Ner Tamid Times - Congregation Ner Tamid

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Ner Tamid Times - Congregation Ner Tamid
Congregation Ner Tamid
a reform synagogue
Ner Tamid Times
www.CongregationNerTamid.org
16 AV- 16 ELUL 5775
Volume 30, No. 8
AUGUST 2015
Prez’s
Menschen-ings
Cantor’s Notes
Cantor Patti Turner
Eight years ago, when I. D. Freed (of blessed memory)
stepped down from being the spiritual leader of Congregation Ner
Tamid due to illness, I stepped up and took over the position, as
spiritual leader and cantor. It was eight years ago, that we began
studying Torah together. We started our study sessions with the Book
of D’varim (Deuteronomy).
So when we met last weekend (Jul 25th), we began where we
started.
It has been so exciting and rewarding for me to watch the
members of this congregation and study group grow in their thinking
and understanding of Torah and Gd.’s will for us. It seems that each
and every year we find something new, even in words we have read
before.
Sometimes, we get through 3 words, sometimes through 8
lines or so, and sometimes we make through the whole portion, but I
can assure you, there is rarely a dull moment!
This week’s Torah portion, “V’etnachtan,” we hear the
warning, again to keep Gd.’s commandments, as well as a repetition of
the 10 Commandments. But there is a difference in this telling of the
10 Commandments and the 1st telling in Sh’mot (Exodus).
In Sh’mot, we are told “v’zachor et haShabat” – remember
the Sabbath. Here in D’varim, we are told “shamor et haShabat” – to
guard (or keep, as we say) the Sabbath.
Why the difference? Did Moses make a mistake when he
restated them? Did he forget? He was, after all, 120!
On the web site, Judaism 101, we read:
Shabbat involves two interrelated commandments: to
remember (zakhor) Shabbat, and to observe (shamor) Shabbat.
Zakhor: To Remember
Remember the Sabbath day to sanctify it (Hebrew: Zakhor et
yom ha-Shabbat l'kad'sho) -Exodus 20:8
We are commanded to remember Shabbat; but
remembering means much more than merely not forgetting to observe
Shabbat. It also means to remember the significance of Shabbat, both
(Cantor Continued on page 5)
August will be a busy month as we begin the
preparations for the High Holy Days! (Can you believe that they
are just over a month away?) Please see the flyer on page 4 of the
newsletter for the service schedule dates and times. If you would
like to participate in the services, please contact me as we have
English, Hebrew and non-speaking parts available. Members will
receive tickets to the services. If you are not a member and
would like to attend our services, please contact us at
[email protected] for information. All of the
services and events for the holidays are included.
I would like to thank the Board members for all of the
hard work that they put into making sure that Ner Tamid
continues to flourish. We have mentioned in the past that we
operate on a very tight budget. The members of the Board have
stepped up and pitched in to go above and beyond, by not only
fulfilling their financial obligation, but adding additional
donations to help the budget. If you are in a position to contribute
to Ner Tamid beyond your dues requirement, we would be
delighted to accept your assistance. If you are not a member,
please consider a donation to Ner Tamid, which can be made to
the General Fund in your name or anonymously.
Please join us for an evening of family, food, and fun
crafts that celebrate our Jewish heritage on Saturday, August 22nd,
at 6:30 pm. All ages are welcome to participate. We will be
making some decorations for the Holidays including for the
Sukkah. In addition, back to school is often a difficult time for
families in need. The price of admission to the evening is
a canned good or other microwavable, non-perishable item, to be
donated to less fortunate families in the area. Join us for a night of
making memories and mitzvahs.
Israeli/International Folk Dancing returns to Ner Tamid
on Saturday evening, August 29th, at 7:00pm. Come and join for a
Educational & Upcoming Events





Family Craft Activity, August 22nd, 6:30 PM
Israeli/International Folk Dancing, August 29th, 7:00 PM
Selichot Service, September 5th, 7:30 PM
Every Shabbat, 7:30 PM, Friday Night Services.
Every Shabbat 10:00 AM, Shabbat Morning Service, 10:45 AM Torah Study.
(President Continued on page 3)
Congregation Ner Tamid
751 Hebron Parkway, #340
Lewisville, Texas 75057
(972) 416-9738
2014—2015 Contacts
Cantor/Para-Rabbi . . Cantor Patti Turner
972-416-7069
[email protected]
President . . . . . . . . Randy Friedberg
972-315-1911
[email protected]
Vice President . . . . . . . . . Cary Miller
972-492-6023
[email protected]
Secretary . .
.Brittni Coe
214-704-2224
[email protected]
Congregation Ner Tamid’s CARE COMMITTEE
brings a "neighbor helping neighbor" approach to
providing aid and support to congregants who need help
during difficult times. We offer help with cooking because
of illness or accidents; and provide assistance to families in
mourning or with other special needs.
If you know of an individual, or family, in the C-N-T community who
can use our assistance, or if you want to join our team, please e-mail:
KAThy Friedberg at: [email protected]
ONEG SHABBAT GUIDELINES
 If you are unable to provide Oneg on your assigned date, please find a
replacement for yourself or feel free to send in a donation or drop
items off beforehand. Thank you!
