2014 report

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2014 report
2014
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT
REPORT
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2
Decathlon in figures
3
Interview
6
Sustainable development governance
8
Sustainable development issues
12
Liberating energy
14
Understanding climate issues
15
Decathlon Foundation
18
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
20
Innovation lovers
21
Eco-design
24
Environmental labelling
28
Choosing the right product components
29
Customer satisfaction and continuous improvement
32
Repairing your product
34
Customer input events
36
TRANSPORT AND STORES
38
Managing our sites
39
Storage and transportation
43
Stores and their community involvement
46
Managing health and safety
48
Promoting employee development
50
RESPONSIBILITY IN PRODUCTION
54
Working sustainably with our subcontractors
55
Adopting a progressive HR stance
59
Wastewater treatment: a global approach to supplier support
64
METHODOLOGY
66
Our social performance indicators
67
Our environmental performance indicators
72
Our societal performance indicators
72
Correlation table
73
Methodological note
79
Statement of one of the statutory auditors
83
CONTENTS / 1
CHALLENGES AND
MANAGEMENT
2 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Decathlon in figures
Innovation lovers, for the happiness of people: such is the sentiment shared by almost 65,000 Decathlon
employees worldwide.
Our aim is to place innovation at the heart of everything we do, from designing our products to our after-sales
service; and at each stage of our activities, from manufacturing items to delivering them to stores.
Our 20 Passion brands, the brands developed by Decathlon, are working hard to offer our customers
technically sophisticated, aesthetically pleasing and user-friendly products that are always priced as low
as possible.
Our business culture hinges on two key values: Vitality and Responsibility.
These values are intrinsic to anyone who enjoys sport and who is keen to experience the pleasure and
benefits that sport has to offer.
OUR EMPLOYEES IN THE WORLD
number of employees:
64,934
64
,934
GROWTH IN NUMBER
OF EMPLOYEES WORLDWIDE
65,000
50,000 55,000 60,000
2011
OUR EMPLOYEES
WORLDWIDE
Europe = 80.7%
Asia = 12%
Russia = 3.8%
America = 2.4%
India = 0.9%
Africa = 0.2%
BREAKDOWN OF EMPLOYEES
BY AGE
20 – 29 = 65%
30 – 39 = 21%
40 – 49 = 7%
< 20 = 6%
50 + = 1%
2012
2013
2014
OUR EMPLOYEES BY ACTIVITY
WORLDWIDE
Business and services = 78.9%
Logistics = 9.9%
Design/Production = 5.9%
Support activities = 5.3%
BREAKDOWN OF EMPLOYEES
BY GENDER
Men = 59%
Women = 41%
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 3
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
OUR ACTIVITY IN THE WORLD
TURNOVER
BREAKDOWN OF TURNOVER
our annual turnover:
8.2
International = 60.5%
France = 39.5%
billion of euros
GROWTH IN TURNOVER
GROWTH IN TURNOVER IN 2014
IN BILLIONS OF EUROS
6
6,5
7
7,4
2010
2011
2012
2013
8,2
2014
OUR BUSINESS ACTIVITY ZONES WORLDWIDE
One zone consolidates all of Decathlon’s activities operating within a geographical area: distribution to
stores and online, production, transport and logistics and support services.
Africa Zone : Marocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Madagascar.
Asia Zone : China, South Korea, Taiwan, Singapore, Indonesia, Vietnam, Cambodia, Thailand.
America Zone : Brazil.
Europe Zone : France, Spain, Italia, Polond, Portugal, Germany, Belgium, Hungary, United Kingdom, Romania, Czech Republic, Turkey,
the Netherlands, Sweden, Bulgaria, Croatia.
India Zone : India, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka.
Russia Zone : Russia.
4 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
BREAKDOWN OF OUR POS
BY COUNTRY
BE
BR
BG
CN
HR
CZ
FR
DE
HU
IN
IT
MA
NL
PL
PT
RO
RU
ES
SE
TU
GB
Stores
884
22
18
4
115
1
9
288
23
16
20
100
2
5
44
24
13
24
128
1
9
18
Openings
2014
103
2
3
2
32
1
2
3
2
0
10
6
0
2
9
0
1
8
13
0
3
4
103
new
points of sale in 2014,
bringing Decathlon’s total to 884.
44
warehouses
ehouses
worldwide
ldwide
20
Passion brands
(Decathlon’s brands)
OUR PRODUCTION AREAS
Our production areas bring together the countries where Decathlon teams have a physical presence and
organise product manufacturing with subcontractors.
Africa production area : Marocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Madagascar.
America production area : Brazil.
North Asia production area : China, Taiwan, South Korea.
South-east Asia production area : Cambodia, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam.
South-west Asia production area : Bangladesh, India, Sri-Lanka.
Europe production area : France, Portugal, Italy, Turkey, Roumania.
CIS 1 production area : Russia.
1. Commonwealth of Independent States.
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 5
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Interview
It doesn’t matter whether you’re an employer, a customer or a member of the public, anyone can tackle
sustainable development issues at Decathlon.
Decathlon’s Sustainable Development Director Isabelle Guyader and CEO Michel Aballea team up to
provide the answers.
“
I tell our teams: go on, take some risks!
Push your sustainable development boundaries!”
— Michel Aballea, Decathlon CEO.
Interview with Isabelle Guyader and Michel Aballea
Decathlon sustainable development director and CEO respectively.
Why work at Decathlon?
Michel Aballea: Firstly, my main reason is the same one that brought me
to Decathlon 25 years ago: because I love sport! Our young employees join
us primarily because of their love of sport. The second reason is because
Decathlon’s purpose, “Innovation lovers, for the happiness of people”, very
much resonates with me and makes me want to be part of this adventure.
Lastly, our business is keen to boost performance through employee
satisfaction, particularly by allowing them plenty of freedom linked to
genuine responsibility.
Isabelle Guyader: Exactly, and I’m sure that enjoyment for all really only
makes sense in the long-term; my role is to support the business’ sustainable
development. All Decathlon employees are citizens first and foremost, and
they don’t just leave their beliefs behind when they come to work. Our role
is to provide them with a clear framework and to support them with training
sessions and ways in which to work… We trust them because every day we
give each of them the means to make their own decisions, within their own
particular area.
Michel: Do you think that we currently place sufficient trust in our employees?
Isabelle: I think that we need to explain the purpose and that once we’ve
shared this purpose we can then nurture that trust.
Should I buy a product from Decathlon?
Michel: Absolutely, because a Decathlon product looks good, is technologically advanced and is inexpensive. The values our products embody are
safety, ease of use, practicality and lifestyle...
6 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Isabelle: To that I would also add the concept of dialogue and sincerity
with our customers, particularly with the environmental labelling project
we’re working on. This project means we’ll be able to award our products
an environmental performance rating. In this way, customers will be free to
choose products based on this particular criterion.
Michel: Do you mean that the information will be visible on the product label?
And in the product information online?
Isabelle: Yes, it will be on all labelling in store and online. What’s more, when
we manufacture a product, we’re extremely vigilant about the conditions
under which it’s made. We pay particular attention to the health and safety
conditions of our employees producing these products. For me, our strength
lies in our longstanding arrangement of working directly with our suppliers.
Michel: And also perhaps the fact that we operate locally too, close to our
suppliers.
Isabelle: This proximity enables us to work with our suppliers to improve
the efficiency of our production lines, our ergonomics and our safety. Such
ambitious targets mean that we really are leading the way when it comes to
improving working conditions in our factories.
What is Decathlon doing to preserve the planet?
Michel: We love sport, and we particularly love sport in the great outdoors.
Nature is our playground! We like to say that we’re borrowing the Earth from
our children. We have a responsibility to protect our environment in order to
safeguard the joys of sport as we know them. Where do you think we should
focus our efforts in the coming years?
Isabelle: The product side of things is an extremely big issue. When we
calculate the carbon balance of our activity, we can see that the product
is a massive contributor to our CO2 emissions. We need all our teams to
pull together to find the right solutions, so that products are designed with
human progress in mind; in other words, so that they are more environmentally friendly but still incorporate this economic aspect. This requires
innovation, because there’s no obvious solution out there.
Michel: Decathlon’s purpose, “Innovation lovers, for the happiness of
people”,supports what you’re saying. The message behind this is also to say
to our teams: go on, take some risks! You also need to push the boundaries
in terms of sustainable development by ensuring that our products are more
ecologically friendly and safer for the people using them and manufacturing
them.
Isabelle: Absolutely; I’m in no doubt that innovation is one of the keys to
sustainable development within our business.
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 7
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Sustainable development governance
Sustainable development is a central issue. Our decision-making system therefore involves all of the
company’s activities and conveys Decathlon’s key values of Vitality and Responsibility .
Explanations for each role:
sustainability.decathlon.com
Reporting and communication
Management
SD Reporting Manager
SD Communication Manager
SD Director
Steering Comittee
SD Promoter
Internal Auditors
Internal Auditors
Regulation
SD Legal Expert
TEAMS
Environment Project Managers
SD in Production Managers
Tasked SD Assessors
Tasked Environment Leaders
SD Director:
- Leads a team of experts and a cross-functional network within the business.
- Defines SD policy in line with the key areas outlined by the team and in conjunction with the business’
strategy.
- Ensures adequate human, financial and material resources to enable effective implementation of the
policy.
SD Promoter:
- A member of the Senior Management team; co-opts strategy proposals from the SD team and introduces
them to the business.
Steering Committee:
- Comprises representatives from the various branches of the business (retail, logistics, production,
design and quality).
- Approves SD strategies and manages them by means of quarterly progress reviews.
SD Reporting Manager:
- Collects quantitative information, implements internal reporting protocols and writes methodological
notes.
SD Communication Manager:
- Gathers qualitative information.
- Draws up the Sustainable Development Report in accordance with regulations.
- Produces information campaigns designed to raise awareness of sustainable development at
Decathlon, both internally and externally.
SD Legal Expert:
- Monitors all legal information pertaining to sustainable development and manages compliance status
in terms of the various obligations.
- Assists with implementing regulatory obligations.
- Provides support with regard to day-to-day regulatory issues.
8 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Internal Auditors:
- In conjunction with tasked SD in Production Managers and SD Assessors, internal auditors audit the
internal personal health and safety assessment conducted on our suppliers.
Environment Project Managers:
- Supporting a set of key themes, they define: strategy, training courses and assessment tools.
- They coordinate a network of environment leaders in their specific area.
SD in Production Managers:
- Produce Human Responsibility in Production and Environmental assessments and help suppliers to
improve their skills.
Tasked SD Assessors:
- Constitute a network of employees approved as Human Responsibility in Production or Environment
assessors to carry out audits among our suppliers.
Tasked Environment Leaders:
- Within a defined scope, these coordinate the implementation of environmental actions, training,
environmental assessments, communication, etc.
N.B. The HR team is responsible for HR governance; product safety is assigned to the quality department.
Site safety is maintained by the site operating departments.
PROGRESS THROUGH DIALOGUE
Because of the variety of our activities and our operations, we dialogue with organisations on several
levels: regional, national, European and international. We’re working to try and identify all stakeholders as
exhaustively as possible. Work is already under way with some of them. By way of example:
ALLIANCES NETWORK
Website http://www.reseau-alliances.org/
We are a partner of World Forum Lille, taking part at a regional level in a workshop
dedicated to employee mobility/accessibility on their worksite, organised by the
Alliances Network.
Our projects
http://www.worldforum-lille.org/fr/
http://declic-mobilites.org/
PERIFEM (Technical Association for the Commerce and Distribution sector)
Website http://www.perifem.com/internet/presentation.asp
In 2014, helped to compile a guide on how to conduct a Greenhouse Gas
assessment, so as to employ a common methodology best suited to the needs of
the distribution sector.
Our projects
http://www.bilans-ges.ademe.fr/fr/ressource/guide-sectoriel-list/index/
idElement/8
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 9
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
FCD (Federation of Commerce and Distribution)
Website http://www.fcd.fr/
Sits on the FCD Environment Committee that works to promote Sustainable
Development.
Our projects
http://www.fcd.fr/actualites/article/id/62
FPS (Professional Federation of Sports and Leisure businesses)
Website http://www.entreprisesdusport.com/fr/
Has been part of the CSR Commission of the FPS since 2014 (working on the code
of conduct for the FPS and on an event linking CSR and sport).
Our projects
http://www.entreprisesdusport.com/fr/infos-conso/developpement-durable/
conference-5-juin-2014/
EUROCOMMERCE
Website http://www.eurocommerce.eu/
Member of the Environment Committee, with the aim of monitoring and
anticipating any future strategic and legislative developments for the European
Union in terms of the environment.
