Vpited Met odist - Manchester eScholar

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Vpited Met odist - Manchester eScholar
THE UNITED METHODIST-THURSDAY. JULY 9. 1908.
From Darkness to Light. By Christopher Hunt.-(see
The
fiage 601.)
Vpited Met odist
THE WEEKLY JOURNAL OF THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH.
With which is incorporated the "Free Methodist," founded 1886.
No. 3 2. NEW SERIES.
[cN11.]
THURSDAY, JULY 9, 1908.
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PUBLISHED WEEKLY.
ONE PENNY.
A New Beginning.
Severances.
UNITED Methodist ministers who are changing
Circuits are expected to be in their new Circuits
by next Sunday, and at the moment this issue
comes into the reader's hands large numbers of
our ministers and their families will be completing their preparations for departure from old
scenes, if they are not actually at the moment
moving to the new sphere. Our heart goes out
in quick thought and sympathy to our brother
ministers and their dear ones who are in this
case. We remember keenly the ceaseless toil,
the physical weariness, the multiplied worries,
the sore distractions which attend the period of
ministerial removals, especially for the minister's
wife. But we think of what is far more tryingthe severance by the minister of a relationship
with his people which is surely of the most
intimate, beautiful, tender and sacred kind, the
relationship of the true and faithful pastor to his
flock; the sharp interruption of the full flow of
valued friendships formed by ministers' wives and
families with many members of their churches
and congregations; the sudden launching of all
-minister, minister's wife, and minister's children-upon new and unknown seas for a voyage
whose course and issues are shrouded in impenetrable and baffling mystery. There will be
many sore, sad and wistful hearts in ministers'
families at this time. May the God of all comfort comfort them !
Advantage and Disadvantage.
A time like this is one in which, for ministers,
and many of their people also, the balance of
disadvantage will seem to attach to the itinerant
ministry, as compared with what is possible to
the settled pastorate, say of Congregationalism.
We are persuaded that, viewed over a wider area
and when the heart is less distracted by the
upheaval of a recent removal, the balance of
advantage lies with the Methodist system as
practised in this country. At least that system
brings with it this outstanding advantage-that
periodically it affords the opportunity to
ministers and people alike of making a new
beginning in their relationships. We are not
unmindful that the advantage has its disadvantages for both minister and people: this,
light has its shadow also. Visitation with the
old list in the hand was so much easier a thing
than it will be with the new list. Names of
streets, their situation, the numbers of the doors,
the faces of the occupants, were all so much
more familiar and real than the new can be for
a twelve month at least. The problems in the
old Circuit were so familiar, the characteristics
of the workers were so well-known-never so
familiar or so well-known as when they had to
be left-that it really seems as if better work and
more effective were possible where we were than
where we are to be.
Many Minds, Many Ministries.
But is the advantage we reckon up so easily
all advantage? Is it quite as great as we think
it to be ? Does not familiarity with the difficulties of a problem, for instance, sometimes
594
breed a tolerance of them which makes their
removal impossible? Is it not possible that a
fresh mind working upon them at this stage may
see ways of solution we never saw ? And is it
not true always, Many minds, many ministries ?
It is not given to every minister to make equally
effective appeal to all types of thought, emotion
and temperament. There are of necessity some
souls unmoved by his ministry. He pipes to
them and they do not dance, he mourns to them
and they do not lament. At the sound of his
trumpet some at once gird on the armour and
step out bravely into the fight : others are as if
they had • not heard,. a veritable sleep of Rip
Van Winkle has fallen upon them. Let another
trumpet be blown, and by other lips, and they
will perchance wake to new life and activity.
May we be permitted to say to each brother who
enters a new Circuit this week, Brother, you
carry that new trumpet; you have a ministry to
some whom, perchance, your predecessor left
cold and unmoved; you bring fresh eyes and
mind to old problems and difficulties? A great
and effectual door is set before you : pass boldly
through it. What was insoluble to revered
brethren who have gone before you may lose its
rigidity and become plastic at your touch : the
wall of rock before which they vainly cried,
" Open Wheat l " "Open Barley I " may become
the door into a treasure-house as you cry, "Open
Sesame I "
Interrelated Ministries.
Indeed, their ministry has prepared the way
for yours; what they have done makes it easier
for you to do what is given you to do; that they
have cried "Open Wheat ! " and failed may show
you that you ought to cry "Open Sesame!" and
succeed. There is not only a variety of ministries
but an interrelation of ministries.
The ploughman prepares the way for the sower and the
sower for the reaper. So we should each enter
upon our new spheres believing in its boundless
possibilities ; believing that there is a work given
us to do there which in the strength of God we
can do mightily and effectively, which in the
wisdom of God we can do in its measure perfectly, and which in the election of God we alone
can do uniquely—just in the way and at the
very time it needs to be done. Let us believe
in the gifts and callings of God, and hopefully,
cheerfully, trustfully, aye, and songfully, if we
can, follow where He has said " Come." Let a
man but be able to say, " I am where God wants
me to be; I have a distinct work to do here
which He wants me to do"; and he shall have at
once the still strong heart to which is given
the prophecy of illimitable achievement for God
and man.
"The Fair Beginning of a Time."
But what we are thinking of most just now is
that the removal of our ministers graciously opens
the way to a new beginning for ministers and
people alike. We are all more or less liable to the
staleness and straitness which custom brings. A
new appointment means for the minister new
opportunities—opportunities, it may be, for the
exercise of powers now dormant, or for new
exercise of old powers; for forming new habits
of private prayer and personal spiritual culture;
for giving fresh heed to the favourite injunction
of Dr. Fairbairn to his students, Beware the
morning pipe, the morning paper and the seductive arm-chair; for laying larger and more perfect plans for reading and thought, for the
making of newer and more pertinent sermons, for
better pastoral work, for richer ministries to the
young, for increased Spirit-suffused evangelistic
activity for the salvation of men and women and
children, body and spirit and soul. Oh, the
delight of turning over a new clean leaf and
making a fresh start in the ministry ! That is the
delight which is coming' to many of our ministers
this week. Nor is the privilege of their people
less glorious. It is the privilege of listening to
a new voice, of hearing the old message put in
THE UNITED METHODIST.
a new way, of seeing their church life and
activity as it is seen by fresh eyes, of beholding
their local problems as they present themselves
to a new observer, of listening to the call of a
new leader. We have no need - to urge our
people to receive their new ministers in kindness
and to cherish them in love for their works' sake:
a thirty years' knowledge of our Methodist
Churches teaches us how needless such exhortations are; but perhaps it is needful to urge our
people to beware of conservatism, and to avail
themselves to the full of the freshness of outlook,
of the initiative in forms of activity, of the variety
in methods of service which come to them in the
arrival of a new minister. Let there be no
attempt to run everything into the old mould, to
pare things down to the old pattern, to look
askance at thoughts, suggestions, plans of work
simply because they are new. The wise minister
will on the one hand avoid the radical error of
telling his new people what they did in his old
Circuit, and on the other hand his new people
will, if they are wise, avoid telling him what
his respected predecessor used to do and how
he used to do it. The outstanding advantage of
the change which has come both to minister and
people is that it affords the grand opportunity
for new initiative, new methods, a new spirit. It
is a new dispensation. Let us all fervently pray
that ministers and people alike may be wise to
know their day and opportunity.
Notes by the Way.
On the
Wing.
WHILE these lines are being read
a number of United Methodist
Church ministers and their wives
and children are on the wing to "fresh woods and
pastures new." Changing the figure, of all people
among us they have to say with significant and
literal meaning, "Here have we no abiding city,
but seek one to come." They can speak of no
house as their own. It and the furniture belong
to "the Circuit." That does not mean, th4nk God,
that they have no home of their own. For the
husband where the wife is, for the wife
where the husband is, for the parents where
the children are, and for the children where
mother and father are—that is home. Houseless
they may be for a few hours as they move from
circuit to circuit, but homeless none of them are
while the dear ones are around them.
*
* * * *
Wistful
Oust thoughts go out tenderly toLooks
day to those who are leaving part
Backward,
of the home behind them—to
fathers and mothers who are leaving children, to children, boys and girls, who are
being left behind. Other people in other walks
of life have to do the same thing, but perhaps no
class of men and women have to do it so much as
ministers and their wives. And the pain of it is
the same for all right-thinking parents and children, but it is more frequent for ministers and
their wives and children. And it never loses its
poignancy. That one child has been left here
and another there does not make the leaving of
a third elsewhere more easy. Let our people be
patient if their new minister and his wife look
back wistfully to the old Circuit where their
Joseph or their Benjamin is. It is not that they
are thinking detractingly of the new but tenderly and yearningly of what they have left in
the old. We know how kind the Methodist people
can be to their ministers under such circumstances,
and we are sure our own people will not be found
wanting in this matter to-day.
*
*
* *
Good
Wishes.
FOR all our migrating brethren and
sisters we wish a safe journey, a
kindly and enheartening welcome,
and a tarrying in their new sphere in the power
and grace of Jesus through the indwelling of the
Holy Ghost the Comforter. And may He pour
balm on all sore hearts and courage into every
shrinking and timorous soul, and give us all
everywhere and always the peace of God that
surpasses all understanding, to keep the heart and
mind in the knowledge and power of our Lord
Jesus 1 May this year be for every one of us a
year of spiritual wonders
JULY 9, 1908.
Working
People
and the
Universities.
UNDER the trees in Balliol College,
Oxford, last Thursday evening, a
meeting was held which promises
to ;nark a distinct stage in the
development of the intellectual and
economic life of the workers of this country. The
occasion was a garden party given in honour of
the Labour Conference which had been in session in the University city for some days, and
the opportunity was taken of explaining a scheme
which a joint committee of Labour men and
Oxford professors had agreed upon for promoting
the direct access of working men to some of the
colleges connected with the University. Briefly
the scheme is as follows : University classes are
to be started for working men and women in industrial towns, not for technical instruction—it is
felt that that ground is as a rule fairly covered
already in this particular—but for promoting the
broader culture which the historic Universities
promote. From these classes it is proposed to
draft promising students to one or another of the
Colleges at Oxford.
*
* * * *
IT appears that a beginning of the
Beginning
scheme has already been made at
Made.
Rochdale where, every Saturday
afternoon, some forty students meet
under the tuition of an Oxford graduate. It is
very cheering, but not surprising, to hear that Professor A. L. Smith, of Balliol College, speaking
at the meeting last Thursday, said that he had
looked through the papers of the Rochdale students
and had found that several of them were equal
to anything that could be produced at Oxford.
* * * *
A Step Past WE welcome the proposal outlined
Ruskin Hall. above with great heartiness, and
hope that the attempt to carry it
out will prove an unqualified success. We do
not forget that a very good beginning in the
same direction has been made by the establishment
of the Ruskin Hall at Oxford, which has already
sent out students who are wielding a helpful influence upon their fellow workmen. As we understand the new proposal, it is a development of the
idea embodied in the establishment of Ruskin.
Hall, and carries the workers nearer to the heart
of the privileges and opportunities which in this
historic University of Oxford have been too long
and too exclusively accessible only to certain
classes of the Community. The ideal surely is to
make our Universities accessible to all who have
the brains and the heart to avail themselves of
the opportunities they afford. That alone should
be the key to these treasure-houses of knowledge—
not money, or class, or social status. That was
the ancient use in our Universities. Soon may
it be completely the modern use also!
*
* * * *
Getting
AT the same time we sincerely hope
Knowledge
for Service.
that the new proposal may not be
a means whereby those who avail
themselves of it step out of the
"class" (we do not like the word, but use it only
for brevity's sake) to which they, already belong,
but a means whereby they return enriched to serve
the "class" into which they were born. Anything
other than this will only help to perpetuate the
present divisive system of things. There is no
section of the community which understands the
pinch of the shoe, and where the pinch is, better
than the workers of this country. They know
their own problems only too well. What they
do not know so well is the relation of their problems to the larger ones of which they are only a
part, and the relation of the remedy the workers
themselves propose to the larger remedies which
the social ills of the community require. They see
clearly what is within their range of vision : it
is the range of vision which requires widening.
That can come only through the wider culture
in history and economics which the Universities
alone afford. A hundred or two of their fellows
who had achieved this wider outlook would be
an unspeakable and immeasurable good to the
working people of this -country—but only on the
condition that they remained among the workers
—spreading - the light, setting the problems and
the remedies in perspective, minting their knowledge and thought and circulating it as current
coin among the men' and women of their own
"class." To use their culture simply as a means
of stepping out of their "class" into another
supposed to be "higher" would defeat the main
good which lies enfolded in the new proposal as
the oak tree lies in the acorn, and it would leave
our sorely pressing labour problems largely just.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
JOLT 9, 1908.
where they are. Just now the Labour movement
needs, more than anything else, the larger ministry of labouring men and women, who, enriched
by the knowledge the Universities can give, consecrate it entirely to the service of their fellowworkers, use it, in a word, not for individualistic but for communistic purposes, not as a
means of "getting on" themselves, but of helping
their fellow-workers as a whole to get on. Men
and women of this kind would .become saviours
of society in a degree unprecedented and undreamed of.
Table Talk.
ADDRESSES FOR " MINUTES."
Will ALL Ministers please send on their
addresses to the Editor, where they differ
from the addresses against their names found
in the "Minutes " of the Uniting Conference ?
IMMEDIATE attention to this request will
greatly facilitate the preparations for the issue
'of the "Minutes" of the Sheffield Conference.
*
*
*
*
NORWICH CIRCUIT.
IT will be remembered that the Norwich Circuit
reported the largest increase of members in any
United Methodist Circuit to the recent Conference,
viz., 119. The returns for the June quarter show
a further increase of 18 and there are over 100
still on trial. Last year, we see, they raised over
£2,300 as a Circuit for all purposes. We congratulate the workers and friends of the Circuit
on its prosperity, and trust it will continue and
abound yet more and more.
HONOURING LONG SERVICE.
IN connection with our Hucknall Church certificates of honour have been presented to teachers
who have served in the Trinity Sunday School
The Rev. T. Scowby
over twenty-five years.
made the presentations. Mr. R. Goodall has been
.a teachei- continuously 40 years; Mr. John Collins,
34 years; Mr. J. Cullen Howitt, 36 years; Mr.
George Radford, 37 years; Samuel Dabill, 32
years; Miss Storer, 29 years; Mr. H. A. Piggin,
25 years; Mr. Thomas Pegg, 25 years; Mr. Thos.
Cartledge, 25 years. All these are to-day either
superintendents or teachers in the same school. It
is a good record of faithful service.
*
*
* *
MR. W. PERCIVAL WESTELL, F.L.S., M.B.O.U.,
one of the contributors to the science section of
our Connexional "Pleasant Hour," has just been
appointed Editor of the Natural Science Department and Publicity Manager of Messrs. J. M.
Dent and Co., publishers of the well-known
"Everyman's Library." We offer congratulationi
to our honoured contributor.
* * *
*
OUR CONNEXIONAL EVANGELISTS.
WE invite special attention to the following
letter received from the Rev. John Moore
{U.M.F.C.), Home Missionary Secretary :
DEAR AIR. EDITOR,--I shall be pleased if you
will let the readers of the UNITED METHODIST
know that I am now making out the engagements of the Evangelists for the winter months,
and shall be glad to hear from the Churches
having a desire for mission services during the
winter, that I may give .them some assistance
through our agents.
Kind regards, yours sincerely,
J oHN MOORE.
Hughenden, Coppice Road,
Nottingham, July 1st, 1908.
*
* * *• *
MR. CYRIL J. SEED, son of the late Mr. Joseph
Seed, of Queen's Road Church, Halifax, has won
in open competition a mathematical exhibition,
worth £60 per annum, with a prospect of increase, at St. John's College, Oxford. We are
pleased to record that Mr. Seed, who is a scholar
in our Queen's Road Sunday School, was placed
first on the list, and offer him our congratulations.
BEREAVEMENT OF ONE OF OUR NATIVE
MINISTERS.
A CORRESPONDENT writes People interested in
missions, and especially the friends of the Rev.
T. 'F. Campbell, will be sorry to learn of the death
of his esteemed. wife, which took pla–ce in Sierra
Leone recently.
She was a gentle, reserved
African lady, and an excellent helpmeet to her
husband in his arduous duties as superintendent
of a Circuit and as District secretary. It will be
remembered that Mr. Campbell was one of the
African students trained in the Manchester College some years ago.
[We tender to Mr. Campbell our warm and
respectful sympathy in this great trial which has
come to him.—ED., U.M.]
* * *
MR. JOHN BURNS AND THE UNITED
METHODIST CHURCH.
A FRIEND, who has special means of knowing
the truth, calls our attention to the erroneous
statement, made at the Sheffield Conference and
reported in one of our Conference numbers, that
Mr. John Burns, M.P., President of the Local
Government Board, was once connected with our
Paradise Road Sunday School, and that his father
was for some years church steward there. These
statements would be true if made concerning Mrs.
John Burns and her father. They are not true
concerning that lady's husband and his father.
It is a pleasure to us to hear that Mrs, Burns
cherishes the kindliest feeling towards her father's
Church and the Church of her girlhood. We are
glad to see that Mr. Burns is making recovery
from the accident that befell him during the early
days of June. The President of the Local Government Board has many thousands of friends who are
wishing for him a speedy recovery, especially in
view of the unique work he can do in connection
with the long overdue reform of our Poor-Law
system which the Government has undertaken.
*
*
* * *
THE Rev. Lewis H. Court contributes an interesting and well-illustrated article on "John
Wesley and the Quakers of Dartmoor" to the July
issue of the "Wesleyan Methodist Magazine."
That magazine, by the way, keeps well up to
the high standard as to articles and production
which the Editor, the Rev. John Telford, B.A., set
up two years ago.
BEGINNING with the first Saturday in July the
"Daily Graphic" is issuing weekly a supplement
devoted to religious life and thought. Men and
women whose names are prominently identified
with religious movements will contribute to its
columns, and questions affecting the Established
Church, Nonconformity and Roman Catholicism
will be dealt with fully and impartially. The supplement will be profusely illustrated.
*
* * * *
OUR SEASIDE CHURCHES.
A CORRESPONDENT asks us if it would be possible for us to publish a full list of seaside churches
belonging to the United Methodist Church, with
specific information as to the streets they are
situated in and the times services are held. He
thinks that this would facilitate loyalty to our own
Church on the part of our friends visiting seaside
resorts. We shall be glad from time to time
during the holiday season to do what our correspondent asks, if our seaside churches will supply us with the requisite information.