. .
Treasurer . . . . . . . . . Joel Goodman
972-242-8764
[email protected]
Trustee . . . . . . . . . . .Larry Spritzer
972-539-7206
[email protected]
Trustee . . . . . . . . . . .Michael Bergel
940-591-6446
[email protected]
Trustee . . . . . . . .
. . .Mark Pierce
972-245-5799
[email protected]
Worship Committee . . Cantor Patti Turner
972-416-7069
[email protected]
Membership & Care Committee
Kathy Friedberg
972-315-1911
[email protected]
Ner Tamid Times Editor
Kathy & Daryl Friedberg
972-315-1911
[email protected]
NT Web Site . . . . . . . . .Joel Goodman
972-242-8764
[email protected]
Wanted!
 Stories

Anecdotes
 Poems

Quotes
Share your interests and points of
view with the rest of us that we all may
grow.
Kathy & Daryl Friedberg, Editor
(972) 315-1911
Email: [email protected]
PAGE 2
Congregation Ner Tamid's CARE COMMITTEE
When providing Oneg, please keep the following guidelines in mind:

An inexpensive, small centerpiece would be appreciated. Vases will
be provided for flowers.
 Oneg suggestions include a sheet cake or two dozen cookies as well as
fruit, nuts, trail mix or vegetables.
 Juice and wine will be provided.
 Paper products and silverware will be provided.
 Set up should be done before Services, but, if necessary, can be done
quietly during Services.
 Clean up includes emptying trash cans, sweeping and mopping floors,
washing and putting away all items used, and wiping down
countertops.
If you are aware of a special occasion [anniversary, birthday,
graduation, etc.] and would like to provide Oneg on a date not scheduled
for yourself, please feel free to contact the Oneg provider scheduled and
make arrangements with them.
[email protected]
The Harlan S. Friedberg Memorial Yahrzeit Plaque is a
thoughtful way to remember loved ones who have departed
from us but will never be forgotten.
Memorial Plates, each with a light to be illuminated for
the Yahrzeit, are available that can be inscribed with up to
three lines of personal engraving which may include the
departed’s name, Hebrew name, if desired, and the Hebrew
and Gregorian dates.
The cost of each Memorial Plate is $180.00. The ten times Chai will
provide for the continued funding of additional Memorial Yahrzeit Plaques, as
they become necessary, as well as the cost of the individual Memorial Plates and
engraving.
If you have someone’s name that you would like to have placed on the
Yahrzeit Plaque, please contact Randy Friedberg or any member of the Board.
Much as the Mourner’s Kaddish is a spiritual reaffirmation to the goodness of
life, so shall these Memorial Plates be a visual reaffirmation and tribute to the
goodness of our loved one’s lives.
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
AUGUST 2015
Kosher Fusion
Hot…Hot…Hot… and I’m
loving it !
I remember the summers in
Israel were kind of like in Texas
only hotter and steamier. Unlike
these days we didn’t have air conditioning at the house or the stores
but surprisingly we survived. Besides cooling off at the beach or
with a water hose, we ate a lot of
seasonal fruit & vegetables, and
made tons of fresh fruit drinks.
Luckily the same fruit and vegetables are in season here like peaches, apples, melons, grapes, tomatoes, cucumbers, summer squash
and more…
Let’s sit by the pool (or water hose, LOL) refresh with a delish drink and of course we have to
eat something.
Peach Lemonade with Cantaloupe
Ice:
4 cups of water
2 cups coarsely chopped peaches
(about 3-4 peaches)
1 cup sugar or more if you like it
sweeter
1 cup fresh lemon juice (about 5-6
lemons)
1/2 cantaloupes, seeded
1 peach cut into 8 wedges

Combine the first 3 ingredients in a medium saucepan
over med-high heat. Bring to
a boil, reduce heat and sim-
AUGUST 2015
by Shuli
into the pocket. Also tastes good on
Jewish Rye Bread.
mer 5 min. cool completely
about an hour.
 Transfer mixture to a blender
and blend until smooth.
 Strain the mixture through a
sieve over a pitcher, reserving
the liquid and discard solids.
Stir in lemon juice. Add
more
cold water as needed/to taste. Refrigerate.
 Use a melon baller and scoop
melon. You can also cut the
melon into cubes if you don’t
have a melon baller. Place the
melon balls on a sheet tray and
freeze. Place 4-5 frozen melon
balls in each glass and pour the
lemonade, garnish with 1
peach wedge.
(President Continued from page 1)
Chicken Salad in a Pita:
2 chicken breasts from a store
bought rotisserie chicken
1 apple or pear, skinned and diced
1 cup quartered seedless red grapes
1 stalk celery finely chopped
1/4 cup finely chopped red onion
1/4 cup walnut halves, roughly
chopped
2 Tablespoons finely chopped fresh
parsley
1/4
teaspoon
kosher
salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground black
pepper
1/2 cup good quality mayonnaise


Take the skin and bones off
the chicken breasts, dice the
meat and put in a large bowl.