ADEME (Environment Agency and Energy Control)
Website http://www.ademe.fr/
Involved drawing up guidelines to help the various activity sectors write their
greenhouse gas emissions accounting guide.
Our projects
http://www.ademe.fr/lignes-directrices-developpement-dun-guide-sectoriel-bilan-demission-gaz-a-effet-serre
Afnor/ADEME
Website http://affichage-environnemental.afnor.org/
Involved for several years in Afnor-Ademe (French environment and energy
management agency) working on the environmental labelling of products, aiming
to define common evaluation methods for use within France.
ORSE (CSR observatory)
Website http://www.orse.org/
A member of the ORSE for several years. This organisation provides continuous
monitoring of CSR in businesses across France, Europe and the world.
10 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
PCN France (National Contact Point)
Website http://www.tresor.economie.gouv.fr/pcn
Meeting with the PCN members in September 2014, with the aim of presenting a responsible purchasing
strategy and discussing potential areas for progress. This meeting forms part of the drive to disseminate
and monitor the PCN report on the implementation of the OECD textile/clothing sector guiding principles
dated 2 December 2013.
IMPACTT
Website http://www.impacttlimited.com/
Decision to join the Benefits for Business and Workers scheme (BBW) at the end of
2014 implemented by the consultancy firm Impactt Limited.
Our projects
http://www.impacttlimited.com/case-studies/benefits-for-business-and-workersbbw
EUROPEAN COMMISSION
OEF (Organisation Environmental Footprint)
Website http://ec.europa.eu/environment/eussd/smgp/organisation_footprint.
htm
Participation in a European experiment to define a common method for calculating
a multi-criteria environmental footprint for businesses.
PEF (Product Environmental Footprint)
Website http://ec.europa.eu/environment/eussd/smgp/product_foot
print.htm
Participation in a European experiment to define a common method for calculating
a multi-criteria environmental footprint for products.
OCDE (Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development)
Website http://www.oecd.org/fr/
Member of a consultative committee (with representatives from PCNs, businesses,
the European Commission, multi-stakeholder initiatives, NGOs and unions) tasked
with writing a guide on due diligence in the textile and footwear industries.
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 11
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Sustainable development issues
Decathlon’s CSR approach involves defining and prioritising the company’s strategic issues relating to
corporate and social responsibility.
Dedicated teams coordinate a table of indicators in order to measure how effective efforts have proved for
each issue.
Decathlon’s results for 2014 were as follows:
CROSS-CUTTING HUMAN ISSUES
86%
91%
91%
50%
17%
WILLINGNESS TO GO TO WORK
of employees are happy to go to work.
RESPONSIBLE AND AUTONOMOUS EMPLOYEES
of employees feel they are able to take on
initiatives and make decisions to keep their
customers happy, within their particular fields
of responsibility.
MONITORING EMPLOYEE HEALTH AND SAFETY
of employees consider their physical safety in
the workplace to be well protected.
81%
81%
56%
SHARING THE VALUE CREATED BY EVERYONE
of employees are Decathlon shareholders.
119,918
9,9918
ENCOURAGING EMPLOYEES AND CUSTOMERS
TO USE SOFT TRANSPORT METHODS
of Decathlon’s greenhouse gas emissions
are generated by customer and employee travel.
622
622
A MOTIVATING BUSINESS PLAN
of employees are motivated by their company’s
business plan (their store, warehouse, production
office, department, etc.).
TRAINING IN ORDER TO DEVELOP TALENT
of employees are satisfied with their
professional development.
ENSURING FAIR PAY
of employees feel that their pay levels are
consistent with their responsibilities and
performance.
HELPING PEOPLE TO PLAY SPORT AND TO
INTEGRATE INTO SOCIETY THROUGH OUR
FOUNDATION
beneficiaries of Decathlon Foundation projects
in 11 countries.
ENCOURAGING OUR CUSTOMERS AND
EMPLOYEES TO DO SPORT
customer input events organised in France
by Decathlon stores.
ISSUES RELATING TO OUR PRODUCT AND SERVICE RANGES
11,206
206PPM
PPM
97%
DEVELOPING SAFE, DURABLE AND HIGH
QUALITY PRODUCTS
customer product returns (per million).
GUARDING AGAINST CHEMICAL HAZARDS
FOR CUSTOMERS, EMPLOYEES AND
THE ENVIRONMENT
of tests comply with our standards.
12 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
10.3%
4.06/5
STANDARDISING ECO-DESIGN
BY INCORPORATING SUSTAINABLE
USE OF RESOURCES INTO THE EQUATION
of products sold are eco-designed
(in terms of quantity).
ENCOURAGING THE SALE OF INNOVATIVE
PRODUCTS THAT ARE AFFORDABLE BY AS MANY
PEOPLE AS POSSIBLE
is the average customer rating for our innovative
products.
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
ISSUES RELATING TO PRODUCTION FROM THE RAW MATERIALS
STAGE THROUGH TO PRODUCT MANUFACTURE
65%
18.2%
HELPING OUR SUPPLIERS TO IMPROVE
WORKING CONDITIONS IN OUR SUPPLY CHAIN
of tier 1 suppliers rated ABC.
DEVELOPING RESPONSIBLE SOURCING FOR
CERTAIN “SENSITIVE” RAW MATERIALS
of cotton products are made using environmentally-friendly cotton.
85%
31%
REDUCING POLLUTION EMITTED DURING
PRODUCTION, AND PRIORITISING THE
MONITORING OF WATER QUALITY
of suppliers concerned comply with Decathlon’s
standards.
DEVELOPING LOCAL SOURCING OF
COMPONENTS AND PRODUCTS
of Decathlon brand products for each area are
made with locally manufactured products (in
terms of turnover).
ISSUES RELATING TO THE TRANSPORTATION, STORING AND
DISTRIBUTION OF OUR PRODUCTS
35
35
BUILDING OUR SITES FOR A SUSTAINABLE
FUTURE (STORES)
accredited stores.
145.5
14
45 5
REDUCING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND
IMPROVING THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF OUR
SITES (STORES)
is the average energy consumption of our stores.
3353
53
REDUCING GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS
RESULTING FROM PRODUCT TRANSPORTATION
per item delivered in Europe (transportation
from production country to store).
KWH / M2 / YEAR
G OF CO2
5
71.2
KWH / M2 / YEAR
BUILDING OUR SITES FOR A SUSTAINABLE
FUTURE (WAREHOUSES)
accredited warehouses.
REDUCING ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND
IMPROVING THE ENERGY EFFICIENCY OF OUR
SITES (WAREHOUSES)
is the average energy consumption of our
warehouses.
ISSUES RELATING TO THE USAGE AND END-OF-LIFE OF OUR PRODUCTS
4.15/5
15/5
MAINTAINING LONG-TERM CUSTOMER
SATISFACTION
is the average customer rating for our products.
10.3%
BUILDING IN PRODUCT RECOVERY RIGHT FROM
THE DESIGN STAGE, TO ENCOURAGE RECYCLING
of products sold are eco-designed
(in terms of quantity).
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 13
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Liberating energy
Decathlon is re-focusing on the basics by giving all of its employees both freedom and responsibility.
Centred on their enjoyment and motivation at work, the idea is to develop their skills to help create value
and improve satisfaction for the end client.
BECOMING OURSELVES AGAIN
Over the years, hierarchies have been set up, frustrations have sometimes rooted themselves and
well-being in the workplace has sometimes suffered.
Liberating Decathlon, a drive spearheaded by Michel Aballea and his team, enables each employee to take
responsibility for their own area of activity. Each employee makes decisions whilst being finely attuned
to the consequences of these. It is important that employees trust each other whilst acting within a global
framework. In 2014, a large number of events and conferences were organised internally to enable each
and every employee to understand and implement these managerial changes.
“
I found the day both enriching and energising. This makes it all the more satisfying to work
at Decathlon; I appreciate the ambitiousness of its project, the diversity of its employees,
its ability to adapt and to put plans in motion. At first I found the analysis exercises a bit
repetitive, but the diversity of the projects helped me to understand that there’s something
for everyone there, and that it’s our job now to expand at our own pace, in line with our
own needs and beliefs.”
— Sébastien
The company’s values are upheld by its employees.
A DIFFERENT WAY OF WORKING
Happiness at work, personal fulfilment and self-expression: these are just some of the alternative ways
in which the business helps its employees to develop. We no longer organise our operations around a
specific business department; instead we focus on developing our skills. Coaches support and train
employees, helping them to boost their levels of competence. Well-being at work becomes the condition
for developing ground ripe for innovation. Happiness is very much in the interests of performance.
14 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Understanding climate issues
Our greenhouse gas assessment is a snapshot at a given point in time of the GHG emissions generated by
each of Decathlon’s activities. Updated and published every year, it is used to identify the main sources of
GHG emissions, to measure the effectiveness of emission reduction programmes, and to raise awareness.
BREAKDOWN :
BREAKDOWN OF CO2 EMISSIONS IN 2014
Product production = 67%
Customer travel = 17%
Site construction and operation = 7%
Product transportation = 6%
Employee travel = 3%
RÉSULT:
4,519,000 tonnes de CO2 were generated in 20142 .
We use two indicators to manage our performance, in line with the peaks and troughs of Decathlon’s
activity:
• GHG emissions per products sold: + 0,3% compared with 2013.
• GHG emissions by revenue: + 6% compared with 2013.
Efforts by our teams on the ground have limited the extent of these falling standards:
• Our sites have become more energy efficient.
• The goods flow and use of air transport for products going to Europe have been optimised.
However, it is vital we remain vigilant with regard to:
• Waste recycling in stores. Overall, this has fallen, despite the efforts of certain countries.
• Product eco-design. The rate is flattening out, as teams are currently working on environmental
labelling.
“
Our ambition is to set a common target by means of an improvement goal, shared with all
teams within the business.”
— Émilie Aubry, GHG assessment manager for Decathlon.
2. The scope of this survey extends to all Decathlon stores, warehouses,
offices (international head office, brand sites, production offices, etc.),
as well as product transportation from production countries to stores,
and employee and customer travel.
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 15
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Interview with Émilie Aubry and Romain Poivet
Interview with Emilie Aubry, manager of Decathlon’s GHG Emissions project,
and Romain Poivet, an expert in GHG Emission Assessment methods for ADEME.
Why produce a GHG emissions assessment?
Romain: Human activity is largely responsible for climate change. Given this
situation, businesses can conduct greenhouse gas emission assessments in
order to gain an understanding of their impact on the climate, as well as to
evaluate their dependence on fossil fuels (oil, natural gas, coal, etc.) with a
view to reducing their emissions
What are the key GHG issues for mass retail?
Romain: The same as those highlighted by your GHG emissions assessment:
products, with raw materials and manufacturing, logistics, and customer
travel. These results should be viewed in the context of those for the food
retail sector, which has more challenges in terms of keeping products chilled.
How are teams involved?
Emilie: Employees play a pivotal role! Firstly, a comprehensive network of
leaders provides the data required for the calculations. Then, the overall
Group assessment is broken down into individual assessments by activity or
geographical area. This information is communicated to managers, who can
then merge it with their own specific data in order to introduce appropriate
action plans. We are currently working on an IT tool designed to make it
easier to collect data and communicate results.
And how do we get the customer interested in these results?
Romain: We need to convert the information available at Group level into
information that directly concerns the customer. For example, by giving
them data about the product’s CO2 “cost”, Decathlon is enabling customers
to decide between different products that can help them reduce their
carbon footprint when playing sport.
Emilie: This is what we hope to do with our environmental labelling efforts.
The information on products’ environmental performances will be instantly
visible to customers on signage both in store and online.
What is Decathlon hoping to achieve in this area?
Emilie: Statistics are not an end in themselves. For the time being, we use
two indicators to measure our GHG emissions in line with our activity. Our
ambition is to set a common target by means of an improvement goal,
shared with all teams within the business.
To eventually be able to create an overall environmental performance
indicator, we will need to combine other criteria such as water and soil
pollution, or resources depletion. We’re working on it!
16 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
ADAPTING TO CLIMATE CHANGE:
We’re carefully monitoring the work of the GIEC3,
and have communicated upwards our need for a
methodology that can help research and innovation
by the European Union so that we can better
understand this issue. Decathlon is also a member
of the working group OEF, which aims to define
a methodology for calculating business’ overall
environmental performance.
OUR MAIN ACTION LEVERS
• For our products:
eco-design and suppliers’ environmental processes.
