CONTENTS - Wisconsin Agri

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CONTENTS - Wisconsin Agri
CONTENTS
5 An Interpreta on of the Origins of the 2012
Cental Great Plains Drought
7 WABA Meets With Governor’s Staff &
DATCP Concerning The West, Texas
Fer lizer Plant Explosion
9
OSHA’s New Hazard Communica on
Requirements
12 Fer lizer Record
17 Implements of Husbandry - Ho est
Topic on the Roads Today
18 Succession Planning; The First Steps for
Small Business Owners
20 “Fall” LEP is Expanded to General Industry
24 WABA Golf Results and Pictures
31 WABA Motorcycle Tour Summary
34 WI Crop Management Conference and
Industry Showcase
37 The Cost of Doing Business: Grain
Engulfment/Entrapment
38 10 Technologies Changing Farm Machinery
39 Bowling Tournament
42 WI Man Drives Tractor to Farm Progress
Show
45
Ac on Ads
By Tom Bressner,
WABA ExecuƟve Director
Gree ngs once again from the Wisconsin AgriBusiness Associa on. We hope this quarterly
magazine finds each of you enjoying the final
days of summer and doing well. Why does it
seem that Winter lasted forever, but Summer flies
by in no me at all?
On July 31st, your associa on completed its first full fiscal year since
our 2012 merger. Each and every day, it appears more and more that
the foresight of your Board of Directors to create the merger between
our parent associa ons (WCPA and WASA) was clearly the right thing
to do. Financially, your associa on is on solid ground. Legisla vely,
because we now represent virtually all agri-business industries, we
are opening doors that neither of our parent associa ons could do
because of their limited scope. Regulatory-wise, we have been able
to create working rela onships with regulatory agencies that formerly
used to be out of reach. Yes, I am very proud to tell you that a er
just one year in existence, the Wisconsin Agri-Business Associa on
is quickly becoming a well recognized and respected organiza on
throughout the legisla ve and regulatory world.
As always, legisla ve and regulatory issues are on the forefront for
your associa on. Currently WABA is working with Senator Moulton
and Representa ve Nerison to write legisla on to fix some recent
Department of Revenue mis-interpreta ons on sales tax exemp ons
for agricultural facili es and equipment that classify as manufacturing.
We have been, and con nue to be, very involved on the proposed Department of Transporta on regula ons for Implements of Husbandry.
We have also been proac ve in the a ermath of the West, Texas
fer lizer plant explosion, helping the Governor’s Office and DATCP to
get their arms around the risks of the fer lizer/farm chemical industry,
and the regula ons and controls already in place to minimize this type
of catastrophe from occurring in our state.
During July, August and early September, par cipa on in our Scholarship Program Trap Shoot and three Golf Ou ngs were all well attended. In November, for the first me, we will give you another fun
opportunity to help our Scholarship Fund by holding a Bowling Tournament. In all this year, WABA will give a total of $18,000 in college
scholarships to young people majoring in agricultural studies. This
(ConƟnued on Page 4)
Volume 2, Issue 3. Fall 2013
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Wisconsin Agri-Business Assoc.
Board of Directors & Staff
Presidents
Erik Huschi - Badger State Ethanol, Monroe
Stan McGraw - Dodgeville Agri-Service, Dodgeville
Vice Presidents
2801 International Lane
Suite 105
Madison, WI 53704
Phone: 608-223-1111
Fax: 608-223-1147
Sco Firlus - Allied Coopera ve, Adams
Tim Lange - The DeLong Co. Inc., Clinton
[email protected]
www.wiagribusiness.org
Bruce Andersen, Treasurer - Bio-Gro Inc., Cedar Grove
Doug Cropp, Secretary/Treasurer - Landmark Services Coopera ve,
Co age Grove
Larry Fiene, Secretary - WinField, Mt. Horeb
Secretaries/Treasurers
Members
Our Mission
The mission of the Wisconsin
Agri-Business Association
is to represent, provide programs and services, educate,
train, manage regulatory and
legislative affairs, and to be
a strong unifying voice for
the agribusiness industries of
Wisconsin.
Advertisers
A & L Great Lakes Laboratories, Inc.
Ag Systems, Inc.
Agrium US, Inc.
CliftonLarsonAllen LLP
CP Products Company, Inc.
Contree Sprayer & Equipment Co.
Edgewell Ag Products, LLC
FEI-East
Fertilizer Dealer Supply
FORCE Unlimited
Great Salt Lake Minerals
INTX Microbials
Mayville Limestone, Inc.
Michael Best & Friedrich LLP
Monsanto
SCS BT Squared, Inc.
Skinner Tank Company
Syngenta
Jon Accola - Premier Coopera ve, Mineral Point
Tim Bauer - Deer Creek Seed, Ashland
Randy Bina - River Country Coopera ve, Bloomer
Kathy Dummer - Buck Country Grain, Arcadia
Steve Hanvold - AgVentures LLC, Marathon
Thomas Hoffman - Central Wisconsin Coopera ve, Stra ord
Timothy Hoyt - Monsanto, Arlington
Joey Kennicker - Greg’s Feed & Seed, Inc., South Wayne
Guy Mathias - AG Systems, Inc., DeForest
Marc Powell - Hanna Ag, LLC, Verona
Advisors
Shawn Conley - UW Dept. of Agronomy, Madison
David Crass - Michael Best & Friedrich LLP, Madison
Ma Ruark - UW Dept. of Soil Science, Madison
Staff
Tom Bressner - Execu ve Director
Jim Nolte - Safety Director
Denise Poindexter - Director of Member Services
Joan Viney - Director of Member Communica ons
Follow us on
facebook and Twi
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
er
3
(ConƟnued from Page 1)
year for the first me, WABA will make four scholarships available to college bound students through
the Wisconsin FFA Founda on. Also in the past,
your associa on has simply been a donor to the FFA
Founda on Awards Program. This year, WABA will be
thee complete sponsor of the State Diversified Crop
Produc on Award Program.
Also in August, our Con nuing Consultants of Agronomic Professionals Program (C-CAP) and our two
Grain Grading Schools went well, offering educa onal
opportuni es to WABA members from all across
the state. Also, two webinars sponsored jointly by
WABA, OSHA and M3 Insurance, allowed members
the opportunity to provide employee training without having to leave the facility.
Plans are well under way in preparing for our upcoming Wisconsin Crop Management Conference and
Industry Showcase to be held in the Alliant Energy
Center in Madison on January 14-16, 2014. This
year’s show will be the biggest, and hopefully, the
best ever, with the addi on of breakout sessions
covering grain and feed topics, an addi onal 30,000
square feet of trade show floor, a two day silent aucon of valuable items for the scholarship program,
and key note speakers that are mo va onal, informa ve, and entertaining. We hope you will all mark
your calendars and plan to a end.
In early August, WABA sent out our annual membership renewal no ces. Thank you to all of you who
have already renewed your membership for the
2013-14 year. We will do all we can to make your
investment something you are proud of. If you have
not yet renewed your membership in WABA, we
hope you will consider doing so in the near future.
At the Wisconsin Agri-Business Associa on, we will
never forget why we exist - to provide value for our
members. We are your associa on, and we appreciate your support, your loyalty, and your membership.
Un l next me...
Tom Bressner
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1
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4
An Interpretation of the
Origins of the 2012
Central Great Plains Drought
An Assessment Report of the
NOAA Drought Task Force Narrative Team
Historical Context - How do 2012 rainfall amounts and high temperatures compare to years past?
Precipitation deficits for the period May through August
2012 were the most severe since official measurements began
in 1895, eclipsing the driest summers of 1934 and 1936 that
occurred during the height of the Dust Bowl. This prolonged
period of precipitation deficits, along with above normal
temperatures, resulted in the largest area of the contiguous
United States in drought since the U.S. Drought Monitor
began in January 2000. By early September, over threequarters of the contiguous U.S. was experiencing at least
abnormally dry conditions with nearly half of the region (the
Central Plains in particular) experiencing unprecedented
severe drought.