  Add all other ingredients except the mayo and mix well.
  Add the mayo, mix gently to
coat salad. Keep refrigerated.
To Serve: Cut pita in half or use a
flat beard, put lettuce in the pita
pocket and spoon the chicken salad
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
fun filled evening, and don’t fret if you
have two left feet, some of us have two
right feet, and so it will all work out!
Torah Study and Havdalah will precede
the dancing at 5:30 pm, as will Bring Your
Own Dinner at 6:30 pm.
The Board is also looking at a
number of possible Community Service
activities for after the High Holy Days and
we are soliciting ideas. If you know of
anything that you would like to participate
in, please contact a Board member. As part
of this we are recommending that you
bring staple canned goods to Temple for
donation to the various shelters in our
areas.
Please remember to support our
Community Service activities (see page 9).
The Kroger Community Rewards Program
needs you to re-attach your card to Ner
Tamid each year in August. Please take a
moment to go to the Kroger Community
Rewards page on the Kroger website and
add Ner Tamid. Don’t forget to add Ner
Tamid to your Tom Thumb Rewards
Program, and the Amazon Smiles program.
Come experience what sets Ner Tamid
apart.
Where you are more than just a name!
Shalom, Randy
PAGE 3
Please join
Congregation Ner Tamid
for our HIGH HOLIDAY SERVICES
at 751 Hebron Pkwy, Ste 340
Lewisville, TX 75057
DATES AND TIMES 5776 – 2015
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
Sept
5
13
14
19
22
23
23
27
Saturday
Sunday
Monday
Saturday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Wednesday
Sunday
Selichot Service
Erev Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah
Tashlich
Erev Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur
Break the Fast
Sukkot (at Cantor Patti’s)
7:30PM – 9:00PM
7:30PM – 9:00PM
10:00AM – 1:00PM
11:45AM – 12:45PM
7:30PM – 9:00PM
10:00AM – 6:30PM
6:30PM – 8:00PM
6:30PM – 9:30PM
For ticket information
e-mail: [email protected]
or call (972) 416-9738 [leave message]
PAGE 4
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
AUGUST 2015
(Cantor Continued from page 1)
as a commemoration of creation and as a
commemoration of our freedom from slavery
in Egypt.
In Exodus 20:11, after Fourth
Commandment is first instituted, G-d explains,
"because
for
six
days,
the
L-rd made the heavens and the earth, the sea
and all that is in them, and on the seventh day,
he rested; therefore, the L-rd blessed the
Sabbath day and sanctified it." By resting on
the seventh day and sanctifying it, we
remember and acknowledge that G-d is the
creator of heaven and earth and all living
things. We also emulate the divine example,
by refraining from work on the seventh day, as
G-d did. If G-d's work can be set aside for a
day of rest, how can we believe that our own
work is too important to set aside temporarily?
In Deuteronomy 5:15, while Moses
reiterates the Ten Commandments, he notes
the second thing that we must remember on
Shabbat: "remember that you were a slave in
the land of Egypt, and the L-rd, your G-d
brought you forth from there with a mighty
hand and with an outstretched arm; therefore
the L-rd your G-d commanded you to observe
the Sabbath day."
What does the Exodus have to do
with resting on the seventh day? It's all about
freedom. As I said before, in ancient times,
leisure was confined to certain classes; slaves
did not get days off. Thus, by resting on
Shabbat, we are reminded that we are free.
But in a more general sense, Shabbat frees us
from our weekday concerns, from our
deadlines and schedules and commitments.
During the week, we are slaves to our jobs, to
our creditors, to our need to provide for
ourselves; on Shabbat, we are freed from these
concerns, much as our ancestors were freed
from slavery in Egypt.
We remember these two meanings of
Shabbat when we recite kiddush (the prayer
over wine sanctifying Shabbat or a holiday).
Friday night kiddush refers to Shabbat as both
zikaron l'ma'aseih v'rei'shit (a memorial of the
work in the beginning) and zeikher litzi'at
Mitz'rayim (a remembrance of the exodus from
Egypt).
Shamor: To Observe
Observe the Sabbath day to sanctify
it
(Hebrew: Shamor et yom ha-Shabbat
l'kad'sho) -Deuteronomy 5:12
Of course, no discussion of Shabbat
would be complete without a discussion of the
work that is forbidden on Shabbat. This is
another aspect of Shabbat that is grossly
misunderstood by people who do not observe
it.
Most Americans see the word "work"
and think of it in the English sense of the word:
physical labor and effort, or employment.
Under this definition, turning on a light would
be permitted, because it does not require effort,
but a rabbi would not be permitted to lead
Shabbat services, because leading services is
AUGUST 2015
his employment. Jewish law prohibits the
former and permits the latter.
Many
Americans therefore conclude that Jewish law
doesn't make any sense.
The problem lies not in Jewish law,
but in the definition that Americans are using.