• For our buildings:
eco-designed buildings, improving energy efficiency,
recycling and waste reclamation.
• For transporting our products: optimising sourcing procedures, use of multimodal transport and maximisation of lorry
loads.
3. Intergovernmental group of climate change experts.
More information: https://www.ipcc.ch/
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 17
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Decathlon Foundation
The Foundation shares the values of Decathlon’s purpose. Since 2005, it has been helping employees who
want to get involved in sport-based social inclusion projects.
For 10 years, the Foundation has helped 435 employees get involved in 257 projects designed to
benefit more than 130,000 people in 21 countries4.
THE FOUNDATION IS CHANGING!
The Decathlon Foundation currently operates with a board of directors and a team in France that works
in tandem with several country-based representatives. Decathlon is keen for countries to be autonomous
and to select and approve their own projects.
Local Foundation Teams are being formed so as to facilitate employee initiatives and project monitoring.
In 2015, China, India, Brazil, Spain and Italy will be in a position to function autonomously.
SPORT AND INCLUSION
The ultimate aim of the Foundation’s work is to enable disadvantaged people to access education, training
and employment.
Former beneficiaries of projects supported by the Foundation have had the opportunity to do work
experience placements, with some going on to become Decathlon employees.
The Sport in the City project: Lyon and Paris.
The Decathlon Foundation has been supporting the Sport in the City association for a number of years in Lyon and more recently in the Paris
region. By building new football grounds in the inner Parisian suburbs, Decathlon is hoping to create solid links between its stores and Sport in
the City centres.
The Sport in the City project dovetails perfectly with the aim currently supported by the Foundation,
namely to use sport as a vector for educational and professional integration by involving our stores, our
warehouses and our services to offer professional opportunities to young people who are passionate
about and motivated by sport. The project approved in October 2014 has already given two youngsters
the chance to work in regional stores.
4. i.e. 38 projects were approved in 2014, supporting 19,918 beneficiaries in 11 countries.
18 / CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
In Lyon, the project implemented 10 years ago enabled three youngsters to obtain an employment contract
in the Part-Dieu and Bron stores. Numerous tours of the business are held with the aim of introducing
youngsters to the world of professional employment.
NUMBER OF PROJECTS CARRIED OUT
OVER THE LAST 10 YEARS
Europe Zone = 208
Africa Zone = 15
Asia Zone = 15
India Zone = 11
America Zone = 7
Russia Zone = 1
The French project “More for roms”, approved in 2012, has seen various beneficiaries hired on fixed term contracts.
The Chinese project “Another possibility of life”, approved in 2014, helps those disadvantaged in society.
The first British project approved in 2014, “Street league” focuses
on introducing British youngsters to the world of employment.
The 2012 Indian Project “Reality gives football programme” has
enabled young Indian children to break down social barriers.
CHALLENGES AND MANAGEMENT / 19
PRODUCTS
AND SERVICES
20 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Innovation Lovers
Innovation is clearly stated in Decathlon’s purpose: “Innovation lovers, for the happiness of people”. We
innovate in order to make sport more accessible to as many people as possible, by means of ingenious,
attractive products sold at a competitive price.
From the product design stage through to visiting our stores and websites, all employees share one
common objective: to offer our sports customers a different experience
“
The principle idea is to innovate in a sustainable and systematic manner.”
— Vincent Ventenat - Director of innovation
THE ADVENTURE STARTS
WITH UNIVERSAL EMPLOYEE COMMITMENT:
Decathlon maintains a culture of innovation, a fertile ground for encouraging people to take risks, even if it
means making mistakes. The teams responsible for product design are primarily the ones benefitting from
this mind-set, but it involves all other departments within the business too. As innovation is more than just
a process, we give our employees the freedom to be bold and creative, in order to find solutions that will
become the services and products of the future.
The way in which teams are organised into project mode is reviewed
to enable a more cross-disciplinary approach and encourage dialogue
between departments.
Project coordination and management methods are also reviewed in order to develop team's autonomy
in decision-making, with a more collaborative working model. For example, Actireo shoes by the Newfeel
brand were developed in 9.5 months compared with the 18 needed for the standard model. This efficiency
is largely due to the greater flexibility of teams when it comes to finding solutions. More autonomous, employees discover a sense of responsibility and develop their skills, thereby increasing value added in their
day-to-day work.
To derive maximum benefit from the numerous workshops5 organised, an internal tool
(Keep It) has been developed to store areas
for discussion and their outcomes, year after
year. This enables us to capitalise on ideas
and share them among our teams.
5. Brainstorming workshops designed to bring forth ideas about new products/services or developments.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 21
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Brand Innovation Managers for some of our Passion brands are working hard to breathe life into this
environmental project.
“
Every day is a new chapter in a unique adventure”
— Sylvain Venant.
We chat to Sylvain Venant,
Brand Innovation Manager at B’TWIN.
What is the role of the Brand Innovation Manager?
The BIM instils, supports and cultivates a culture of innovation. A visionary, the
BIM poses questions, provides explanations and leads their brand’s differentiation
strategies. The BIM is also a manager "on the ground", who helps teams to adopt the
necessary methods, skills and collaborative practices to improve and ensure that
projects succeed.
How do you see innovation at B’Twin in 10 years’ time?
It's important to take a big step backwards in order to identify the downward price
levers right across the value chain: how we design, produce, source, communicate,
sell and purchase... right through to after-sales service and recycling.
Innovation will be even more collaborative in nature (both internally, and with the external environment),
designed and fine-tuned with a 360° approach, placing the customer-user at the heart of the process.
We must now step up our efforts to ensure that all employees can be creative and innovate within the
business, regardless of the department they work in. This ambitious objective is our way of promoting the
optimum well-being of all our teams worldwide and ensuring that they take pride in their work.
The Decathlon Innovation Awards
Every year since 2005, Decathlon has showcased
its expertise at its own Innovation Awards. This
event is as much an opportunity to introduce
ground-breaking new products and services to
our customers and partners as an in-house competition that brings our teams closer together.
It's an evening when the most innovative products - whether by their usage, technology or
spin-off usage – are introduced, with the winning
entries voted for by customers and employees.
Don’t miss this year’s event on 8 October 2015!
22 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
INNOVATION: A RESPONSE TO SOCIETY’S CHALLENGES
Our management methods are geared towards the assumption of
responsibility. Such employee autonomy has seen the birth of new brands
and product modifications inspired by sustainable development issues.
Each brand is free to choose its own projects depending on its policy, its
market, the economic context and whether it's the right time to be doing it.
4,06/5
is the average6 rating
awarded by our customers
for our innovative products.
GALLERY OF INNOVATIVE PRODUCTS
ARPENAZ 10 BACKPACK: AN ENVIRONMENTALLY-FRIENDLY INNOVATION
Following a workshop, the manufacturing process for the Arpenaz 10 backpack was
revamped to comprise one single seam, thereby reducing the amount of material
used, decreasing production time, increasing the number of backpacks that could be
transported in the lorries, and making the end product cheaper.
▶ Video
with the designer of the Arpenaz 10 backpack:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZJPIm6I9wug&feature=youtu.be
THE MYBIKE: DESIGNED AND MANUFACTURED IN INDIA FOR INDIAN PEOPLE
The teams in India have developed (with basic technical support from
B’Twin’s teams) bikes suited to the needs and means of the Indian
population. These bikes are 40% cheaper than the models sold previously.
THE CAPERLAN SINKER: LEAD-FREE FISHING FOR THE ENVIRONMENT
This ground-breaking, lead-free-certified product reached the finals at the 2014
Innovation Awards.
▶ Video
Lead-free fishing: a new strategy from Caperlan
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JkFPBoC2Q8k
T H E
S P O R T
I D E A
B O X
And what if we turned your ideas into reality?
Who better than a sportsperson to know what they need to improve
their performance? We know that anyone who loves sport has opinions
and ideas to share. That's why we've invited to them to help us design
the sports products of tomorrow on decathloncreation.com. The aim of
this platform is to convert ingenious ideas and suggestions submitted
by community members into actual sports products that are both
innovative and affordable.
6. Out of 13 970 ratings collected in 2014 on these products.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 23
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Eco-design
PRODUCT LIFECYCLES AND IMPACT REDUCTION
Efforts to reduce environmental impact starts as soon as we begin the product design stage.
Analysing lifecycle enables us to assess the product’s environmental impact. We can use it to
identify the challenges facing us as well as levers
to achieve these and to reduce product-related
impacts.
CLIMATE CHANGE
Long-term changes in the global climate
caused by rising greenhouse gas levels.
WATER CONSUMPTION
The various product-related impacts.
Total water consumption contributing to the
depletion of water resources.
WATER POLLUTION
Physical, chemical and biological
deterioration of water quality.
CLIMATE CHANGE
Depletion of both renewable and
non-renewable natural resources.
24 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
UNDERSTANDING THE IMPACTS ASSOCIATED WITH OUR PRODUCT,
USING THE EXAMPLE OF A T-SHIRT:
The lifecycle provides a good overall way of looking at a product's various impacts on the environment.
Applying more in-depth analysis, conduct a stage-by-stage review of the environmental consequences for
a product like a T-shirt7.
LIFECYCLE IMPACTS OF A T-SHIRT
Production = 33%
Raw materials = 27%
Usage = 19%
Distribution (customer travel) = 12%
Transport = 7%
End of life = 2%
The biggest impacts are generated by raw materials and production. In the case of a T-shirt, such impacts
are linked to water consumption and pollution occurring during these stages. This is why teams use
recycled materials as well as new dyeing processes. Furthermore, a T shirt's recycling potential and second
life possibilities reduce the impacts associated with this product’s end-of-life.
On average, one T-shirt produces 7.2 kg CO2, the equivalent impact of a light bulb burning for
150 hours8.
OTHER EXAMPLES OF ECO-DESIGNED PRODUCTS
ATHLETEE T-SHIRT
REF : 8297656
Made from
100% organic cotton.
MC ELIOFEEL T-SHIRT
REF : 8240455
The main component
is made from 80%
recycled fibres.
BIDARTE PALM
REF : 8333507
Available in various colours.
Its main component is made entirely from recycled materials
GROWTH CURVE FOR ECO-DESIGNED
PASSION PRODUCT SALES
(IN QUANTITIES SOLD)
The level of eco-designed products is flattening out, as
teams are currently working on environmental labelling.
7.2%
2010
9.4%
10% 10.5% 10.3%
2011
2012
2013
2014
7. Survey carried out by our research department as part of our environmental labelling project for a cotton T-shirt.
8 . ADEME, 2011.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 25
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
“
Eco-design is part of Quechua’s DNA,
and it’s important to maintain this identity”
— Benjamin Lafoux.
Profile for Benjamin Lafoux
Product engineer at Quechua since 2004 and environment manager since 2012
In practical terms, what are your missions as environment manager?
Basically to give value to the environmental dimension, to reverse the trend
of recent years in which the environment has been seen solely as an expense.
Eco-design is part of Quechua’s DNA, and it’s important to maintain this identity.
The manager is involved in the writing of all joint projects. A huge strategic
coordination effort between the various departments is required in order to ensure
that the environment is properly taken into account, as each person has their own
responsibility at their own level. I am there to pass on good practices, introduce
new components and relay the group's key projects such as the carbon balance
assessment or environmental labelling. When I conduct our environmental review
at the end of the year, we'll be able to determine action levers and understand
which products we need to concentrate on in order to reduce our impact.
How is your network organised?
There are more than thirty environment managers across the design and
production departments. The sustainable development department organises
meetings between all the managers. It’s an opportunity for us to discuss ecocomponents, eco-design and project progress, and to focus on other initiatives. We
are all interconnected so that we have a solid network stretching from production
through to our stores.
55%
A flagship product: the Quickhiker tent
The materials used in the Quickhiker Ultralight have been reviewed
so as to reduce their environmental impact and increase their durability.
The use of a 65% recycled polyester fabric, a lightweight component
made from recycled plastic bottles (see choosing the right product
components section), has enabled us to improve both our technical
and environmental performance. Our tents are sold with a kit that means
anyone can repair a broken pole. The entire product is also repairable
in store.
9. Out of a total of 294 engineers.
26 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
of product engineers
at Decathlon have been
trained to use our tool
so that they can conduct
an environmental
assessment9.
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT:
RAISING AWARENESS AND MOBILISING EMPLOYEES
Passion magazine, our in-house publication available in all countries, devotes one of its chapters to our
efforts in sustainable development. 2014 was also the first year that the group compiled its first report for
employees.