U.S. Drought Monitor, Sep 4, 2012
http://droughtmonitor.unl.edu/
For a longer-term perspective, the Palmer Drought Severity Index (PDSI) for August 2012 is compared to a longterm PDSI average spanning from 1895 to 2000 (left) and identifies the core region of the drought to be the central
Plains region, with the most extreme moisture deficits occurring over the western Plains (consistent with the Drought
Monitor map). A central U.S. epicenter for the drought is also affirmed by the May-August standardized rainfall deficits
(middle) with -2 standardized departures from the 1981 to 2010 long-term average being widespread from Colorado to
Missouri. Much of the dry region also experienced hot temperatures (right). The combination of low rainfall and high
temperatures is typically seen during summertime droughts over the central U.S.
What caused the 2012 Central Great Plains Drought?
The central Great Plains drought during May-August of 2012 resulted mostly from natural variations in weather.
• Moist Gulf of Mexico air failed to stream northward in late spring as cyclone and frontal activity were shunted
unusually northward.
• Summertime thunderstorms were infrequent and when they did occur produced little rainfall.
• Neither ocean states nor human-induced climate change, factors that can provide long-lead predictability, appeared
to play significant roles in causing severe rainfall deficits over the major corn producing regions of central Great
Plains.
6
Contacts: Marty Hoerling ([email protected])
Annarita Mariotti ([email protected])
The full report can be downloaded from:
http://www.drought.gov/drought/content/resources/reports
The timing of the 2012 Central Great Plains Drought: Was it a “flash drought?”
This figure was created using the drought monitor graphic tool at
http://www.drought.gov/drought/content/tools/drought-monitor-graphics
The 2012 Central Great Plains drought developed
suddenly, and did not appear to be just a progression
or a continuation of the prior year’s record drought
event that occurred over the southern Great Plains,
but appeared to be a discrete extreme event that
developed over the Central U.S. The figure to the
left shows the rapid expansion of abnormally dry to
exceptional drought conditions during June 2012
for the High Plains (Wyoming, Colorado, Kansas,
Nebraska, South Dakota and North Dakota), an
example of a flash drought. The x-axis extends from
Mar 1, 2012 through Sep 30, 2012.
Impacts of the Central Great Plains Drought
Along with the rapid development of the drought, impacts emerged quite swiftly. Loss estimates by the end of
July 2012, before drought severity peaked, were $12B. It remains to be seen if the economic effects of the 2012
drought will approach prior events, including the 1988 drought that inflicted $78 billion in losses and the 1980
event that caused $56 billion in losses (adjusted for inflation to 2012 dollars). Broad sectors were affected, and
continue to be affected, by the 2012 drought. Notable for the swiftness of impacts was the reduction in crop
yields caused by lack of timely rains. Also, curtailment of commerce on major river systems occurred owing to
reduced water flow. It is expected that water supply reductions in the semi-arid western portions of the drought
where reservoir storage was depleted by lack of rains will also have long-term impacts, as will livestock health
and its long-term effect on herd stocks. Preliminary USDA estimates of farm and food impacts of the 2012
drought indicate corn yield (per acre of planted crop) was about 123 bushels. This is 26% below the 166 bushel
yield expectation that the USDA had at the commencement of the growing season.
Was the extent and severity of this drought predicted?
Official seasonal forecasts issued in April 2012 did not anticipate this widespread severe drought. Above normal
temperatures were, however, anticipated in climate models, though not the extreme heat wave that occurred and
which was driven primarily by the absence of rain.
Report Details
An Interpretation of the Origins of the 2012 Central Great Plains Drought
Assessment Report
20 March 2013
Composed by the Narrative Team of the NOAA Drought Task Force
Lead: M. Hoerling
Co-Leads: S. Schubert and K. Mo
A. AghaKouchak , H. Berbery, J. Dong, M. Hoerling, A. Kumar, V. Lakshmi, R. Leung, J. Li, X. Liang, L. Luo, B. Lyon,
D. Miskus, K. Mo, X. Quan, S. Schubert, R. Seager, S. Sorooshian, H. Wang, Y. Xia, N. Zeng
The NOAA Drought Task Force is organized by the Modeling, Analysis, Predictions and Projections Program (MAPP) of
OAR/Climate Program Office
http://cpo.noaa.gov/ClimatePrograms/ModelingAnalysisPredictionsandProjections/MAPPTaskForces/DroughtTaskForce.aspx
This report was produced in partnership with the National Integrated Drought Information System (NIDIS)
Contacts: Marty Hoerling ([email protected])
Annarita Mariotti ([email protected])
The full report can be downloaded from:
http://www.drought.gov/drought/content/resources/reports
WABA Meets With Governor’s Staff and DATCP Concerning The
West, Texas Fertilizer Plant Explosion
It is no surprise to anyone that a er the fer lizer
plant explosion in West, Texas, people all across the
na on immediately became concerned about fer lizer/farm chemical plants in their community. This
topic also became a topic of discussion for the United
States Senate Commi ee on the Environment and
Public Works as well. Chaired by Senator Barbara
Boxer from California, the Senate commi ee held
several hearings on the topic, gathering facts and
data on ammonium nitrate, anhydrous ammonia, and
fer lizer plants in general.
As a result of these hearings, on July 9, 2013, Senator
Boxer sent a six paragraph le er to all fi y governors
in the na on, asking them to review the applicable
fer lizer requirements in their state and to adopt
policies that will prevent the loss of life while, with
appropriate protec ons, allowing the use of ammonium nitrate and alterna ve sources of nitrogen. The
message being sent was that the fer lizer industry
needs more regula ons and more oversight.
Knowing that Governor Walker received this le er,
WABA Staff arranged a mee ng with Patrick Hughes
- Policy Director for Governor Walker, and Jeff Lyon WI Deputy Secretary of Agriculture. The mee ng was
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
held in the Governor’s Office on August 5th. The intent of the mee ng was to discuss the actual volume
of ammonium nitrate sold in Wisconsin (9,840 tons
in 2012, only 0.6% of total agricultural fer lizers), to
address all myths that the fer lizer industry needs
more regula on (currently regulated federally by
Homeland Security, OSHA, and EPA along with state
regula ons from DATCP), and to talk about self-inia ves being implemented by the fer lizer industry
to address fer lizer storage concerns (ResponsibleAg
Fer lizer Code of Prac ce currently being dra ed by
The Fer lizer Ins tute and the Agricultural Retail Associa on).
As a result of this mee ng, along with extensive internal research conducted by DATCP, it is the opinion
of WI Secretary of Agriculture, Ben Brancel, that
there, “are sufficient state and federal regula ons to
ensure proper storage and handling of ammonium
nitrate.” In other words, no further regula ons are
needed. A copy of Secretary Brancel’s le er back to
Senator Boxer is posted on the next page.
Next chance you get, thank Secretary Brancel for
standing up for our industry.
(ConƟnued on Page 8)
7
OSHA’s New Hazard Communication Requirements
On March 26, 2012, OSHA’s revised Hazard Communica on Standard (HCS) was published. The revision to
the Standard made it align with the Globally Harmonized System (GHS) for the Classifica on and Labeling of
Chemicals in the workplace. The GHS is an interna onal approach to a hazard communica on system and
standardizes the labeling and classifica on of chemical hazards crea ng a common framework to help reduce
confusion surrounding chemical hazards. GHS was developed by the United Na ons and there are over 65
countries that are in the process of adop ng it in some way. It was mandated
in 1992 as part of the United Na on Conference on Environment and Development.
The change to hazard communica on will improve the quality and consistency
of hazard informa on in the workplace, making it safer for workers by providing
easily understandable informa on on appropriate handling and safe use of hazardous chemicals, as well as harmonizing the U.S. hazard communica on rules
with those used interna onally.
Changes to the hazard communica on standard affect the areas of chemical hazard classifica on, chemical
labeling elements, and safety data sheet format.