The Torah does not prohibit "work" in the 20th
century English sense of the word. The Torah
prohibits "melachah" (Mem-Lamed-Alef-KafHei), which is usually translated as "work," but
does not mean precisely the same thing as the
English word. Before you can begin to
understand the Shabbat restrictions, you must
understand the word "melachah."
Melachah generally refers to the kind
of work that is creative, or that exercises
control or dominion over your environment.
The word may be related to "melekh" (king;
Mem-Lamed-Kaf).
The quintessential
example of melachah is the work of creating
the universe, which G-d ceased from on the
seventh day. Note that G-d's work did not
require a great physical effort: he spoke, and it
was done.
The word melachah is rarely used in
scripture outside of the context of Shabbat and
holiday restrictions. The only other repeated
use of the word is in the discussion of the
building of the sanctuary and its vessels in the
wilderness. Exodus Ch. 31, 35-38. Notably,
the Shabbat restrictions are reiterated during
this discussion (Ex. 31:13), thus we can infer
that the work of creating the sanctuary had to
be stopped for Shabbat. From this, the rabbis
concluded that the work prohibited on Shabbat
is the same as the work of creating the
sanctuary.
They found 39 categories of
forbidden acts, all of which are types of work
that were needed to build the sanctuary:
Sowing
Plowing
Reaping
Binding sheaves
Threshing
Winnowing
Selecting
Grinding
Sifting
Kneading
Baking
Shearing wool
Washing wool
Beating wool
Dyeing wool
Spinning
Weaving
Making two loops
Weaving two threads
Separating two threads
Tying
Untying
Sewing two stitches
Tearing
Trapping
Slaughtering
Flaying
Salting meat
Curing hide
Scraping hide
Cutting hide up
Writing two letters
Erasing two letters
Building
Tearing a building down
Extinguishing a fire
Kindling a fire
Hitting with a hammer
Taking an object from the
private domain to the public, or transporting an object in the public domain.
(Mishnah Shabbat, 7:2)
or a match) unless the tool is needed for a
permitted purpose (using a hammer to crack nuts
when nothing else is available) or needs to be
moved to do something permitted (moving a
pencil that is sitting on a prayer book), or in
certain other limited circumstances. Objects that
may not be handled on Shabbat are referred to as
"muktzeh," which means, "that which is set
aside," because you set it aside (and don't use it
unnecessarily) on Shabbat.
The rabbis have also prohibited travel,
buying and selling, and other weekday tasks
that would interfere with the spirit of Shabbat.
The use of electricity is prohibited because it
serves the same function as fire or some of the
other prohibitions, or because it is technically
considered to be "fire."
The issue of the use of an automobile
on Shabbat, so often argued by non-observant
Jews, is not really an issue at all for observant
Jews. The automobile is powered by an internal
combustion engine, which operates by burning
gasoline and oil, a clear violation of the Torah
prohibition against kindling a fire. In addition,
the movement of the car would constitute
transporting an object in the public domain,
another violation of a Torah prohibition, and in
all likelihood the car would be used to travel a
distance greater than that permitted by
rabbinical prohibitions. For all these reasons,
and many more, the use of an automobile on
Shabbat is clearly not permitted.
As with almost all of the
commandments, all of these Shabbat restrictions
can be violated if necessary to save a life.
As we know, there is no Temple,
today, and many Reform Jews do not refrain
from work. However, it is my hope that we
will, somehow, choose to make this time of the
week, different from the rest of the week. It
may be to attend services, study Torah, take a
nap in the middle of the day, or as I once heard
– just do something that you wouldn’t ordinarily
do during the week because of time constraints.
Please come and join us for Torah
study, every Saturday morning. We look
forward to having your input in our discussions.
Shabbat Shalom!
All of these tasks are prohibited, as
well as any task that operates by the same
principle or has the same purpose. In addition,
the rabbis have prohibited handling any
implement that is intended to perform one of the
above purposes (for example, a hammer, a pencil
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
PAGE 5
Weekly Parshas
Vaetchanan
Deuteronomy 3:23 - 7:11
The Sidra continues the address to
the people by Moses that began in last
week's portion. Moses recounts how God
denied his request to be allowed to enter
the land of Israel; Moses must view the
country from atop Mount Pisgah. He
pleads with the nation to adhere to God's
laws scrupulously - especially the laws
regarding idolatry. Failure to conform to
these laws will inevitably result in
expulsion from the land.
Moses apportions three cities on
the eastern side of the Jordan River to
serve as Cities of Refuge.
In an effort to stress the
importance of maintaining all the
commandments, Moses recalls how awestruck the people were at the time of the
Revelation when they assembled at the
foot of Mount Sinai to receive the Ten
Commandments.
A slightly altered
version of the Ten Commandments from
the one found in the Book of Exodus is
restated.
The most prominent of our
prayers is found here: the first paragraph of
the Sh'ma, asserting the exclusive
relationship between God and Israel, and
Israel's duty to study and observe the
Torah at all times.
Future generations should be
trained, not only in the observance of the
Torah, but in the account of the
deliverance from Egypt. A strict warning
against intermarriage and idolatry is
issued. The special relationship between
God and Israel is stressed again: in love,
God redeemed the Israelites from slavery;
it is, therefore, their duty to observe the
commandments.