The Green Awards are an important occasion in the sustainable development calendar, rewarding the
best sustainable development initiatives. This year’s event saw two packaging projects, a logistics and
property project in Russia and a customer input event dedicated exclusively to sustainable development:
the Gr’In Day.
GREEN AWARDS CEREMONY
First place: a project to reduce boxes used for B’Twin bikes. Smaller boxes for lorries, meaning warehouses can store more.
Third place: development work on clothes hangers, pre-hanging
garments in production and recycling to generate less CO2.
Award winners with their trophies.
Second place: the joint property and logistics project in Russia.
Jury’s special prize: the customer input event by Aulnoy les Valenciennes dedicated to sustainable development.
Employees attending the event, applauding the winners.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 27
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Environmental labelling
Environmental labelling is a large-scale project that our teams have been working on since 2009. Its aim is
to give customers the keys enabling them to apply an environmental criterion when making a purchase.
The rating on a particular product (going from A
to E) is designed to inform our customers about
its environmental performance, making it possible to compare products sharing the same
typology.
Our aim is to ensure
From 2014, pictograms in store will be used to distinguish products
designed with environmental concerns in mind.
In December 2014, environmental impacts were calculated for
49% of Decathlon's Passion products; in other words, over 1,900
products10. Their rating is yet to be determined.
100%
that all our Passion brand
products have an environmental rating in 2016.
ECO-DESIGN ONLINE!
Some Passion brands offer an “eco-design” sorting filter on their online retail website, to help customers
find the products with the smallest environmental impact.
http://www.domyos.fr/
http://www.quechua.fr/
Example of Quechua’s online rating system.
10. Passion products are assessed and then awarded an environmental rating.
28 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CREATING A POSITIVE DYNAMIC WITH OUR STAKEHOLDERS
Decathlon collaborates with a large number of stakeholders. We place our customers at the very heart
of our focus. We take their expectations and opinions into account. We have conducted three surveys
amongst our customers, which have enabled us to fine-tune our labelling. Pioneers in this subject, we have
implemented11 a discussion platform on environmental labelling for consumer products (ADEME/Afnor)12.
We are working on defining methods for assessing the environmental impact of products, and on creating
labelling formats. Devising an accounting method is a complex issue, as is fixing a scoring framework,
which is why Decathlon is also working with the European Commission on the textile PEF platform13.
Generally speaking, we adopt an open-minded approach with public authorities, associations
and other businesses when it comes to sharing information, and standardising and converging our
methods.
Choosing the right product components
When Decathlon designs products, choosing which components to use is a key stage. The teams are
committed to designing reliable products that incorporate innovative materials that reduce the impact on
the environment.
REDUCE THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF PRODUCTS
ORGANIC COTTON
In 2014, Decathlon excelled itself by becoming one of the top 5 businesses in the world using organic
cotton. Domyos and Quechua are the leading consumer brands at Decathlon, a company that uses 4,271
tonnes of organic cotton were used last year, 613 tonnes more than in 201314.
Using organic cotton helps to preserve the soil
and water resources and encourages biodiversity, as
it is grown without using either chemical fertilisers
or pesticides.
11. In France.
12. ADEME coordinates a methodological platform operated by AFRNOR, which is compiling a “Good practices Guide” as well as ratings for
different product categories.
13. Decathlon is taking part in the European environmental labelling experiment PEF (Product Environmental Footprint), to define a common
method of calculating multicriteria environmental footprints for products. Decathlon is a member of the technical secretariat for textiles, the aim
of which is to define assessments methods, test environmental labelling visuals and define rating classifications for this product category.
14. For 2014: the indicator is calculated by taking the tonnage of organic cotton, BCI cotton and recycled cotton. The proportion of BCI cotton
and recycled cotton are currently still fairly insignificant.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 29
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
RECYCLED POLYESTER
Our flagship product made from recycled polyester, Quechua’s Forclaz 50 fleece, continues to be popular
among customers (men, women and children). We’re looking to adopt an even more innovative stance
towards this mass-produced product by switching from a recycled fibre with a 65% recycled bottle content
to a fibre made entirely from recycled bottles by 2016.
COLOURING WITHOUT DYEING
Colouring without resorting to the use of dyes is nothing new. At Decathlon we're innovating - by mixing
a coloured fibre with a neutral fibre. With no need for water, production times are shorter, the fabric is
stronger and the cost is cheaper. These textiles will be in store from the 2016 Spring/Summer season
onwards, used in our Quechua tents.
One square metre of fabric uses 75% less water. This will save 130 million tonnes of water, equivalent
to 44 Olympic swimming pools! That’s a lot of water that's not going to be polluted or wasted.
The spool of thread is solution-dyed without using water.
ENSURING USER HEALTH AND SAFETY
Our suppliers agree to respect our list of prohibited substances15.
We don’t just take into account country-regulated substances but also impose thresholds for
substances that we consider to be hazardous to our customers.
EXAMPLES OF SUBSTANCES THAT WE HAVE PROHIBITED:
Residual isocyanates that can cause allergies. Also, since 2008,
we have prohibited the use of phthalates16 in all our products,
not just in toys as stipulated by pre-2015 regulations.
To ensure that all our products comply with our standards, all products from
all of our suppliers are subjected to tests17 at various points during their
lifecycle: during the design phase or production stage, and even in store.
6,717
products tested in
2014, i.e. 26% more
than in 2013.
15. Substances regulated in all distribution countries, as well as the substances that we have prohibited.
16. 10 phtalates.
17. As well as tests conducted by our suppliers, tests are also carried out by Decathlon on these products.
30 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Since 2010, Decathlon has been giving its suppliers pre-implementation training in chemical risk
management in order to safeguard employee health. The aim is to enable them to act autonomously
in terms of chemical risk management. The dedicated team remains on hand to assist with any needs
and to help ensure compliance with standards; we are creating tools specific to their requirements.
Stricter controls are carried out on products considered to be more sensitive (those aimed at children
under 3, toys and products that come into contact with food, etc)18.
We’re working impartially, objectively and honestly.
Besa
Environmental health engineer, answers questions on chemicals asked by customers.
What do your missions involve?
My job was created to respond effectively and quickly to customer queries
about our products. Customers contact us in store, via our Customer Relations
Centre, by telephone, by email19 or by comments made online on the Decathlon
website. I respond to all of their questions about how our products are made and
how they comply with the various regulations. I also deal with any adverse skin
reactions associated with product use. My job is also to satisfy the requirements of
governmental bodies20 and consumer associations.
What sort of relationship do you have with our customers?
Our priority is to be able to guarantee their safety; we take any feedback extremely
seriously. We analyse all elements of information that we have in order to establish
whether there is any link between the product and the reaction.
I make every effort to contact the customer within 3 days21. Similarly, we are
committed to providing the customer with a final response within 45 days22, now
we’ve reduced this to within 40 days, which includes the following stages:
- receiving the customer’s product,
- conducting tests,
- producing analysis results,
- communicating our conclusions to the customer.
If necessary, we contact the customer’s doctor or we may suggest they visit a
specialist.
It is rare for a product to be in dispute, but should there be a risk for our customers,
production is halted and the products destroyed.
18. In 2014: over 97% of products tested complied with our standards.
19. [email protected]
20. DGCCRF: commission for consumption, competition and fraud control.
21. Indicator implemented during the period from June to December 2014.
22. This time limit was calculated by using that determined by REACH regulation (CE) N° 1907/2006 of 18 December 2006
concerning the recording, assessment and authorisation of chemicals.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 31
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION
AND CONTINUOUS IMPROVEMENT
From designing our products through to selling them, Decathlon focuses on delivering long-term customer
satisfaction. The quality of our products and services is an on-going requirement, with user safety a
prerequisite.
QUALITY: A CROSS-FUNCTIONAL PROCESS
As we are the product designer, and because of our regular visits to our subcontractors, we are in a position
to continuously improve the quality of our brands’ products. It is an essential requirement, and one that
we try to foster at various stages of the product lifecycle:
DURING THE DESIGN PROCESS
At each of our Passion brands, one or more quality managers are entrusted with monitoring the products.
Their primary aim is to supervise user safety. They help to develop the product, determine the use that the
product is designed to fulfil (depending on, for example, playing conditions and frequency, ability level,
etc.). Once at this stage, they analyse the product to detect potential weaknesses and resolve them. Tests
are then carried out in the field or in the lab in order to check durability, and the degree to which the
product's technical performance corresponds with its intended usage.
“
Our role is to support teams through collaborative working. We work together: quality
managers, product engineers, method engineers, product managers, etc., to develop
a product in line with our customers’ usage requirements and any manufacturing
constraints. The most important consideration is our customers' safety and long-term
satisfaction.»
— Nicolas Lenglet, Domyos quality manager.
▶ Video
Decathlon // Hi-tech at low prices: product tested, quality guaranteed.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=akvSaCtUfVs
DURING PRODUCTION
Once the product specifications have been drawn up, it’s necessary to make sure that the manufacturing
process does not compromise on quality in any way. Our production teams control the quality of
items across the factory chains, and conduct tests to check whether objectives have been achieved.
Subcontractors are assisted and regularly assessed in these areas.
IN STORE AND ONLINE
Should a product on sale in store be faulty, there are several possible solutions designed to protect the
customer and ensure that fully compliant product replacements are available as quickly as possible:
withdrawal from sale, repair products returned to suppliers, products destroyed, recall campaign for
products sold. Decathlon implements the necessary teams and resources to ensure that the right corrective
action is taken. Quality representatives are appointed in each country and IT tools shared in order to speed
up response times and improve efficiency.
32 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CORRECTIVE ACTION PROCESSES
IN 201423
80% items returned to warehouses
10% items repaired in store
5% items destroyed in store
5% customer recall campaign in store
IN TERMS OF ITEMS SENT
BACK TO WAREHOUSES
50% were destroyed
25% items were repaired
25% were sent back to suppliers
It is important that our customers bring back or return their faulty
products in order to help us make quality improvements. Some will
be sent straight to our design teams for analysis and correction!
1,204 PPM
Passion Brand products
Returns rate (per million)
for Passion brand products
returned by customers
because they were faulty
or because the customer
was dissatisfied 24.
CUSTOMER SATISFACTION IS AT THE HEART OF
WHAT WE DO
Among the main sources of information that helps us understand how
our customers perceive our product quality are the ratings and comments
they post on our retail websites.
This source has been extremely valuable to us since 2008, enabling us to
measure their enthusiasm for our products. By analysing them in more
detail27, we were able to determine their definition of what quality was,
and identify the link that exists between opinions and satisfaction.
For our customers, a quality product is a product that caters effectively
for its usage and is durable over time.
4.14 /5
25
The average product
rating for our Passion
brand products. This
marks an improvement
on 2013’s figure (4,07/526)
as our brands have made
this subject their central
priority, in a bid to improve
customer satisfaction.
This definition confirms and strengthens our own convictions about
creating ingenious, long-lasting products.
23. Out of 180 corrective quality actions, i.e. 3 million items concerned (Decathlon brands and other international brands included) with regard to
over 800 million items sold in 2014.
24. Compared with 1,196 passion brand products in 2013, this increase can be explained by an increase in the number of certain products
returned by our customers.
25. Out of 229,290 ratings collected in 2014..
26. Out of 119,904 ratings collected in 2013.
27. Internal survey conducted from 2013 to 2014 involving 204 products (involving all Passion brands and manufacturing processes)
29,800 respondents, scope: France. We are working to extend this survey to a global audience.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 33
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Whatever the rating or comment, we use them to identify usage needs upstream, and to continually
develop our product range downstream, by discontinuing ranges that have left customers disappointed,
or by simply not renewing them.
By leaving ratings and comments on our websites, our customers are actively helping to improve
the quality of our products!
Comments are used to amplify ratings, to enable us to delve further into what makes customers satisfied
or disappointed with our products.
“
As a strong advocate of customer satisfaction, I use the comments left by customers to
continually improve the quality of our products. Once the average score dips below 3,
we draw up stricter action plans to bring the rating back up quickly.”
— Germain Provot, B’Twin’s quality manager.
ADVANCING THROUGH CAPITALISATION
For each problem encountered, teams note down the root
causes (poor usage classification, component-related issues,
design rules poorly applied, etc.).
This process of understanding is designed to improve our
standards so that we can capitalise on the causes
of non-quality and improve the quality of our products on
an on-going basis.
Repairing your products
Decathlon enables its customers to use the product for as long as they possibly can. The Passion brands
operate dedicated services designed to help everyone repair their product themselves, or have their
product repaired.
