watershed experience programs

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watershed experience programs
WATERSHED
EXPERIENCE
PROGRAMS
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
p.21
CONSERVATION LANDS & RECREATION
Conservation Halton acquires and
manages conservation lands to
provide
active
and
passive
recreational
opportunities
while
protecting the natural environment.
What are the projects associated with this program?
• Development of regional parks for watershed communities
• Master planning of parks to ensure sustainability of natural lands
• Operation and management of six primary conservation areas including
Kelso/Glen Eden, Mountsberg, Rattlesnake Point, Hilton Falls, Crawford Lake,
and Mount Nemo, all of which generate revenues through user fees
• Provision of active recreational opportunities such as cross-country skiing,
snowshoeing, downhill skiing, snowboarding, mountain biking, rock climbing,
group camping, boating and swimming
• Provision of passive recreational opportunities such as hiking, picnicking, fishing,
birding and nature appreciation on more than 9000 acres of conservation lands
• Provision of park services and programs that contribute to visitor experience
Why is the conservation lands and recreation program important?
• Recreational opportunities are provided in attractive natural settings
• Public access to conservation lands is provided to watershed residents
• A rapidly expanding population requires greenspace for recreation and well being.
Who benefits from this conservation program?
• Almost 600,000 visitors use Conservation Halton lands annually of which 60% are
watershed residents
• Local economies benefit from recreational and tourism opportunities
• Special interest groups such as downhill skiers, cyclists, rock climbers, bird
watchers, scout and guide groups, and naturalist clubs
• Watershed municipalities
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION
p.22
Conservation
Halton
provides
environmental education programs to
students and watershed residents. These
programs contribute to a greater
awareness and appreciation of the
natural environment.
What are the projects associated with this program?
• Environmental education programs at two centres, Mountsberg and Crawford
Lake
• Tours and demonstrations on the cultural and natural heritage of the watershed
• Workshops and seminars on the watershed’s natural environment
• Annual maple syrup demonstration
• Hawk and owl education programs
• Cultural heritage programs at a reconstructed Iroquoian Village
• Summer day camp on conservation for children 6-12 years old
• Community outreach programs
Why is environmental education important?
• Hands-on learning opportunities provided for children and adults
• Opportunities are provided for people to learn about the natural environment
• Awareness of environmental protection and stewardship is increased
• Students and the general public become environmental stewards with strong
conservation ethics
Who benefits from this conservation program?
• 43,000 students and teachers annually from 12 boards of education
• Non-profit community groups such as scouts, guides, brownies and church
groups
• Watershed residents – 120,000
• Municipalities
• Regional economy is enhanced
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
CRAWFORD LAKE CONSERVATION AREA
p.23
About Crawford Lake Conservation Area and
Iroquoian Village:
• 468 hectare park located on the Niagara
Escarpment in Milton
• Park features a rare meromictic lake formed during
glaciation
• Significant plant communities well represented
within the conservation area, in addition to old
growth cedar ecosystems there is evidence of:
Mesic semi-open boulder talus scrub land
Wet mesic
Closed deciduous slope forest
Open dolomite cliff face
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA # 18) as well as a provincial Area of
Natural and Scientific Interest (ANSI)
• ESA 18 also contains an excellent example of talus
slope forest
• The reconstructed Iroquoian site represents the
nucleus of a 25 year study that includes research in
more than 100 native settlements
• Identified as a Nodal Park in Niagara Escarpment
Parks and Open Space System
• World Biosphere Reserve as part of Niagara
Escarpment
Regionally rare plant and animal species occurring in
this area:
• Grape fern (botrychium rugulosum)
• Burning bush (euonymus atropurpurea)
• Green violet (hybanthus concolor)
• Ginseng (panax quinquefolius)
• Jefferson salamander (Ambystoma
jeffersoniamum)
• Stinkpot (sternotherus odoratus)
• Eastern pipistrella (pipistrellus subflavus)
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Elevated boardwalk with interpretive signage
encircles the meromictic lake
• 19 km of hiking, snowshoeing and cross-country
ski trails, with links to the Bruce Trail system
• Visitors Centre with auditorium, exhibits, gift
shop, washrooms and cafeteria
• Reconstructed 15th century Iroquoian Village with