Eikev
Deuteronomy 7:12 - 11:25
In this continuation of Moses’
farewell messages, he reassures the
Israelites of God’s blessings as a reward
for observance of the commandments.
Similarly they will be led to victory over
the Canaanite inhabitants of the Land of
Israel if they remain faithful. Conquest of
the land must be followed by purging it of
all remnants of idolatrous practice.
Many were the lessons to be
learned from the Israelites’ forty-year
PAGE 6
sojourn in the wilderness: they were tested
in terms of their loyalty to God’s
commandments, they had achieved a
measure of discipline through the
hardships they endured, and they learned
that God would see them through their
difficulties. Most importantly, they must
remember that their impending victory
over the Canaanites should not be viewed
as a sign of their virtue and piety - it was a
fulfillment of the promise made to their
ancestors.
Photo by Cary H. Miller
Shoftim
Deuteronomy 16:18 - 21:19
To illustrate this last point, Moses
recalls the sinfulness of the nation in
making the Golden Calf and at Tav’erah,
Massah, Kivrot HaTa’avah and Kadesh
Barne’a.
With Moses’ days coming to an
end, his focus turns to a number of issues
and institutions, which will be necessary
for the maintenance of law and order, once
the Israelites possess the Promised Land.
Their
future
was
entirely
dependent on their obedience to the Torah
and love for God.
Judges need to be appointed and
they should exhibit a high degree of
impartiality; they must resist bribes under
all circumstances. Difficult cases are to be
referred to higher authorities.
Re'eh
Deuteronomy 11:26 - 16:17
In yet a further continuation of
Moses’ farewell speeches, the Israelites are
informed that a future of either blessings or
curses is in their hands. The specifics of
these alternatives will be spelled out in a
ceremony that is to take place upon entry
into the land. All is contingent upon
adherence to the Torah.
As part of the Torah’s program
for eradicating idolatry, all local cultic
shrines, sacrifices and other practices were
to be eliminated; ritual would be centrally
concentrated “in the place that God would
choose.” The second tithe was to be
brought to this central location – not for
donation to the Sanctuary, but to be
consumed and enjoyed by the religious
pilgrim. Passover, Shavuot and Sukkot
were to be celebrated by pilgrimage to this
as yet unidentified, “place.”
Other idolatrous trappings were
also prohibited: child sacrifice, and
inflicting gashes or shaving as a sign of
mourning. False prophets – those who
encouraged idolatry – were to be executed,
and any town that had been subverted (i.e.,
that had totally gone over to idolatry) was
to be thoroughly destroyed.
A social and economic contract
giving great consideration to the poor is
promulgated. The Laws of Kashrut are
reiterated.
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
Idolatry is punishable by death by
stoning – but only after a thorough
investigation and upon testimony by at
least two witnesses.
Provisions are made to permit a
monarchy to develop. However, the king
must remain devoted to the Torah; he must
write his own personal copy to be kept in
his possession at all times and he must
study from it regularly.
Several
restrictions are placed on the king to
prevent abuse of power and the amassing
of wealth.
God will provide true prophets to
guide the people; there is, therefore, no
need to resort to magic and superstition.
False prophets – those whose predictions
do not come to pass or who attempt to lead
the people astray into idolatry – are to be
executed.
Willful murderers are to be turned
over to their victims’ families. Unsolved
murder cases render the inhabitants of the
town in which the victim was found
culpable.
The town’s leaders must
perform a ritual of atonement and
expiation. Boundary markers may not be
moved or removed; it is an act of theft.
Witnesses who give false testimony are to
be subject to the punishment the defendant
would have received had s/he been
convicted.