Chemical hazard classifica on: The defini ons of hazards have been changed to provide specific criteria for
classifying health and physical hazards. These specific criteria will help to ensure that evalua ons of hazardous
effects are consistent between manufacturers, and that labels and safety data sheets are more accurate as a
result. Under GHS, hazard classifica on is made through specific statements and pictograms rather than a numeric system. Chemical manufacturers and distributors are responsible for establishing the hazard informa on.
Labels: Chemical manufacturers and importers will be required to provide a label that includes a harmonized
signal word, pictogram, and hazard statement for each hazard class and category. Precau onary statements
must also be provided. Below is a new sample label.
(ConƟnued on Page 10)
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
9
(ConƟnued from Page 9)
Safety Data Sheets: The Safety Data Sheet plays
a prominent role in hazard communica on according to the GHS. The document follows a 16 sec on
format with the hazard informa on, including the
labeling informa on, shown in sec on 2 (Hazard
Iden fica on). On the SDS, sec on 2 is unique
because it contains all of the hazard warning informaon found on the label (i.e., pictogram informa on,
signal words, hazard warnings, and precau onary
statements). Also on the SDS, pictograms can be
reproduced in color or in black and white. They can
be subs tuted with the name of the pictogram that
should appear on the label. It is important to note
that sec ons 12-15 on the SDS cover informa on related to the environment and transporta on and are
not under OSHA’s jurisdic on.
The revised HazCom standard adopts eight specific
GHS pictograms for use on labels. Each is surrounded
by a red border and designed to convey the health
and physical hazards of chemicals. A ninth, environmental pictogram which deals with Environmental
Hazards may be present on a label, but is not an
OSHA requirement. Environmental hazards are not
within OSHA’s jurisdic on. Workers are required to
be trained on pictograms.
What Employers need to do and when:
Chemical users: Con nue to update safety data
sheets when new ones become available, provide
training on the new label elements and update
hazard communica on programs if new hazards
are iden fied.
Chemical Producers: Review hazard informa on
for all chemicals produced or imported, classify
chemicals according to the new classifica on criteria, and update labels and safety data sheets.
Effec ve
Comple on
Date
Requirement(s)
Who
December 1,
2013
Train employees on the
new label elements and SDS
format.
Employers
June 1, 2015
Comply with all modified
provisions of this final rule,
except:
December 1,
2015
Distributors may ship products labeled by manufacterers under the old system
un l December 1, 2015.
June 1, 2016
Update alterna ve labeling
and hazard communica ons
program as necessary, and
provide addiitonal employee
training for newly iden fied
physical or health hazards.
Employers
Transi on
Period
Comply with either 29
CFR 1910.1299 (this final
standard), or the current
standard, or both.
All chemical
manufacturers, importers,
distributors
and employers
Chemical
manufacturers, importers,
distributors
and employers
For those companies interested in further informaon, you may visit the OSHA Hazard Communica on
Website, or contact one of the four Area Offices in
the State of Wisconsin: Appleton (920) 734-4521,
Eau Claire (715) 832-9019, Madison (608) 441-5388
and Milwaukee (414) 297-3315.
Wisconsin Agri-Business Associa on (WABA) also
has a webinar available through its Website which
reviews the new components of the Hazard Communica on Standard and will sa sfy the training requirements that must be completed by December 1, 2013.
You can contact Jim Nolte, Safety Director for WABA
for addi onal assistance or with any ques ons you
may have.
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July 2013
FERTILIZER
RECORD
Contact:
Harry Vroomen
(202) 515-2702
Melinda Giesler
(202) 515-2705
A statistical publication released monthly by The Fertilizer Institute
August 15, 2013
THE FERTILIZER INSTITUTE RELEASES JULY FERTILIZER DATA
Washington. D.C. - The Fertilizer Institute (TFI) today released it's monthly fertilizer data report, Fertilizer RECORD, which is
based on TFI's survey of North American fertilizer production facilities.
Producer Disappearance*
July 2013 - July 2013 vs. July 2012 - July 2012
Nitrogen - United States
Ammonium Nitrate
Ammonium Sulfate
Phosphate - United States
Total Phosphoric Acid
Combined DAP & MAP
Total U.S. Phosphate
Potash - North America
Total North American Potash
Production
July 2013 - July 2013 vs. July 2012 - July 2012
Nitrogen - United States
Ammonium Nitrate
Ammonium Sulfate
Phosphate - United States
Total Phosphoric Acid
Combined DAP & MAP
Total U.S. Phosphate
Potash - North America
Total North American Potash
Closing Inventory
July 2013 vs. July 2012
Nitrogen - United States
Ammonium Nitrate
Ammonium Sulfate
Phosphate - United States
Total Phosphoric Acid
Combined DAP & MAP
Total U.S. Phosphate
Potash - North America
Total North American Potash
*Disappearance is defined as apparent shipments. Producer Disapperance does not include domestic shipments of imported products. TFI surveys producers for production and ending inventory data
and calculates disappearance as production plus the change in ending inventory
Note: Data presented in the Fertilizer RECORD are based on a survey conducted for The Fertilizer Institute by the International Fertilizer Development Center. The data reported may not include the
entire industry. Refer to the participation index column of the report for the percentage of industry production capacity reporting.
425 Third Street S.W., Suite 950 Ɣ Washington, D.C. 20024 Ɣ (202) 962-0490 Ɣ Fax: (202) 962-0577
FERTILIZER
July 2013
RECORD
2012/2013
2013/2014
Trends, Producer Dissappearance
U.S. Diammonium Phosphate (DAP)
U.S. Monoammonium Phosphate (MAP)
700
600
600
500
thousand tons
thousand tons
500
400
300
200
300
200
100
100
0
0
J
A
S O N D
J
F M A M
J
J
U.S. Ammonium Sulfate
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
North American Potassium Chloride
450
1,600
400
1,400
350
1,200
300
thousand tons
thousand tons
400
250
200
150
1,000
800
600
400
100
200
50
0
0
J
A
S
O N D
J
F
M A M
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
J
J
A
S
O
N
D
J
F
M
A
M
J
13
FERTILIZER
RECORD
United States
JULY 2013
(THOUSAND SHORT TONS)
PRODUCTION
Change
ParticFrom
ipation Total
Jun
Index Jul13
13
PRODUCT
%
Jul
12
%
%
Total
Y-T-D
CLOSING INVENTORY
Change
From
Jul12
Y-T-D
OnSite
OffSite
Change
From
Jun
Total
13
%
PRODUCER DISAPPEARANCE
Jul
12
Change
From
Total Jun
Jul
Jul13
13
12
%
%
%
%
Total
Y-T-D
Change
From
Jul12
Y-T-D
%
NITROGEN PRODUCTS
Anhydrous Ammonia
A/
N-solutions (28%)
A/
Am nitrate-solid
92
131
15
-17
131
-17
27
17
44
2
11
130
6
-16
130
-16
Ammonium sulfate
95
284
-10
-6
284
-6
285
80
365
27
5
206
-25
1
206
1
2
52
2,511
6
2
2,511
2
Urea - solid
A/
PHOSPHATE PRODUCTS
Phosphate rock
Total phos acid
1, 2
Super phos acid
1, 3
97
2,652
1
-2
2,652
-2
6,612 2,267 8,879
100
765
10
2
765
2
121
16
137
-5
5
771
10
0
771
0
100
57
60
29
57
29
5
3
8
99
46
53
33
18
53
18
Conc. superphos
A/
Diammonium phos
542
1
-11
542
-11
154
391
545
1
17
538
-3
8
538
8
Monoammonium phos
378
-5
2
378
2
151
406
557
8
47
337
-13
-12
337
-12
919
-2
-6
919
-6
305
797
1,102
4
30
875
-7
-1
875
-1
10
2
765
2
271
407
678
2
25
748
6
3
748
3
Combined DAP & MAP
100
POTASH
Potassium chloride
A/
OTHER MATERIALS
Granular NPK mix
A/
NUTRIENT TOTALS
NITROGEN
A/
4
765
K2O - (KCl)
A/
P2O5
1. P2O5
2. Includes superphosphoric acid.
3. Superphosphoric acid for agricultural use only.
4. Total excludes concentrated superphosphate.
A/ Data withheld to avoid disclosure.