*
*
*
*
WILLIAM REGINALD PRESHOUS, the twelve-yearold son of the Rev. John Preshous, King's Lynn,
has just won a Junior County Scholarship, tenable
for four years at the King Edward VII. Grammar
School, King's Lynn. There were 208 candidates
for 40 scholarships, and Reggie came out top of
the list. Bravo! Reggie.
*
if
*
*
BISHOPSGATE SERVICES.
The Tuesday midday services at Bishopsgate
Chapel are being continued to the end of July, the
following being the preachers for the month
595
Dr. H. Grattan Guinness (7th), the Revs. G. A.
Johnston Ross, M.A. (14th), A. T. Gutter), ,(21st),
and J. W. Ewing, M.A., B.D. (28th). The services will be suspended during August, and resumed on September 15th. Mr. Grear is much
encouraged by the great readiness with which the
preachers come to his help.
* * * *
*
The Beyer Fellowship of the Victoria University has been divided, half being given to Mr.
Maurice R. Turner, son of the Rev. Josiah Turner,
Barnsley, in recognition of the value of original
research work in chemistry, done by him during
the year. *
*
*
*
Many of our readers will be glad to hear that
the Grocers' Company have made . a grant of £25
to the London Poor Children's Boot Fund, of 82
John Street, Theobalds Road, W.C., of which
Lady St. Helier is president, and Sir. John Kirk
treasurer.
*
*
*
We have received from the University Tutorial
College (32 Red Lion Square, Holborn, W.C.),
their Matriculation Directory for June ](price ls.
net). It gives particulars of the requirements of
the London and other Universities regarding
matriculation and the taking of various degrees.
Full details are also given regarding the tutorial
work undertaken by the University Correspondence
College.
Our readers who contemplate taking
arts or divinity degrees will find this Directory
very useful.
*
*
*
The issue of "The Century Bible" makes steady
progress towards completion, other two volumes
being announced for early issue.
These are
"Exodus," by Professor Bennett, D.D., and the
second part of "Isaiah," by Principal Whitehouse,
D.D. So much has been learned recently regarding both books that the volumes will be welcomed by all Bible readers and students as a
concise summing up of the results of the present
position of scholarship.
*
* * *
Open-air work promises to be even more successful this season than in previous years. Free
Church Councils all over the country are making
arrangements for systematic campaigns. In order
to assist in work of this nature, the National Free
Church Council have prepared a number of hymn
leaflets containing most suitable selections for the
open air. Particulars of these can be obtained
from the National Council's Publication Manager,
Memorial Hall, London, E.C.
* * * * *
MINISTERIAL ARRANGEMENTS.
The Rev. John F. Lawis has declined an invitation to remain in the Halifax, Brunswick Circuit,
for a fourth year, and will remove at the Conference of 1909.
The Rev. T. Letcher has accepted a unanimous
invitation to remain in the Bolton (Albert Place)
Circuit for a fourth year, till 1910.
The Rev. E. V. Stephens has intimated his intention of leaving the Callington Circuit at next
Conference, after six years' service.
The Revs. R. Wilton and James Stephens have
accepted unanimous invitations from the Norwich
Circuit for a fourth year, till 1910.
The Rev. R. Squire has intimated his intention
of leaving the Taunton Circuit at Conference,
1909, after four years' service.
The Rev. W. J. Christophers will remove from
the Downham Market Circuit at next Conference.
The Rev. J. S. Pinner has intimated to the
Rochdale, Baillie Street, Circuit, his intention of
removing at the Conference, 1910.
The Rev. J.. B. Goodhand has intimated his
intention to remove from the Manchester Second
Circuit in 1909, after four years' service.
The Rev. R. F. Bell has decided to leave the
Derby, Dairy House. Road, Circuit at next Conference.
The Rev. George Eayrs, has intimated his intention of removing from the .Batley Circuit at
next Conference.
596
THE UNITED METHODIST.
SHEFFIELD CONFERENCE.
JULY 9, 5908.
who was received by the audience upstanding. His
address was a_touching plea for more workers for
Christ. He said he desired to speak for the
Christians in West China and for the heathen in
that country. In a telling and appealing manner
he roused the imagination of the audience by
introducing to them the different sections of the
men, women, and children among whom he had
laboured. In our Church in West China there are
a number of splendid Christians, men and women,
whose first purpose in life is to bring men and
women to Christ. What would they say if they
were here? He thought their first Words would be
to thank us for sending missionaries to West
China. He thought they would plead for us to
send more missionaries to China at this time, as
there never was so great an opportunity. China
is waiting. What shall the answer be? What
shall I say for you? Could he tell them that the
Church would send the men they needed? In succession he called up the crowd from Miao which
had invaded his house to learn of Christ, and the
heathen who in their thousands were waiting to
hear the message. What should he say to them?
Christ was calling them ; there was no salvation
for Him until the world was saved. Christ had
died to save the world, and they must do the rest.
They must bring joy and peace to the Master.
What remains to be done you must do. Will you?
(Applause.)
the late M.N.C. about six or eight, and the late
THE ORDINATION SERVICE.
B.C. about the same number on the average.
The Conference Chapel presented an inspiring Thirty is about the average aggregate. This year
scene on the second Monday evening. Standing there were thirty-eight. The late B.C. section always set apart an afterroom was hard to find. The only available
seats were a few in the press pew. One can noon and evening for this service. The experiences of the young men ordained were taken in the
imagine the feelings of the thirty-eight young afternoon, the greater portion of the evening sermen who stood before that great assembly. It vice was given to the "Charge." It is evident
was the first Ordination Service of the United that some change must be made. Either there
Methodist Church. There was great expectation. will be an afternoon public session for this purEach of the three Methodist tribes, now one, had pose, or the "batch" will be divided, and another,
en the old days made much of this service. It or, possibly a third, church be used as well as
was always emotional, usually impressive, and not the Conference Chapel for the ordination. Thig
seldom of a high spiritual character. The older will require two or three sets of conductors, and
men used to talk much of great "charges" they two or three Charges. But surely the Church is
remembered. And in one section, at any rate, the rich enough in men to provide all needed.
COOPER G. HAWKEN.
Charge given by a minister as the Ex-President
of the Conference was often the most ambitious
Following are the names of the brethren who
and memorable of his public official utterances.
were received into full Conne:.;ion :
The programme this year broke down, and for
The Revs. J. H. Baron, H. R. _ Barry, J.
the simplest of reasons. The time allotted for the Boaden, A. L. Broadfield, E. Clark, L. P. Colley,
service was obviously and utterly inadequate. Be- W. A. Cooper, A. E. L. Davis, F. Dennis, S. G.
hold it I Apart from singing and announcements Dimond, T. Dodgeon, A. E. Dymond, C. Ellison,
there were on the programme two prayers, a D. G. Elwood, F. Fox, J. Gibbon, A. D. Gifford,
Scripture lesson, a resolution to be moved, H. Hinchcli ffe, F. Husband, W. H. Jeffries, J. E.
WORK IN EAST AFRICA.
(seconded and supported, thirty-eight young minis- Langley, Arthur Lee, C. W.. Limb, H. G. Lowe,
ters were to give some account of their conver- F. J. May, G. E. Minnear, H. Parish, H. PritThe Rev. J. B. Griffiths has been so long fn
sion, their call to the ministry and their present chard, H. Robson, E. H. Smith, W. 0. Smith, East Africa that he had a difficulty in addressing
Christian experience, and further to avow their W. E. Stockley, E. H. Tuck, G. W. H. Wallis, an English audience. His address was a fine depledge to preach the doctrines of the Church and J. Wallett, G. E. Welch, and F. Wright.
scription of the country and people among whom
maintain, its discipline, and lastly, there was the
he has been working He showed the difficulties
Ex-President's Charge. All this, including the CONFERENCE MISSIONARY MEETING. of the work, amid unhealthy climate and lack of
"Hallelujah Chorus," and other singing, had to
conveniences, but, nevertheless, he could say, withThe spacious Hanover Chapel was crowded on the out fear of contradiction that we had the finest
be crowded into an evening service beginning at
seven o'clock. Had we the temper of our Puritan first Tuesday evening for the Missionary Meeting. sphere of labour on the East Coast of Africa. At
fathers and mothers who enjoyed sermons five From the platform the gathering was an inspira- Mazeras we have two centres, at Mazeras and
hours long-, or if we were as keenly interested as tion. Mr. Joseph Ward, of Sheffield, was in the Ribe, with beautiful houses and churches, with
modern theatre-goers in certain of their favourite chair, and surrounding him were the speakers, a college and sanatorium. There were ten staplays, the thing might be done. But under exist- a number of returned missionaries and officials. tions at Mazeras and three at Rib& On these
ing conditions it is impossible. It was calculated
The President announced the opening hymn, stations there were day and Sunday Schools, with
beforehand that each young minister might com- "All hail the power of Jesu's name," which was evening classes, in addition to the ordinary serpress into one minute the account of his conver- heartily sung to the tune of "Diadem." Prayer vices. Every preacher was expected to visit from
sion, call to the ministry and present experience. was offered by the Rev. Henry T. Chapman (one house to house. During the last three years they
This obviously was where the breakdown came. of the Foreign Missionary Secretaries).
had built a new college at. Mazeras, a sanatorium
The President made tactful, kindly and repeated
The President subsequently introduced the chair- at Nairobi, and five different stations presented
attempts to regulate the flow of testimony, and man, who then took charge of the meeting.
by the Treasurer (Mr. Robert Bird, J.P.) had been
the men themselves made gallant efforts to keep
The Rev. G. Packer presented a brief report. opened. (Cheers.) Mrs. Griffiths had translated"'
within the time limit. But it could not be done. He said the printed report would be issued as soon their book of service and part of the catechism.
How could it in one minute? I have no word as possible after Conference. The United Church He assured them that Mrs. Griffiths was an outof blame for the young men. They evidently possesses six distinct Mission fields, all full of and-out missionary. (Applause.) They had also.
strove to keep the commandment. But it was promise—three in China, two in Africa, one in a little dispensary built by their own hands, of
impossible for them to be justified by perfect Jamaica.
which they were proud. Their membership was
obedience. Every man fell. Some a bit deeper
Jamaica reports a good increase of members. not large, but it was genuine; they did not lack
than others.
The work in West Africa is spreading, and new applications, but they were most careful whom
Yet, who would have missed their words? opportunities are inviting our acceptance. In East they admitted.
They - required six more misMost of the experiences struck one as coming Africa considerable improvement is recorded, and sionaries, but they were not downhearted. They
straight from the life-centre. In several cases China is the country of the future. The income were full of hope; and East Africa as a whole had
some of us regretted the curtailment. We could was in round figures £20,000—a sum altogether a splendid future ; and he believed that our Mishave heard more with pleasure and unto profit. inadequate, since we are understaffed in every sion, for which they had sacrificed so much in
They were a goodly band. As far as we could direction.
He appealed for increased financial lives and money, would not only share in the
judge no false note was struck. The Church is support.
future, but it would have a great deal to do in.
enriched by their coming into our ranks.
forming the future. (Applause.)
CHAIRMAN'S ADDRESS.
When each had spoken, and the ordination
The
chairman,
in
a
forceful
address,
said
that
at
prayer had been uplifted, and the packed and
A RETURNING MISSIONARY:
heated congregation had settled to hear the vener- this first public meeting of the first Annual ConThe Rev. John Hedley said he was not now a
ference it was becoming that we should consider
able Ex-President's Charge, it was evident that our
returned missionary, but a returning missionary.
Lord's
command,
"Go
ye
into
all
the
world
the assembly, as a whole, was in no mood to
In a powerful address he appealed to the audireceive a long address, but panted for an early and preach the Gospel to every creature." We need ence to see to it that the Message of Peace•
deliverance. The Rev. E. Boaden placed him- as United Methodists more men and women to should be preached to the people of China. What
self under the severest restraint. The briefest acknowledge God's right to reign over us and was to be the future : China for Christ and'
Charge on record was given. He spoke under to whom we have pledged our allegiance. They re- Christ for. China? Was the United Methodist
ten minutes, five is the space some reporters joiced in the amelioration which is coming to thou- Church going to retreat, economize, turn back?.
measured. The outside limit was ten. The be- sands in this and other lands, and which has come He did not think sa, but they were going forward'
loved father erred on the safe side. He evidently through Christ. Their hearts were full of grati- in the strength of our Master and'in the Spirit of
shared the modern horror of long services, and tude to the Giver of all good for men and women our God. (Applause.)'
probably earned the gratitude of the large audi- of sterling worth, who are willing to lay aside all
The Rev. C. Stedeford moved a vote of thanks:
the world is prepared to offer and give themselves
ence, or nine-tenths of it.
to the ministry of God's Holy Word, for the in a brief address.
There was some disappointment, however. I saving
of
the
people
at
home
and
abroad.
Their
Mr. Robert Bird, J.P., in seconding, was.
think the young men were disappointed, although missionary horizon had widened, and from the
the weighty and fitting words addressed several fields the cry came to-night, "Come over heartily welcomed. He said no service at' home'
them were as jewels shining and precious. and help us." What would be the watchword? was in proportion to that of those who left homeStill at 'an Ordination Service the young minis- The call for aggressive work at home and abroad for service abroad. He was- delighted to see the
missionaries. He hoped the result of this meetters and the Church have a right to expect a
loud and strong: Methodist Union never ing would be that they would-go away, with their
worthy exhortation. And no one pretends it can was
meant retraction, but the strengthening of the hearts filled with the love of God and zeal'for HiS
be done in five minutes. In this there is no re- causes.
He appealed to them for a liberal giving work. (Applause.)
flection upon the venerable Ex-President. He
as God had blessed them, that they might
The President put the resolution, which was"could no other," in the difficult conditions of according
sustain those whom they had elected to be their carried with acclamation, and an inspiriting meetthe hour.
messengers, that the Lord might bless and wel- ing was brought to a clbse with the. Benediction.
Next Conference will probably have an amended come the coming of His Kingdom. (Applause.)
During the evening a united choir led'
Order of Service for the ordination. It must be
the singing and effectively rendered' the anthem :.
remember that the number, thirty-eight, is much
WHAT SHALL I SAY?
"How
lovely are the Messengers •"; conin excess of the aggregate number ordained each
The first returned missionary to address the ductor, Mr. J. Kaye; organist; Mr. EL Coulton,
year by the three uniting Churches. The late
F.M. have usually had about fourteen or sixteen, Conference was the Rev. S. Pollard, of China, The collection realized L'224 5s. 4d..
JULY 9, 1908.
The Wit and Humour of
Conference.
BY REV.' J. L. HOOXINS.
IN his opening remarks, as chairman of the
Conference tea-meeting, the President told of a
chairman who declared, on taking the chair, that
a better man ought to have taken the position, but
that, unfortunately, one could not be found.
As an instance of truth being stranger than
fiction—it was in the above speech that the President, reminiscent of the early evangelization of
Sheffield, had to plead for the reception of the tale
how Jeremiah Cocker, preacher, dealt with the
wild bull that was let loose upon him : he took
the bull by the horns and in that position continued
and finished his sermon. The President assured
us he was simply historical, and that he carried
about with him no romance or imagination. It
was a tribute to the Doctor that his audience then
-consented to swallow that bull.
The roll-call which constitutes the Conference
proceeded in a business-like and mechanical way,
names being called'in their irreducible simplicity ;
individuals being recognized as representatives
only : doctors, graduates, ministers, mayors,
county councillors, all responded to names given
them in baptism. The impartial silence with which
the names were received was suddenly broken at
the call of "Edward Boaden," the delegates expressing their veneration for our Ex-President by
a cheer ; but having begun to recognize, it was
amusing to observe the endeavour of the Conference to stop ; varying measures and emphasis of
applause registered a sensitiveness which wished
to be discriminating without being partial.
The reply to the name "Bell " was too faint to
reach the Secretary's ear, who inquired if Mr.
Bell answered, whereupon the answer rang out
clearly. Puns are ever plentiful, and my neighbour
remarked that the delegate had not bellowed his
response.
With characteristic modesty, or else with a desire
not to be pedantic, the Secretary on calling his
own name gave no answer to it. Whereupon my
neighbour asserted the Secretary's presence with
a stentorian "Here! "
Considering the amount of talk, there were few
'of those slips of the tongue which never mercifully escape the notice of one's hearers; as when
a London delegate, speaking of his difficulty in
getting an acceptance of his Circuit's invitation,
declared that all the men - who were at liberty were
engaged.
The affable Secretary of Conference, wise as a
serpent, harmless as a dove, made an announcement with a knowing smile, that a collection for
the caretaker of the Conference premises would
be taken during the voting for the election of
members of Committees!
Mr. Packer's bag was always the mystery box
in the M.N.C. Conferences, and it has at once become a sacred mystery in the eyes of the new Conference. A reverend delegate, with an amendment
to an official resolution, advised the members to
keep an eye on Mr. Packer's bag. But, surely,
the remark was strangely misunderstood by a
concerned delegate who having lost some valuable,
and failing to recover it, began to make inquiries
as to the whereabouts of Mr. Packer's bag1
In the Revs. R. Abercrombie, J. Cockin and Mr.
W. Jones we have three talkers of marked individuality, Mr. Abercrombie's philosophic mind
connects everything with a principle and puts
everything in its class, then discusses it—and
plays with it. His nimble wit is like your sunbeam in the ewer, delighting you and eluding
you if you try to catch it. One delegate, answering him in debate, declared that one never knew
whether he was making fun of one or not.
There was fun and philosophic phrasing in
Mr. A's remark that there is a tendency to persistency in the holding of office. Again speaking
on the question of affording facilities for academic
attainments—"in this age of widely diffused culture, the time may come when it will be a distinction not to have graduated." "Some men add
only a little to the immeasurable waste of commonplace." Then would come a discerning bit beautifully put; speaking of the "officialized" man,
liable to "ossification of the heart," he advised
such men periodically to retire and " go back to
the heart of nature and back to the bosom of the
eternal,"
The Rev. J. Cockin is effective and interesting
in debate in another way. The rapier is not his
weapon, he uses artillery and demolishes an argu-
THE UNITED METHODIST.
ment by pouring a broadside upon the last speaker.
It was thus that he opened out on Mr. Barnes.
To a stranger who knew not of the good friendship between the two, and unacquainted with Mr.