(Parsha Continued on page 9)
AUGUST 2015
16 AV – 16 ELUL 5775
Congregation Ner Tamid
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
Wednesday
Thursday
AUGUST 2015
Friday
Saturday
1
AV 16
Parshat
Vaetchanan
‫פרשת ואתחנן‬
Deuteronomy 3:23 - 7:11
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
9:16 PM (18 min)
2
AV 17 3
AV 18 4
AV 19 5
AV 20 6
AV 21 7
AV 22 8
AV 23
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti
Parshat:
Eikev ‫פרשת עקב‬
Turner
Deuteronomy
7:12 - 11:25
Oneg: Rebekah James
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
9:10 PM (18 min)
8:03 PM
9
AV 24 10
AV 25 11
AV 26 12
AV 27 13
AV 28 14
AV 29 15
7:30 PM Services: Brittni Coe
Oneg: Carolyn Jobe
Board Meeting
10:00 AM
Parshat:
ELUL 1 17
ELUL 2 18
Rosh Chodesh
Elul
‫ראש חודש אלול‬
ELUL 3 19
ELUL 4 20
NE WS L E T T E R
DE ADL I NE
ELUL 5 21
Re'eh
‫פרשת ראה‬
Deuteronomy 11:26 - 16:17
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
9:03 PM (18 min)
7:56 PM
16
AV 30
ELUL 6 22
ELUL 7
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti
Parshat: Shof'tim ‫פרשת שופטים‬
Turner
Deuteronomy 16:18 - 21:9
Oneg: Marilynn Lepley
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
6:30 PM Family Craft Activity
7:48 PM
8:55 PM (18 min)
23
ELUL 8 24
ELUL 9 25
ELUL 10 26
ELUL 11 27
ELUL 12 28
ELUL 13 29
ELUL 14
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti
Parshat:
Turner
‫פרשת‬
Oneg: Judy & Harv Judelson
7:39 PM
Ki Teitzei
Deuteronomy 21:10 - 25:19
5:30 PM Torah Study, Havdalah
6:30 PM Bring your own dinner
7:00 PM Israeli/International Folk
Dancing
8:46 PM (18 min)
30
ELUL 15 31
PAGE 7
ELUL 16
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
‫כי־תצא‬
AUGUST 2015
Congregation Ner Tamid
Sunday
Monday
Tuesday
1
SEPTEMBER 2015
17 ELUL 5775 - 17 TISHREI 5776
Wednesday
ELUL 17 2
Thursday
ELUL 18 3
Friday
ELUL 19 4
Saturday
ELUL 20 5
ELUL 21
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti
Parshat: Ki Tavo ‫פרשת כי־תבוא‬
Turner
Deuteronomy 26:1 - 29:8
Oneg: Jessica & Cary Miller
5:30 PM Torah Study, Havdalah
6:30 PM Bring your own dinner
7:30 PM Selichot Service
7:30 PM
6
ELUL 22 7
ELUL 23 8
ELUL 24 9
ELUL 25 10
ELUL 26 11
8:37 PM (18 min)
ELUL 27 12
ELUL 28
7:30 PM Services: Brittni Grant
Parshat:
Oneg: Mardi Moon
Labor Day
Nitzavim
‫פרשת נצבים‬
Deuteronomy 29:9 – 30:20
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
7:21 PM
13
ELUL 29 14
Erev Rosh
Hashanah
‫ערב ראש השנה‬
7:30PM
TISHREI 1, 5775 15
TISHREI 2 16
TISHREI 3 17
TISHREI 4 18
8:27 PM (18 min)
TISHREI 5 19
TISHREI 6
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti
Shabbat Shuva ‫שבת שובה‬
Turner
Parshat: Vayeilech
‫פרשת וילך‬
Oneg: : Karen Jennings &
Deuteronomy
31:1
31:30
Mark Pierce
Rosh Hashanah
5775
5775 ‫ראש השנה‬
10:00AM
7:11 PM
7:18 PM
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
11:45 AM Tashlich Service
8:18 PM (18 min)
20
TISHREI 7 21
TISHREI 8 22
TISHREI 9 23
Erev Yom
Kippur
TISHREI 10 24
Yom Kippur
‫יום כפור‬
‫ערב יום כפור‬
TISHREI 11 25
NNEEEW
R
WSSLLEEETTTTTEEER
R
DDEEEAAADDLLLIIINNNEE
TISHREI 12 26
TISHREI 13
7:30 PM Services: Cantor Patti Parshat:
HaAzinu ‫פרשת האזינו‬
Turner
Deuteronomy 32:1 - 32:52
Oneg: Marcy & Alan Prager
10:00 AM Shabbat Service
10:45 AM Torah Study
4:30 PM Sukkah Building
8:08 PM (18 min)
8:12 PM (18 min)
7:08 PM
27
TISHREI 14 28
TISHREI 15 29
TISHREI 16 30
Erev Sukkot
Sukkot I
Sukkot II
‫ערב סוכות‬
‫סוכות יום א׳‬
‫סוכות יום ב׳‬
6;30 PM BYOD Dinner
7:30 PM Sukkot Service
at Cantor Patti Turner
7:02 PM
TISHREI 17
Sukkot III
(CH''M)
‫סוכות יום ג׳ )חל‬
(‫המועד‬
Oneg: Rebekah James
6:59 PM
PAGE 8
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
AUGUST 2015
(Continued from page 6)
Rules of warfare and siege are promulgated. Certain
individuals are exempted from military service. The Israelites must
sue for peace prior to resorting to war. A scorched-earth siege policy
is prohibited.
Ki Teitzei
Deuteronomy 21:10 - 25:18
prohibited combinations; betrothal, marriage, divorce, remarriage,
rape, adultery, inheritance, newlyweds, levirate marriage, widows,
orphans, the mamzer; laws governing relations with foreigners; the
army camp; sheltering slaves; vows; vineyard and field workers;
paying wages in a timely fashion; security for loans; testimony of
close relatives; forgotten sheaves and leftover fruit; weights and
measures.
The sidra concludes with a reminder to always remember
This final group of laws, given by Moses to the Israelites, as the baseless aggression of the Amalekites towards the Israelites
they were poised to enter the Promised Land, is directed mainly immediately following the exodus from Egypt.