14
Nitrogen Data Available on a 3-Month Lag
FERTILIZER
RECORD
United States
APRIL 2013
(THOUSAND SHORT TONS)
PRODUCTION
Participation Total
Index Apr13
PRODUCT
%
Change
From
Apr
Mar
13
12
%
%
Total
Y-T-D
CLOSING INVENTORY
Change
From
Apr12
Y-T-D
OnSite
OffSite
Total
%
PRODUCER DISAPPEARANCE
Change
From
Mar
Apr
13
12
%
%
Total
Apr13
Change
From
Mar
Apr
13
12
%
%
Total
Y-T-D
Change
From
Apr12
Y-T-D
%
NITROGEN PRODUCTS
Anhydrous Ammonia
82
826
-5
0
8,092
-3
308
438
747
-17
79
975
24
-10
7,765
-9
N-solutions (28%)
90
903
-1
16
8,067
-2
381
527
908
2
44
886
3
-28
7,702
-5
Am nitrate-solid
92
160
-8
-19
1,561
-17
44
29
73
-10
88
168
0
-19
1,528
-19
Ammonium sulfate
95
271
-12
-12
2,896
1
215
79
294
6
54
253
-29
-27
2,853
-2
Urea - solid
84
235
2
-8
2,014
-12
108
235
343
3
104
226
10
-37
1,821
-19
97
2,844
-3
8
27,411
12
5
65
2,477
0
7
24,867
0
100
720
-2
-3
7,435
-3
111
11
123
-13
-11
738
1
-1
7,464
-3
100
49
-8
-5
534
-6
5
0
5
-43
7
53
4
2
535
-6
PHOSPHATE PRODUCTS
Phosphate rock
Total phos acid
1, 2
Super phos acid
1, 3
6,271 1,866 8,137
Conc. superphos
A/
Diammonium phos
533
-9
-9
5,687
-5
126
422
549
4
60
511
-13
-30
5,495
-10
Monoammonium phos
388
-7
-10
4,180
-6
96
429
525
1
21
383
-12
-26
4,047
-6
921
-8
-9
9,867
-6
222
852
1,074
3
38
894
-12
-28
9,543
-8
Combined DAP & MAP
100
POTASH
Potassium chloride
A/
OTHER MATERIALS
Granular NPK mix
A/
NUTRIENT TOTALS
NITROGEN
678
-5
0
6,635
-3
503
765
1,267
-8
67
785
25
-29
6,106
-12
4
720
-2
-3
7,435
-3
219
429
648
-1
24
725
-2
-16
7,306
-4
K2O - (KCl)
A/
P2O5
1. P2O5
2. Includes superphosphoric acid.
3. Superphosphoric acid for agricultural use only.
4. Total excludes concentrated superphosphate.
A/ Data withheld to avoid disclosure.
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
15
Implements of Husbandry - Hottest Topic on the Roads Today
On July 31, 2013, the Wisconsin Department of Transporta on released a study concerning Implements of
Husbandry and their effects on Wisconsin roadways.
Since that me, the study has been a topic of discussion at every rural coffee shop in the state. It has also
been the subject of six Town Hall Mee ngs across the
state that were conducted by WisDOT.
DOT recommenda ons proposed in the report for
the future opera ons of farm and agri-business
equipment on the roadways deal with many different
factors including: height, width, length, axle weights,
and overall weights. While it is impossible to adequately summarize the 53 page study report in this
short ar cle, a complete copy of the report can be
found at:
h p://www.dot.wisconsin.gov/business/ag/docs/
final-ioh-phase2-report.pdf
What we can tell you is that whatever becomes of
this DOT study is in the hands of Senate Transportaon Commi ee Chairman, Senator Jerry Petrowski,
and Assembly Transporta on Commi ee Chairman,
Representa ve Keith Ripp. Even as you read this
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
magazine, they are sor ng through the DOT study,
the wri en opinions submi ed by farmers, agribusinesses, town officials, and road commissioners across
the state, as well as the hundreds of verbal comments received at the Town Hall Mee ngs, trying
to strike a fair balance on heights, widths, lengths,
and weights that should be allowed by large agricultural equipment. What the final legisla ve package
will look like is s ll yet to be determined. However,
WABA will be monitoring this issue very closely, trying to protect our industries as much as we possibly
can. Keep your eyes open for “WABA Industry News”
email ar cles in the coming weeks, because we will
be keeping you informed with every piece of movement on this legisla on we see. We will also most
likely request you to contact your legislators on the
issue as needed as well.
I encourage you to go to the website men oned
above, and get familiar with the recommenda ons
from the DOT study. If you have any ques ons,
please do not hesitate to call WABA. We are staying
on the front line of the issue, and will be up to date
with its happenings at all mes.
17
Succession Planning: The First Steps for Small Business Owners
By Pat Sturz
Many agribusiness owners know they need to make
formal plans for a successor, but planning can easily
take a backseat to the urgency of managing people,
credit, cash flow, and daily opera ons. But with more
and more owners in or approaching re rement, succession planning must become a priority.
equately trained with the right management skills.
Succession planning starts by communica ng with
those you know and trust. Start the process by talking to family, staff, and advisors who can objec vely
discuss your vision for the future — for yourself and
your company.
Once you have shared your ideas you can formulate a
plan by focusing on the following steps:
•
Iden fying financial conflicts:
o An cipated value versus the real value of
your company
o Personal needs a er re ring
o Management’s acceptance of risks associated with a change in ownership
o Credit capacity of the company, and the
impact on opera ons a er the transi on
•
Deciding which family and/or key manager(s) you
want to be part of your ownership and management succession plan.
Most businesses are family owned and operated —
some for genera ons — and have had a substan al
impact on their local communi es over the years. In
addi on, many of these businesses are smaller, and
therefore highly dependent on their owners to manage day-to-day issues.
Common struggles
Most small business owners have similar challenges
when they start the succession process:
•
•
•
•
•
Avoiding selling to a third party while s ll providing for the welfare of trusted managers and
employees
Developing the next genera on to manage and
lead without being personally involved in the
business
Incen vizing key employees to remain through an
ownership and management transi on
Guiding the long-las ng legacy of your business
for the community, family, and employees
Knowing if you have the finances necessary to
maintain your lifestyle, including hobbies, ac vies, and daily expenses, and whether you have
provided for your spouse and family
How do I start?
Although many small business owners prefer to pass
the business on to family or staff, most family business transfers ul mately fail. This is o en due to a
lack of trust and communica on between the owners
and successors, and the successors not being ad-
18
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for future leadership, ownership, and management
once the owner re res or is unable to run the business.
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•
•
•
Making sure successor(s) understand the responsibili es and risks associated with their role.
Alignment of all of the stakeholders regardless of
their role is essen al for your vision to be realized.
Evalua ng your successor owner/manager’s
dynamics in an cipa on of how he or she will
respond to a change in management.
Assessing the near- and long-term development
needs of the company.
Assess your small business’ value
Evaluate how the concepts below affect your small
business’ future, and what you need to do to sustain
the value and opera ons of your enterprise.
•
•
•
Franchise value — What is your business’ value
for your market? If your business is a hot commodity now, will it have long standing value?
Facility — Is your facility up to industry standards
or is substan al investment necessary to meet
future requirements?
Financial performance — What is your return on
investment as an opera ng business as opposed
to investment earnings on the a er-tax proceeds
if the business is sold?
The last ques on is o en the key decision if a sale is
contemplated. Small business owners can be seduced
by high mul ples and what appears to be irresis ble
sale offers. What o en happens, however, is that
business owners have difficulty ge ng the return
on investment necessary to maintain their current
lifestyle.
For example, assume your business is making $1 million a year (a er your reasonable salary of $300,000).
You may have a buyer offering five mes earnings,
which combined with your net worth puts $8 million
a er tax in your pocket. You would then need to have
an investment return exceeding 16 percent to maintain your lifestyle.
Sale Example
Annual business net income
Your annual salary
Sale offer
Your net worth a er sale
Required investment return to maintain your lifestyle
Depending on your other re rement planning (or
your stage of life), this may not be an issue, but rered business owners o en find this problema c.