two completed longhouses
• Gathering Place facility accommodates 120 for
meetings, educational tours and picnics
• In 2001 a Native Species Teaching Garden was
constructed
• Crawford Lake employs 6 full time staff, and 10 to
20 part time or seasonal staff and 5 volunteers
• Over 75,000 visitors annually, including more than
27,000 students participating in educational
programs
Programs, Services, and Events:
•
•
•
•
•
Outdoor educational programs for all ages
Cultural tours and interpretation for all ages
Seasonal programming throughout the year,
including a very popular Sweet Water Season
program
Unique birthday party programs for children
6 all-terrain wheelchairs are available for use by any
•
visitors on the trail system
picnic areas
Operating Schedule
Open 7 days a week, year round
Closed Christmas Day
Opens daily at 10 am, closing time varies seasonally, but is
generally open until 4pm or 5 pm
Park Location:
Crawford Lake Conservation Area is located at Steeles
Avenue and Guelph Line, 5 km south of Highway 401 and
15 km north of the Q.E.W.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
MOUNTSBERG CONSERVATION AREA
p.25
About Mountsberg:
• 472 hectare park located at the intersections of
Flamborough, Milton and Puslinch
• landform features include wetlands, forest,
meadows and a 202 hectare water control reservoir
on a tributary of Bronte Creek
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA)
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Wildlife Walkway where visitors can visit the
resident owls, hawks, eagles and falcons, plus
resident bison and elk herds
• Home to the Raptor Education Centre – flight
demonstrations, displays and between 30 and 40
resident birds of prey
• Demonstration farm with barn yard animals
• Children’s PlayBarn constructed in 2002
• 20 km of hiking, mountain biking, snowshoeing
and cross-country ski trails
• Visitors Centre with auditorium, exhibits, gift
shop, washrooms and eating area
• Historic Cameron House accommodates 40 for
meetings, retreats, family events and get-togethers
• Working sugar camp, called Mapletowne. It
features a sugar shack, pancake pavilion, candy
cabin and country store
• Reservoir for fishing and non-motorized boating
• Skating pond for winter ice skating
• Over 52,000 visitors annually, including more than
18,000 students participating in educational
programs
Programs, Services, and Events:
• Outdoor educational programs for all ages
• Seasonal programming throughout the year,
including a very popular Maple Syrup program
• Unique birthday party programs for children
• Horse-drawn wagon or sleigh rides
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
•
•
•
•
Summer day camp serving children ages 6 to 14
Overnight group camping available
picnic areas
In 2003 Santa decided to take up residence in
Christmastown at Mountsberg – he welcomed
hundreds of visitors in his first year
Operating Schedule:
Open year round
Closed Christmas day
10 am to 4 pm
Park Location:
From Highway 401 go south on Guelph Line. Turn west
on Campbellville Road for 4 km and then go north on
Milburough Line for 1 km to park entrance.
From Highway 6 or Guelph Line, follow Campbellville
Road to Milburough Line and then go north for 1 km to
park entrance.
We’re closer than you think! Under 40 minutes from
Milton, Burlington, Cambridge, Guelph, Brampton
Hamilton, Mississauga and Oakville!
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
KELSO CONSERVATION AREA
p.27
About Kelso Conservation Area:
• 397 hectare park located on the Milton outlier of
the Niagara Escarpment in Milton
• Park established in 1960
• a dam and 35 hectare reservoir were constructed in
1961 for flood protection stream augmentation
along the Sixteen Mile Creek in the summer
months
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA # 17)
• This area was where the ancient old growth cedar
ecosystem was first identified in the region
• The Kelso Conservation Area is home to the Glen
Eden Ski & Snowboard Centre in the winter
months
• Kelso Conservation Area employs 8 full time staff
and 45 seasonal staff
• Its spring, summer and fall attendance is close to
130,000 annually
• The Halton Region Museum is located within the
conservation area
• There is an historic lime kiln on site
Regionally rare plant and animal species occurring in
this area:
• Green milkweed (asclepias viridiflora)
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Boat rentals – canoes, paddleboats, kayaks,
rowboats and sailboards
• Supervised swimming in the reservoir
• Change rooms and washrooms
• Two picnic shelters and nine picnic sites
• Comfort station with washrooms and showers
• Ten group campsites
• Two food concession buildings
• Over 16 km of hiking and biking trails
• Hiking trails link to over 700 km of Bruce trail
• Stream and lake fishing – trout, crappie, bass,
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
•
perch, pan fish, and steelhead.