DOING IT YOURSELF
Repairing products rather than discarding or exchanging them helps us to reduce our environmental
impact. Geonaute has embarked on a big project with its customers to try and increase their post-purchase
satisfaction. Faults on electronic items are often complex issues to pinpoint, so the Passion brand has
introduced a web site (http://support.geonaute.com/en-GB) designed to help customers use their
products. This after-sales service initiative has seen a fall in the number of products thrown away, and with
improved product understanding, fewer product returns have been recorded.
Folding your scooter, fitting a brake and changing a
tyre: get some help with the basics with these videos
produced by Oxelo!
See you on Oxelo's YouTube channel!
34 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
▶ Video
https://www.youtube.com/user/oxelo
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Domyos has also developed a tool to help customers solve their problems
remotely. The after-sales service website (http://sav.domyos.co.uk/) is
there for customers to use autonomously. Should they fail to solve their
problem, they can opt to be called by a technician. The technician can
resolve faults remotely, send spare parts and even organise a replacement
to be shipped to the customer’s home address.
In France
54%
of solutions are found
remotely.
The Domyos website is available in 18 languages, with remote problem solving available – with
support from a technician possible in 6 countries28.
Domyos is currently working with the Workshop to roll out technical support to even more countries.
GETTING YOUR PRODUCTS REPAIRED
IN THE WORKSHOP
Located in our Decathlon stores, Workshops can repair products,
maintain and service them, and even customise them.
How repairable an item is depends on three elements:
• component availability,
• the machines and tools required to carry out the necessary
work,
• the technicians’ methods and expertise
In 2014, 88% of customers recommended the Workshop.
▶ Video
https://youtu.be/UtBLstpKYds
“
In 2014, 3 million customers worldwide used our
Workshops to have their equipment serviced or
repaired. They awarded them an average score of
4.27/5”.
Our Workshop technicians place
customers at the very heart of their strategy,
responding to 100% of all comments posted.
— Axel Amblard - Workshop services manager
The Workshops are committed to our sustainable development drive:
• by supplying our second-hand items sector: trocathlon.fr
• by recycling used components.
Our repair and maintenance work
means that our customers don't have to stop
practicing sport.
28. France, Spain, Italy, Belgium, Portugal and China
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 35
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Customer input events
Decathlon doesn’t just sell sports items. We also organise regular customer input events in our stores.
These events invite our customers to come and join in or discover various sporting activities. They’re fun,
friendly occasions for all ages.
Two new events made an appearance in 2014: team sports day and combat sports day.
622 customer input events were organised in 2014, i.e. 108 fewer than in 2013. More stores took part
but they organised fewer events. 190 French stores took part in 2014, compared with 205 in 2013.
INTERNATIONAL EVENTS
Decathlon Neelambur in India organised its first ever Vital
Sport event. This day saw employees, customers and
sporting associations get together to discover a range of
new sports. It was also an opportunity to strengthen ties
between Decathlon and local sporting associations.
“
We would like to thank you for organising this Vital Sport event in Coimbatore. It’s given
us a chance to run some introductory boxing sessions. Children and adults were all very
interested in our sport. We also enjoyed being able to learn about other sports. We hope
that Decathlon organises this type of event again.”
— Kovai Boxing Academy (India).
Photos of the Vital Sport
day in India
36 / PRODUCTS AND SERVICES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CHANGES AT TROCATHLON
The Trocathlon, an event that our stores have run for 29 years, is implementing some developments
in response to the changing needs of our customers. After surveying its customers, Decathlon
France is now hoping to meet their expectations by offering a new service: trocathlon.fr
(https://www.trocathlon.fr/). Now, customers in France can buy and sell second hand sports items online
whilst benefitting from Decathlon’s guarantees:
Decathlon teams are on hand to advise customers in stores across France, and to help them post
their adverts online.
This new service from Decathlon is expected to be rolled out in other countries from 2015 onwards.
The Trocathlon event takes place twice a year in Spain, Italy, Portugal, Germany, Belgium, Hungary,
Romania and Poland.
The products collected are checked
over before being sold.
We're there to help buyers and sellers
throughout the process.
PRODUCTS AND SERVICES / 37
ENJEUX ET
TRANSPORT
MANAGEMENT
AND STORES
38 / TRANSPOAND
ENJEUX ET MANAGEMENT
AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Managing our sites
IMPROVING OUR ENERGY CONSUMPTION MANAGEMENT.
Decathlon is implementing an international strategy to manage energy
in its stores. This global strategy operates at local level to ensure
optimum effectiveness. This means that the involvement of all our teams
worldwide is enabling us to improve the energy efficiency of our stores.
A strategy split into three phases:
- Promotion and communication. To get teams involved in managing
energy on their site, there’s the inspiring example of a Decathlon UK
employee, who set up a «Green Keepers» network. She rounded
up teams from the various UK stores and explained the benefits of
managing energy consumption properly. Making teams autonomous
is the first, essential step before moving on to the next phase.
9.21%
of our company-owned
retail space is certified,
i.e. 35 sites. This is more
than in 2013, with figures
of 6.47% and 24 sites
respectively29.
- Managing energy consumption in real time. Knowing your consumption in real time can help you
better manage performance. Decathlon Italy is gradually installing this new technology in all of its stores.
Employees will be warned when consumption hits peak levels and will be able to respond accordingly.
- Modernising our sites. When building new stores, we try – as far as possible – to do it with environmental
certification in mind. In the remainder of cases, we make technical improvements, such as in Germany,
where we swap to LEDs whenever we change our lighting.
MOUNTAIN STORE, AN HQE-CERTIFIED BUILDING
In November 2014, Quechua, Wed’ze and Simond, Decathlon’s mountain brands,
inaugurated their new international base camp in Passy, in the heart of the Mont Blanc
lowlands. The HQE label 30 was primarily concerned with the issue of landscape integration
(66% green spaces, green cycling and pedestrian link, etc.). The project had minimal
environmental impact too (noise levels, water management, 100% recycled site waste).
The building is extremely efficient from an energy point of view, with large triple-glazed
doors and windows, insulation and natural light. Recycling and construction material
selection were also key issues.
29. Figure revised at the end of the year.
30.HQE certification for stores means we can also reduce noise pollution during construction work.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 39
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
RENEWABLE ENERGIES
Decathlon Belgium continues to fit out its stores with photovoltaic panels. Five stores
have installed this technology, with the panels generating between 20 and 25% of a
store’s energy requirements.
Stores’ electricity consumption fell by 6%, i.e. 145.5 kWh/m² in 2014, and 157 kWh/m² in 2013. The figure
for warehouses also dropped, with consumption totalling 71.2 kWh/m² in 2014 and 80 kWh/m² in 2013..
The figures are confirmation of the initiatives implemented in stores and warehouses. Decathlon is
maintaining its goal of reducing energy consumption by 20% between 2012 and 2015
Decathlon teams are working to minimise and recycle waste generated by commercial activities. Boxes,
hangers and packaging are all types of waste processed by our stores and warehouses day in, day out.
Decathlon Belgium is working with the Walloon
government to create spaces reserved for car-sharing
schemes in its car parks: there were 100 spaces in 2014.
These spaces are a way to encourage the use of «soft»
methods of transport.
40 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
WASTE MANAGEMENT
Sorting waste in order to recycle it enables Decathlon to recover raw materials or give certain items a new
life. It’s an important stage in terms of reducing our environmental impact.
TYPES OF WASTE GENERATED BY OUR SITES
DECATHLON STORES, BRAND SITES, COMPANY-OWNED WAREHOUSES.
Recycled paper and cardboard = 48%
Mixed waste = 46 %
Recycled plastic = 3 %
Other (wood, metals, textiles, etc.) = 3 %
DECATHLON SPAIN SHOW THE WAY
In our Spanish stores, customers have to pay
for their shopping bags. It’s one of the country’s
main strategy thrusts in its bid to reduce the
number distributed. In 2014, this scheme
helped to finance Decathlon Spain’s sustainable
development initiatives. A huge beach clean-up
campaign was organised in October, to raise
awareness amongst customers and employees
alike. It was an opportunity to forge partnerships
with Spanish institutions such as the Ministry of
Sustainable Development.
Furthermore, Decathlon Spain has also
developed a global waste recycling strategy.
Employees in store are made aware of the
approach, with all recycling costs and methods
explained. Solutions are put forward for recycling
hangers, which are collected before being
re-used.
Decathlon Spain gets its employees
on board. Everyone is able to share his
or her good practices on a dedicated
intranet site.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 41
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
SPECIAL MENTION FOR DECATHLON BELGIUM
Decathlon Belgium has an effective waste recycling
programme, collecting 75% of its in-store waste. Whilst
the legislation governing these areas is stricter in Belgium,
our Belgian stores have performed extremely well. As well
as recycling plastics and cardboard, stores also collect
aerosols, inner tubes and metals.
WASTE RECYCLING RATES
Stores
Warehouses
46%
2014
56%
2013
88%
86%
2014
2013
Thanks to renewed efforts by teams, recycling rates in warehouses are extremely satisfactory. However,
recycling rates in stores fell last year. There was a drop in overall figures due to a sharp decline in recycling
rates in French stores
Our certified warehouse in Betonka (Russia) tops the rankings, recycling 98% of its waste.
ENABLING OUR CUSTOMERS TO RECYCLE
At the entrance to our stores are several containers for
collecting used batteries and electric and electronic waste.
Decathlon then makes sure they are sent to the right
processing site so that they can be recycled correctly.
In France, the Triman signage system is a visual
reference point notifying consumers that a
particular product (including the packaging)
contains specific instructions as regards its
recycling.
42 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Storage and transportation
Storing and transporting our products are important aspects of our business growth. 2013 saw three key
strategies designed to bring down CO2 emissions resulting from this activity. A year on, we can see that
these efforts have been sustained, adapting in line with the latest standards, needs and ambitions.
DEVELOPING OUR NETWORK OF WAREHOUSES
Our warehouses are located at strategic points so that deliveries can be made to our stores within optimum
timeframes. Our teams work tirelessly to reduce the distance our products have to travel.
RUSSIA ADAPTS ITS LOGISTICS NETWORK TO ITS GEOGRAPHY
Russia: 7 time zones and nearly 1,000km between its Moscow
distribution platform and its Decathlon stores. A collaborative
project involving distribution, logistics and property has made
it possible to implement a country-specific strategy. Regional
platforms have been opened close to the most far-flung stores.
Lorries travelling to regional platforms are loaded to capacity,
which means that our products are covering less distance.
In Russia in 2014, lorries travelled 1,000,000 fewer kilometres, saving 1,500 tonnes of CO2.
2
new warehouses certified in
2014: Rouvignies (France)31
and Betonka (Russia)32,
making 5 certifications
in total.
31. High Quality Environmental standard.
32. BREEAM.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 43
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
OPTIMISED BOXES;
FULLER LORRIES AND WAREHOUSES
We’re working on different areas:
• optimising boxes: an initiative undertaken by our design teams.
• filling lorries to capacity: aiming to ship full boxes as well as improving
lorry loading.
1,259
items shipped
per m² in 2014, that’s
an improvement on 2013
(1,165 items/m²)33.
• number of items in warehouses: we’re working on the number
of items shipped per m² with a view to boosting the number of items per m³, particularly through
optimising height wise storage.
OPTIMISING BOXES FOR OUR B’TWIN BIKES
How can we reduce the size of our bike boxes?
That’s the question that Decathlon teams are asking
themselves. So they’ve been working on a new way to
assemble bikes, which means using smaller, shorter
boxes that are therefore easier to handle. This can
only be positive for the environment, with boxes that
enable us to transport 50% more bikes in our lorries.
Locally, the Bouc Bel Air warehouse and the stores within its distribution zone have introduced
innovative developments in terms of lorry-loading height, with 40% more boxes per lorry now being
shipped. Stores have invested in lift trucks that can hold more boxes, and the logistics organisation
has been redesigned. This has enabled them to reduce the number of lorries on the roads.
+ 7.6%
The Saragossa warehouse
has increased its average
per lorry load factor from
49 to 52m3, a rise of 7.6%34.
Employees working in the Lompret warehouse.
33. At global level.
34. In average in 2014, the rate was 49.05m3 between key import warehouses and distribution warehouses, i.e. 12,504 items per lorry.
44 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
ALTERNATIVES TO ROAD TRANSPORT
Where infrastructure permits, major import warehouses are located on multi-modal platforms. In Europe,
11.5% of products are transported via train or barge35 .
For flows leaving Asia, we’ve been working with a sea transportation company committed to an
on-going programme of environmental improvements. One of its key moves was to invest in a fleet
of boats to reduce its fuel consumption; every year the company issues us with its environmental
performance results.