Psychological factors
Every re rement situa on is different. Some small
business owners are ready to say goodbye and enjoy
re rement. Others are miserable without the thrill
and challenge of running a business. Making an assessment of where you fall on this scale is cri cal to a
happy life and a sound succession decision.
Addi onal psychological factors involve family. Quite
o en, business owners just can’t pull the trigger to
let their son or daughter take over. While the founding owner grew up selling and worked his or her way
to the top, the second genera on o en has been
groomed in a different manner. Despite college degrees, and working every job in the business, it is s ll
o en difficult for business owners to turn over the
keys.
A struggle o en occurs because too many family
members are involved, some working in the family
business and some not. How to divide up the wealth
and power can be quite a challenge. If a sale to third
par es is contemplated, an added complica on is the
possibility of pu ng several family members out of
work.
Be realis c and flexible
Be pragma c about your plans for ownership and
management succession — not everything will happen exactly how you envision it, and you will need to
stay flexible.
Remember, you don’t need to execute a plan all at
once, but by se ng interim goals, you can have a
solid plan in place before you’re ready to pass on the
business. The sooner you start discussing your succession with those you trust, the sooner you can feel
secure about your company’s legacy and your personal future.
$1 million
$300,000
$5 million
$8 million
16 percent
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
19
“FALL” LEP is Expanded to General Industry
On April 1, 2013; OSHA included General Industry in
a “FALL” Local Emphasis Program (LEP). Construc on
has had a “FALL” emphasis program for a number of
years. This emphasis program will address all fall hazards and par cularly, ladder use and training.
There will be no specific inspec on targe ng of sites
for the General Industry “FALL” LEP; however, complaints and referrals can be upgraded to an inspecon if a fall hazard is alleged. Compliance Officers
will focus on fall hazards and fall training during
rou ne inspec ons. Compliance Assistance Specialist
(CAS) will be discussing the LEP at outreach sessions.
Falls, slips and trips accounted for over 25% of the
work-related injuries in 2011 according to the Bureau
of Labor Sta s cs (BLS). In Region V (WI, OH, MN,
MI, IL, IN) from FY 2007-2011, “Falls from Ladders”
were the fourth leading cause of all fatali es and the
leading cause of death by falls. Surprisingly, “Falls
from the Same Level” was the second type of fatal
fall.
Fall protec on in General Industry is stricter than
Construc on. At four feet, the employer must provide fall protec on in General Industry unless the
worker is on a scaffold. Scaffold guardrails are required at ten feet. General Industry also requires
fall protec on in unique circumstances such as over
dangerous equipment, pits or vats.
Floor holes or uneven work surfaces create tripping
or ankle twis ng opportuni es. This is a challenge
with sidewalks or concrete heaving due to frost or
metal grates on floors. Drains covers need to be
secured in place. Chutes, pits, ladder hatch ways all
need to have fall protec on regardless of heights.
Skylights need to have a strong cover or guard so that
the skylight does not break if a worker steps onto it.
Open-sided pla orms need standard railings if over
four feet or above dangerous equipment. This
includes the mezzanine above offices, the roof area
that maintenance personnel travel, and catwalks or
pla orms alongside equipment. The condi on of
the work pla orms need to be part of the facility
inspec on program to detect if damaged or corroded
especially if it is exposed to the weather elements or
harsh chemicals.
OSHA’s stairway and ladder requirements are a specifica on or prescrip ve standards that have par cular
requirements to ensure uniformity to the design and
construc on. Stairways are required when frequent
access is required to eliminate ladders.
Ladders, fixed and portable, are used extensively in
General Industry to access produc on equipment
and to access heights such as roofs. The ladders may
be a few rungs to the full length of a grain silo. Fixed
ladders are o en damaged by movement of materials and portable ladders get their fair share of abuse
by carrying, se ng up and taking down. Inspec on
and training on proper ladder use is cri cal and will
be evaluated during “FALL” LEP inspec ons.
The following are some of the General Industry Standards for the preven on of slips, trips and falls:
•
•
•
•
•
•
Housekeeping: 1910.22
Floor and wall openings and holes: 1910.23
Fixed industrial stairs: 1910.24
Portable wood and metal ladders: 1910.25 and
1910.26
Fixed ladders: 1910.27
Scaffolding: 1910.28
Housekeeping and an orderly work area is cri cal to
elimina ng slip, trip and falls. Hoses and cords laying
on walkways create a tripping hazard. Wet surfaces
from water, chemicals, product, and oil create slippery walking surfaces. General clu er and obscured
aisle ways create an obstacle course.
20
(ConƟnued on Page 21)
MAYVILLE LIMESTONE, INC.
PO Box 25 Mayville, WI 53050-0025
(920) 387-5700
(800) 236-4512
FAX (920) 387-5723
(Bagged Products)
Coarse Barnlime
Feeding Lime
Garden/Lawn Lime
(Bulk Products)
60-69 Aglime
80-89 Aglime
90-99 Aglime
Limestone Products for Agriculture
(ConƟnued from page 20)
What is a standard guardrail?
Railings must be able to withstand at least 200 lbs of force applied along
the top rail in all direc ons.
Employee training and the enforcement of safe work
prac ces are cri cal for ladder safety. Common ladder viola ons include leaning a step ladder against
a surface rather than opening it up and locking the
spreader bar, using the ladder in viola on of the
manufacturer’s instruc ons such as standing on
the top rung, and not extending the portable ladder three feet above the landing. Because ladders
require a strong inspec on program and employee
compliance, many construc on companies have
adopted a slogan “Ladders Last” and will do work
from aerial li s, scaffolds or other means to eliminate ladder use. h p://www.osha.gov/Publica ons/
OSHA3625.pdf
OSHA has launched an extensive campaign on “Fall
Preven on”. Your local OSHA Office has brochures,
posters and s ckers to promote this campaign. The
LEP document should be posted on the Website
shortly. If you want a copy ahead of me, your area
office can provide you with one. The Compliance
Assistance Specialist can develop a presenta on or
workshop specific for FALLS if your group or associaon is interested in addi onal training. h p://www.
osha.gov/stopfalls/index.html
Other “FALL” issues to evaluate in your facility include
working on “rolling stock”. These are tanker trucks,
loaded flat-bed trailers, railroad cars and other large
mobile equipment. Employees need to be trained
to mount/dismount vehicles while maintaining three
points of contact. OSHA may require fall protec on
for opera ons that have a fixed loca on that work is
performed.
(ConƟnued on Page 22)
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
21
(ConƟnued from Page 21)
Fixed ladders, whether wood or metal
must comply with 1910.27.
This Wisconsin company decided they needed
to install overhead fall protec on to ensure
safety when sweeping hopper trailers. Since installa on, they have had 2 near falls where the
system arrested the fall.
Install cost of approximately $25,000. The fall
protec on saved possible fatali es and/or disabling injuries.
Floor holes or grates need to be protected prevent a worker from stepping into
the opening. An auger is below the floor
level.
22
Thank you to ALL our
Sponsors!
GOLF
PREMIER SPONSORS:
Ag Systems, Inc.
BASF Corpora on
CHS, Inc.
FEI-East / Davis Equipment Corp.
Koffman Industries, LLC
Monsando
Syngenta
The Andersons
West Central
WinField
GOLD SPONSORS:
AgVentures
Duffy Grain
Helena Chemical Co.
Rosen’s Inc.
Ziegler Ag
Mark Your Calendars!
November
November 12th
WABA Bowling Tournament
Knuckleheads
Wisconsin Dells, WI
December
December 10
WABA Legisla ve Recep on
Madison Concourse Hotel & Governor’s Club
Madison, WI
SILVER SPONSORS:
Allied Coopera ve
Buck Country Grain
CoBank
Fer lizer Dealer Supply
TRAP
Ag Systems, Inc.
Allied Coopera ve
BASF Corpora on
FEI-East / Davis Equipment Corp.
Murray Equipment, Inc.
Rosen’s Inc.