166,000 spring, summer and fall visitors
Programs, Services, and Events:
Home to numerous mountain bike events
Regular host to the Flamborough Antique show
Host to many triathlons
Corporate events
Park Location:
From Highway 401, take Highway 25 north to
Campbellville Road; go west to Tremaine Road. Go south
until you reach Kelso Road. Turn right to park entrance.
From Highway 5, take Tremaine Road north to Kelso
Road. Turn left to park entrance.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
GLEN EDEN SKI & SNOWBOARD CENTRE
p. 29
About Glen Eden Ski and Snowboard Centre:
• 20 hectare facility located within the Kelso
Conservation Area on the Niagara Escarpment in
Milton
• Conservation Halton took over management and
ownership of the ski facility in 1967
• 73 metre vertical rise with 12 slopes
•
•
Glen Eden employs 13 full time staff, 95 seasonal
staff plus over 200 snow school staff
In 2003 Glen Eden took control of the snow
school operations
Facilities and Features:
• One half pipe and one quarter pipe
• Terrain park
• 5 lifts with an uphill capacity of more than 6800
skiers per hour
• 100% snowmaking
• Night lighting
• Adventure Centre for equipment rentals and ski
tuning on state of the art equipment
• Two day lodges with their own food concessions
• Large ski and snowboard school
• Between 40 and 50 fully trained volunteer ski
patrol staff
• In winter 2003/2004 a 4 chute snow tube park
with specialized tube lift was built
• A pedestrian overpass is to be installed in early
2004 to allow better access to the west end slopes,
the sunset day lodge and new snow tube facilities
•
•
•
Programs, Services, and Events:
• School ski trips
• March Break and Christmas ski and snowboard
camps
Ski and snowboard lesson programs for all ages
177,000 skier and boarder visits winter and early spring
Over 12,000 school children participating in school visits
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
•
54,000 ski and snowboard lessons delivered each
season
Operating Schedule:
mid-December until March as weather conditions permit
Monday to Saturday 8:30 am to 10 pm
Sunday 8:30 am to 4:30 pmt
Park Location:
From Highway 401, take Highway 25 north to
Campbellville Road; go west to Tremaine Road. Go south
until you reach Kelso Road. Turn right to park entrance.
From Highway 5, take Tremaine Road north to Kelso
Road. Turn left to park entrance.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
RATTTLESNAKE POINT CONSERVATION AREA
p.31
About Rattlesnake Point Conservation Area:
• 299 hectare park located on the Milton outlier of
the Niagara Escarpment in Milton
• Acquired to preserve and protect the unique and
valuable cliff ecosystems, unusual biological
associations and springs which feed the Bronte
Creek
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA #18)
• Significant plant communities well represented
within the conservation area, in addition to old
growth cedar ecosystems there is evidence of:
Mesic semi-open boulder talus scrub land
Wet mesic
Closed deciduous slope forest
Open dolomite cliff face
• Identified as a provincial Area of Natural and
Scientific Interest (ANSI)
• Includes headwaters of Limestone Creek
Regionally rare plant and animal species occurring in
this area:
• Grape fern (botrychium rugulosum)
• Burning bush (euonymus atropurpurea)
• Green violet (hybanthus concolor)
• Ginseng (panax quinquefolius)
• Jefferson salamander (ambystoma jeffersoniamum)
• Stinkpot (sternotherus odoratus)
• Eastern pipistrella (pipistrellus subflavus)
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Comfort Station with washrooms and shower
facilities
• Two picnic shelters with picnic grounds
• 5.5 km of hiking trails with connections to the
Bruce Trail System
•
•
•
•
•
18 group camp sites
Five lookouts for scenic viewing
Three designated rock climbing sites
Rattlesnake Point employs two full time staff, and
part time or seasonal staff
Over 40,000 visitors annually
Programs, Services, and Events:
Popular rock climbing destination
Well renowned for its hiking trails
Favourite camping area for youth and service groups of
all ages
Park Location:
From Highway 401, take Highway 25 south to Steeles
Avenue, west on Steeles to Appleby Line, south on
Appleby for 3 km.