When the
toward the individual’s responsibility to maintain lawful and humane opportunity arises, the Amalekites are to be destroyed.
relations with others. Chief among these rules are injunctions for
proper behavior in domestic affairs, consideration for others and
Downloaded 3/27/2008 from
kindness to animals.
A partial list of the numerous topics covered in this week’s
portion follows: female captives; the first-born son’s inheritance;
execution and burial of convicted criminals; return of lost property;
animals struggling under their burdens; removal of eggs and young
from a nest; rooftop parapets; agricultural crossbreeding and other
http://www.pasyn.org/index.php?page=216 With permission. Copyright 2008 Park
Avenue Synagogue All Rights Reserved
Downloaded 8/2/2008 http://www.suite101.com/reference/ki_thavo
Downloaded 8/2/2008
http://www.chabad.org/parshah/otherparshas_cdo/aid/9175/jewish/ParshahArchive.htm
Jewish Jokes!
Ben & Jewerey’s Ice Cream Flavors:
RabaNut
Rashi Road
Af Al Pecan
Lehitra Oats
Mi Ka-mocha
Chuppapaya
Moishmallow
Lemontations
Carmel Shake
Bubble Gum-ora
Cherry Bim
Balak Berry
Cin'm'n Toff
Mazel Toffee
Butter Shkotz
Manishta Nut
Soda & Gomorra
Bernard Malamint
Olive Hashalom
Maimonidip (Rumbomb)
Cashew Le'pesach
Berry Pr'i Hagafen
Cherry Bum
Chazalnut
Oy Ge-Malt
Rhubarbanel
Abba Ebanana
Choc-Eilat Chip
Almond Schacter
Kol HaVodka
O-lime Habah
Wailing Walnut
Weizman Institutti-Fruitti
Tora Sheba'al Pear
Lubavicher Resberry
*All flavors available in Cohen, Yiddishe-Cup or Bamid-Bar.
Try our new dietary line: Yassir Ara-lowfat.
Shalom,
Hilda & Kathy
Downloaded 7/29/2015, www.haruth.com
NEED A GREETING CARD?
Send a family member/friend a greeting card and
help fund C-N-T. Greeting cards, for any occasion, will
be made up and sent out quickly. Just make a monetary
donation to C-N-T, to whatever fund you wish, and send
the
information
to:
KAThy
Friedberg
at
[email protected]
AUGUST 2015
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
PAGE 9
We are told in Proverbs,
“The soul of a person is the candle of God.”
Yahrzeits
Anniversaries
AUGUST
2 - Jane A. Ecklund, Mother of Jessica Miller, H 17 Av
2 - David N. Pritsker, Son of Hildagarde Pritsker, H 17 Av
4 - Jacob Guimon, Grandfather of Rebekah James
5 - Ted Kenneth Turner, Father of Ray Turner
8 - Dora Judelson, Mother of Harvey Judelson, H 23 Av
13 - Becky Hardowin, Sister-in-law of Lynn Hardowin
13 - Mark Prager, Brother of Alan Prager
15 - Lois R. Friedberg, Mother of Randy Friedberg
15 - Sandie Sue James, Mother of Mike James
15 - Preston Ray, Son of Harry Ray
30 - Shimon Bergel, Father of Michael Bergel
31 - William Ross, Father of Elliott Ross, H 16 Elul
SEPTEMBER
3 - Jill Heyman, Aunt of Patti Turner
4 - Ann Malone, Cousin of Carolyn Jobe
5 - Eugene Wilharm, Father of Jessica Miller
13 - Garry Schwartz, Brother of Kathy Friedberg
15 - Richard Pierce, Uncle of Mark Pierce
17 - Linda Fliegel, (Lifka Joda), Sister of Renée Spritzer, H 04 Tishri
26 - Genevieve Bega Gilbert, Mother of Shelley Allison, H 13 Tishri
29 - Billie Lewis, Aunt of Carolyn Jobe
30 - Jack Smilowitz, Father of Flo Arden
Publicity
Your assistance is needed. A Publicity Committee is being formed to
help get the word out that Ner Tamid is one of the best kept secrets in the
Metroplex. We don’t want to be secret anymore. We need some ideas,
some writing and some placement to get the word out.
Please contact:
Randy Friedberg at [email protected]
if you can give us a couple of minutes of your time.
PAGE 10
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
AUGUST
1 - Mark Pierce & Karen
Jennings
13 - Cathy & Rex Thumann
31 - Mara & Michael Bergel
SEPTEMBER
21 - Ashley & Beau Putman
Birthdays
AUGUST
1 - Nicholas Turner
4 - Rebekah James
8 - Brandon Shore
8 - Patti Turner
10 - Lynn Hardowin
10 - Rylynn Thumann
12 - David Judelson
13 - Austen Putman
13 - Delaina Clark
17 - Sheldon Goodman
18 - Carolyn Grant
18 - Leslye Silver
19 - Renée Spritzer
20 - Payton Villarreal
21 - Geoffrey Allison
22 - Andre Hardowin
25 - Mathew Scott
29 - Judy Judelson
SEPTEMBER
5 - Harris Pierce
5 - Megyn Putman
6 - Robert Davis
7 - Jonathan Prager
8 - Alan Prager
13 - Ashley Putman
14 - Rachel Thompson
19 - Erika Bertsch
22 - Rusty Silver
23 - Wesley Archere
29 - Jon Turner
AUGUST 2015
TRIBUTES 5775
Cut out and mail with contribution to Congregation Ner Tamid, P.O. Box 112772, Carrollton, Texas 75011-2772.