Syngenta
BOWLING
Don-Rick Insurance
I.D.O. Feed & Supply
Transporta on Development Associa on
of Wisconsin
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
23
WABA Golf Tournament Results
Skyline Golf Course
24
1st Place Flight: Monsanto
2nd Place Flight: Agrium
3rd Place Flight: Ziegler Ag
WABA Golf Tournament Results
Trappers Turn
Golf Course
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
1st Place Flight: Milwaukee Inspec on Service
2nd Place Flight: Inpak Systems
3rd Place Flight: Allied Coop
25
Trappers Turn Golf Course Continued...
Trappers Turn Golf Course Continued...
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WABA Golf Tournament Results
The Oaks Golf Course
28
1st Place Flight: M3 Insurance
2nd Place Flight: SCS Engineering
3rd Place Flight: Ag States Group
The Oaks Golf Course Continued...
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
29
The Oaks Golf Course Continued...
30
The Oaks Golf Course Continued...
The Motorcycle Tour
This year’s tour kept with the same tradi on of scenic riding, comradery, discussions, and tours. They looped
through West Central Wisconsin, crossing Dane, Sauk, Richland, Vernon, Monroe, and Juneau Coun es. They
toured the McFarlane Manufacturing opera on where they make llage equipment, and farm implements
and also toured the new Allied Coop fer lizer hub plant located in Tomah, WI. They then con nued on to ride
along the east shore of Castle Rock Lake to Wisconsin Dells, stopping at the Splash Tavern, and other scenic fun
stops.
Pictured are some of the group on this trip.
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
31
32
Wisconsin Crop Management Conference and Industry Showcase
company, feed mill or grain elevator. This should
provide a great opportunity to create and build
loyalty with some of your best customers.
Alliant Energy Center Exhibit Hall
Madison, Wisconsin
January 14-16, 2014
•
We are excited to announce plans for the 2014 Wisconsin Crop Management Conference and Industry
Showcase! In 2014, the conference and show will
have something for all of our members, including
agronomy, feed, seed, and grain. Both the conference and the show are going to be bigger and be er
than ever before, and we want you to be a part of it.
Here are some changes for 2014.
A endee a endance numbers are expected to be
around 1400-1500, with almost all of them being
ac ve par cipants in the agronomy, feed, seed,
and grain businesses.
•
In addi on to the numerous educa onal breakout
sessions that already exist at the Crop Management Conference on agronomy and soil management topics, nine addi onal sessions will be
added to a ract interest from our grain and feed
industry members as well.
•
Key legisla ve leadership will again be invited to a
Wednesday evening recep on on the Trade Show
Floor, giving you the opportunity to meet them
and discuss issues that are important to you.
•
The WABA Scholarship Commi ee will host a silent auc on of great items during the trade show,
on the trade show floor. Besides raising money
for our scholarship program, you will have the
chance to buy sports ckets, golf ou ngs, hotel
packages, memorabilia, etc...
•
•
The Wisconsin Agri-Business Associa on (WABA)
will no longer be a part of the Corn-Soy Conference held each year in late January in the Wisconsin Dells. Beginning with 2014, the Corn-Soy
Expo will be an en rely producer show, with no
sponsorship or programming from WABA. Therefore, in addi on to the great agronomy show we
have always had at the Wisconsin Crop Management Conference, in 2014, grain and feed exhibitors and educa onal breakout sessions will be
added as well.
Instead of the 70,000 square feet of trade show
floor space we have tradi onally had at the Crop
Management Conference and the 20,000 square
feet of trade show floor space we have had at
the Corn-Soy Expo, in 2014, we will use the en re
100,000 square feet of space available in the Expo
Center. This will provide ample room for exhibits
of all sizes... from table top to semi trailers, sprayers, grain augers, etc...
The opening session of the conference already has
two confirmed speakers that are sure to be of interest. Mo va onal speaker, Dr. Lance Fox, will tell us,
and show us through pictures and video, how to not
let mountains stand in the way of our dreams as he
shares his experience of climbing Mt. Everest, the
world’s tallest mountain.
•
In 2014, tables and chairs will be set up through
out the en re trade show area, and all meals for
all conference a endees will be served solely in
the trade show area. This will provide you more
me to visit all of our great exhibitors, and see
the products and services they are marke ng.
Dr. Fox will be followed by Philip Corzine. Besides
farming in Central Illinois, Phil is also the General
Manager of South America Soy, LLC which purchased,
developed and farms 3,500 acres in the State of
Tocan ns, Brazil. Phil will talk about developing
the rain forests, farming in South America, logis cs,
transporta on, markets, etc...
•
On the last day of the show (Thursday), WABA
member companies will be allowed to sponsor
their best producer customers to a end and
see the technologies and products available at
the trade show. Producers will have a different color of name badge so they can be easily
iden fied, and will only be there because they
are sponsored by their agronomy company, seed
34
As you can see, we have a lot of reasons to get excited about the 2014 Wisconsin Crop Management
Conference and Industry Showcase. However, the
key to making this successful is you. If you have
been a normal a endee at the Crop Management
(ConƟnued on Page 35)
(ConƟnued from Page 34)
Conference in the past, we invite you to join us again.
If you have been a normal a endee at the Corn-Soy
Expo, we invite you to join us at our new venue in
Madison. If you have never a ended either, what a
great opportunity to start a new tradi on!
The decisions made for the 2014 show were made
based on the results of surveys conducted with our
exhibitors and a endees at both the 2013 Wisconsin
Crop Management Conference and the 2013 CornSoy Expo. If you have any ques ons or concerns, we
want to hear them. Please feel free to contact us at
any me.
Here is looking forward to a great conference and
show in 2014!
DATCP Secretary Ben Brancel addressing
the 2013 WCMC Awards Banquet
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
35
WISCONSIN AGRI-BUSINESS ASSOCIATION
2801 International Lane, Suite 105, Madison, WI 53704 • Phone (608) 223-1111 • Fax (608) 223-1147
2014 Contract for Exhibitor Space
Wisconsin Crop Management Conference & Agri-Industry Showcase
We hereby make application for booth space at the 2014 Wisconsin Crop Management Conference & Agri-Industry Showcase,
January 14-16, 2014, at the Alliant Energy Center in Madison, WI.
Booth Rental: Please observe booth rates on the chart
to the right. Prices are for WABA members and non-members.
First-time exhibitors qualify for WABA member rates. Please
indicate the number of booths requested along with a check or
credit card information payable to WABA for the amount shown.
There is an Early Bird Special of 5% savings if paid in full by September 30, 2013. Exhibitor payment is required with this application unless other arrangements have been made. Please contact
the WABA office with questions regarding exhibitor space rental.
Contracts may be cancelled with full refund on or before September 30, 2013. No refunds will be granted after September 30, 2013.
Exhibitors must submit a Certificate of Insurance to WABA (See
reverse side for more information).
Number of 10 x 10 booths:
______________
Booth Size:
__________ ft. x __________ ft.
Less 5% if paid by 9/30/2013: - $________________
Total Enclosed:
$________________
# 10x10
Booths
WABA
Member
Cost
NonMember
Cost
# 10x10
Booths
WABA
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$585
$1,023
13
$4,300
$7,525
25
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2
3
$965
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14
$4,600
$8,050
26
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$1,290
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15
$4,900
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27
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4
5
$1,560
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16
$5,200
$9,100
28
$8,800 $15,400
$1,900
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17
$5,500
$9,625
29
$9,100 $15,925
6
$2,200
$3,850
18
$5,800
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30
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7
$2,500
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19
$6,100
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31
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8
$2,800
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20
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32
$10,000 $17,500
1
#10 x 10
Booths
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9
$3,100
$5,425
21
$6,700
$11,725
33
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10
$3,400
$5,950
22
$7,000
$12,250
34
$10,600 $18,550
11
$3,700
$6,475
23
$7,300
$12,775
35
$10,900 $19,075
12
$4,000
$7,000
24
$7,600
$13,300
36
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for updated exhibitor map and listings. WABA reserves the right to make
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The Cost of Doing Business: Grain Engulfment/Entrapment
engulfment/entrapment hazard.