Cockin and his ponderous style, and the above-.
noted way of pulverizing a personality in reducing
an argument—to a stranger the apparent personal
attack would, as it did, provoke a protest. Mr.
Barnes, of course, was amused, to the simulated
surprise of his opponent, who declared that were
he in Mr. Barnes's position he should have insomnia for a week. The children's interests were
involved in the question at issue, and Mr. Cockin
—a notorious bachelor—declared that his own
children were all right, as far as he knew, and
his wife was never happier. Whenever he rises in
Conference it is like opening all the windows and
feeling refreshing breezes.
Mr. Jones, well known to the M.N.C. section,
soon elicited enquiries, "Who is that man?" He
wears that old look of pain some of us know so
well as he delivers himself, and which is intensified
as some shrewd and witty remark is working its
way to his lips, and while his audience laughs he
stands injured innocence personified—" I second the
resolution, Mr. President, and when the report
comes back I hope those who have had so much
to say this afternoon will remember that they have
said it and will not say it all over again."
A Conference Review.
BY WILLIAM JONES.
"GENTLEMEN of the jury, what is your verdict
in this case?" asked the judge ; and then an unlettered juryman timidly enquired : "Can we have
more than one opinion, sir?" "You can have as
many opinions as you like if you will now agree
upon one, and reserve the rest for private expression among your own friends," and they agreed.
Now, if a jury, made up of all those members of
Conference who were willing to serve upon it, were
to sit, what would be their verdict upon the
Sheffield Conference? I think it would be this :
A very trying Conference. Of course, there would
be members who would want to have a preface,
and very many who would wish to add a supplement, and there might even be a minority report,
but the central verdict would be : A trying Conference. And no wonder, for it was inevitable
that it should be so. Think of it, three streams
meeting at a junction, and the impact of the
waters not only ruffling the whole surface, but
also stirring up the depths, so that it was no
wonder if now and then the Conference became
slightly muddled. It was not a conflict so much
as a confusion, but there was no disaster at the
junction, for even the most adventurous spirits
who took their little boats on to the most tossing
waters never allowed themselves to be overwhelmed, and if they lost one oar they soon found
another, and calling it "A, point of order," started
afresh. Some of the members came like schoolboys with their lesson book, the Agenda, tucked
under their arm, but it soon became apparent that
they had not "read, marked, learned and inwardly
digested" their lesson. And this was the result
"Mr. President. May I enquire--?" "You
will find your answer in the Agenda, which you
have had in your possession for more than a
week." A minute later "Mr. President. May I
further enquire--?" "That matter is not now
before the Conference, but will come on later."
And thus we went along our wandering way ; the
thirst for information was amazing and bewildering, but fortunately the President had not to
answer all the questions, for there stood Mr.
Packer, the very embodiment of patience, courteous ingenuity, ready to deal out every kind of
information to all and sundry, and appeared so
full of it as to make a keen business man exclaim : "My Sirs, but that brother has a wellstocked shop, and he knows just where he. has
put everything, and can reach anything off the
shelf in three winks." And it was well for the
Conference that it was so.
• We had introduced into our procedure what to
many of us was a novelty—we voted mostly by
saying "Aye" or "No," and not by show of hands.
This method had one merit, it helped the more
silent members to give vent to their over-charged
feelings, and thus get the stuff off their stomachs ;
and yet, as I overlooked the many grey or shining heads found in the company, I could not help
saying to myself : "The lungs of these honoured
brethren are not so powerful as when they were
597
big lads; but they will keep their hands cleaner,
and will be less afraid to have them viewed by
the best company ; and so, I should think, they
would prefer to vote by show rather than by
shout." Well, the Conference is going to Plymouth next year.
Though good in many ways, this Conference
must not be considered a sample or model one;
it could not be so, everything was too new and
too hurried. We were too much like families
who had been doing a Saturday flit, moving out
of three smaller houses into a large one, and haying not only the three sets of furniture we had
possessed for a long while, but also some entirely
new furniture which we had not had time fully
to unpack before the first Sunday came, and found
us very ill-prepared for a critical survey by our
most dainty and fastidious friends, and the hope
was that the callers would be few and very kindly,
and not want to see too much. Next year we
hope to have our furniture arranged, and our.
pictures properly hung.
The evening meetings were largely attended,
and the tone was excellent, but in future it would
be well to divide candidates for ordination into
two groups, meeting at two centres, and thus
give more time to each young man than was
possible this year. The Sacramental Service was
a very profitable time, but the conversation on
the Work of God was too hurried to be of any
great value; and it is to be hoped that next year
an earlier day, in the first week, will be chosen
for the discussion of this important matter; and
a morning would be best when the Conference Is
full, fresh, and in a receptive mood. Such a
service would do something to raise the tone and
improve the quality of the spiritual atmosphere of
the Conference itself, which this year left much to
desire. It is no answer to such a request to say
that time cannot be found for such a purpose; for
communities, like individuals, can always find
time to do that which they most wish to do, and
the introduction and continuance of a more devotional spirit would shorten and simplify many
of our discussions.
Next year the members of the Conference will
journey to Plymouth. Many will turn their backs
upon the rugged abruptness of the more boisterous
North, and, picking up other pilgrims as they
travel across the middle counties of England,
will by and by find themselves in a softer atmosphere and among a people of gentler speech and,
perhaps, manners. The late Bible Christians will
be more at home, there will be less business to
do, and therefore more time to do it in, and so
it is to Plymouth, and the Western people, that
we must look for the exemplary model Conference, with more leisure to show respect for authority, deferential courtesy to each other, a high
quality of devotional tone, and an enthusiasm
for God and the well-being of humanty, as shall
make the gathering an abiding inspiration and
a precious memory.
All things considered, we have done well at
this first Conference, and we may reasonably hope
to do better next year.
The King's Garden Party.
IMPRESSIONS OF THE PRESIDENT.
DuarNG the sittings of the Conference our President (the Rev. Dr. Townsend), as representing
the United Methodist Church, was commanded to
attend the King's Garden Party at Windsor.
It will be remembered that the Conference gladly
responded to the request of the President to be
allowed to retire from the Chair on the Saturday
morning that he might accept the invitation.
On the President's return we asked him to give
us his impressions of the Royal gathering.
"It was the most delightful function I ever
attended," said the President. "The weather was
exceedingly fine. There were over 9,000 guests
present. They included fourteen members of the
Royal Family, and a large number of members
of the House of Lords and the House of Commons.
A large number of Bishops were also in attendance
and it was gratifying to find so many leading
Nonconformists present, both ministerial and lay.
All the Nonconformist ministers of Windsor were
present, and I was told it was the first notice
they had ever received, which was no doubt due to
the influence of the King."
The King and Queen and Royal Family
mingled very freely with the guests, and were
to be seen passing to and fro speaking with those
whom they recognized."
"For my own part, I met with Di . Clifford and
598
•
' chummed with him most of the time. I also
met Dr. and Mrs. Brook, Mr. Duckworth and
Mr. Essex. Mr. Boaden was also present, and it
was gratifying to remember that all these friends
were connected with our own Conference."
As the Doctor had to preach in Sheffield on the
following day it will be evident that he had to
depend on excellent railway arrangements to return in time.
" I left the Conference," said the President,
"about eleven o'clock in the morning, and got
to ,Windsor about, half-past three. I left Windsor
THE UNITED METHODIST..
JULY, 9, 1908.
about seven o'clock, and caught the ten o'clock
train in London for Sheffield, reaching my destination about two o'clock in the morning 1
"I was quite fit for my preaching appointments
next day.
"When I reached London on Saturday afternoon
I was pleased to notice that all the evening papers
contained an account of our Conference here,
applauding the action of the Conference in singing the first verse of the National Anthem, when
it was informed that Dr. Brook, Mr. Boaden and
myself had been honoured by the King."
The
Government Licensing Bill.
News' of Our Churches.
BIRKINSHAW.
School
SATURDAY, June 20th, was a redStonelaying. letter day in the history of the
Birkenshaw United Methodist
Church, marking as it did the first stage in the
carrying out of the scheme for the erection of a
new Sunday School. The new school is being
erected on a site adjoining the chapel in Bradford
Road, according to plans by Messrs. Watson,
Son, and Ellison, of Wakefield, at an estimated
cost of about £1,600, including furnishing. The
stonelaying ceremonial, which was witnessed by
a large gathering, consisted of the laying of four
foundation stones by Mrs. D. Thornton, Mrs. J. G.
Mowat (Cleckheaton), Mrs. Joe Scott, and Mr.
T. Lister. The last-named took the place of his
father, who has taken the deepest interest in the
scheme, and was looking forward with the greatest
pleasure to laying one of the stones himself,
but about noon he was suddenly taken ill. The
Rev. R. H. Kipling presided, and in addition to
the stonelayers there were also present the Rev.
W. Leicester (Blackpool), the Rev. W. T. Barradough (Greetland), the Rev. S. Knapp, Mr. D. H.
Thornton, Mr. J. G. Mowat, Alderman B.
Crowther, Councillor J: H. Bates and Mr. W.
Halstead. The chairman said that besides telegrams from friends expressing regret at their
absence, there had also been received a letter from
the Rev. E. Boaden, who was the first President
of the United Methodist Church, wishing them
every success. The Rev. W. Leicester delivered
an address on' the polity of the United Methodist
Church. Tea followed in the old school, and at
night 'a meeting was held in the chapel. Alderman B. Crowther presided, and addresses were
delivered by the Rev. W. T. Barraclough, the
Rev. S. Knapp and the Rev. W. H. Proudlove.
A financial statement was submitted, showing
that over £700 had been already raised or promised towards the cost of the new school. The
list of subscribers was headed by Mr. Edward
Lister with a promise of £200. The collection
at the afternoon ceremony had amounted to
1113s. 6d., and donations had been received as
follows : Mrs. Mowat, twenty-five guineas; Mrs.
Thornton, £20 ; Mr. Scott (for a friend), Z20;
Mr. Ed. Lister, £25. Later total raised and promised, £760.
BERRY BROW, HUDDERSFIELD.
OrgaR
ON Sunday, June 21st, the organ
Reopening.
reopening services were held. •The
Rev. W. H: Locicley, of Stockport,
was the preacher, and very impressive were both
his discourses. The Salem Choir,, under the
guidance of the organist, Mr. Haigh Littlewood,
gave the following anthems : "The Wilderness"
and "Seelc ye the Lord" in the morning, and
Hear My Prayer" and "The Lord is Nigh" in
the evening. Mrs. Greenhalgh, Miss Wood, Mr.
E. Berry and Mr. H. Dawson, junior, took part in
the quartette; and Miss Wood, Mr. H. Shaw
and Mr. N. Sanderson were the soloists. In the
afternoon the. High Street U.M.C. choir gave
one of their most enjoyable musical services. Mr.
S. Kendall was the conductor, and Mr. J. E. Ibeson the organist. The following were the anthems
given : "0 for a Closer Walk with God," "They
that go down to the Sea in Ships," "King of
Love," "Hail gladsome Light," and "Abide with
Me." Madam England sang the solo entitled
PLight," and Mr. J. E. Ibeson gave the following
organ solos : "Magnificat," "Barcarolle," and
"Daybreak." The Rev. G. W. Stacey gave a
short address. The singing and playing of both
choirs and organists were highly, appreciated, and
nothing but praise N upon the lips of our music-
loving people respecting the whole day's proceedings. The congregations were particularly good
all day, and the collections, including a special
donation from the young men's class, came to
over £10.
LEEDS.
Scholars'
IN connection with the anniversary
Reunion.
of our Park Sunday School, Caroline Street, Leeds, a reunion of old
scholars was held, the first of its kind in connection with the place. Over 700 invitations were
sent to different parts of the world, and it resulted in a gathering of between 800 and 400.
The tea was followed by a meeting which was
held in the chapel. It was a great and memorable gathering, and many who could not be present owing to distance sent letters testifying that
they owed the best in their lives to the influence of
the splendid Christian men who had been in
connection with the place. The meeting was a
most enjoyable, one. There were words of greeting and a hearty welcome given by some of our
present teachers and the pastor, then followed
short addresses by a number who had been connected with the place for many years—some spoke
going back forty and sixty years. The meeting
was interspersed with splendid songs and hymns.
The anniversary, which followed on the Sunday,
was a huge success in every way, and so came
to an end one of the most profitable and memorable times of recent years.
SHEFFIELD.
Presentation AN interesting gathering took
of Portraits. place at Surrey Street U.M.
Church on Wednesday evening,
June 24th. For many years Mr. Charles Wardlow and Mr. Henry Woodcock have been closely'
associated with the official life of the church.
Recently each gentleman found it necessary to
relinquish his position as a Circuit steward, and
as there was a unanimous wish to mark their long
and generous services by some proof of goodwill,
the decision to present to each a portrait of himself, and also to place a replica of each in the
school premises, received immediate and hearty
support from all parts of the Circuit. A tea was
provided, and the gathering of past and present
members testified to the widespread interest in the
event. The subsequent meeting was presided over
by Mr. Marmadulce Wardlow. Mr. England presented the portrait to Mr. Charles Wardlow, and
Mr. F. Heath performed a similar duty to Mr.
Woodcock. The recipients expressed their pleasure and appreciation in speeches which were
reminiscent of their life-long association with the
church. Additional interest was given to the
gathering by the fact that a number of the delegates to United Methodist Conference just held in
the city were able to attend and bear testimony
to the signal services which have been rendered
to the churches by these veteran workers, especially as Mr. Wardlow is well-known throughout the whole Connexion for his generous support of church efforts. Amongst those present
were the Revs. J. Barlcer, W. Bowel!, W. A.
Fryar, W. Francis, G. H. Turner, G. A. Ward
and Alderman T. Snape.
A CITIZENS' Demonstration in support of the
Licensing Bill will he held in Hyde Park on Saturday, July 25th. Organizations representative of
all the Churches, of various temperance societies,
Liberal Associations, Labour Party and trade
union societies will be represented.
Over 100 bands will take part in the procession, and there will be a great display of banners.
Over fifty District Committees have been formed
for the purpose of arranging local contingents,
who on the day of the demonstration will proceed
to the Embankment, and then march in one great
procession, via Northumberland Avenue, to Hyde
Park, where there will be twenty platforms, this
being the maximum number allowed by the authorities.
The chairmen will include : The Bishop of
Hereford, the Dean of Carlisle, Lord Kinnaird,
Mr. Arthur Henderson, M.P. (chairman of the
Labour Party), Dr. J. Clifford, Sir John Bamford
Slack.
In addition to the Rt. Hon. Winston Churchill,
M.P. (President of the Board of Trade), the
speakers will include : Mr. G. N. Barnes, M.P.,
Mr. R. Bell, M.P., Mr. Will Crooks, M.P., Mr.
F. Maddison, M.P., Mr. George Nicholls, M.P.,
Mr. W. C. Steadman, M.P. (Secretary, Parliamentary Committee, Trades Union Congress),
Mr. Arthur Sherwefl, M.P., the Rt. Hon. Sir
T. P. Whittaker, M.P., Dr. Munro Gibion, Lady
Dorothy Howard, the Rev. Canon Horsley, the
Dean of Hereford, the Rev. C. Silvester Horne,
M.A., Lady Henry Somerset, the Rev. G. Hooper,
(President, Metropolitan Free Church Council),
Dr. Dawson Burns, Mrs. Ormiston Chant, Mrs.
W. S. Caine, Principal A. Garvie, D.D. (New
College, Hampstead), the Rev. Thomas Law
(Secretary, National Free Church Council), and
the Rev. H. S. Woolkombe, M.A. (Oxford House).
The arrangements of the Demonstration are
being made by the London United Campaign
Committee.
The railway companies are advertising excursions from all parts of England and Wales.
Friends therefore who are interested will have
every facility for attending the Demonstration.
The Licensing Controversy.
DEAR MR. EDITOR, — It has been stated in the
course of the controversy on the Licensing Bill
that licensed property is rated at three times the
amount the same property would be rated at if
unlicensed; and relying on that statement an
appeal is made to ratepayers to oppose the Bill for
"pocket interests." With a view of ascertaining
What truth there is in the above statement I have
prepared a return for all the houses in the county
of Herts, the renewal of which has been refused
since the 1904 Act.
It will be seen from the enclosed return applying to 40 houses that they were assessed as
follow :
Sch.-A
when
Licensed.
Sch. A
when
Unlicensed.
Gross value
Poor Law
Licensed,
Gross value
Pow Law
Unlicensed.
£902 £847 18 0 £845 5 0 £740 7 0
The compensation paid amounted to £23,701.
Numerous deductions may be made from these
figures, but the appeal to the pockets of the ratepayers will, I fear, lose its force, anyhow so far
as county districts are concerned. Indeed, the
result of this looking into matters may be that
the ratings of licensed premises, and certainly
Schedule A, will be raised; and the ratepayers
may thus get relief instead of alarm by the
passing of the Bill.
Yours, etc.,_
A. HOLLAND-HIDDERT.
H
[The return the Hon. A. Holland-Hibbert encloses with the above letter relates to 40 licensed
houses. In regard to two of them the assessment
is higher now the premises are unlicensed than
they were as licensed. In regard to 18 of them
.CURED INSTANTLY BY
the assessment shows no difference. In regard to
Prevents
siepiegightsim,
Decay, Saves
Prevented.
the 'remaining 20 the difference under Schedule A
is only £54 2s. and under the Poor Law assessNEURALGIA, Headache, and all Nerve
Pains removed by BUNTER'S NERVINE.
ment £99 18s.
Yet for the extinction of that
All Stores, Is. lid.
yearly value of £154 the suns of £23,701 was
w" 't"'""da"'''. paid !— ED., U.M.
yez.,.42 roViv%IlgtiriP
TOOTH-ACHE
BUNTER'S
NERVINE
JULY
9, 1908.
Books and Bookmen.
WHoso is wise will not allow early numbers
of "The Monthly Chronicle"—the first volume of
which was issued in 1838—to pass by him unclaimed. I paid, in my youthful enthusiasm, tenpence at a second-hand bookstall in Leeds for
Volumes 1, 2, 3, and 5, and now know, what I
then surmised, that the speculation was a happy
one. Leigh Hunt's "Notes of a Lover of Books"
run through the volumes, and it was the sight
of these pleasant articles as I aimlessly turned the
pages that made me willing to part with my
pocket-money in so alarmingly reckless a way.
