made
the pottery
and loaded
the kilns in
their free
time.
Many pots
were made
to honor
dead
relatives
and
friends.
Most of
these
artists
names are
unknown.
Face Vessels
have been
found along
the routes of
the
Underground
Railroad and
on gravesites.
Sometimes
face jugs
were shown
as mean or
the devil to
keep
children
away.
Slave potter “Dave”
(David Drake) from
Edgefield, South Carolina
could read and write, and
was owned by publishers
of a newspaper. Under
the risk of severe
punishment, this slave
potter created jugs with
rebellious sayings on
them.
Pottery created by Dave
sells for over $140,000
today.
Once in a
while there
is a double
face jug.
This one
is a triple
face
Many times
face jugs
are fun and
humorous.
There are still
families that
create Face
Jugs in North
Carolina.
Kings pottery
in Seagrove
NC are 9th
generation
face jug
potters.
Your turn...
You will…
• Research Face Jugs in African American
Folk and Primitive Art.
• Imagine and then draw in pencil an
expressive vessel face design.
• Create in clay using slab, coil or pinch
methods, an expressive face vessel in the
spirit of Edgefield Potteries.
• Apply a color scheme in glaze to complete
the project.
Before you begin in clay…
• You must research and then draw your
vessel and face design to scale and in detail.
– Your drawing will be hung next to your vessel,
therefore, it must match your final clay piece.
This is part of your grade.
– Your drawing must:
• Be drawn to scale (size it will be in reality).
• It must be at least 8” in one direction.
• All handles and elements must be included.
– You must get prior approval of your drawing before
moving on to clay.
PBS History Detectives

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