How much grain is too much? Is there a method to
determine the risk of engulfment? Is the evalua on
based on “it won’t happen to me” or “I have to get
this done”?
Numerous ar cles have been wri en on Grain Engulfment/Entrapment dangers, yet unprotected workers
have died in grain bins. Why?
Background:
OSHA has taken a strong enforcement stance along with
a significant outreach campaign to make grain bin owners, employers and employees aware of the life threatening hazards. The Head of OSHA, David Michaels, PhD,
MPH, on February 1, 2011 issued a no fica on le er to
Grain Storage Facility Operators to alert them of the hazard and abatement methods. The le er stated: “OSHA
will not tolerate non-compliance with the Grain Handling
Facili es standard.” Besides the cau oning of significant
OSHA penal es, the le er warned: “If any employee dies
in a grain storage facility, in addi on to any civil penales proposed, OSHA will consider referring the incident
to the Department of Jus ce for criminal prosecu on
pursuant to the criminal provisions of the Occupa onal
Safety and Health Act of 1970.”
With a threat of high OSHA penal es and criminal prosecu on, why would an employer allow entry into a grain
bin without the proper equipment and not following the
proper procedure? On June 19, 2013, a press release
stated that OSHA is working hard to change the ‘it won’t
happen to me’ mindset,” said Nick Walters, OSHA Regional Administrator for six Midwestern states.
Mindset Change:
So what a tudes need to change? Many managers
complain about the lack of staff, the poor design of older
bins, urgency of produc on and the lack of capital to
improve equipment as reasons for entering bins without
all the precau ons in place. The new mindset or a tude
needs to be: Proper entry procedures and equipment is
the “cost of doing business”.
3. Entry is prohibited if there is flowing grain.
In determining if the grain poses an engulfment
hazard, the phase “angle of repose” is used to describe the natural slope of the grain when it stops
moving. Many people in the grain industry consider
this a “safe condi on” to entry. What needs to be
considered is will the grain’s angle of repose will be
disturbed or changed by the person walking on the
grain causing the grain to move? Also consider that if
the task is to unclog a conveyor, when the clog is removed, grain will begin to flow to fill that void, even
though the conveyor or auger is locked out.
4. Entry into a Grain Bin with grain is a “non-rou ne
task” and a Confined Space.
With a non-rou ne task, do not assume that everyone is familiar with the procedures and that the condi ons inside the bin are the same as the last entry.
The permit needs to be filled out specific to the condi ons that exist for that entry. An adequate number
of trained staff members must be present throughout
the entry. Proper equipment must be provided and
used, proper procedures followed and an emergency
plan in place.
Entries are made for various reasons so it understandable that “proper entry equipment and procedures”
would also vary with the situa on. Grain Bin Entry is a
“big deal”. A cultural or mindset change needs to be
embraced by top management and communicated to
the workers. Whether the ownership is a coopera ve,
independent, or corpora on; Board of Directors, Owners,
and CEOs need to understand the risk of entry and the
severity of the consequences if something goes wrong.
1. Eliminate the need or “perceived need” to enter.
Several engineering controls such as entry-less sweep
augers, moisture probes and aera on systems will
reduce or eliminate the need to enter. Grain harvested, dried and kept “in condi on” will flow be er and
reduce or eliminate the need to enter.
2. Entry shall be prohibited if the grain can cause an
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
37
10 Technologies Changing Farm Machinery
From Farm Industry News
In July, 1,400 of the world’s foremost agricultural and
biosystems engineers are mee ng to discuss the latest
advancements in farm machinery at the 2013 American
Society of Agricultural and Biosystems Engineers (ASABE)
Interna onal Mee ng, this year held in Kansas City, MO.
Engineers from as far away as China get 15 minutes to
present their latest research projects on everything from
berry-picking equipment to swine housing. Their work is
changing the mechanics of how farmers produce food,
feed and fuel.
“You can probably tell from presenta on tles what the
topics are,” says Mark Hanna, Iowa State University extension agricultural engineer, who moderated one of the sessions. “There are several papers on seeding mechanisms,
followed by harves ng papers on a variety of crops like
sorghum, yam, cherries, and combine fires in sunflowers.
High-speed photography was used in one analysis. GPS
posi oning was used to place and retrieve storage bins
during cherry harvest.”
The list of projects takes up close to 100 pages in the program guide. Here’s a look at just 10 of them.
1. Vehicle guidance lasers. Farm vehicles that steer
themselves typically rely on GPS signals to chart their
course. But engineers are looking at other types of
sensors to supplement, and in some cases replace,
satellite naviga on. For example, Joon Yong Kim from
Seoul Na onal University in Korea is exploring the use
of laser distance sensors to guide tractors and farm
machinery without the need for an operator. Op cal
sensors, classified as vision guidance, also are being
studied.
2. Weeding robots: Lie Tang, Iowa State University-Ames,
is developing a high-efficient weeding robot in crop
fields. Tang is looking at using plant spacing informaon in stereo images to iden fy weeds within the
rows. Similar research is taking place in China, where
Chunlong Zhang, China Agricultural University in
Beijing is studying the design of an intra-row weeding
robot.
3. Seed meters: Plan ng only one seed at a me is the
key to high yields in corn. Randy Taylor, Oklahoma
State University, is evalua ng different corn seed
singula on meters, including pneuma c metering
devices and an -blocking devices for seed tubes.
4. Variable rate irriga on: Several speakers looked at
advances in irriga on management. Arndt Gossel,
University of Missouri-Columbia, is evalua ng the
performance of a center pivot variable rate irriga on
system. In Canada, Hafiz Ahmed, University of Sas-
38
katchewan, is looking at solar-powered center pivot
irriga on systems that produce their own energy.
5. Mobile apps: Joseph Dvorak, University of KentuckyLexington, is modera ng a session on mobile apps in
agriculture. Topics include a crowdsourcing app for
precision agriculture decision-making by Dharmendra
Saraswat, University of Arkansas Coopera ve Extension Service-Li le Rock; a mobile app for tractor
rollover detec on and emergency no fica on by Bo
Liu, University of Missouri-Columbia; farm machinery monitoring and route guidance using a tablet PC,
Caicong Wu, China Agricultural University-Beijing;
and task-specific, collabora ve mobile apps and cloud
storage services, being developed by Jonathan Welte,
Purdue University-West Lafaye e, IN.
6. Big Data for machinery: For years farmers have used
yield and agronomic data to track and improve agricultural produc on prac ces. Now, engineers like Joe
Luck, University of Nebraska-Lincoln, are looking at
agricultural field machinery data as a source for Big
Data.
7. Variable-rate nitrogen sensors: Gary Roberson, North
Carolina State Univeristy-Raleigh, is studying sensorbased vs. map-based variable rate nitrogen applicaon.
8. Smart pes cide applicators. The science of chemical
applica on con nues to advance with new systems.
Hui Liu, Ohio State University-Wooster, is studying the
influence of travel speed on spray deposi on uniformity from an air-assisted variable-rate sprayer. Yue
Shen, also from Ohio State, is developing a real- me
chemical injec on system for air-assisted variable-rate
sprayers. And Durham Giles, University of CaliforniaDavis, is using unmanned aircra to apply chemicals
on specialty crops.
9. Op cal crop sensors. John Nowatzki, North Dakota
State University-Fargo, is applying op cal crop sensor
technology, fairly commonly used in corn, to measure
soybean needs during the growing season so you can
tailor crop input applica on.
10. Wireless networks. Finally, engineers are developing
wireless networks that allow machines to communicate and transmit informa on. Joseph Dvorak, University of Kentucky-Lexington, is developing a wireless
network that can control a fleet of field robots. Bo Liu,
University of Missouri-Columbia is using smartphones
to measuring soil compac on. And Haixia Li, Oklahoma State University-S llwater, is using a 2.4GHz radio
to monitor and transmit crop characteris cs during
various growth stages.