From Q.E.W., take Appleby Line north; 1 km north of
Derry Road on top of escarpment.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
MOUNT NEMO CONSERVATION AREA
p.33
About Mount Nemo Conservation Area:
• 169 hectare park located on the Niagara
Escarpment in Burlington
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA #8)
• This ESA is characterized by:
• The high number of native plant communities
• Old growth cedar community that occurs here
• The occurrence of crevice caves which are very
rare in the region
• Classified as a provincial Area of Natural and
Scientific Interest (ANSI)
• Part of the Niagara Escarpment Parks and Open
Space System
• UNESCO Niagara Escarpment World Biosphere
Reserve
• One of the best examples of cliff ecosystem in
Ontario
Regionally rare plant and animal species occurring in
the area:
• Hart’s tongue fern (phyllitis scolopendrium)
• Yellow mandarin (disporum lanuginosum)
• Drooping sedge (carex prasina)
• American chestnut (castanea dentate)
• Orchard oriole (icterus spurious)
• Eastern pipistrelle (pipistrellus subflavus)
• Small-footed bat (myotis liebii) which is also
globally rare
• Jefferson salamander (ambystoma jeffersoniamum)
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Scenic lookout with interpretive signage
• 4 km of hiking trails
• Hiking trails conjoin with Bruce Trail system
• Crevice Caves
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
•
Provides public access to the Niagara Escarpment
Programs, Services, and Events:
• Well renowned for its hiking trails
• Great location for movie and television filming
• Over 16,000 visitors annually
Operating Schedule
Open 365 days a year
Self serve fee station in effect
Park Location:
Mount Nemo Conservation Area is located north of the Q.E.W. on Guelph Line,
between Highway 5 and Britannia Road.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
HILTON FALLS CONSERVATION AREA
p.35
About Hilton Falls Conservation Area:
• 645 hectare park located on the Niagara Escarpment
in Milton
• The dam and reservoir on site was constructed in
1971
• Designated as a regional Environmentally Sensitive
Area (ESA #25)
• This area considered one of the top biological sites
in the region and is characterized by:
• The vast expanse of shallow till/bedrock plain
• The richness of its vascular flora
• The high number of native plant communities
• The diversity of its biological communities
• The fact that it contains the largest forest tract in
southern Ontario
• Classified as a provincial Area of Natural and
Scientific Interest (ANSI)
• Protects the headwaters of Sixteen Mile Creek
• An historic mill is located on site
Regionally rare plant and animal species occurring in
this area:
• Hart’s tongue fern (phylitis scolopendrium)
• Muhly (muhlenbergia sylvatica)
• Sedges (carex careyana, carex Formosa, carex
gracilescens)
• Green violet (hybanthus concolor)
• Ginseng (panax quinquefolius)
• Bedstraw (gallium pilosum)
• Jefferson salamander (ambystoma jeffersonianum)
• Eastern ribbon snake (thamnophis sauritus)
• Pickerel frog (rana palustris)
• Louisiana waterthrush (seiurus motacilla)
• Cerulean warbler (dendroica cerulea)
• Bobcat (lynx rufus)
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT
Facilities and Adventure Activities:
• Visitors Centre with washrooms and exhibit
• Lookouts and interpretive signage at waterfalls
• Over 33 km of hiking, biking and x-country ski
trails
• Hiking trails link with the Bruce Trail system
•
•
•
•
Picnic areas
Hilton Falls employs three full time staff, and part
time or seasonal staff
Over 37,000 visitors annually
Snack bar
Programs, Services, and Events:
• Well renowned for its hiking trails
• It’s unique bird feeding program allows visitors to
experience birds feeding right out of their hands
• Moonlight cross-country ski evenings are unique
and well attended
• April 2004 marks the 5th year of the All-Weather
Mountain Bike Challenge
Operating Schedule:
Open year round
Closed Christmas day
Opens daily at 10 am closing time varies seasonally
Park Location:
From Highway 401, take Highway 25 north to Campbellville Road. Go west on
Campbellville Road for 6 km to park entrance.
From Q.E.W. take Guelph Line north through Campbellville to Campbellville Road. Go
east for 6 km to park entrance.
PROTECTING THE NATURAL ENVIRONMENT FROM LAKE TO ESCARPMENT