*
*
*
The four volumes I still prize, but the second is
the one to which I most eagerly turn. Not because of Leigh Hunt's "Notes," delightful as
they, are, but because of a wretchedly unpoetical
poem and two lengthy articles on "The Virtues
of Brevity."
*
*
*
The writer of the "Brevity" articles, answering the question : "Is silence, or is brevity, always
a sign of wisdom?" tells a story. Coleridge was
impressed, on one occasion, with the grave, owllike aspect of a gentleman who happened to sit
next to him at a public dinner. He never spoke,
but his spreading countenance betrayed interest
' in all that was going forward. It was evident
that he only forbore taking part in the conversation from the natural self-distrust of superior intellect. Coleridge eyed this inscrutable gentleman
with respectful curiosity until a servant entered
bearing Norfolk dumplings, the sight of which
caused the silent philosopher to slap his thigh
and exclaim "Then-i's the jockeys for me 1 "
THE UNITED METHODIST.
DRAMA.
a morning
3 acts
...
5,000
10 novels
...
20 nibs
...
... 1 act
£5,000
... 10 novels
... 20 nibs
(not "Waverleys ")
1 box (theatre) ...
... 6 chairs
6 chairs
...
1 drama
Readers of Barrie will at once understand and
appreciate the final item in the above table. "On
the day I was born," says Barrie, "we bought
six hair-bottomed chairs, and in our little house it
was an event" (one drama)—"the first great
victory in a woman's long campaign ; how they
had been laboured for, the pound note and the
thirty threepenny-bits they cost, what anxiety
there was about the purchase, the show they made
in possession of the west room, my father's unnatural coolness when he brought them in (but
his face was white), I so often heard the tale
afterwards, and shared as a boy and man in so
many similar triumphs, that the coming of the
chairs seems to be something I remember, as if
I had jumped out of bed on that first day and run
ben to see how they looked."
*
*
*
*
I venture to suggest the formation of a "New
Grand Retardation Company." Goldsmith considered four lines a day good work. He was
seven years "beating out the pure gold" of his
"Deserted. Village." Dickens used to regard three
MS. pages as an honest day's work, and was
particularly well pleased with himself if he succeeded in writing four. A friend once said to Tom
Moore that he supposed his verses slipped off his
tongue as by magic, and a passage was quoted
in illustration. "Why, sir," replied Moore, "that
line cost me hours, days, and weeks of attrition
* *
before it would come. Carlyle worked on his
The "Monthly Chronicle" poem in which I am "French Revolution" for three years, on his
interested is thus entitled :
"Cromwell" for four years, and on his "Frederick
ANNOUNCEMENT
the Great" for thirteen years. Modern literature
would enter upon a new and more lasting phase
of a
NEW GRAND ACCELERATION COMPANY if a N.G.R.C. were formed and attracted a wide
and loyal membership.
for the promotion of the
ERNEST F. H. CAPEY.
SPEED OF LITERATURE.
I give the opening stanza only :
Loud complaints being made, in these quick-reading
times,
Of too slack a supply, both of prose-works and
rhymes,
A new Company, form'd on the keep-moving plan,
LETTER FROM REV. S. POLLARD.
First proposed by the great firm of Catch-rem-whoDEAR MR. EDITOR, —There are two little books
can,
which I should very much like all our ministers
Beg to say they've now ready, in full wind and speed, to read. One I have just read to-day, and it has
Some fast-going authors, of quite a new breed—
stirred my heart profoundly. It is "The MarvelSuch as, not he who runs, but who gallops, may lous Story of the Revival in Manchuria." The
read ;
Revival is going on now, and I think it is the
And who, if well-curried and fed, they've no doubt, very best thing which God's Spirit is doing at
Will beat even Bentley's swift stud out and out.
the present time in all the world. Our North
if
if
3F
*
China Mission adjoins the Revival zone, and I
Is Douglas Jerrold's "New Grand Acceleration am longing for the news from our brethren there
Company" the literary need of the hour? Nay, that the fire has set their churches all of a
verily. Our writers are altogether too industrious. blaze and revolutionized missionaries and converts.
Perhaps few present-day authors can rival Lope de My I what letters Brother Hedley will be able to
Vega, the Spanish poet and dramatist who died in write home ! How I envy him going back at
1635. He is said to have been guilty of produc- this critical time when the Spirit of God is miracleing eighteen hundred plays, and to have desecrated working again. I want all our ministers to have
his childhood by dictating poetry when five years a copy of "The Revival in Manchuria" that they
of age I He could write, Montalvan, his bio- may be prepared for the great news we are soon
grapher, tells us, an act of a play in half a morn- going to hear from our North China Mission.
I believe that the fire will go right through
ing, and frequently began and finished five
dramas within a fortnight. This outpaces Mr. China, and I hope to be back on my station in
S. R. Crockett with a vengeance, and leaves time to see myself and my brother missionaries
Miss Corelli miles in the rear, hot and panting. and all the converts turned inside out and made
As for Mr. Barrie, he is an incorrigible tortoise. more like our Master than we have ever been.
Do you know his rate and method of composition? How one longs for the great Revival which burns
up all doubts and sins, and makes us so full of
JOURNALISM.
the Divine that we are able easily and gladly to
2 pipes
1 hour
do just what our Father wants us to do.
2 hours
1 idea
The other book is called "A Modern Pentecost,"
1 idea
3 pars.
and gives the China Inland Mission story of the
3 pars.
1 leader
great work in their part of the Miao field. This
will give our brethren some idea of the great
FICTION.
sphere our Church has in West China, and what a
8 pipes
...
1 ounce
multitude of hearts the Revival Spirit will be able
7 ounces ...
... 1 week
to work on when He reaches the Miao country.
2 weeks
...
1 chapter
The cost of the first book is 6d. net, and of
20 chapters ...
1 nib
the second 3d. Each book can be read through
2 nibs
...
1 novel
in
half an hour, and two splendid missionary ser*
*
*
*
mons can be preached from either. If all the
Mr. Barrie has turned his attention to the stage brethren were to preach four missionary sermons
since he prepared the above tables, and has, pos: based on these two books the missionary fire
sibly, set before himself the ideal of the mighty would burn in our Churches as never before.
Lope de Vega. If so, I think we can work out
I want to appeal to some rich layman to go to
a table for Mr. Barrie at dramatist :
the expense of sending a copy of each of these
Two Stirring Books.
599
little books to all our ministers. The books are
so clearly printed, so packed with the kind of
information we need, and so burning with the
fire that the layman who will do as I suggest
will be doing a great work for the Master and
a great. kindness to all the brethren.
God is at work. He is doing our work—His
work. General Buffer tried to get into Ladysmith and could not. Who does not remember
the blackness of that awful black week ! But
later on General Buller did get into Ladysmith.
Whv? Because the Commander-in-Chief set to
work elsewhere, right at the other side of the
country.
Many of us are having black week in our
Churches. We are downhearted. We despair of
the future because we are ignorant of the present.
Do you think God has forgotten us? Not He !
He never could! Our great Commander-in-Chief
is at work fighting our battles on the other side
of the world. The pity is that the majority
know nothing about it.
I want everybody to cheer up ! We cannot do
good work if we are downhearted. But you
cannot cheer up unless you know what God is
doing.
Nw,
dear Mr. Editor, will you please help me
to find out that rich- layman, and then set him
to work?—Yours sincerely,
SAM POLLARD.
279 Rotton Park Road, Edgbaston, Birmingham,
July 3rd, 1908.
MANCHESTER SECOND (Great lackson Street).—The
School anniversary was successful y celebrated on June
28th. Preacher, Rev. T. Tims Waylett (pastor). In
the afternoon the choir, assisted by friends, gave the
cantata "David." Special hymns were also sung by
children and choir. Mr. J. Lawson, conductor, and
Messrs. E. Cookson and J. B. Kilvert, organists.
Th. MO RI IIII:MTai./f1171:gir„Cie:Zilti Institution
Founded 1894,
Inoorpopated 1909.
WOLSEY HALL,
OXFORD.Martspontiturt Colltgg,
Capital
... A15,000.
Prlooigal :
J. W. 1C141., L.C.P., Double Hens., F.R.S.L.
S. H. Moog, B.A. (Lund.), lit in Hone.
Director of Shades :
Rev. Prof. R. Monet, B.A. (Oxon.), B.D. (Odin.).
Theological Tutors :
Rev. Prof. R. Moon, B.A. (Oxon.), B.D. (Odin.).
Rev. T. PULLAR, M.A.. B.D. (Edin.).
Rev. J. MOORHEAD, B.A.. B.D. (Odin.).
Rev. S. Hoxixooica, MA., B.D. (Oxon.).
Professor E. NORMA. Jones, M.A. (Oxon.).
Rev. W. W. Formsrom, B.O.. B.A. (Land.).
Rev. H. E. Scorn, M.A.. B.D. (Doe.).
Rev. Prof. KIRBOPP LAX., M.A. (Oxon).
POSTAL
TUITION
IfOR
Free Church Workers. Ministers. Teachers,
Laymen, In all branches of Biblical and
Theological Study, Greek. Hebrew, Como...tie. Religion. isc., and for all Theological degrees, including
LONDON UNIV.
BEM
THEOLOGICAL PROSPECTUS. FREE B.D. GUIDE.
List of Successes
and full particulars
on application to
REV. PROF. MOORE, WOLSEY HALL, OXFORD.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
600
BALSAMIC
Eigity •
Nears"
ELI R
COnsumptioft.
Fob"
BRONCHITIS, COUGHS,
ASTHMA & COLDS.
Of 11. Chemists - 141, 21S, 4/6,3r IV-
JULY 9, 1908.
The National Children's the Illniteb flbetbobist
Home and Orphanage.
UNITED METHODIST CHURCH.
Chief Office: BONNER ROAD, N.E.
CHILDREN'S
SUMMER HOLIDAYS.
15e. will provide a Fortnight's Holiday for
One Child.
Publishing Office : 12 FerrIngdon A
E.O.
Editor's Address: 100 Athenlay Road, Hennaed, S.E.
Our London Letter.
I USED to hear my elders gravely say that the
devil generally got into the church through the
choir. My elders were not very musical people,
Remittances from U.M. Churches thankfully reoeived by the and so they were exceedingly emphatic on the
Hon. Treasurer, Rev. A, Crombie, 12 Farringdon Avenue, E.C.
point. Certainly at times it seemed to my junior
Cheques crossed' London City and Midland Bank."
intelligence that his dark majesty had indeed
arrived—and one felt sorry to learn that the choir
BOARDING SCHOOL FOR BOYS.
should have been his channel of communication,
WITH
for the choir were nearer my own age in those
Principal—Rev. ALFRED BOOTHILL, B.A. (Load.)
INDIA PAPER EDITION.
days, and I loved quite a number of them all at
Assisted by Resident Graduates and qualified
We have recently issued a reprint of the above on India
Visiting Masters.
once.
paper. The type is the same as in the first edition, and
Since those early days I have travelled a little
The College is beautifully situated and thoroughly
the prices are the same, though the book is printed on
India paper which is very thin, very tough, and
equipped with Laboratory, Gymnasium, Playing Fields, 'expensive
and some impressions have been corrected. One
quite opaque. Thickness, i inch.
Cubicles, Sanatorium, &c.
of these is that the devil cannot really get into
Bound In paste grain, gilt edges, round
The curriculum includes Classics, Modem Languages,
the Church by the choir, because architecturally,
Commercial subjects, &c.
corners, 10s. 6d. Morocco, red under gilt
in many places, the choir isn't in the church.
edges, round corners, 12s. Od. Levant
Repeated Summons in University and other Examinations.
Not long ago I preached in a West Country
Morocco, best, padded, red under gilt edges,
church where, if the choir didn't play nap or whist
18s.
Per further particulars apply to the PriaciPal.
during
the sermon, it was their own inherent
Also on BIBLE PAPER. Cloth, red edges, 5s.
good nature that saved them. Provided they had
Cloth gilt, burnished edges, Re
not shouted over the tricks, they certainly would
not have disturbed the congregation. They were
(BIBLE CHRISTIAN)
ANDREW CROMBIE, 12 Farringdon Avenue, R.C.
behind the preacher, and in a pen I During the
SHEBBEAR, NORTH DEVON.
sermon they might have seen his topmost back
Governor hair, provided he was qualified for the five-foot- Rev. W. B. LARK.
eight minimum.
Head Master - T. RUDDLE, Esq., B.A. (Load.)
NONCONFORMIST
HOME
SCHOOL
How many choirs in our United Methodist
SIX ASSISTANT MASTERS.
Churches get a fair chance to benefit by the serPupils prepared for the Universities, the Public ExaminPrincipal
HERBERT A. MERRY.
mon? Is a sermon only a question of hearing?
ations, and for Business, at the option of parents.
Assisted by Reeident Break and Preach Mistresses.
Is there no seeing? Is the preacher's face no
Healthy situation. Playgrounds six acres. Diet of the
asset of delivery? Has the play of the
test quality and unlimited in supply.
For PROSPECTUS apply HOLBEROH. Lemke Rd., Ealdistoes.
facial
muscles no part in the telling of
Terms from 24 Guineas per year.
Neale the only extra.
a good story? Is the light of his eye no evidence
GOV.NESS STUDENT required Neat Term.
when his soul breaks through in inspiration?
Ilhastrated Prospectus on application to Rev. W. B. LARK.
"All eyes were rivetted 6n him I " No ! not on
him, on his countenance, thither were fastened
all eyes—except those of the choir. They, poor
ESTABLISHED 1851.
souls, either cannot see him or they see the least
" Made of the purest
SOUTHAMPTON BUILDINGS, HIGH HOLBORN, W.C.'
CLEAVES' vour."—Lattenr.
materials of excellent flainteresting feature about him—his cerebellum. So
21 PER CENT. INTEREST allowed on Deposit Accounts.
CELEBRATEC.
they sometimes find tune-books most interesting.
2 PER CENT. INTEREST on Drawing Accounts with
" Exceptionally choice,
DEVONSHIRE
This disregard of the souls of the choir is seriuniformly delicious..
Cheque Book. All general Banking Business transacted.
COURT CIRCULAR.
ous and hurtful and blameable in the highest
ALMANACK, with full particulars, POST FREE.
CLOTTED CREAM
degree. It is a distinct spiritual hindrance to the
Such delicious an d
C. F. RLTENSCHOFT. BeeveLsry.
harmless dainties."—FAMILY
life of many churches. Gathered in our choirs is
CONFECTIONS. DOCTOR."
the choicest blood we have—and this precious
Hoe Grammar School, Plymouth.
UNRIVALLED FOR
people in ninety per cent of our churches miss the
Head Minder: G. P. DYMOND, M.A. (Lend.)
educative inspiration of the service. One cannot
Second Muter: J. ROUNSEPELL, B.A., B.Sc. (Lond.)
ABSOLUTE PURITY
Teacher's Diploma, London University.
be inspired via a gramophone, and the preacher
AND
Lats.' Success.:
is no more, cannot be, to many a choir.
Nine Successful, Including 17th in First Class
To preachers I would say : Insist on seeing the
Plenum. and 13th in Mathematics. JUNIOR, Twelve
EXQUISITE
FLAVOR.
Successful, including 14th in First Class Honours, let in
faces of the choir—it is good for you and very
Second Class Honours (bracketed).
good for them. Again and again the congregaSold In 1d., 3d. and 6d. Packets.
out of
tion is lifted to God by the preacher, but not so
SOLE MAKERS :
the unfortunate choir, they get no lift, for they
etc., Match
for
Football and Cricket. Gymnasium. Safe open Sea bathing.
"
wist not that his face shone."
Every accommodation for Boarders. Premises recently
Save the choirs—first, by an architectural device!
extended.
It may cost twenty pounds, but those choice young
9evonsbire &ram e6oeolate Works,
souls are worth it. To be musical is to be inFOR SUNDAY SCHOOL LIBRARIES.
CREDITODY, DEVON.
spirational.
Every Sunday School Library should contain a copy of the
My own choir is a delightful board of
consecration, but their high quality dates from
Application for Advertisement Space to be the day they turned their faces pulpitwards. Once
they furnished me with back hair and back
made direct to Advt. Manager, 12 Farringdon millinery whereon to work, and stared congregatree.
tion-wards, naturally seeing every movement in
ANDREW CROMBIE,19 FARRINODOR AVENUE, LONDON, E.O. Avenue, Farringdon Street, London, E.C.
the church, and being distracted generally. Now
we sit in V form—the preacher being at the
point of a broad V, the choir forming the oblique
sides so that they can face the people whilst singing, and yet watch the preacher during the preachEXCLUSIVELY RUN ON TEMPERANCE PRINCIPLES.
ing. I don't think the devil likes this V business.
It is too like a trap, and he is very superstitious
7 g
still,
the result being that he doesn't attend in
Stet.
in
our choir, as he used to attend on the choirs referred to by my elders. One happy result is that
our choir can take entire charge of the Sunday
evening prayer-meeting as devotedly and as savFULL PARTICUR OF OVER 60
ingly as the preacher.
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JULY 9, 1908.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
6os
Letters of Christopher .Hunt.
To thousands of people China, India, Africa for the homeland the brave man refuses to leave
will henceforth be no longer "the rule of three or his people, and as the curtain falls he is seen
compound fractions," but countries of real and nailing a cross above the Mission Chapel in token
FROM DARKNESS TO LIGHT.
deep interest with people to weep over, to pray that the Cross still conquers.
To the Editor of THE UNITED METHODIST.
for, and to lead to the Lord Jesus. Mr. Hedley
The third scene represents an episode in India
DEAR Sit,—Some time ago Dr. Fairbairn paid
took us down China street, and Dr. Fletcher showing what child-marriage and widow-burning
a visit to India. When he returned he said the Jones gave us one of his inimitable talks in the meant before the days the latter was abolished;
strongest impression left upon his mind was the Mission Hospital. Even more interesting than and the fourth—in some respects the most remarksplendid audacity of the missionary enterprise. I the delightful lecturettes of the missionaries were able spectacle of the entire pageant—depicts the
fear I may never set foot in the mysterious East, the comments of the people as they listened. Most defiance of the goddess of fire, Pele, by the
but for the last seven hours I have imagined I interesting of all were the Sunday School teachers. Hawaiian Queen Kapiolani, by which human
was there, and now that I am sitting over my I followed in the wake of one gifted young lady sacrifices were abolished. It is impossible to demidnight meal in my temporary home in a —at a respectful distance, but within hearing— scribe the magnificence of this fourth scene.