QUECHUA PRODUCTS TAKE THE TRANS-SIBERIAN
It’s not enough to eco-design a product. You also have
to be mindful of the means used to transport your items
from their manufacturing location to the distribution
zone. Quechua is keen to remain consistent with its aim
to reduce its environmental impacts. The brand has
therefore decided to use the Trans-Siberian linking Asia
with Russia for some of its Passion products: this option
is 7 times less impactful than air travel and twice as fast
as sea transport.
CHANGES IN
THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT
OF OUR PRODUCTS DELIVERED
TO STORES IN EUROPE
(in grams of CO2/item.))
323
232
Production countries to Europe.
Major import warehouses36 to distribution platforms.
Distribution platforms to stores37.
49
2014: TOTAL = 353
84
72
2013: TOTAL = 508
35. Post-shipment transport from the port to the key import warehouse, 3 out of 7 warehouses are located close to ports.
36. At European level.
37. At European level.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 45
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Stores and their community involvement
A Decathlon store acts as a continuous interface with its environment. A living space for employees and
customers, it plays a role in developing the local community in many ways. We invite you to explore the
various interactions between a store and its stakeholders, within the local direct impact area. A pilot project
is currently underway to identify and strengthen stores’ positive action levers across their communities, for
benefits that are shared by all those within them.
The store works in partnership with sports clubs
(special rates), helping them to improve their
facilities, thereby playing a part in extending sport
to more people. It doesn’t engage in any direct
sponsorship or make donations.
It can help people back into community life through sport, forging
a close relationship with local public bodies.
Waste recycling and reclamation is also managed at store level, depending
on the existing recycling facilities in the area.
The store must now develop its remit to raise customers’ awareness of the impact their purchases and
sports have on the environment.
Employees are recruited locally and paid according to a salary package defined by each country. Decathlon
enhances the employability of its employees, largely through its culture of accountability that sees them gain in
autonomy. Training is intrinsically linked to the responsibilities allocated early on in the role.
46 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
The store contributes to local government and council revenue (in the form of tax
revenue, apprenticeship tax, local and property taxes, etc.) and uses investment
to play a key role in the economic growth of its local area.
Located on the outskirts of towns and cities, the store should ideally be situated close
to public transport links so as to make it easy to get to.
The store can help people back
into community life through sport,
forging a close relationship with
local public bodies.
The store organises events such as Vitalsport, as well as
occasions like Foundation Day.
The store is keen to instil good, fair consumer practices and the lowest
possible prices, and encourages store loyalty (promotional offers, loyalty
schemes, personalised advice, etc.).
The store offers its customers a range of affordable, high quality products and services
(hi-tech/price ratio).
Employee health and safety are important issues for the business.
Store employees are in charge of managing energy consumption.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 47
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Guaranteeing safety
Decathlon considers personal safety as its primary responsibility, and one that can actually help enhance
the well being of our teams, as well as bring about business growth.
STORE AND WAREHOUSE SAFETY
Various tools (promotion, training, prevention, risk management, etc.) exist to ensure everyone’s safety.
Each country gives its employees health and safety training as soon as they join (via an e-learning platform
or other medium specially adapted by the country and its various sectors). An end-of-training questionnaire
is also used to check that each new arrival has gained the required understanding and skills.
WORKSTATIONS IN PRODUCTION FACILITIES
Working and discussion groups are held to enable
employees to help build their own workstations. Our
production facilities have invested in special machines
(such as ski maintenance equipment, etc.) that fulfil the
need to enhance the safety of employees operating cutting
and mechanical tools. In addition, movement and posture
training enables all employees to feel more comfortable in
the workplace and reduce the risk of accidents.
There is a health and safety representative in each store and warehouse at all times. The role of this
representative is to take safety-related decisions: secure building entries and exits, evacuation, customer
and employee assistance in the event of an incident, etc. Employees in this role receive prior training
(evacuation, first aid, first responders, etc.) studying both the theory and the required practical skills.
In April 2014, a customer from the Baden-Baden Decathlon store in Germany suffered a cardiac arrest. 5 sales assistants administered first
aid. According to the emergency services, this customer’s chance of survival would have been very small had they not intervened in this way.
48 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
KEY FOCUS FOR LOGISTICS SAFETY
Logistics teams work constantly to ensure the safety of employees, their work equipment and assets across
all of their warehouses from the day they open.
Safety is the focus of continuous improvement programmes, by means of exchanging good practices,
monitoring risk, controls and inspections (both internal and external), drills (evacuation, etc.), surveillance
and action plan monitoring. Internal controls are organised prior to the opening of any new operational
site and each time a new warehouse director is appointed.
Coordinating the logistics network relies on “black belts” working at country level39 or area level40 with
safety leaders in each warehouse, depending on their scope.
“
In the light of my career, my current experience as safety leader
for the Caen warehouse, and my natural interest in this field, I was
given the role of “black belt” for the France logistics network. This
mission involves passing on the basics for running a warehouse so
as to control risk, communicating changes to local regulations,
coordinating priorities and sharing good practices.”
— Xavier Malandain - safety leader for the Caen warehouse and “black
belt” for France.
“
Supporting our safety leaders in warehouses is an important role and
we have to show a keen interest in raising the skills of these leaders in
warehouses, enabling them to operate fully autonomously.”
— Cristina Gaitan Perez - safety leader for the El Prat (Barcelona)
warehouse and “black belt” for Spain.
Safety training sessions as well as on-site signage have been implemented worldwide
(left: Dourges, France / right: India)
Flows safety is a priority for warehouses;
pedestrian protection, natural lighting,
training in handling equipment and storage
quality, etc. (Caen, France).
38. Where we are owners.
39. France, Spain, China, Italy.
40. Portugal/UK/Germany, Poland/Hungary/Belgium, Brazil/Russia/India/Turkey/Singapore.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 49
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Promoting employee development
Innovation lovers, for the happiness of people: such is Decathlon’s purpose, a guiding light that inspires
our employees every day. At Decathlon, our employees are the first of our key success factors.
ATTRACTING SPORTS FANS AND TALENT!
Decathlon is growing and expanding internationally. To support this growth, we aim primarily to hire strong
personalities who channel our sporting values: team spirit, competitiveness, endurance and energy. These
criteria should enable us to inspire future employees to join Decathlon for the long haul.
We’re not looking for a typical profile; rather the ability to be autonomous and responsible, to predict and
plan ahead, to be open to people and to have natural leadership skills.
Store managers mainly recruit locally, thereby boosting employment within their area.
RECRUITMENT EXPERIENCE: WECHAT IN CHINA
WeChat is an extremely popular social network in China.
Decathlon China has therefore decided to use it as a
recruitment platform, by creating a public account.
Applicants can use it to find information about the
company and vacant positions. They can apply directly to
the one that appeals to them. It’s a great media concept
for both PC and smartphone, and one that
has sparked a certain amount of interest among the
younger generations.
50 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
INDIA GIVES A WARM WELCOME TO ITS NEW EMPLOYEES: WELCOME!
The Welcome project helps to make employee integration that bit easier, with friendly training videos that
instantly convey the atmosphere at Decathlon.
Steve Dykes, CEO of Decathlon India, welcomes
new employees through the use of visuals.
WINNING TEAM MEMBERS:
A KEY ELEMENT OF OUR PEOPLE STRATEGY.
Since 2002, all employees in the company who have held an employment contract for more than 3
months41 take part in the Winning Team Member survey.
This anonymous survey assesses employees’ well-being by looking at various themes such as commitment
to the business plan, the quality of management among their superiors, and their own career development.
Once the results have been analysed, Decathlon then knows which areas its employees are happy with, as
well as those where action plans can potentially be implemented on a local scale.
All teams in stores, warehouses and services receive a detailed set of results of the responses from their
field of activity, enabling them to then measure how far they have progressed and to set new priorities for
action.
2014 saw the best Winning Employee
survey participation rates ever
recorded, with 83% of forms completed
and returned by employees. Whilst
these results are clearly encouraging,
we will continue to promote this survey
in order to boost participant numbers to
maximum levels.
GIRL POWER!
Women account for
41%
41
%
of personnel
at Decathlon42, and 30%43
of managers44 are women.
41. Regardless of their contract, except for temporary or external employees.
42. As of 31/12/14, overall business level.
43. i.e. 3,209 women out of around 10,000 managers.
44. Person responsible for at least one employee in the hierarchy.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 51
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
FORMATION
In France, 30% of department managers are women, but only 17% are store managers. It
is this disappointing statistic that has led Decathlon France to create the “Leadership au
féminin” training initiative. This approach fulfils two key objectives:
- efforts to improve work/life balance
- supporting women in terms of career development, enabling them to flourish in their
professional life.
Since 2013, hundreds of female employees have taken this training course, after which
they have the opportunity to be supported by a dedicated HR manager..
Alongside this training scheme, Decathlon is also working hard to recruit female
employees, and to ensure that their salaries are fair.
▶ Video
Female leadership training
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_7dzBIddPZY
FINDING THE RIGHT WORK/LIFE BALANCE:
For several years now, a key part of Decathlon France’s efforts to manage working hours has been a focus
on work/life balance. Firstly, the business has encouraged all employees to share their thoughts via a
“satisfied employees” table. This information is then analysed by the line manager, who may or may not
issue a favourable response depending on their business activity. Employees can also share their feelings
about the way in which their work was scheduled over the past year.
At the same time, a specific mechanism known as “part-time balance” has been introduced for part-time
working mothers and fathers, designed to limit the range of working hours every week.
Lastly, managers whose hours are calculated on a day basis rather than hourly one can express their views
during personal reviews, commenting on the organisation, their workload and work/life balance.
An annual planning tool enables each employee to plan their coming year, so as to schedule in some
holiday and rest time.
The business agreement also reiterates the importance of playing sport
regularly, for greater employee well-being. Furthermore, a large number
of stores regularly organise sports activities after meetings.
Our diversity agreements also contain provision for other arrangements
(for senior employees, pregnant women, etc.).
We are keen to do more so that all of our employees are happy with
their hours they work and with the activities that make up their day. Our
primary aim is for all employees to be happy to come to work.
45. Compared with 64% in 2013, source: Winning Team Members survey, international level.
52 / TRANSPORT AND STORES
69%
of part-time employees are
“happy with the number of
hours they are contracted
to work”45.
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
HIRING DISABLED EMPLOYEES
In 2014, France’s disability mission celebrated its 15 year anniversary. 15 years of working with our dedicated
teams, in a network with external partners to help people with disabilities get back into work.
▶ Video
15 years of disability initiatives at Decathlon France
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0YAh4QyxfD0
A PARTNERSHIP EFFORT TO COMBAT DISCRIMINATION IN ITALY
Every Decathlon store in Italy has an agreement with local disabled sports organisations
to encourage the recruitment of people with disabilities. Working in conjunction with
town councils, some stores take on people in vulnerable situations, such as orphans
and refugees, as team members, as experience, to help them ease into the world of
employment.
PAY: PAYING A FAIR WAGE BY SHARING
THE VALUE CREATED BY EACH INDIVIDUAL.
Decathlon awards employees pay levels that are commensurate
with their performance. Wages are pegged in line with the local
market, comprising a personal, fixed amount relating to individual
responsibilities and a group-based amount linked to team performance.
11.32%
of the business’ capital
is owned by Decathlon
employees.
Over and above salaries, Decathlon is keen to encourage all its employees to adopt a healthy lifestyle
and play sport. For example, in most countries we operate in, we’re giving our employees a discount card
valid on all items sold in store, so as to help them purchase the equipment they need for their chosen
sport. We’re also thinking of our employees’ health, taking the necessary measures to ensure that health
insurance is specifically tailored to the country in question.
DECATHLON’S EMPLOYEE SHAREHOLDER SCHEME HAS ONE
AIM: TO ENABLE ALL EMPLOYEES TO BECOME SHAREHOLDERS.
Since 1988, we have been committed to ensuring that
every employee is able to invest in the company through
an employee savings scheme.
83.50%
of those eligible are
Decathlon shareholders46.
This scheme was operating in 20 countries in 2014,
following its successful introduction to employees in
India in November, 99% of whom wanted to become
shareholders as soon as it launched.
46. i.e. 32,860 employees worldwide.
TRANSPORT AND STORES / 53
RESPONSIBILITY
IN PRODUCTION
54 / RESPONSIBILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Working sustainably
with our subcontractors
Together with our sub-contractors, we share a desire to make our Passion Brand products the best possible
value for money. Our mutual working environment is based on:
• a relationship based on mutual respect.