A scholarship fundraiser
150 Gasser Road, Lake Delton, WI 53965
Sponsorship Opportunity
I would like to be a Bowling Sponsor for $50.00 or my donation of $____________
Name: _______________________________ Company _____________________________________
Address:____________________________________________________________________________
Email:_____________________________________________
_____ VISA _____ MasterCard _____ Discover _____Check Enclosed _____ Invoice Me
Card Number _________________________________________________________________________________
Expira on Date _______________________________________________________________________________
Name on Credit Card ___________________________________________________________________________
Signature ____________________________________________
A scholarship fundraiser
DATE: November 12, 2013
Sponsors:
TIME: 1:00 Bowling
4:00 Pizza buffet
LOCATION: Knuckleheads Bowling
150 Gasser Road, Lake Delton, WI 53965
Don-Rick Insurance
I.D.O. Feed & Supply
Transporta on Development
Associa on of Wisconsin
REGISTRATION FEE: $35 per person
This fun event is a perfect way to celebrate the harvest,
so be sure to bring your company staff, customers,
family and friends! Even though teams of four are encouraged, singles, doubles and triples are welcome!
3 Games of Bowling, Bowling Shoes, Food
and Prizes!
bec
spo ome
a
nso
r
Put
and
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2013 Bowling Registration Form
Contact Name: ______________________________ E-mail: ____________________________________
Company: _________________________________ Address: ___________________________________
City/State/Zip: _______________________________ Phone: ____________________________________
Please list the names of the bowlers below. Use an additional sheet if necessary. Even though teams of four
are encouraged, singe, doubles and triples are welcome!
Team #1
Team #2
1. _______________________________________
1. _______________________________________
2. _______________________________________
2. _______________________________________
3. _______________________________________
3. _______________________________________
4. _______________________________________
4. _______________________________________
_____ VISA _____ MasterCard _____ Discover _____Check Enclosed
Card Number ______________________________________________________________________
Expira on Date _____________________________________________________________________
Name on Credit Card _________________________________________________________________
Signature __________________________________________________________________________
Fax registration form to: (608) 223-1147
Or mail with payment to:
Wisconsin Agri-Business Assocation, 2801 International Lane, Suite 105, Madison, WI 53704
Or register at our on-line store at www.waba-store.org
Or Email to [email protected]
Wisconsin Agri-Business Assn. - 2801 International Lane, Suite 105, Madison, WI 53704
Phone: 608-223-1111 Fax: 608-223-1147
Wisconsin Man Drives Tractor to Farm Progress Show
From the Rontoul Press
Dean Rueden was wondering what he had go en
himself into.
He also had to drive on an interstate for nearly a
mile.
Asked numerous mes by friends and family if he was
sure he wanted to make the approximately 350-mile
trip from his home in Seymour, Wis., to the Half Century of Progress show in Rantoul, Rueden remained
steadfast. He was looking forward
to it.
“I did everything I could to keep out of the way,” said
Rueden, who was driving the tractor a maximum of
12 miles an hour.
To their credit, despite the tractor’s
presence, Rueden said he didn’t
get any angry looks or one-fingered
salutes from drivers.
No big deal to travel from one state
to another to take in the show.
Things got tougher when he le
Wisconsin. At least there, the twolane highway had a shoulder he
could par ally move off on. When
he got to Illinois 47, the shoulder
was almost non-existent.
Not if you’re traveling by car or
truck.
But by tractor? That’s another
story.
A country boy who grew up on and
s ll lives on the family dairy farm
just north of Green Bay, Rueden
said he thought the trip would be
long and boring with not much to
do except keep his John Deere B
tractor pointed south.
Asked if he would have made the
trip if he had known about the
Photo by: Dave Hinton/Rantoul Press
traffic, Rueden responded, “I think
Dean Rueden with his John Deere B tractor
that he drove from Wisconsin to this year’s ignorance is bliss.”
Half Century of Progress farm show in
Rantoul.
He hadn’t figured on the gridlock in southern Wisconsin and northern Illinois. Life in those parts
seemed to be 24-hour rush hour.
“It was nonstop traffic,” the bearded 46-year-old former electrician said in wonderment, obviously glad to
be in the friendly confines of the Rantoul Airport last
Tuesday, two days before the start of the farm show.
“It was one (car) a er another,” he said. “Then I’m
into ci es. I really was doub ng my sanity.”
It wasn’t just the constant number of cars whizzing
past the slow-moving vehicle; it was also the thought
that he was blocking traffic. (“I was in everybody’s
way,” he said.) So, he did a li le mind control of sorts.
He started blocking it out, and that helped.
At one point he had to drive in a construc on area,
which was one lane, so he would duck in and out
around the construc on barrels, let vehicles pass,
then proceed.
42
boring.”
“It was trying. I wasn’t comfortable
ll I got to Highway 55. The traffic
thinned out. It was long there and
But a er what he experienced earlier in the trip, he
discovered that boring can be good.
Rueden kept an eye on traffic by glancing in the rearview mirror he installed on the John Deere that his
father bought in 1951.
He traveled light, bringing with him supplies and a
small tent, where he stayed the night. It took Rueden
2 ½ days to make the odyssey. He le home on Saturday, Aug. 17, and made it to Rantoul the following
Monday.
The first evening, he was wondering where he would
stay the night when he came upon a bunch of tents
set up at a church picnic. He asked if he could pitch
his tent there, and the church folks said he could.
(ConƟnued on Page 43)
(ConƟnued from Page 42)
“That worked really well,” Rueden said.
The second evening, he had just passed Yorkville.
“I was saying, ‘Lord, help me. I need a place to
sleep,’” he said.
He came upon a rest area where he was able to set
up his tent. The next morning, one of the locals came
to check on him and advised him to wait un l 8:30
a.m. to start out when the traffic would thin out.
Rueden said with so much me to himself in the seat
of a tractor, he had a lot of me to talk to God. He
said he learned something on his trip.
the higher wage that an electrician’s job pays. But he
said simplicity has its benefits. It can cause a person
to drive his tractor to Rantoul rather than have it
trailered in; to stay in a tent rather than a motel.
When he traveled to Alaska one year, he slept in his
car.
It’s more of an adventure that way that can provide
greater memories.
S ll, Rueden wasn’t exactly looking forward to making the trip back to Wisconsin amidst all the hustle
and bustle, but he said he would do it if he didn’t get
an offer to haul his tractor back.
“I need to learn how to trust Him,” he said. “He will
guide you and keep you safe. No radio, no nothing.
We had a lot of me to talk.”
Rueden is one of nine brothers and sisters. The John
Deere B was the only tractor on the farm un l 1960
when his father, Andrew Rueden, bought a John
Deere 435.
He, his father and a friend tore it apart and rebuilt
the B in 1989.
The B has a lot of sen mental value for Rueden.
“I was 4 years old when I sat on this tractor. We were
working on a fence,” he said. “My son Trevor, it was
the first tractor he drove.”
But for a me the tractor sat neglected. For eight
years or so. Then last year, Rueden decided to see if
it would s ll run. A er some fiddling it started right
up and certainly runs well enough to make the trip to
Illinois from Wisconsin.
Driving 12 hours a day on the trip, Rueden figures his
John Deere burned 1.4 gallons of fuel an hour. It was
his first visit to the Rantoul show. He found out about
it from a friend who read about it.
Rueden, who worked for years as an electrician before being laid off, is a tool rental associate at Home
Depot. His parents have since died, and he lives in
the house that he and his siblings built for them on
the farm.
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Rueden said he has learned to live simply without
Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
43
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Page 23
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Wisconsin Agri-Business News Quarterly - Vol. 2 Issue 3
45
Wisconsin Agri-Business
News Quarterly
Advertising Rate Sheet
WABA - 2801 Interna onal Lane, Suite 105 - Madison, WI 53704 - (608) 223-1111
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may also fax the form if paying with a credit card to (608) 223-1147.
ments,
Advertisements should be sent as attachments to [email protected], if you have questions regarding placement or formatting of advertisements,
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Wisconsin Agri-Business Assoc.
2801 InternaƟonal Lane, Suite 105
Madison, WI 53704
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