London suburb I am simply dumbfounded 'at the who was conducting some dozen girls along the
In the closing scene the whole four are brought
sanctified audacity of the London Missionary Indian section. The extent of her knowledge and together. A choir of 200 well-trained voices sings
Society. The- inspiring genius of "the Orient," her bright manner of imparting it amazed me. "From North and South, and East and West,
whoever he may be, is entitled to the lasting grati- The interest of the children was very keen. I they come, they come." They march round the
tude, not of Christendom alone, but of the entire was about to follow her to Samoa and New hall with palms singing this chorale. The other
heathen world. It has been the fashion of late Guinea when a look of reproach caused me to contingents file on the platform to the same music,
years on missionary platforms to say that the retreat shamefacedly into the Chinese Pagoda. and the whole of the seven hundred performers
romance of missions is over. I have said it myself But what an object-lesson to those children.. I take up the strain,
more than once, and was too blind to see what could imagine that more than one of those bright
In Christ there is no East or West,
a cold douche I was administering to missionary girls would be a missionary in less than ten years
In Him no North or South ;
enthusiasm. I shall never utter such purblind time as the result of that visit, and that all of
But one great Fellowship of love
nonsense again. The romance of missions over ! them would be missionary enthusiasts for the rest
Throughout the whole wide earth.
There are many fools among the saints yet. They of their lives.
" God bless you, my unknown And then we all rise and sing, "All people that
take a lot of firing out.
But it's a sorry attempt.
friend—though you might have dismissed me with on earth do dwell."
I.
a sweeter look ! " If I had been a Bible Christian Heart, throat, eyes—all are too full.
Yours, etc.,
At the Reception given to United Methodists I should have had better treatment, I am perCHRISTOPHER HUNT.
several distinguished members of our Church were suaded. Perhaps I should have had better manpresent.
Holm Ditton.
The Rev. G. A. Hampson, of South ners than to have followed, though. But as I
Woodford, presided over a good gathering, mostly cannot disentangle my reflections on this matter
of London Methodists. The welcome of the Ex- I will pass on.
hibition Committee was entrusted to the Rev. W.
III.
Hardy Harwood, the minister of the famous Dr.
Of course I saw the Pageant. I am seeing it
Allon's Church. Mr. Hardy Harwood, who was
now.
I
shall
see
it
for
many a day. I do not
once a Methodist, paid a graceful compliment to
WHEN I returned from the Conference at Shefthe late Methodist New Connexion and United know what my fellow scribes will say of it—Mr. field the other day, I found applications for the
Kaye
Dunn,
for
instance,
who with characteristic text-books of the Local Preachers' Studies awaitMethodist Free Churches. He had seen much of
our work in Yorkshire and Durham, and spoke of daring occupied the best seat in the hall—but ing me, and also requests for books from the
Lending Library. Attention to these took up a
it in the highest terms. Mr. Hancock's reply was for my part I never expect to see anything to considerable portion of the day, but the time was
surpass it to the end of my days. Some have said
very felicitous.
I do not know, by the way,
willingly
given as I am constantly finding that
whether any mention has ever been made of the it is too theatrical, but on this I can pass no these books prove exceedingly helpful. I am
opinion, being one of those antediluvian persons
fact—I am certain it has been noticed and privately
glad to find, too, that this column proves useful
who have never put their heads inside a theatre to people in various parts of the country. I shall
commented upon—but what a lot of good-looking
door. During the two hours I was in the Pageant be glad to have additional applications for the
men the late Bible Christian Church possesses !
Hall I had several lumps in my throat, and my text-books from intending students, and I want
Why, look at—but no, I had better not mention
friend John Medley told me he felt the same it to be understood that the Lending Library is
names, though a score are on the point of my
thing,
and that's a very good test of the quality now open to all the local preachers of the United
pen. If three ministers were on a platform toof the performance. Whether it is an Oratorio, or Methodist Church. The catalogues are threepence
gether belonging to the three Denominations the
a
Cantata,
or a Pageant, or an Opera, or all these each, post free, and the payment of one shilling
best-looking of the three would be the Bible
per year will enable any local preacher to have
Christian, I'll be bound. By way of parenthesis combined, I cannot say, but I never realized quite books sent post free, and with each book stamps
in the same way what the preaching of Christ will be sent to cover the cost of its return. Some
I may say I have never been taken for a Bible
Christian myself. This interesting fact sets one meant in regions beyond as I have to-night. readers pay more than one shilling, and the extra
There are five scenes symbolical of the triumph of payment is welcomed, but one shilling will secure
thinking. What has chisselled these good features,
the use of the books. I gladly report that generthese fine lines and curves? Is it because these Christianity in the four quarters of the world.. ous people at the Conference just closed made
The first shows a camp of North American
good men have "lived out their life as the light,"
Indians. The chief's child is lost, and the medi- contributions which will greatly help in this good
whilst many of us have lived it as a smoky wick,
cine man tells the distracted father that the gods work.
that the difference is so marked? I have an unI MET him years ago, and it was
comfortable feeling, somehow, that the explana- want blood ere the child can be found. The man A 'Veteran
very pleasant to meet him again at
is about to slay an unsuspecting Eskimo, who Local
tion is not entirely to be found in the blue skies
the Conference. He is seventy-four
has come among the tribe for barter, when a shout Preacher.
and glorious landscapes of Devon and Cornwall.
years of age, has been a local
is heard, and out of the woods comes a missionary
No, many of us have been born in the age of the
He calls upon the medicine preacher fifty-four years, has preached 600 Sunwith his sledge.
day School sermons, has never missed an appointkilling pace—and we look it. But others can say,
man to stay his hand. Angrily he turns upon the ment, and is still able to interest and edify the
I stay my haste, I make delays,
missionary, and it seems for the moment as if young, the middle-aged and the old. Mr. MoorFor what avails this eager pace?
the messenger of Christ is to lose his life. The head, for that is his name, belongs to the North
I stand amid the eternal ways
chief interposing, the missionary delivers his mes- Shields Circuit, and is well known and appreciated.
And what is mine shall know my face.
sage
of the Cross. He also produces the lcist His fidelity in relation to his appointments may
Criminologists say there are no good - looking
profitably be reproduced by younger men. It is
criminals. My knowledge of criminals—at least child, whom he has found. In the end the chief exceedingly interesting to meet with these brave
and
his
squaw become Christians and all the
those known to be such—is small, so I cannot
workers, and I shall be glad to hear about and
vouch for the accuracy of the statement. But I people are won for Christ.
refer to others.
The second scene was to me the most thrilling.
have a fairly good knowledge of what hard,
HAS any reader of this column
grinding poverty means to tens of thousands of Livingstone is among his beloved Africans, who Revelation
ever preached on this passage? If
7.
people, and I have rarely seen a good face among are building a mission house. An Arab slaveso,
how has he interpreted the
raider
is
carried
wounded
into
the
village.
these victims of our modern social disorder.
latter part of the text? The editor of "The ExBut this is a digression. It is our handsome Livingstone, dressing the man's wounds, has pre- pository Times" (T. and T. Clark, 6d.) refers to
sented
to
him
a
number
of
slaves
as
a
reward
for
spokesman at the reception who has started me
this passage in his July issue, and asks : "Is
his services; these he immediately sets free. there a more beautiful verse in the Bible?" He
after this hare.
Thoughts of home fill him with a great longing says, however, that he only knows of seven pubAfter a tour through the Exhibition you realize for his native land. "Home, home, home." These lished sermons which deal with it. He names
the aptness of Mrs. Browning's lines, quoted in words are spoken with indescribable pathos. Just the seven, and directs special attention to a rethen native porters are seen approaching, and cent one in which the preacher asserts that the
the Handbook
statement "all kindreds of the earth shall wail
You weep for what you know. A red-haired child there is great excitement among the villagers. because of Him" sets forth a wailing not of fear,
These
prove to be Stanley's men. When Stanley
Sick in a fever, if you touch him once,
Will set you weeping ; but—a million sick!—
himself appears and greets Livingstone the scene but of sorrow. It is pointed out that with this
statement the exposition given by the late ProYou could as soon weep for the rule of three
is intensely realistic. Stanley has come to take fessor Hort perfectly agrees. Dr. Hort said
Or compound fractions.
the missionary home. Though his heart aches "It is not a wailing because of punishment on
FOR LOCAL PREACHERS.
▪
602
THE UNITE-0 METHODIST.
JULY 9, 1908.
themselves;- it is the wailing of sorrowing re- lion of the Leaders' Meeting. Stewards and leaders the case of such leaders as the late Rev. R. Chew,
pentance. The prophecy is not of vengeance, bUt can only receive into membership or suspend from that number was increased to three or four bearof conversion."
membership through the action of Leaders' Meetings, ing their loving and regretful testimony. While
and in no other way.—ED., U.M.]
the writer has spent near half-a-century in the
"Ichabod" THE woman who uttered this word
active ministry, he has not had for the last nine
1 Samuel
was weak, sorrowful, hopeless, and
years, as a supernumerary, the right to speak on
iv. 23.
she died with this word upon her
any question before the house, or he would surely
•
lips, and the word means "There is AUSTRALASIAN METHODIST JOTTINGS. have uttered a mild protest in the recent Conferno glory." And yet, as a clear-eyed expositor has
ence on the scant notice paid to some of his deBY REV. W. F. JAMES.
pointed out : "This gloomy, despairing word,
ceased friends. He felt sorely grieved at such a
---uttered by a mother on her death-bed, proved after
singular oblivion, that reminded him of Tom
FRO31 statistics of the recent Annual Confer- Hood's couplet on a pauper's burial. The relaall to be a false prophecy. . . . Before very many
weeks the sacred ark was brought back . . . ences, compiled by the Secretary of the General tion of one of the deceased came from a distance
before many years that ark stood enshrined in the Conference, it appears the members increased last to hear the testimony he expected to hear borne
holiest place in Solomon's splendid temple at year 3,342 ; adherents, 20,000 ; ministers and pro- respecting his friend, but his journey was altoThe decrease of 3,250 Sunday gether in vain. It is most devoutly to be hoped
Jerusalem, and the glory of the Lord filled the bationers, 24.
house.'" This writer adds : "Now, without hav- scholars has led to enquiry.
that this is not a pattern of the way such a tender
The small proportion of former minor Method- and touching question is hereafter to be treated
ing the excuse of some terrible calamity, we are
often tempted to the same kind of faithlessness as ist representatives at the last General Conference in the united body.
breathed in the bitter despairing cry ' Ichabod.' excited attention. Other facts should not be forI will not enlarge upon the necessarily hurried
. . . There never was a generation yet when gotten. Six Presidents of Annual Conferences, way in which the Reception Service had to be
Christianity did not seem to be decaying in the since Union, were formerly minor Methodist conducted, divesting it of some of its customary
eyes of the people who stood by and watched its ministers. For the last seven years the official hallowedness and power.
work and criticized its failure. These people are organ in South Australia has been edited by' a
Yours truly,
always wanting to write Ichabod' over the door- former Primitive Methodist or Bible Christian.
E. D. GREEN.
way of the Church and across the reports of Five of the eight chairmen of Districts, and seven
District
Home
Mission
Secretaries
this
year
preChristian societies and institutions." The man
who stands in the pulpit must, however, have a vously belonged to Minor Methodism. The lines
HIRED LOCAL PREACHERS.
larger faith and a keener vision, and those who of distinction are rapidly disappearing.
During the ten years, since Union was effected
are addressed in this column must so speak and
MR. G. WHETTON, of Boston, writes
act as to quicken faith and inspire courage in in Queensland, the ministers and home missionI hope the Connexional Committee will see their
aries have increased fifty per cent; local preachers,
those to whom they minister.
thirty-three per cent ; members, seventy-five per way to give Hired Local Preachers some kind
S. C. CHALLENGER.
cent ; adherents, fifty per cent, and Sunday of standing in the United Methodist Church, so
scholars, twenty-five per cent. The home mis- that we may know that as long as we are able
sion receipts have more than doubled; and, while to work, work will be found for us ; only, we must
Church properties have increased thirty-three per have a living salary. If our Connexional men
MAKING AND UNMAKING MEMBERS. cent, the aggregate debt is ..1,000 less than when must have at least £120 per year, a house, ChilUnion was effected. Speaking at a public meet- dren's Fund money, and part of their SuperDEAR MR. EDITOR,—I have found in my work ing in Brisbane recently, Sir Arthur Rutledge annuation money paid for them, then for the sake
as a hired lay preacher that in some of our Cir- challenged "anyone to say that the Union had of our good name we must not expect a Hired
cuits and churches, stewards and leaders, on their not accomplished what it was intended to accom- Local to work a church or Circuit for less than
own responsibility, will make and unmake mem- plish.' By Union they enjoyed in a far higher .4'100 per year without a house, or 4'90 per year
bers of the churches. I know churches where no degree the respect of the people, and had been with a house.
church-meeting has been held for years, and where able to carry out their work as they desired to
no one is ever consulted but one or two: I have conduct it." At the same meeting the Rev. J.
suffered in my career because I have striven to Bowes said : "Ten years ago there was no central
HOLIDAY HOMES.get the churches to work on constitutional lines. mission, no Sisterhood, but now they had both,
Are these, matters of any consequence? Is it right which were doing a great deal of good. There
was
also
a
Bush
Waggon
which
was
of
great
JOHN
KIRK, director of the Ragged School
SIR
that officials have such power, and may exercise
it, to the injury of the churches? If the Constitu- benefit." Delighted to see that the Rev. Sam Union and Shaftesbury Society, 32 John Street,
tion can be altered and its provisions ignored at Pollard has returned home in safety, and in such Theobald's Road, W.C., writes
May we plead with your readers once again
will thus, what is the good of having any Con- bright spirits. God be praised ! My best love to
for liberal help with our Holiday Homes Fund?
stitution at all? If these practices are wrong, the dear brother.
Jamestown,
South
Australia,
May
20th,
1908.
It is scarcely realized what it means to many
who is responsible for putting them right? And
of these poor and crippled children to have a
how must they act to do so? As I have said,
chance of getting a good healthy grip on life,
. I have suffered in trying to be loyal to the Conwhich comes from a fortnight's stay in the
stitution ; I am suffering to-day. I do not wish
country under wholesome influences and surroundThe Late Conference and
in thus writing to gain any credit to myself or
ings. Many of them are weakly, and would soon
injure others, but simply to ask for some guidDeceased Ministers.
go under altogether but for the opportunities thus
ance. If these are things in which no, principle
afforded of rest and change. Such a necessary
is involved, then I have injured my own prospects
DEAR MR. EDITOR,—As one who has attended holiday is worth a very great deal to these chilfor nothing. And I have been told by ministers
and others no principle is involved, each church more' than forty Annual Assemblies since the first dren who are mainly identified with our 140
being free to govern itself after its own fashion. one, when he sat as a representative in the historic affiliated mission centres in the poorest parts of
I should like you, Mr. Editor, to give some one in Rochdale in 1857, the writer cannot remem- London, in addition to a large number selected
ber a single one when, on successivq evenings, from our register of over 7,000 crippled children.
guidance and counsel in this matter.
the public meetings were so uniformly successful On behalf of these handicapped little ones the
Yours truly,
for attendance, as this year in Sheffield, when on Council would again ask for financial, assistance,
ONE WHO IS ANXIOUS TO KNOW AND
five evenings, from the reception at the Town Hall earnestly trusting the aid will be as generous as
Do THE RIGHT. •
to the conversazione at the Cutlers' Hall, each possible to enable them to carry on this most
Cornwall, June 27th...
one had a crowded gathering. It seemed necessary and remunerative work for another sea[The respective powers and rights of Leaders' phenomenal to see such enthusiasm sustained by son. It may be added that the parents are exMeetings and Church Meetings as to reception and the united rallying hosts, and we trust it may prove pected to assist in the cost whenever possible, and
recognition, etc., of church-members are thus defined a happy augury of our Union in future days. care is taken to prevent overlapping. Not unin the section of the Uniting Conference "Minutes" While the debates, in tone and in direction, were frequently, however, help has to be rendered with
setting out the "Provisions relating to the organiza- admirable, perhaps at times hurried, it was evi- clothing and boots thereby increasing the expense.
tion of meetings other than the Conference
dent that some as usual thought if they did not
For thousands of these poor children, as well
"The powers and duties of the Church Meeting take part in most of the conversation, the house as for some of the old folk, there must, alas! still
shall be as follows, that is to say :
would be sorely lacking in necessary light.
be only the "day in the country." For this
"(3) To recognize members on the recommendation
The writer, however, has another object in shorter spell of happiness, the Council likewise
of the Leaders' Meeting." "Minutes" of Uniting writing this letter, and that is, to call attention earnestly plead.
Conference, p. 60, 3.
to the way in which the memoirs of the deceased
"The powers and duties of the Leaders' Meeting ministers were treated. Out of the eleven such
shall be as generally existing at present in the said cases, only two of them were spoken to at length
The Rev. W. Matthews will remove from the
three Churches or Denominations previously to the —the late Rev. W. J. Hocking and Rev. J. Adcock,
date of Union (that is to say) :
after the choice address by the Rev. D. Heath. It Gateshead, Whitehall Road, Circuit at next Con"(3). To receive persons into and to suspend or ex- is true that the season was refreshing indeed, but ference.
clude persons from church-membership . . . .
the remaining nine were almost ignored in the
"(c) To record in a book or roll, to be kept for that painful hurriedness that was shown in the busipurpose, the names of all the members of the. United ness. It was surely a swift despatch, that was
Methodist Church belonging to the particular church, never so seen in our Annual Assemblies. When
and to examine the church-roll, name by name, not honoured men have spent their days in the minisless than twice a year and to exercise general super- try of the Churches, and their deaths are regisNetalt In o
vision of the membership of the church."
tered, it is much to be deplored that their
ntodsnt
Our correspondent will see that the authorify to memoirs should be considered in so summary and
In o
w, dren. T
receive persons into membership or to suspend or mechanical,a manner.
It has long been our custom for one or two
to .exclude them from it belongs to the Leaders'
Meeting, whilst the power and duty of the Church brethren from the Circuits in which the deceased
Meeting ii to recognize members on the recommenda- had travelled, to speak to their names, while in
•
Eiffel
ower
wer
Lemonade
JULY 9, 1908.
WEDDINGS.
REV. E. CLARK—MISS MORREY.