• compliance with our current standards and legislation, for the safety of all concerned.
• attaining the highest possible quality standards.
• improving price competitiveness.
• building a reliable, high-powered supply chain.
• sharing and using mutual information systems.
• preserving the environment.
Our teams work tirelessly to ensure that our partners all make progress in these areas. Traditionally,
strategies designed to improve working conditions are the ones where our teams make most
headway. We are continuing such efforts whilst also making progress in terms of reducing pollution
generated by the manufacture of our Passion brand products.
1,338
905
employees
mpl
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ee
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on
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ing and
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and
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ith subcontractors.
subcontractors
22
producti
production
tiion
tion
n
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subcontractors
ctors
43
production
oduction
n
off
ffices
ices
9
Decathlo
Decathlon
lo
on
production
facilities.
RESPONSIBILITY IN PRODUCTION / 55
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
OUR PRODUCTION AREAS
Our production areas bring together the countries where Decathlon teams have a physical presence and
organise product manufacturing with subcontractors.
Africa production area: Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Madagascar.
America production area: Brazil.
North Asia production area: China, Taiwan, South Korea.
South-east Asia production area: Cambodia, Indonesia, Singapore, Thailand, Vietnam.
South-west Asia production area: Bangladesh, India, Sri Lanka.
Europe production area: France, Portugal, Italy, Turkey, Romania.
CEI47 production area: Russia.
BREAKDOWN OF VOLUMES
PURCHASED BY DECATHLON
(BY PRODUCTION AREA)
North Asia = 50.5 %
Europe = 18.6 %
South-east Asia = 14.2 %
South-west Asia = 11.4 %
Africa = 4.8 %
America = 0.5 %
CEI = 0.1 %
47. Commonwealth of Independent States.
56 / RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
AVERAGE LENGTH OF
SERVICE FOR SUPPLIERS
60%
(TOP 100 SUPPLIERS IN TERMS OF
VOLUMES PURCHASED
BY DECATHLON)
14%
Average: 8.5 years
16%
10%
0%
< 1 year
0%
1-3 years
3-5 years
5-10 years
10-20 years
> 20 years
INNOVATING BY INTRODUCING SUSTAINABLE PARTNERSHIPS
We’re keen to create an exclusive relationship with certain subcontractors,
based on a strongly shared mind-set that shares our vision and our
values. We make progress by working together, helping us to surmount
the day-to-day challenges inherent in what we do. By sharing common
objectives, interests and standards with them, our partners become
important players committed to our business plan. It helps us to view our
subcontractor relations in a new way; a change of mentality that’s good
for everyone involved.
9
partner
suppliers
pliers in 2014.
201
014.
01
4
With this strategy we’re hoping to manufacture 80% of our products with 100 partner suppliers.
THE IMPORTANCE OF PROXIMITY
We are keen to increase our instore product availability by reducing the distance between our clients and
our production sites. Heightened responsiveness to local markets and the demands of our customers
will enable us to reduce our packing, packaging and transportation costs, among other elements. This
strategy helps to minimise our environmental impacts and can generate indirect employment in countries
we operate in.
PROPORTION OF PRODUCTS
MANUFACTURED AND SOLD
LOCALLY
89.6%
29.8%
28%
21.3%
2.2%
Brazil
China
Europe
Russia
India
RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION / 57
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
ON-GOING IMPROVEMENT OF OUR MANUFACTURING PERFORMANCE
So that we can offer our customers the most value added, the lowest prices, the highest quality and
optimum timeframes, we have adopted a continuous improvement approach with both our teams and our
manufacturing partners. The idea is to develop of culture of minimising wastage and optimising resources
in a sustainable manner. By creating conditions whereby the subcontractors’ employees are involved in
optimising their own performance on an on-going basis, resources are naturally allocated to the value
added tasks. Since 2011, a dedicated team has been working to train all employees in this process and
provide on-the-ground support. It also helps manufacturing partners with their continuous improvement
drive. The majority of its efforts take the form of workshops, in real-life factory conditions.
Teams from Decathlon and the
subcontractor analyse factory flows together
and identify possible areas for improvement
(China). In addition, our design teams apply
good design-to-cost practices in order
to fine-tune products that dovetail perfectly
with the required usage, whilst optimising
the use of raw materials.
COMBATTING CORRUPTION
Due to its numerous sites worldwide and its wide
variety of business activities (product manufacturing,
transportation, trade, and building construction),
Decathlon needs to remain vigilant in order to sidestep
any risk of corruption. Over the last few years, we’ve
introduced contractual documents designed to ensure
that our employees, together with their suppliers and
service providers, apply and adhere to good business
practices. Decathlon’s various operational units all have
their own management systems specific to their area of
activity, in order to sidestep this risk. In 2014, a survey was
carried out to identify existing tools, and 2015 will see
various shared tools put forward and distributed.
58 / RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Adopting a progressive HR stance
Working to create better employment conditions in our supply chain and reinforcing health and safety for
those manufacturing our Passion brand products are both priorities here at Decathlon. Our aim is to go
beyond inspection remits in order to develop relationships with our subcontractors that are based on trust
and mutual respect. This is what we called human responsibility in production.
OUR TEAMS ON THE GROUND
Several teams are typically involved on a daily basis:
1- Sustainable development in production managers, in-house specialists in this area: 14 people48 are
based in production areas and conduct the majority of assessments. They also co-devise corrective
action plans in conjunction with suppliers. Recruited locally, their command of the language and
knowledge of the country’s culture make them more effective in their work. They provide production
teams with on-going training so that they understand our expectations in this field.
2- Production teams: working with suppliers on a daily basis, they help conduct assessments and take over
from sustainable development managers in monitoring the implementation of corrective actions. Aside
from assessments, they are also responsible for identifying situations of non-compliance and finding a
solution in conjunction with suppliers. In 2014, 72% of production teams received training in our human
responsibility in production policy.
3- Those assigned to this task: certain employees with production skills (buyers, quality managers, etc.)
can become assessors. They are given internal training in both theory and practical skills49 internally,
which qualifies them to perform these assessments. 26 people have voluntarily put themselves forward
to work in these areas50.
66% of the 1,019 assessments conducted in 2014 were carried out by our internal teams51
(sustainable development in production managers or those assigned to the task). Several times a
year, all internal assessors get together to standardise and improve their practices.
In 2014
72%
of production teams52
were trained in this
approach.
The team of sustainable development in production managers in China.
48. As of 31/12/14.
49. Internal HRP trainers have successfully taken the theory course in the SA8000 standard and the associated assessment techniques.
50. As of 31/12/14.
51. The remaining assessments are conducted by external firms, selected for their global presence and service quality.
52. i.e. 442 people (this training does not involve all production departments)
RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION / 59
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
THE BASIC PRINCIPLES OF OUR APPROACH
Since 2003, our social charter53 has set out our 8 requirements governing working conditions at
subcontractors responsible for manufacturing our brands’ products. Assessments are carried out onsite to
evaluate how well they are being applied:
• no children on site.
• no forced labour.
• a safe and healthy working environment.
• no discrimination.
• no abusive disciplinary practices.
• respect for working hours.
• respect for employees.
• internal HR management key in terms of compliance
with our charter.
An auditor interviewing an employee
The charter is signed and the subcontractor assessed before any commercial relations are agreed54.
The frequency of these assessments depends on:
• the standards required by local legislation.
• resources implemented by countries to ensure that they are being applied.
• subcontractors’ performance levels (the less satisfactory the working conditions, the more often
assessments are required).
At the end of the assessment, the subcontractor’s rating is calculated on a 5-grade scale, from A-E.
A
Exemplary
The sub-contractor exceeds
the requirements of the charter.
B
Objective
achieved
The sub-contractor complies with all
requirements laid down by the charter.
C
Consolidation
D
Basic
E
Unacceptable
The sub-contractor must implement a
corrective action plan, with the help of
Decathlon teams if necessary
The sub-contractor has one year to
improve the situation with the help of
Decathlon teams.
Decathlon suspends production and
helps subcontractors to find a solution to
their problems. A repeat assessment will
take place before production is resumed.
53. Our charter is based on the fundamental principles of the universal human rights convention, the fundamental principles of the ILO, and the
CSR standard SA 8000. It is a legally valid document, and also applies to our own production facilities.
54. If the assessment results are unsatisfactory with regard to our standards, no business relations will be initiated.
60 / RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CREATING A COLLABORATIVE ETHOS WITH OUR SUBCONTRACTORS
2014 saw us get together with our subcontractors for the first time ever, to organise themed meetings
where we could discuss the purpose of our approach, and make joint progress in resolving key issues.
“
This was an opportunity to share information with and among suppliers,
in order to address our common issues”
— Candice Lee: sustainable development in production manager
Candice Lee
Sustainable development in production manager
Why organise meetings with our subcontractors on this subject?
We still have several key omissions from our charter. We therefore wanted
to change the image that our suppliers have of our standards, by helping them
to fully understand the issues involved.
What were the subjects you talked about?
We explained the general purpose of our approach, and our motivations following
the additions of new standards, in the field of fire safety, for example. We identified
which improvements they could introduce in order to comply with these standards.
It was a time for sharing information with and between suppliers, in order to make
headway on shared issues.
What were the stages that followed this meeting?
We were pleased with the results. For example, 27 out of the 42 people attending the
Taiwan production facility felt that they had improved because of the assessments
we are conducting on site. We also did work in other areas to help us achieve our
objectives, like distributing educational booklets.
Other events were also organised with the same aim:
• In Bangladesh, we teamed up with our suppliers at a series of conferences and panel discussions in
order to present our strategies for sustainable development in production, and train them up in our
new fire safety standards
• In China, subcontractors were also invited to take part in a fire safety training course.
• Our teams also went out to train production teams and subcontractors in chemicals managements55.
INVOLVING INCREASING NUMBERS OF SUPPLIERS
As always, we involve our tier 1 suppliers56 in our working conditions assessment and improvement
process. In 2014, we were keen to go even further back along the supply chain and gradually start to add
in our tier 2 suppliers57: This has seen 210 tier 2 suppliers receive support from Decathlon in these areas,
along with the 1,065 tier 1 suppliers.
55. 15 sessions were organised by teams dedicated to chemicals management. 75 people from production teams and 12 subcontractors were
then given training in these areas.
56. Suppliers that we have a direct contractual relationship with.
57. Suppliers of our tier 1 subcontractors, with no contractual relations with Decathlon.
RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION / 61
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Our reasons for spearheading such a development lie in our understanding that some of our tier
2 suppliers make a considerable contribution to the value of our products, or use manufacturing
processes that we are keen to investigate further. For example, screenprinting suppliers that we’ve
identified have been subject to inspections, as this process involves the use of many chemicals, thereby
posing a potential risk to employee health and safety.
UNDECLARED OUTSOURCING BY OUR SUPPLIERS:
DIFFICULT TO DETECT AND RESOLVE.
Despite our official opposition58 to undeclared outsourcing,
some of our suppliers may be using external service
providers to help them manufacture our products without
our prior knowledge. Having our teams working on the
ground is not enough to avoid such situations.
Aware of this shortcoming, we’re keen to make this issue
a priority for 2016.
TOWARDS A MINIMUM LIVING WAGE?
Minimum wage59
Fixed in line with national legislation for each country, according to the economic situation and
competitiveness of its industries (specifically those using a labour force).
Living wage60
Covers the essential needs of workers and their families (food, housing, transport, clothing, education,
health care and savings).
In some countries, the minimum wage does not enable employees and their families to enjoy
a decent quality of life. We hope to work with our subcontractors located in these particular
countries to ensure that their employees are paid a wage commensurate with their needs. In 2014 we joined
the “Benefits for Business and Workers” scheme run by Impactt, an organisation specialising human rights
in the workplace61. The scheme’s multiple goals, which it aims to achieve by means of training courses in
management, up skilling and production organisation, include:
• increasing employee well-being at work.
• bring employees in line with a national minimum living wage.
• enable employees to see where they fit in to the company’s future.
Impactt supported us in our first pilot project to be launched in Bangladesh, involving three subcontractors.
In the light of the lessons we have learned from this project, we’re planning to roll out this method at other
suppliers and in other countries.
58. Signalled by a contractual clause signed by the subcontractors.
59. Definition largely based on the ILO conventions and the universal declaration of human rights.
60. Definition largely based on the ILO conventions and the universal declaration of human rights.
61. Impactt is a specialist consultancy firm working to improve working conditions and the means to live via world supply chains, with the aim of
delivering clear commercial benefits to both ends of the chain.