My Contribution to Ner Tamid
___in memory of
___in honor of
___honoring the Yahrzeit of ___speedy recovery of
___in appreciation of
Honoree: _____________________________
Fund: _________________________________
Name: ________________________________
Contribution: $____________________ Signed
(optional): ______________________________________________________________
Contributions are gratefully accepted for the following funds. Acknowledgments will be published monthly.
 Rabbinic Fund
 Building Fund
 Ark Fund – Maintains and/or remodels the
 Temple Beautification Fund
 Caring Congregation Fund – Supports
Provides for enhanced study opportunities.
 Maimonides Fund – for members in dire need.
 General Fund – Supports the administrative
programs of caring for our members and
Community.
costs of the Temple, i.e. Rabbi, facility
Temple Endowment Fund – Supports the
maintenance, etc.
general programs and events of the Temple.  Bertha Kurzban Music Fund – provides for
Harlan S. Friedberg Memorial Fund –
the Congregations needs in all areas involving
Maintains and adds to the Yahrzeit Plaque.
music.
Lee Mirowitz Memorial Fund – Provides
 Cantor’s Discretionary Fund – Distributes
educational computer software.
funds to individuals, community causes or
worthy institutions as determined by the Cantor.
Marilyn & I. D. Freed Study Center Fund –

Ark.
Torah Fund—Repair our Torah & acquire
another Torah
Prayer Book Fund
Rabbi’s Discretionary Fund – Distributes
funds to individuals, community causes or
worthy institutions as determined by the Rabbi.
Religious School Fund



Please add our Tom Thumb Rewards number, 2740, to your rewards card and shop at Tom Thumb!
Pleases shop Amazon at www.smile.amazon.com and designate Congregation Ner Tamid as your charity.
Please add our Kroger Community Rewards number, 93262, to your rewards card and shop at Kroger







Donations have been received to the:
Community Service
General Fund from:
Friedberg Family in Honor of Hilda Pritsker’s Birthday

Harlan S. Friedberg Memorial Fund from:
Anonymous

Bertha Kurzban Music Fund from:
Friedberg Family wishing a full and speedy recovery to
Jonathan Prager

Misheberach
Please support our on-going Community Mitzvah Projects:
 Collect staple food items, coats and
blankets for Jewish Family Service (contact Randy Friedberg)
 Collect manufacturer coupons for
Military bases overseas (contact
Marilynn Lepley)
 Donation bottles for a variety of
community & outreach service
organizations.
The Friedberg / Moon families wish Refuah Shlema
Blessing of Healing ~ complete healing to all who need healing and /or
prayers.
AUGUST 2015
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
PAGE 11
Congregation Ner Tamid
Place
Stamp
Here
P.O. Box 112772
Carrollton, Texas 75011-2772
Web Site:
http://www.CongregationNerTamid.org
Phone: (972) 416-9738
Address Service Requested
. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
Congregation Ner Tamid Mission Statement
Inside this issue:
Anniversaries & Birthdays
10
Calendars
7-8
Cantor’s Notes
1
Care Committee
2
Community Service
11
Congregation Ner Tamid is dedicated to preserving and strengthening Jewish
values, through communal worship, education and community service. We offer
an atmosphere of warm involvement and welcome all families and individuals
interested in participating in the community of the congregation. We interpret
and practice Judaism according to Reform principles and embrace the Reform
movement's commitment to diversity, outreach, inclusiveness and social justice.
MEMBERSHIP
Congregation Contacts
2
Donations
11
[Includes tickets for High Holiday Services]
Educational Events
1
We are missing one member . . . where are you?!
Jewish Jokes
9
Kosher Fusion
3
Membership
12
Mission Statement
12
Oneg Shabbat Guide
2
President’s Message
1
Weekly Torah Portion Summary
Yahrzeits
6
10
Check our web site for up to date info.
We can be found at:
http://www.CongregationNerTamid.org
PAGE 12
Are you, or do you know of someone, interested in a small,
but active, and most of all, friendly Reform Jewish
Congregation that has been in existence since 1984 and is
located in the heart of the Dallas Metrocrest Community? Well, that describes
CONGREGATION NER TAMID! For information email Kathy Friedberg, Membership
Committee Chairperson, at [email protected]
MEMBERSHIP CLASSIFICATIONS:
 FAMILY
 SINGLE PARENT
 SINGLE PERSON
 STUDENT
 JUNIOR
 ASSOCIATE
[Membership includes tickets for High Holiday Services]
Interested? . . . Talk to us!
16 AV - 16 ELUL 5775
AUGUST 2015