AN interesting wedding took place on Thursday
week at Tunstall, Staffs, the contracting parties
being the Rev. Edward Clark and Miss Morrey,
the only daughter of the Rev. Joseph Morrey, of
Burslem. The bridegroom was ordained at the
United Methodist Conference held in Sheffield.
MR. J. W. BEARDER—MISS E. M. RAPER.
SALEM CHURCH, Bradford, was crowded on
Wednesday, June 3rd, to witness the marriage of
Miss Ethel Marian Raper, eldest daughter of
Mr. and Mrs. Richard Raper, of Gefle House, to
Mr. John William Bearder, only son of Mr. and
Mrs. Walter Bearder, Eldersleigh, Broad Lane,
Bradford.
The officiating ministers were the
Revs. C. F. Hill and P. H. Thomas, and Mr.
B. W. Clough presided at the organ. The bride
was attended by four bridesmaids—Misses Mabel
and Winifred Raper, also by Misses Ethel Marian
and Florence Mary Bearder, sisters of the bridegroom. Miss Winifred Raper acted as train-bearer.
Each wore a gold and diamond brooch, the gift of
the bridegroom. Mr. Percy Foster was best man,
and Mr. Harry Horner, Mr. Lea Jowett, and
Master M. Raper were groomsmen. Immediately
after signing the register Mr. and Mrs. Raper
held a reception in the schoolroom, which was
attended by about 240 guests. Mr. and Mrs. J. W.
Bearder left for London, where the honeymoon
will be spent. They were the recipients of many
and costly presents.
REV. R. STRONG, B.LITT.—MISS
W. DIMOND.
THE marriage of the Rev. Robert Strong,
B.Litt., of Leeds, and Winifred, only daughter of
the Rev. R. Dimond, of Leamington Spa,
took place at the Warwick Street United Methodist Church, where the Rev. R. Dimond is minister,
on Wednesday, June 24th. The ceremony was
conducted by the Rev. S. George Dimond, of
London, brother to the bride, assisted by the Rev.
A. H. Robins, of Matlock, and the Rev. E. F.
Lord, of Loveclough, friends of the bridegroom.
The bride was given away by her father, and was
accompanied by Miss Hilda Gamble (cousin) as
bridesmaid. The Rev. Charles Dimond, of Redditch, eldest brother to the bride, was best man.
The service was musical, the organist (Mr. Franklin) rendering Mendelssohn's "Wedding March"
as the bride left the church. The bridal party left
in the afternoon en route for the Yorkshire coast,
where the honeymoon will be spent prior, to returning to Leeds, their future home. There was
a large number of useful presents.
REV. A. E. BANKS—MISS RIDLEY,
THE marriage of the Rev. A. E. Banks to Miss
Ridley, of our Felling Shore Church, took place
at Whitehall Road Church, Gateshead, on Tuesday, June 30th. The Rev. W. Matthews officiated,
assisted by the Rev. E. Troughton. The Misses
Lilly and Belle Ridley, sisters of the bride, were
bridesmaids, and Mr. J. Hateley, of the Felling
Church, acted as best man. After the ceremony,
a reception was held in the Lecture Hall, when
about seventy guests were present in response to
the invitation of the parents of the bride (Mr. and
Mrs. J. Ridley). The usual toasts were given.
In the speeches reference was made to the efficient and acceptable services rendered by the Rev.
A. E. Banks to the Circuit during the past three
years, as well as to his personal character and
abilities. The family to which the bride belongs
has a long and honourable connection with our
Felling Shore Church, and she has been a devoted worker in the same church. She takes with
her into her new relationship the best wishes of
friends for her happiness ; whilst both bride and
bridegroom have the p-rayers and good wishes
of the Circuit for their happiness and success in
the life and ministry of the Gospel. The esteem
of many has found expression in the gift of
useful and valuable presents.
LONDON EIGHTH (Paradise Road).—The committee of
open-air mission organized a very successful open-air
entertainment on June 20th. The afternoon was fine
and the programme included sports. ,The orchestral
society of the church rendered several selections and
through this effort not only the current expenses of mission were met, but a deficit balance from last year was
cleared off.
THE UNITED -METHODIST.
"The Future Punishment of the
Wicked."
DEAR MR. EDITOR,—Some three years ago I
published a small book, on "The Future Punishment of the Wicked." My simple object in doing
so was to place before those who might read it the
plain and simple teaching of Christ on this
solemn subject. Three editions of this book having
been disposed of, I am now issuing a fourth. I
have been encouraged to do this by the many testimonies I have received from ministers, local
preachers, and others, as to the good they have
received, and the clearer views they have
gained as to the teaching of Christ, from the
perusal of the book. It is well known that I take
what is called the "orthodox," but what is now,
unhappily, with many the unpopular, side of the
queStion. As I am publishing this fourth edition
without any idea of profit, I shall be happy to
present a copy, post free, to any minister, local
preacher, or earnest young man who may be engaged in any form of Christian work in the
United Methodist Church. So many efforts are
being made in the present day to unsettle the
minds of men with respect to the question of
Future Punishment, and so much has been written
in favour of "The Larger Hope," "Conditional
Immortality," "Universalism," and other theories
of a similar character, that it seems only right and
fair that thinking men should calmly consider
what Christ Himself has said on the subject, and
should carefully weigh His words on this solemn
question.
Yours truly,
WM. SHEPHERD ALLEN.
P.S.—Please apply to Messrs. J. Brooks, 33
Hopwood Avenue, Manchester ; or to me, Woodhead Hall, Cheadle, Staffs.
Services on a Summer's Day.
A BRIGHT sunny English summer morning
favoured the Rev. C. D. Barriball's innovation on
the ordinary Church service at Hart Memorial
Church, Gravelly Hill.
The order of the service did not vary from the
one the congregation is accustomed to, the difference being only that the whole of the service
was adapted specially to the children. As the
congregation sang the opening hymn "Onward,
Christian Soldiers," the patter of little feet was
heard, and then the steadier tread of the elder
children, as in orderly file the scholars passed up
the aisles, joining as they walked in the singing
of the hymn. Each child was adorned with a
flower, while many carried, in addition, bunches in
their hands.
The service right up to the sermon went with
a swing, and when the text, "I am the Rose of
Sharon," was announced, the faces of the little,
as well of the elder, children were turned in
expectancy to the preacher, who held them under
the spell of the power of the Word, as he drew
lessons from the rose, which, like the character
and life of Jesus, distilled beauty and fragrance
and drew universal admiration from all beholders,
finishing his short and telling sermon by pointing
out that Jesus, unlike the rose would never die.
At the conclusion of the sermon, Mr. Barriball
expressed his satisfaction at the way the young
folk had supported him by their presence and attention, and in doing so he certainly voiced the
view held by the congregation.
The whole service, in its simplicity, touched
the hearts of the elder members of the congregtion,
SPECIAL OFFER
603
and, as was remarked in the vestry at the close :
"If one could only get at the young folk in this
way, the indifference of the older people to religion would soon be dispersed."
The evening service was especially for young
men and women, and it is quite sufficient to
say that the increasing numbers of young men
and women coming to the services show that these
are fully appreciated.
The writer of these few words of cordial thanks
and endorsement, could not help rejoicing in the
fact that, come what may of religious strife in
connection with secular education, here at least
was a practical illustration that, after all, it is
the Church's work and the Church's duty to seek
for recruits for our King's Army amongst the
young people who will keep ever flying the banner
of the cross.
The simple service, with the glow of childhood's
joy, must have brought refreshment to many tired
and wearied brains, and rekindled the fires of
enthusiasm in many who attended.
ONE WHO WAS PRESENT.
IN MEMORIAM.
MR. RICHARD HARDMAN.
OUR Radcliffe Church in Bolton, St. George's
Road Circuit, mourns the death of Richard Hardman, which took place on June 21st in his sixtyfourth year.
He was a brand plucked from the burning, he
having been the slave of drink, of folly and of
sin. For thirty-three years he lived in the far
country, was a companion of "Owd Mo," whose
wonderful story has been written by Mr. Thomas
Champness, and was such a devoted owner of a
celebrated breed of running dogs that the laying
aside of what was to him a serious stone of
stumbling proved to be a heavy cross indeed.
Every Sunday evening, his godly brother Walter
prayed in the prayer-meeting for his salvation,
and many a Monday morning was kicked by him
for his intercessory zeal ; but, by and by, this
brother's fervent effectual prayer brought Richard
Hardman to the Saviour. Being invited to the
class-meeting he there found the Saviour.
Himself saved, he sought to save others.
Though not a preacher, his crown is bejewelled
with many souls, won largely by his teaching in
the Sunday School, his testimony in the classmeeting and his personally inviting to the Saviour
his relations, friends and his workmates. One
mourner at the funeral related that he had only
worked three days in the same coal pit, ere he
was gradually induced by our departed friend, not
only to attend God's house, but also to seek the
Saviour.
He not merely read, he loved his Bible, his
"Pilgrim's Progress," and his hymn book. He
grasped God's promises in all the simplicity of
childlike faith, and when his money for tracts
and good works ran short he prayed for and
received the same, either by most remarkably finding lost money in the streets or by opportunely
offered overtime work at the pit.
His memory will be kept green by many poor
people and by many old scholars who will remember his faithful lessons drawn from Gawin
Kirkham's well-known picture, "The Broad and
Narrow Way," a copy of which he gave to the
school.
If only we knew all there is to tell of this unfamed hero, of this United Methodist saint unsung, we should know enough to write the story
of a lesser Billy Bray or William Carvosso or
FRANK RHODES.
Richard Weaver.
"
"The United Methodist."
As an
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604
THE UNITED METHODIST.
JULY 9, 1908.
unity and solidarity the nation demanded a King. Samuel omitted to pray for Israel, he would, acWhen Samuel became aware that the wish was no cording to his own verdict, have been guilty of
mere passing fancy but a fixed resolve of the sin, v. 23. What a privilege and a responsibility
people he acquiesced, and wisely directed what he to stand as mediator between God and the souls
could not oppose. He realized that let the Go- of the people, and if so, how great is the sin of
JULY 19TH, 1909.
vernment take what form it might, if the people prayer-omission. "More things are wrought by
'were loyal to God and truth all would be well, prayer," etc. It is the souls of men that should
SAMUEL WARNS SAUL AND THE
whereas if the government were ideal and the be our supreme concern. Mediatorship is the
PEOPLE.-1 Sam. xii.
people were faithless and rebellious all would be privilege and prerogative of all the redeemed.
Samuel would pray and teach, and the people must
-GOLDEN TEXT.—" Only fear the Lord, and serve ill. That which differentiates men is their God- make both effectual by their steadfast obedience.
Him in truth with all your heart ; for con- consciousness, their sense of relation and respon- A sense of gratitude and of God's continued lovingsider how great things He hath done for you" sibility to Him, and it was this which lay at the kindness should bear fruit in consecrated lives
back of Samuel's great career, and was the
(1 Sam. xii. 24).
secret of his life-long fidelity, integrity and dis- the master-motives to goodness are love and
THE point of view of chapter xii. is the retire- interestedness, enabling him to place duty before gratitude.
ment of Samuel as judge at the coronation of self-interest.
Saul as King. The chapter may be regarded as
Samuel's farewell address and Saul's coronation Righteousness Exaiteth a Nation—The Witness
of History (vv. 6-15).
•sermon. Gilgal was a place of hallowed associations, calculated to inspire every patriotic heart.
These verses show that God is the true King,
Here was set up the heap of stones to com- the Guide, the Goal of the people. From their past
memorate the miraculous crossing of the Jordan ; history Samuel furnishes a series of illustrations
HINTS AND HELPS.
here the covenant had been renewed; here the of the great law that obedience means well-being,
BY REV. W. BAINBRIDGE.
first Passover in the Promised Land was cele- and disobedience spells disaster. With this readbrated; here a camp had been maintained during ing of Isiael's history during the period of the
the early conquest ; and here the first King was Judges the exposition of Judges ii. 11, etc., should
JULY 19TH.
crowned with impressive ceremonies. This great be compared. The scheme is the same in both—
--national assembly at Gilgal marks an important apostasy and oppression, followed by penitent
TOPIC MUSIC IN HEAVEN.
epoch in Jewish history, it ratified the work of prayer and deliverance. V. 14 should be read
REV. V. 9-14; vu. 9-17.
the assembly at Mizpeh, finally closing the period from the Revised Version. "Samuel piles up one
of the Judges and formally inaugurating the new upon another the conditions of their happiness,
IT is suggested in the Topic List that this meetmonarchy. Samuel resigned his office as .a Judge then from the depths of his emotion breaks off, ing be led by the Praise Committee, and in the
and the government of the people into the hands leaving the blessed consequences of their obedi- Year Book that it be a praise meeting. Sacred
of Saul, but retained his influence and authority ence unsaid." From the past Samuel turns to the concerts have their time and place, but not in a
as a prophet.
present and the future, and sees the same eternal C.E. prayer meeting. So the true spirit of praise
law of righteousness in operation now and onward will be sought and exercised. A very careful
Life-long Integrity and Disinterestedness
through the centuries. Samuel states his great programme should be prepared, and as far as
(W. 1-5).
principle : (a) positively, " If ye will fear and the singing is concerned it would be well to
These verses are cast in dialogue form, and serve
and hearken unto the Lord . . . well "; have a rehearsal.
exhibit Samuel as the ideal patriot, judge and
A very attractive invitation might be printed,
negatively, "But if ye will not hearken, etc."
ruler—a worthy model for succeeding ages, a (b)
We
need
to-day to learn the great lesson Samuel or cyclostyled, and wisely distributed amongst the
;:perpetual rebuke to all corrupt, self-seeking offielder
scholars. As for example :
ago,
"lest
we
forget,
lest
we
forlong
so
- dials. He is about to reprove and warn as well taught
get." A nation is wealthy, great and strong not
YOU
as to encourage the people, but before doing so because
it
is
sea-girt,
mountain-walled,
protected
secures public testimony to the cleanness of his
are very warmly invited to the . . . .
• official career. Sin often goes unreproved because by battleships, armies and navies, and has abunChristian Endeavour Weekly Meeting, on
conscience convicts the would-be reprover. The dant harvests, abounding commerce, etc., but beMonday next, when a most interesting.
God and His righteousness are put in the
Programme is to be rendered, led by the
scene must have been most impressive. Samuel cause
place, and the people are holy, obedient,
with long flowing locks, now white with age, first
PRAISE COMMITTEE.
faithful
and
true.
"By
the
soul
only
are
the
Subject "Music in Heaven."
stands, in the hour of his seeming failure, before nations great or free." We life by admiration,
Solos. Duets. Quartets.
the people of Israel who had been his flock, his
and love, by lofty ideals, by devotion to high
We shall miss YOU, if you do not come.
children, his very life, and receives, from those hope
unseen
aims
and
motives.
Mammonism,
militarwho had in a measure cast him off, full acknow- ism, commercialism, selfism must yield sovereignty
If the Church choirmaster is a deeply spiritual
Aedgement of the justice, purity and disinterestedman, enlist his services ; but don't bring anyone
ness of his official life. Surely this was the to God.
to take part in the meeting simply because he
Thunderstorm Repentance (vv. 16-19).i
crowning hour of his life. "A good name is
or she can sing. Should the Praise Committee
rather to be chosen than great riches, and loving
The ancients were deeply Influenced by physical be unable to provide anything so ambitious as is
-favour rather than silver and gold."
phenomena, and for most people even to this day here suggested, then let the meeting take the
The wealth of an agricultural people was in there is need of some visible manifestations and following form :
kind, hence the reference to oxen and asses in expressions of spiritual truths. Matter may be
(1) Several hymns of praise sung sitting :
v. 3. The Septuagint reads "from whose hand made to minister to mind and spirit. A lovely
"0 Lord of heaven, and earth, and sea "
' have I received as a bribe even a pair of shoes?" landscape, an artist's masterpiece, a composer's (C.E.H., 76);
—a proverbial expression for a mere trifle, a paltry oratorio have as their basis matter, or material
"Come Thou Fount of every blessing" (C.E.H.,
bribe, Amos ii. 6; viii. 6. It was verses 8-5 things, yet become high priests introducing to the 64);
that made Grotius call Samuel the Jewish Aria- holy of holies. The sterner and more terrible
"Like a river glorious " (C.E.H., 61).
- tides. Samuel has also been called the second elements have their purpose and value as well as
(2) Several prayers, especially for the devotional
Moses. Moses, his great predecessor, stood at the gentler and more gracious. The Israelites did spirit, the spirit of praise and thanksgiving, of
the cradle of the infant nation wisely directing not speak of secondary causes active in nature ; adoration and communion.
and legislating, and all subsequent history felt they ascribe all phenomena to the direct agency
(3) Solo : "The Homeland " (C.E.H., 68).
the grip of his majestic personality.
Samuel of God, cp. Ex. xx. 18-21; Psa. xviii. 14; xxix.
(4) "We praise Thee, 0 God" (C.E.H., 1). The
deeply influenced the national ideals and life when 3 ; civ. 4. 7. Wheat harvest was in early setting is Jackson's, and it ought not to be diffithe nation, in a sense, came of age and became summer, May—June, when thunder and rain are cult to render this well-known noble hymn of
conscious of its unity and its possible destiny. almost unknown in Palestine (Prov. xxvi. 1). It is praise. Before it is sung the leader might possiSamuel was great as a Judge in an era of politi- good to recognize God in all the events of life, bly give the story of its composition. The incal confusion. He infused into the people the but thunder and storm always remind us how formation may be gathered from any standard
spirit of earnest and hearty patriotism, and lifted completely we are in God's hands. The Israel- work on hymnology to be found in the Reference
them out of their superstitious conceptions of re- ites make confession of their sin and folly, though Libraries.
ligion, transforming what had been a fetish the form of the prayer seems to reveal its shallow(5) Solo : "The Better Land."
(1 Sam. iv. 3-7, etc.) into a reality. He taught ness : note, not that we sin not, but that we die
(6) Scripture Reading (Rev. v. 9-14) by Leaders
that not by arms or numbers are a people made not, cp. Acts viii. 24. Maclaren pointedly remarks, and Members.
great and strong, but by character, by obedience "the faith that is built on ' signs and wonders ' is
LEADER "And they sung a new, song, saying,"
to God. Samuel was great as the founder of the easily battered down : the repentance that is due
ALL- : "Thou art worthy," etc.
-schools of the prophets. He recognized that legis- to a thunderstorm is soon over when the sun
LEADER : "And I beheld," etc.
-lation has its place in reformation, but saw clearly comes out again."
ALL : "Worthy is the Lamb," etc.
also that if the reformation is to be permanent
LEADER : "And every creature," etc.
The Prophet. as Mediator OM 20-25).
and progressive it must have its roots in the heart
ALL: "Blessing and honour," etc.
- of the people. If the people are to be righteous
Samuel's closing words brim with tender and
LEADER : "And the four beasts," etc.
they must know what righteousness is, if they are great truths. He has been shunted as ruler, but
Also Rev. vii. 9-17. Let this splendid passage
to be prosperous they must know the conditions prophets cannot be made or unmade by any peo- also be read in the manner above indicated, the
••of abiding prosperity. So he founded the schools ple, and he reserves the privileges of being his
of the prophets that thereby the moral nature of people's intercession. vv. 20-22. Let the memory
NEW CURE FOR DEAFNESS.
the people might be developed, and from this of sin forgiven kee •ous humble, grateful, watchful ;
humble source may be traced that great upgrowth let our hope of progress centre in God 1 God's
A GENTLEMAN who has cured himself after
and development of the eighth century, when the free choice of Israel to be His "peculiar people" suffering for fourteen years- from Deafness and
prophets of the God of righteousness became the is one of the characteristic ideas of Deuteronomy. Noises in the head, will be pleased to forward
very strength and stay of the nation. Samuel Cp. the use of the plea of v. 22 by Moses (Ex. full particulars of his Remedy to all readers of
was great as a statesman in an era of transition. xxxii. 12; Num. xiv. 18 ; Josh. vii. 9 ; Rom. xi. THE UNITED METHODIST, post free. Write H.
All development demands the casting aside of 1, 2). For Samuel as the type of successful in- Clifton, 187 Amberley House, 35 Waterloo Road,
things which have been held dear. To realize its tercessors see Psa. xcix. 16; Jer. xv. 1. Had London, S.E.
anternatf
onat lesson.
BY REV. CHARLES A. ASHELFORD.
¢bristian Endeavour Waver
Meetings.
JULY 9, 1908.
Leader first setting forth the parts. This will
give effectiveness to the reading.
(7) A few words from the Leader might follow,
pointing out the various doxologies in this wonderful book of Revelation, and their significance.
(8) Hymn : "Jerusalem, my happy home"
(C.E.H., 192).
(9) Solo : "I know not what awaits me"
(C.E.H., 190).
(10) Hymn : "The radiant morn " (C.E.H.,
158).
(11) Testimonies. A few personal words might
fittingly conclude the meeting. Experiences of
benefit obtained through one of the "old songs of
Zion." For instance, I never join in singing "My
faith looks up to Thee" without recalling the now
sainted Rev. John Medicraft, at the close of a
dedicatory service thirty years ago, reading verse
by verse as we sang the hymn. The last lines of
the last verse,
"0 bear me safe above—
A ransomed soul,"
were almost inaudible, his emotions overcoming
his utterance.
(12) Hymn : "Father, in high Heaven dwelling"
(C.E.H., 150).
Benediction.
[Where a Society has no organized Praise Committee the failure to carry out the above or a
similar programme, may bring home a great
need. Let such a Committee be at once formed.
On it Associate Members may find a place.]
for the Cbtibren.
PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.
LESSON XXVIII.
A KIND DEED OF JESUS.
LUKE viu. 26-45.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
near that man ; he is mad; he might hurt you."
But Jesus was not afraid. No! His heart was
too full of toys for that. He went on until he
came to the hill-top, where among the rocks the
man lived. When the madman heard Jesus
coming he. rushed out to frighten him away.
Jesus stood quite still, His white robe gleaming in
the sunlight, and His face shining with love.
The poor man when he saw Him gave a terrible
cry, and fell down on his knees as though in great
pain. You see, the love of Jesus was far stronger
than the evil spirit which had got into the poor
man. When he saw Jesus he wanted to be good.
Then the evil spirit hurt him, which made him
fall down crying with pain.
Jesus casts out the evil spirit. Jesus stretched
forth His hand and said to the evil spirit, "Come
out " and it came out of the man. There was a
big herd of swine feeding near. The loud cries
of the poor man frightened them, they set off
running towards the edge of the cliff, and fell
over it into the sea and were drowned. When
the keepers of the swine saw this they ran down
the hill to the town to tell the people what had
happened. The men and women left their homes
and ran up the hill, the poor mother with them,
and when they came to Jesus they saw the man
who had been mad "sitting at His feet, clothed
and in his right mind." Oh, how astonished the
people were! How glad that poor mother was
when she saw her husband no longer wild, but
gentle and quiet I The man wanted to stop with
Jesus, who had done so much for him. But Jesus
said to him, "Go home and tell the people what
great things God has done for you." The man
obeyed Jesus. He went with his wife home, and
the children jumped for joy when they saw their
father coming, looking gentle and kind. The
man told everyone how Jesus had cast out the evil
spirit from him, and the next time Jesus visited
that place all the people received Him gladly.
EXPRESSION DRAWING :
Arm OF LESSON.—To show that Jesus has the
power to cast out evil spirits from men.
INTRODUCTION TO LESSON STORY.
Ask, "Do you remember the lesson we had on
Whit-Sunday, about Jesus giving His own good Spirit
to His disciples?" Sometimes people have not a good
spirit in them, and Jesus has the power to take this
away, and give His own good Spirit in its place.
Ask, "What would you do to your little friend if he
was in a bad temper?" Let the children say ; then
tell following incident.
Ned was running home from school in a bad
temper. Tom held out his arms to stop him. "Get
away," shouted Ned, "or I'll fight you." Tom held
out a big piece of toffee towards Ned, and said, "You
can have it." Ned stopped, took the toffee, and was
soon, like Tom, in a good temper.
----„_...,--,....i-'-'
--__.
,----• rn 7-)-
7.___
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)
605
Church News in Brief.
PRESENTATIONS.
PLYMOUTH (Stonehouse).—On June 30th a meeting
was held to bid farewell to Rev. J. H. Squire, B.A.
Mr. W. Tamblyn presided over a good attendance.
Rev. A. Hancock and other officials of the Circuit
spoke of the excellent work done by Mr. Squire
during his five years' ministry. - The Free Church
Council was represented by its secretary, and Rev.
Rhys Harries. On behalf of the young people Mr.
W. J. Luke presented Mr. Squire with a magnificent
photograph of the C.E. Society, and Mr. J. B.
Jewell presented a purse of gold on behalf of the
church. Replying, Rev. J. H. Squire spoke of the
loyalty of the congregation. He heartily thanked
them for their kind words and gifts.
Dos-rotv (Zion).—Last week a presentation was made
to Rev. Kaye Garthwaite, who is removing after five
years' ministry. A tea preceded the presentation.
Mr. Frank Smith, superintendent of the Sunday
School, occupied the chair, and was supported by
Mr. Broughton, Mr. J. Cook, Mr. Coupland, and
The chairman, in a few
Rev. Kaye Garthwaite.
brief remarks testified to the interest which the pastor
had always taken in the Sunday School and its
work, and to the appreciation of his services by the
officers, teachers and scholars. Mr. J. Cook and Mr.
Coupland followed with similar testimony to the
work done by Mr. Garthwaite in other branches of
the work of the church. Mr. Broughton then presented Mr. Garthwaite with a purse of gold from the
members and congregation as a small token of the
great love and esteem they had for him as pastor,
leader, and friend. Mr. Garthwaite, in response,
gave a short résumé of his work during his ministry.
LONDON (Brunswick).—On June 26th Rev. James
Payne preached farewell sermons to good congregations. On Tuesday tea was generously provided by
Mrs. H. J. Shrubsall. After tea a presentation was
made to Mrs. Payne, of a gold bracelet by Mrs.
Clayton on behalf of the ladies' sewing meeting.
Mrs. Payne suitably replied. In the evening a public
meeting was held, presided over by Mr. F. Clayton
(Circuit treasurer), addresses being given by Messrs.
E. F. Shrubsall and A. Edwards ; after which Mr.
Clayton, on behalf of the Church, presented to Mr.
Payne a case of cutlery and a scarf pin and stud.
Mr. Payne feelingly responded. After the presentation several friends spoke of the good received during
Mr. Payne's ministry.
ABERAVON.—At the Circuit quarterly meeting a sum
of money was presented to Rev. W. R. A. Budd,
with which to purchase the set of five volumes of
"Hastings's Dictionary of the Bible," on his removal
from the Circuit. The ministers of the town, of
whose Fraternal Mr. Budd was President, also presented him with a framed photograph of the group
as a token of the esteem in which he was held. His
final service last Sunday was well attended.
LESSON STORY.
On the East side of the sea of Galilee there was
a little town called Gergesea. It had but few
houses, for the hills rose steep behind, and on
either side were cliffs rising straight up from the
sea. In this town lived fishermen and men who
kept herds of swine.
The man with the evil spirit. In one house
there was sorrow for the mother and children were
alone because their father • had left thein. An evil
spirit had got into him, and made him mad. He
ran away from his home, and lived among the big
rocks on the top of steep cliffs overlooking the sea.
Once he had been a kind father, now he was fierce
and wild. The fishermen once went up the hills
to find him, and they caught him and bound him
with chains; but he was so strong that he burst
his chains and tore off his clothes, and he ran
back to the lonely place among the rocks. After
that no one dared to go near him. He lived alone,
and if any man came near his hiding-place, he
rushed out and frightened him away. What a
terrible life that evil spirit led him I And there
was the poor mother weeping at home because the
father who had loved and cared for them, had
left them.
Jesus meets him. One day Jesus said to His
disciples, "Let us go across the Sea Of Galilee."
They got into a ship and sailed across, and landed
at Gergesea, Then Jesus heard of the poor man
Jesus was
who had an evil spirit in him.
always ready to help the sick and sad ; and He
Went to the little house where the mother lived
and cheered her with kind words. Then He
began to climb up the rocky hill-side, the disciples
,th him. Some fishermen called out, "Don't go
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To introduce our Cycles we make this Special Offer to readers of thin paper : A £7 7e. Od.
Machine for £3 19o. 6d., sent Carriage Paid to any part of the United Kingdom.
TERMS CASH WITH ORDER.
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all Accessories supplied
for 7/6 extra.
£3/19/6
Ladies' 5s. extra,
with Celluloid
Chain Cover.
MONEY
RETURNED "Pe
IF DISSATISFIED.
SPECIFICATION:-
Frame, 22in. to 26in., sloping or parallel top tube ; best weldless steel tube throughout ; four coats of enamel and heavily Plated :
Frame and Mudguards lined in colours ; B.S.A. Licensed Pedals; Perry's Chain ; Ball Free Wheel ; Steel double stayed Mudguards ; two Roller Brakes : three-coil Plated Saddle; Albion Tyres ; Plated Rims ; all bearings of the finest hardened steel.
PLEASE NOTE Ties ADDRESS:-
H. GARLAND & Co.,
LEIGHTON BUZZARD, BEDS.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
606
BARNSLEY (Ebenezer).—A large company gathered
to bid farewell to the Rev. T. S., Mrs., and Miss
Willetts, and present them with tokens of their
esteem. The presentation to Mr. and Mrs. Willetts
took the form of a handsome eight-day clock in a
richly-carved oak case, and to Miss Willetts of an
elegantly-bound copy of the Holy Bible, which was
presented by Miss Porter on behalf of the teachers
of the Sunday School. At the meeting Mr. W.
Woodruff (senior church steward) presided. The presentation to Mr. and Mrs. Willetts was made by
Councillor E. Harral (church and Circuit treasurer.
steward). Mr. W. Norton spoke on behalf of the
Trust, Mr. J. Knee on behalf of the school, and Mr.
J. H. Taylor on behalf of the Church.
SOUTH SHIELDS. — Rev. J. Arthur Howarth con•
ducted farewell services on June 21st. On Monday
he departed from the railway station amid manifest
tokens of good will. There was a demonstration of
feeling at every railway station in the Circuit
through which the train passed. Over twenty presents were given by friends, including a handsome
revolving chair to complete the suite of roll-top desk,
etc., presented three years ago when seven years'
service had beets completed. The C.E. presented a
travelling bag ; the Young People's Class a set of
books. Mr. Howarth's sister, Miss Howarth, received
presents as a devoted and successful worker in the
Circuit.
NOTTINGHAM (Redcliffe Road).—On Sunday evening week, after service, conducted by Rev. E. F. H.
Capey, who was closing five years of happy and successful ministry, Mr. George Goodall, J.P., expressed the Church's appreciation of Mr. Capey's
ministry, and the esteem in which he was held by
all, and presented him on their behalf with a purse
of gold.
GOOLE. —Rev. W. B. Moult, M.A., has laboured for
seven years in this church, and his labours have been
highly appreciated. Last week the schoolroom was filled
with an enthusiastic gathering, for the purpose of
making a series of presentations. Mr. H. C. F. Hartman presided. After an interesting musical programme,
the chairman spoke of the high esteem in which. Mr.
and Mrs. Moult were held. During Mr. Moult's ministry
the church-membership had been doubled, and the debt
reduced by about £1,500. Mr. Porter presented a
purse of gold to Mr. Moult, and eulogistic addresses
were given by Messrs. J. Hutton, J. W. Wadsworth, A.
Wadsworth, and Smith. Mr. J. W. Wadsworth, on
behalf of the Sunday School, presented Mr. Moult with
the two volumes of Hastings' " Dictionary of Christ and
the Gospels." The Sunday School has always taken a
leading position in the Sunday School examinations, and
Miss Dawber asked Mr. and Mrs. Moult to accept a
number of silver-plated serviette rings, which had been
purchased by the candidates for the Scripture examinations. Rev. W. B. Moult, M.A., had a great reception
on rising to respond, and the proceedings concluded
with a supper.
NOTTINGHAM (Sneinton Boulevard).—Farewell sermons were preached by Rev. J. Wallets on June 21st
to increased congregations. After the evening service
Mr. W. Henson (church secretary) presided over a
meeting, and•addresses were delivered by Mr. Lounds
(school superintendent), Mr. Hallam (secretary to C.E.),
Mr. Walkington and Mr. Duffin (treasurer); the latter
of whom presented Mr. Wallett with a purse of gold.
Regrets were expressed at the termination of his ministry.
Mr. Wallett is greatly loved and respected, his
Ministry here 'having been very successful.
WEST HARTLEPOOL (Burbank).—Rev. Dr. Irving concluded his ministry here on June 28th, preaching to
crowded congregations. The afternoon service in the
;School was one of exceptional interest. The upper
Dr.
schoolroom was densely packed with scholars.
Irving's address will long be remembered. Subsequently Mr. Hodgson (superintendent), on behalf of the
,officials and teachers, presented Dr. Irving with a
volume of .The Religious Teachers of Greece," and
,expressed his regret at his removal, he having always
,given his services ungrudgingly to the School. Foil, xing this a further presentation was made on behalf of
• Mr. Arthur Di), and his class of young men. This took
the form of a framed photo group of the class, taken
'while in camp at Richmond. Mr. R. H. Fawcus, one
of the senior members of the class, handed this ,to Dr.
Irving; who in reply exhorted the young people to keep
in close touch with the Sunday School.
`THE CHILD'S FACE.
- "Jersey,
January 18th, 1803.—The child who was suffering from sore eyes, and whose face was in one solid
mass, and could scarcely see, is now nearly well again.
We' tried both English and French medical men, but to
no avail. I tried one box of Wesley's Ointment, with
the above result
- SAML. WRIGHT..
This Ointment is warranted to cure bad legs, bad
hr..% ulcers, urns, 'scalds, boils, rheumatic pains, sore
eyes and all skin diseases Post free for 12 stamps from
Holdroyd's Medical Hall. Cleckheaton, Yorks.
CHOIR SERVICES.
SOUTHPORT (Manchester Road).—At the annual choir
services the Rev. J. H. Bowker, of Preston, was the
preacher. Anthems were rendered by the choir, and the
soloists were Miss Cheetham and Miss Lily Whitton.
GENERAL NEWS.
PRESTON FIRST (Orchard).—The
annual choir excursion was held on Whit-Wednesday, when an enjoyable
time was spent at Windermere, Ambleside, Grasmere,
and Bowness.—(Lostock Hall.) The choir trip took
place on Whit-Tuesday, when Llandudno was visited. .
HUDDERSFIELD (Berry Brow).—The annual Sunday
School procession and "sing" on Whit-Monday were
acknowledged on every hand as especially successful this
year. Mr. Haigh Littlewood conducted the singing and
a larger number of "stops" were made than usual.
The ladies catered for the tea in a field kindly lent by
Mr. T. Taylor, who with Mrs. Taylor 'also provided the
large company of teachers, parents and scholars with
oranges, and their kindness was much appreciated.
WEST HARTLEPOOL (Burbank).—In connection with
Mr. Day's class of young men, their usual camp outing
took place again this Whitsuntide at Richmond, in Yorkshire. As it has been stated before in these columns
many of the members of the class are, or would be,
prevented from ever having a day in the country were
it not for this outing, which has been successfully
carried out the last two years. The lads were away
from Saturday till Tuesday night. The friends of
Burbank Church have generously assisted financially, and
all expenses have been met. It is hoped that the
interest shown in the young men may eventually have
good results. On June 21st a very interesting paper
was given en "Our Camp Out at Richmond," by Mr.
H. Wenn, the senior member of class, and at close of
service Mr. W. T. Walton gave an address.
CIRCUIT QUARTERLY MEETINGS.
YORK (Monk Bar) Held at Monk Bar June 10th,
the Rev. J. A. Thompson presiding. The numerical
returns showed a net increase of six on the quarter.
The missionary report was presented showing that
£55 15s. bd. had been remitted to the treasurer. Mr.
Alfred Hick and Mr. J. W. C. Bakes presented reports
of the District meeting.
The chairman accepted a
unanimous invitation to remain in the circuit a third
year.
PRESTON FIRST. —Held at Lostock Hall, the Rev.
J. H. Bowker presiding. The registrar's report showed
an increase in the number of church-members. Mr.
F. J, Savory, who has recently removed to Preston from
Queensbury, in the Halifax North Circuit, was unanimously received as a local preacher. The Rev. E. C.
Urwin and Mr. C. Booth gave excellent reports of the
District meeting. The "Thanksgiving Fund" was referred to the consideration of the leaders' meetings of
the three churches in the circuit.
DARLINGTON. —Held on June 24th, at Victoria Road.
The Rev. William Hall presided. The financial state.
ment showed a small balance due to the treasurer,
Messrs. Newton and Gaines gave interesting reports of
the District meeting. Mr. Fred Shorter was passed on
as a local preacher on trial, and two young men were
received on to the plan as local preachers on trial.
It was reported that consent had been given for the
sale of the Shildon estate, and that offers for the estate
had been received. Arrangements have been made for
alterations and installation of electric light at Victoria
Road. It was decided to have a united mission in the
Albert Road Church in the month of November. The
reports showed considerable advance in the past year,
and there is a general expectation of great blessings in
the next Connexional year.
RIPLEY. —Held at South Wingfield, the Rev. J. W.
Mold in the chair. Messrs. W. E. Masterson (sec.)
and Councillor G. Turner (treasurer) urged the claims
of the Thanksgiving Fund.
Messrs. J. Stirland, J.
Thompson, S. Hambleton and Councillor G. Turner
gave a report of the District meeting. Two young men
were accepted as preachers on probation. The chairman
reported that Mr. W. Curzon had taken his second
written book examination, which was highly satisfactory.
The steward's account showed a credit balance of over
£16. The Wingfield Church provided tea, and were
heartily thanked.
APPLany.--Held at Appleby. Presided over by the
Rev. R. Brewin. The numerical returns showed a membership of 161. The number of Sunday School scholars
was 322. An effort to decrease the Circuit debt had
resulted in promises and subscriptions of £21.
CREWE. —Held at Hightown, the Rev. A. Wilcock
presiding. The financial statement showed a deficiency
of about £6. Reports of the District meeting were
given by Mr. J. T. Worthington and Mr. A. Fletcher.
A brief report of the Conference proceedings was given
by Councillor S. Kay. Messrs. A. E. Fletcher and
R. T. Worthington were congratulated on having passed
the examination for admittance to the College. Appreciative references were made to the labours of the.Rev.
J. Goodyear who leaves for Newcastle-on-Tyne.
JULY 9, 1908..
BURTON-ON-TRENT.—Held at George Street. Not since
the death of Alderman T. B. Lowe has such a sense of
loss been felt in the Circuit as that caused by the death
of Mr. C. H. James. By a fortuitous concourse of circumstances the officials' table was occupied by -entirely '
different brethren to those generally seen there. Owing
to the absence of the Rev. H. Fry (superintendent
minister and Mr. A. J. Dickinson (secretary to
preacher's meeting) who were attending. Ccinference,
their places were taken by the Rev. J. H. James and
Mr. "P. T. Gatliffe respectively. A resolution of syn.'
pathy with Mrs. C. H. James and her family was
moved by the Mayor (Alderman Tresise) and Mr. J. G.'
Mallins (Victoria Street). The Mayor (Alderman C.
Tresise) was elected Circuit steward in place of the
late Mr. C. H. James. The Circuit numerical returns
showed a decrease of four for the quarter, after allowing for deaths and removals. The financial statement
was alio ,slightly down. The Rev. W. H. Faulkner
-presented the report of the District meeting. Mr. R.
Clarke (St. Paul's Square) very hospitably entertained
the delegates to tea.
WEST HARTLEPOOL. —Heidi at York Road Church, the
Rev. D. Irving, M.A., D.C.L., presiding, The numerical report showed an increase in the membership of 10.
Reports were received from the representatives to the
District meeting, who in particular expressed their
delight at the feeling of complete unity which had
pervaded the first District meeting of ' the United
Church. A hearty vote of thanks for their services
was accorded to Dr. Irving and the Rev. William
Field, who are leaving the Circuit after four and five
years respectively.
ANNIVERSARY SERVICES.
ROCHDALE (Molesworth Street).—Sunday
School anniversary services were held at Littleborough on June 14th,
1908. There was a large congregation at the evening
service. Preacher, Rev. G. Kilgour. The singing of the
choir, assisted by scholars and friends, was much
appreciated.. Organist, Mr. Jonathan Crossley; conductor, Mr. J. W. Mitchell. Collections, £28.
HUDDERSFIELD (Longwood).—At the anniversary services Rev. J. E. Radcliffe preached two excellent sermons. The scholars and choir rendered special hymns
and.anthems. Large congregations were present. Miss
F. Beaumont presided at the organ, and Mr. J. H.
Pearson conducted. Collections, £36 16, ld., the
largest amount for some years.
PRESTON FIRST (Guttridge Memorial).—At' the church
anniversary the preacher was the Rev. J. Whitton, of
Southport. In the afternoon the choir gave the cantata "Strangers and Pilgrims." The principals were :
Mrs. Hancock, Miss D. Kitchen, Mi. A. Brooks, Mr.
A. Mansley. Mr. W. Churton conducted, and Mr. J.
Brown was the organist.
.
.
CLECKHEATON (Central).—On June 21st Sunday
School anniversary services were held. Rev. Walter
Leieester, of Blackpool (a former pastor) preached to
large congregations.
The choir and Sunday School'
scholars sang their Whitsuntide hymns and anthems.
Collections, £86 6s. 3d.
BIRKENHEAD (Claughton' Road).—Sunday School
anniversary services were held on June 21st. Preacher,
the Rev. J. Percival. In the afternoon a special service
was held, presided over by Mr. J. Mossop Jones, and
an address was given by Mr. Ower Lewis (of Liscard).
Special singing was rendered by the children and choir;
conductor, Mr. F. J. Hale; organist, Mr. W. Harker.
BRADFORD (West Bowling).—Sunday School anniversary took place under favourable circumstances and
good congregations assembled. Preacher, Rev.' F. J.
Wharton (pastor). Rev. G. W. Goodwin gave the' address in the afternoon. The singing was conducted by
Mr. H.- Wilkinson. Collections, £25 10s. (Shearbridge
Road). Sunday School anniversary was held Sunday,
June 21st. Preacher, Rev, T. P. Batten. The scholars
and teachers to the number of 200 proceeded through
the neighbourhood in the morning. In the afternoon
and evening the church was well filled in every part.
Very successful services realized £35, including ‘6 from
an anonymous donor.
WEST HARTLEPOOL (York Road(. The Sunday
School anniversary was held June 14th. Preacher, Rev.
Wm. Field (circuit minister).
In the afternoon a
children's service was held, presided over by Councillor
H. Mason. Songs and recitations were given by the
scholars, and the choir and scholars rendered choruses.
On Wednesday the annual tea was held, followed by a
concert. This is the fourth anniversary in succession
conducted by Mr. Field, and each year the collections
have constituted a record.
BELFER. —Sunday School anniversaries have been
held at the following places: Salem (L22), Rev. S. C.
Challenger; Holbrook Moor (z24 4s. 6d.), Mr. H.
Chambers; Openwood Gale (‘17 12s.) Rev. J. W.
Nield; Marehay (£18), Mr. S. Hebb; Heaze
(£16 12s. 8d.), Rev. J. W. Nield; Nether Heaze
Councillor G. Turner; Ambergate (47 16s.), Councillor G. H. Hunt, J.P. ; Over Lane (45 10s,), Rev.
J. W. Nield.
—
HOW TO MAKE LIGHT BUNS,
By using Eiffel Tower Bun Flour the most
inexperienced person can make light Buns and
Cakes with certain success. Try a id, packet.
if
/
▪
JULY
9, 1908.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
THE UNITED METHODIST
ournal of
TUESDAY MORNING is the latest time
ger reeristimg Adoerti”nrexts far isserties
The Weekly J
the
United Methodist Church.
Is the rustling cumber.
Communications
to be12addressed
to
theAllAdvertisement
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'
RIP Book Early for Jul, and August. VA
PEARL ASSURANCE CO.,
LIMITED,
Chief 011ices I London Bridge, E.C.
Animal Income
••
.• 111,760,000
by 8676,060
Food. Increased during
Clams Paid
..
••
••
.• 86,751,000
Additional rayreeentatiru wanted.
Hemp cog
S. D.
G. SHRUBSALL, DireMors.
year 16107
BOWLES, 1f
WHEN REPLYING
TO ADVTS.
,
Pleasant
garden.
feet;
Stations).
Cars
residence large
Old-fashioned
district ; limestone;
site
.) —Apply,
mo
tablishment,
home;
with
PLEASE MENTION
HURCH BAZAAR PENCILS and Penholders,
Cumberland.
we
prome-
lace;
refunded if you are not satisfied,—Write
Manager.
for Missions, Churches,
Schoolrooms, etc. Veneer, cane, rush and
wood seats.— Mealing Bros., Manufacturers,
High Wycombe. Tel. Address:
Wycombe. Est. 1025.
OLOURED
Amommodation
Public) and Priv. Sitting On
Tbreorninuteo
for Cyalirta. Comfortable
from Gntral Station. Preakfarta, Dinners,
Piano. Pon Viol,
recommended.
bedroom.
From
Sunday afterChina. Africa.
noon
Cheap hire,
SULPHOLINE
NNE
ce
UNITED KINGDOM MD OF ROPE UNION, III & 60 OLD BAILEY, LONDON, E.G. ,
Pimples, Spots.
Unite) Metbobtet aura.
SUNDAY'S PREACHING APPOINTMENTS,
July 12th, 1908.
Church.
Cheri!.
Alarming.-
Kerning.
Mission, Q;and°etZ"Val7e'y wal 1 Road. H. SiaDyei Dann, vl..TiELD3reinVOL,
R.H,W.Hooks.
Gair. R.
W. Gal, It.e
Walham
Grove,
Fulham.Hill.
Loudon
8th
H. Hooks.
Railton Road. Herne
London
13th
F, H.
London
8th Park Crescent, Clapham Park Road.
Buxton. ' J.F.C.L. Pye.
Buxton.
Eltham.
BristolPlace
Road. (1 minute from Marina Parade and J.F. C.L. Pye.
Bri
ghton. Park
Front).
S.
B.
Lane.
Preston
Park,
J.
P.
Davey,
Avenue
Brighton, Stanford
Beaconsfield
Roadminutes from Dyke Road P. Davey. S.B. Lane
Brighton, Old Shoreham
OldRoad
Shoreham
Road Stop).
G. Eayrs,
F. W. H.
W. G. Peck. W. G. Grattridge
Peck.
Morecambe Sandylands Promenade.
Appointments are foserted in this column at the rate of Zs. 8d. per quarter prepaid.
King's Cross
London '41t11
(3 migrates from .
Tram).
'UNITED METHODIST'
economical;
promenade.
views;
balcony;
nade,
(0
your "
Tennis. Croquet, and Bowls. Shady
walks with grand trees, leading to lake
and fountain. Grand Winter Garden
Lounge. Noble smoke, writing, and
billiard rooms. Plain English catering
of the best only.
Boarding Houses and
Apartments.
Reduced
ORGANS from £4 10,
ClosesPORTABLE
toandportmanteau
18 lbs.
wellillustrated
made. sine.
A realWeight
treat forfromChristian
Strong
workers.
Send
Road, City Road, London.q.t.—Harland, 78 East
OF" ADVERTISE
607
Leeds
tram,
Woodhouse Lane.
J.
Shilling Bottles everywhere, or by Poet from
Bedford Laboratory, London. O.B. Gratis Sample
le
en on receipt of Id. Stamp for Postage.
EATING'S
W DER
DO__
IttIv
FLEAS BUGS FLIES
rFunaman
WANTS" in THE UNITED METHODIST, 25 WORDS for ONE SHILLING, and One Halfpenny for
each additional word. Three insertions for price of two.
JULY 9, 1908.
THE UNITED METHODIST.
6o8
Application for Advertisement Space in this
Paper should be made to
ADVERTISEMENT MANAGER,
12 Farringdon Avenue, London, B.C...
all kinds of Church,
W. H. ADES & SONS For
School and Mission Room
Furniture, ere.
NO ORDER TOO LARGE. NO ORDER TOO SMALL.
THE GENERAL RULES of thi United Methridist
Church 1d. by post, lid.
Our No. 2f
Reversible Back
Seal.
•
SOCIETY CLASS BOOK, for use in the United
Methodist Church, Is.
eforand i mproved rn
NOTICE BOOK. New
each week with
tion,IT containing two pages
Cloth, gilt
Daily spaces, to last one year.
lettered, is. neb by post, is. 2d.
Progressive Works, Daventry, Northants.
Central for Business or Pleasure,
Absolutely Quiet and Home-like.
Write for
"Row to 'Pend a week in London," with Tarie
and Testimonials Post free on aPPHcafion.
WILLIAM LOSSOCK, Proprietor-Manages,
Telegraphic Address: "Healthiest. London."
Methodist
Emi4ratiop.
ANDREW C ROM BIE,""lant EAnyb
The Free Methodist Fire
Insurance Association
DOMESTIC SERVANTS for
QUEENSLAND—FREE
Manufacturers by Royal Patent
Insures Connexional,
Circuit and Ministers'
Property only ; all
pronto accruing are
appropriated solely to
Connexional purposes.
PAsssoss. Ages 17 to 35. Good
references required. Situations guaranteed. Also Farm-workers. Fares
for Man, Wife, and family, ONLY
Is, Send stamp, and state experience.
of H.M. King George II. 1729,
AND BY
Special Warrants of
All communications to he made to Rev.
E. BOADEN, 13 Newbold Terrace
East. Leamington Spa.
Methodist Emigration League
Norwich.
Appointment to
44.4PPoirartt14
H.M. The King, H.M. The Queen, and
H.R.H. The Prince of Wales.
OPEN-AIR
MISSIONS.
7-'ryg
An Excellent Collection of ,
17 Hymns, suitable for Open.
Air Missions, arranged by the
Rev. F. RAISE, 81 Cleveland
Road, Sunderland,
WILD'S
The Original
Firm.
10111
30-40
LUDCATE HILL.
(Central for Charing Cross. Cannon St.
and Holborn Viaduct Stations, for the
Concentrated
Continent.)
70 & 71 EUSTON SQUARE.
(Close to Euston. Midland, and G.N.R.
Stations.)
Handy for EARLY and LATE Trains.
ELECTRIC LIFT.
0e0a.
is always a welcome resource to those responsible for
the comfort and health of the family. It contains
the ingredients required in the food taken by Growing
Childhood, the Strenuous-Living, Old Age, and the
Invalid. It is a superb stimulant as well as a
permanent strengthener. 300 Gold Medals, &c., have
been awarded to the Firm.
Eipi4ratiop.
FREE &
AUSTRALIA:
P.a..; Farmhands & DomesASSISTED
NEW ZEALAND,
CANADA.
LOWEST FARES ; all classes, Fan-
tic Servants.
PASSAGES.
N.B.—Insist on having Fry's, and reject substitutes, which
are often pushed for the sake of extra profit.
hands and Domestics specially wanted,
situations assured, good wages. Send
stamp, stating experience, and Colony
desired. Introduction to Metho-
LONDON.
Mrst-Olass
Temperance Notels,
or
Methodist
ASSISTED
6, 7, 8 & 9, Bridgwater Square,
BARBICAN, LONDON.
PULP
fire Insurance
Specimen copies sent
post free on application.
TRANTER'S TEMPERANCE
HOTEL (Est1ablished
859)
IN COMMEMORATION of the Founding of the
United Methodist Church. A Card, beautifully
printed in colours, with Portraits of the Rev.
Edward Boaden and the three other Presidents.
Per dozen, 9d. pose
Single copy, 1d. post free.
free.
SEND FOR LISTS FROM ACTUAL MANUFACTURERS—
can be had at is. per 100,
7s. lid. per 1,000.
VISITORS TO LONDON...
Home Comforts. Cleanliness and
Quiet. Central for Busitiess
or Pleasure.
Weedy Lawns
Vennis eon*, -93owling greens, etc.,
TRANSFORMED
into a beautiful sward of richcoloured close-growing grass by
CLIMAX 'LAWN - SAND.
28 lb. will dreas 100 eq. yds.
.71.?/2 j20i
PRICESg
Carriage paid.
Try it now. Any Enquiry Welcomed.
dists everywhere. Better hell,
given than any other Organisation)
Methodist Emigration League,
Norwich.
OUR EYES ! OUR EARS !
BOUNDARY CHEMICAL Co., Ltd.,
LUTON STREET, LIVERPOOL.
New Trestment (without op-
•
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•
•
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•
••
••
••
•
••
•
•
•••
•
•
•
•
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I INDIVIDUAL COMMUNION CUPS
-Are 10 use
hundreds of
Churches,
including those of
Rev, Dr. Townsend,
President, if nited
Methodist Church ;
J. H. Tort., IA,
Birmingham ;
. Dr. Clifford, London,
Dr. Wenyon,
Woolwloh ; eta., etc,
THE "IDEAL"
TRAYS.
Can be passed
down the pews
as safely as the
ordinary Communion Cup. It
is impossible to
upset the Cups.
All noise or rattle
avoided.
eration) for all diseases of the Eye
and Ear Deafness in all its forms:
Noises in the Head and Ears :Discharges from the Ears Deafness
from Influenza and Catarrh. Special
remedies forwarded. Hundreds of
letters in testimony.
No " EarDrums," • Ear-Cornets." or painful
instruments. Write for up-to-date Testimonials and Printed
Form of Questions to answer, SENT FREE.
Mr. T. IRON (Ison's Eye and Ear Dlapenanry, Ltd.),
71 Gt. George- Street, Leede.
/87.)
Nor,sr.—Mr. Icon visits the principal towns of
Yorkshire,Lancashire, the Midlands, the Counties of
Durham, Westmorland, Cumberland, etc.—Write
for dates of visits or see notices in local papers.
PATENTED.
•
•
Printed at Tax
New. Edition for the use of
THE UNITED METHODIST CHURCH.
AL -0
-
Baptismal Certificates.
They are Issued as follows :
BAPTISMAL REGISTER, containing space for 205 Names,
bound in strong morocco cloth.. price 30. Ditto, with
sflr.owd.moroceo cloth,
space for 400 Name
w
s,
casbpouVicien.
BAPTISMAL CERTIFICATES, in books containing 50 Fortis,
Address the Makers-
TOWNSHENDS, Ltd., Birmingham.
.•
The Baptismal Register
• •..•
.
MAGNET PRESS,
.
When replying to ADVERTISEMENTS
please mention
"UNITED METHODIST."
188 Rye Lane, Peckham, S.E., and Published by
ANDREW CROMBIE,
perforated for tearing out, bound In cloth, price 2s.
ANDREW CROMBIE, 12 FarrIngdon Avenue, E.C.
12 Farringdon Avenue, Farringdon Street,