More information: http://www.impacttlimited.com/
62 / RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
HOW OUR PANEL PERFORMEDL
In 2014, 65% of our tier 1 suppliers62 (74% in 2013) and 53% of tier
2 suppliers involved in our scheme scored performance levels of
A, B or C63.
There are several reasons to explain this development:
Garment factory in Bangladesh.
• the addition of extra fire safety requirements could result in a D score (specifically the need for fire doors
separating factory floors from fire escapes).
• greater transparency on the part of certain subcontractors regarding the hours worked by employees.
As a result, more transparent relations should enable us to improve these situations.
• stricter standards required by internal assessors regarding issue resolution. We require proof that our
corrective actions have been effective in the long-term before raising a subcontractor’s score.
CAUSES OF NON-COMPLIANCE OBSERVED AMONG OUR SUBCONTRACTORS.
100
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62. during a review of the voluntary process for the 2014 financial year was carried out on this indicator, a discrepancy was noted at 28 tier 1
supplier sites (out of the 1,065 involved) with no audit report in the supplier database tool.
63. Photo dated 5/01/2015.
RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION / 63
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Waste water treatment:
a global approach to supplier support
Since 2009, Decathlon has been supporting a panel of suppliers with the aim of minimising the pollution
they generate by manufacturing their items. By pooling social and environmental assessments gradually
over time, we hope to work together with these suppliers to implement a global CSR approach.
WATER POLLUTION: A MUST-HAVE
Practically all manufacturing processes require water, which – once used – is generally discharged into the
natural environment. Water is now a precious resource that is unevenly protected throughout the world.
Decathlon has been working on this priority issue since 2014, with the aim of reducing contamination risks
for local residents.
Used for fishing, food and transport,
water is the central focus of multiple issues for
Bangladeshis (photo taken near the waste water
treatment plant of one of our key local suppliers).
ASSESSING HIGH IMPACT SITES
As a key player in the textile and footwear industry, Decathlon’s initial targets are subcontractors that
use dyeing and tanning manufacturing processes. This decision was based on the fact that among the
processes used to manufacture Decathlon brand products, these are the ones that could pose the greatest
immediate pollution risks. Sites using paints and surface treatments will be included in this process from
2015 onwards.
For tanning and dyeing, we require suppliers to fulfil the quality criteria governing waste water as
stipulated in our specifications.
64 / RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
CONTROLLING THE QUALITY OF MANUFACTURING WATER
Our specifications define the quality thresholds to be complied
with64. To ensure compliance with these specifications, the auditor
takes various treated water samples and sends them to an external
laboratory. The results are then sent to the supplier within a fortnight.
To simplify the process, the waste water quality and working conditions
are assessed at the same time and by the same assessor, who has
received prior training.
41
suppliers
ers
assessed
ed in 20
2
2014
014
1 .
35
suppliers
complied with
Decathlon’s specifications
A technician from the waste water
treatment plan taking a water sample
prior to discharge.
SUPPORTING PROGRESS
If results do not meet the required standards, the supplier has 6 months to correct the problem, with the
help of our on-site teams.
The effectiveness of waste water treatment is now a criteria that relevant suppliers must satisfy before
embarking on a business relationship with Decathlon.
Decathlon will gradually develop solutions it can use in conjunction with its suppliers to handle issues
such as hazardous waste treatment, energy efficiency and air quality.
As from 2015, test audits will be carried out on water treatment management (human organisation,
reporting and maintenance, etc.) before eventually being rolled out in 2016.
Production teams and subcontractors have
been supplied with educational booklets
specific to industrial water management in
order to help them progress in these areas.
64. Decathlon’s specifications include 15 parameters for testing, covering the key risks for local populations. Each parameter test must satisfy the
strictest limit, either that set by local legislation or that set by Decathlon.
RESPONSABILITY IN PRODUCTION / 65
METHODOLOGY
66 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
OUR SOCIAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
INDICATORS
% of employees by gender and geographical zone.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Employees hired on permanent contracts.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Employees hired on temporary contracts.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of employees recruited overall.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of departures (permanent contracts).
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of resignations (permanent contracts).
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of redundancies (permanent contracts).
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of retirements (permanent contracts).
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Rate of turnover for permanent personnel.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
65. Employees hired in France in 2013 on a permanent contract: 3,310.
66. Employees hired in France in 2013 on a temporary contract: 21,349.
67. Number of resignations in France in 2013: 3,048.
68. Number of redundancies in France in 2013: 362.
69. Number of employees retiring in France in 2013: 11.
2014
Men
Women
Europe Zone
59%
41%
Russia Zone
41%
59%
Asia Zone
55%
45%
India Zone
81%
19%
Africa Zone
71%
29%
America Zone
72%
28%
World
59%
41%
France
3,30665
China
2,114
Russia
1,682
Spain
284
Italy
504
World
13,641
France
26,79866
Spain
11,960
France
30,104
Spain
12,244
France
3,504
Spain
1,094
France
2,81767
Spain
964
France
45168
Spain
70
France
869
Spain
0
France
21.6%
Spain
18.6%
METHODOLOGY / 67
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
INDICATORS
World payroll.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
% of world payroll/turnover.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
% of capital owned by shareholding employees.
(as of 01/07/2014)
Number of shareholders.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
% of shareholding employees.
(compared with rights holders)
2014
€1,572,850 K
World
(1,418,800 K€ en 2013)
World
19% (idem 2013)
World
11.32%70
World
32,86071 sur 20 pays
ayant accès à
l’actionnariat et
39,354 ayants droits
World
83.5%72
World
83%73
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
% of people who responded to the annual Winning
Team Members survey.
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes,
quite” to the question “On their satisfaction with their
department's and the company's business plan.”
in the Winning Team Members survey.
World
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes, quite”
to the question “I am happy to go to work.”, in the
Winning Team Members survey.
World
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes, quite”
to the question “In my area of responsibility I can take
the initiative and make decisions in order to keep my
customer happy.”, in the Winning Team Members
survey.
World
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes, quite”
to the question “My overall pay is consistent with my
performance and responsibilities.”, in the Winning Team
Members survey.
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
World
Yes, very
39%
Yes, quite
39%
Total who said Yes
81%74
Yes, very
43%
Yes, quite
43%
Total who said Yes
86%75
Yes, very
54%
Yes, quite
37%
Total who said Yes
91%76
Yes, very
16%
Yes, quite
40%
Total who said Yes
56%77
70.% of capital owned by shareholders in 2013: 11.085%.
71. Number of shareholders in 2013: 31,887 out of 19 countries with access to share ownership and 38,084 eligible persons.
72. Objective for this indicator: 100% of eligible persons and 80% of personnel worldwide .
73. 40,295 employees responded to the survey, compared with 34,056 in 2013.
74. 79% in 2013.
75. 85% in 2013.
76. 85% in 2013.
77. 56% in 2013.
68 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
INDICATORS
Permanent personnel working full time.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Permanent personnel working part time.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
% of part time personnel / Total Permanent Personnel.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes, quite”
to the question “I am happy with the number of hours I
am contracted to work.”, in the Winning Team Members
survey.
2014
France
9,699
Spain
1,337
France
6,557
Spain
5,333
France
40%78
Spain
20%
World
69%79
France
3.29%
Spain
3.79%
(Temporary contracts only - Survey conducted in September 2014 at
international level)
Absenteeism rate for employees on permanent contracts.
(number of hours not worked because of absenteeism/
number of hours worked in theory)
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes,
quite” to the question “My physical safety at work is
protected.”, in the Winning Team Members survey.
World
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level)
Number of accidents at work leading to a stoppage.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
% of people who responded “yes, very” or “yes, quite”
to questions “about personnel development” in the
Winning Team Members survey.
Yes, very
54%
Yes, quite
37%
Total who said Yes
91%80
France
976
Spain
926 81
World
81%82
(Survey conducted in September 2014 at international level) )
78.% of part-time employees out of all permanent personnel in France in 2013: 41.05%.
79. 64% in 2013.
80. 90% in 2013.
81. 1,902 accidents travelling to work, 126 of which were in France and 88 in Spain, during journeys to or from work.
82. 79% in 2013.
METHODOLOGY / 69
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
INDICATORS
Number of trainers who have delivered at least one
training course during 2014.
2014
World
14,65483
World
27,684
World
1,973,46584
World
5,62 hours85
World
45,402
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Number of employees who have taken at least
1 e-learning course.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Total number of training hours.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Average amount of training delivered per employee.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of employees who took at least 1 training
course in 2014.
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Training courses leading to a qualification
(UP and HOPE programmes).
World
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Number of women Managers88.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Number of people with recognised disabilities.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Number of Mission Handicap accredited "advisor”
employees.
UP programme86: 188 qualified and
177 in process of qualifying
HOPE programme87: 40 employees
and 15 different nationalities
World
3,209 women managers
France
3.47%, i.e. 631 people89
Spain
2.1%
France
15090
World
0.5%
World
99
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Seniors rate (people aged 55 and over / total
personnel).
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
Number of nationalities working within the business.
(Situation as of 31/12/2014)
83. 12,817 trainers in 2013.
84. 1,710,858 training hours in 2013.
85. Average number of hours’ training delivered per employee in 2013 : 5.59.
86. UP programme: certification course offered by Decathlon and its partners, which accredits employees’ professional working experience.
87. Hope programme: an internal corporate MBA-type course run in partnership with the IESEG.
88. Person managing at least one other person below them – Managers accounted for 17% of all personnel in 2014.
89. Rate of people with a recognised disability in 2013: 3.13%.
90. Number of “mission handicap-accredited” advisors in 2013 in France: 126.
70 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
COLLECTIVE AGREEMENTS SIGNED IN 2014 IN FRANCE AND SPAIN
Collective
agreements
signed in 2014
France
Retail
(Decathlon SA)
Pay
Pay
Services
(Decatlhon SA
+ promiles)
Incentive
Incentive
Incentive
Pay
Mandatory annual
negotiations
Mandatory annual
negotiations
Mandatory annual
negotiations
Health insurance
agreement (medical
expenses)
Health
Pay
Bonus dividend
Bonus dividend
Bonus dividend
Diversity
Gender equality
agreement
Gender equality
agreement
Gender equality
agreement
Group committee
renewal
Group committee
agreement
Employment
Working conditions
Misc
Decathlon
Spain S.A.
Employee profit-sharing (group agreement)
Pay
MAN
Logistics
Spain
Equality
of opportunity
and treatment plan
Creation of a France
health and safety
committee
Travel time
compensation
Collective
agreement
METHODOLOGY / 71
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
OUR ENVIRONMENTAL PERFORMANCE
INDICATORS
INDICATORS
GHG emissions in tonnes of CO2 equivalent generated
by Decathlon’s activities
2014
World
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Average water consumption on our sites (Decathlon
stores and company-owned warehouses) in litres
per m2. (From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Quantity of waste generated by our sites (Decathlon
stores, Brand sites and company-owned warehouses)
in tonnes.
World
World
(From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
Overall consumption by energy type on our sites
(Decathlon stores, Brand sites and company-owned
warehouses) in MWh. (From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
World
Renewable energy production in kWh for each of our
stores. (From 1/01/2014 to 31/12/2014)
World
Scope 191
22,500.C02e
Scope 2
149,600.C02e
Scope 3
4,347,000.C02e
Total
4,519,000.C02e
Stores
119 litres/m2 92
Warehouses
51 litres/m2
Paper and
cardboard separated
31,398 tonnes
Plastic separated
1,701 tonnes
“Other” materials
(wood, scrap metal,
textiles, etc.)
2,224 tonnes
Mixed waste
30,090 tonnes
Total93
65,413 tonnes
Electricity
428,708,560 MWh
Gas
23,813,657 MWh
23,813,657 kWh94
OUR SOCIETAL PERFORMANCE INDICATORS
INDICATORS
2014
% of employees having received chemical risk
prevention training95.
World
80%
% of suppliers having signed the latest version of
Decathlon’s toxicology specifications.
World
83%96
91. These limits correspond to scopes 1, 2 and 3 of the GHG protocol method. Data for 2013 is as follows: Scope 1: 23,500 C02e - Scope 2: 130,600
C02e - Scope 3: 3,604,400 C02e, i.e. a total of 3,604,400 C02e.
92. The average consumption for a store and a warehouse was calculated for 2014 using a database of actual data obtained from a sample of 7
stores and 14 warehouses. The 2014 average confirms that reporting is not exhaustive, given the low consumption.
93. Waste quantities generated in 2013= 49,384 tonnes in total .
94. Renewable energy production by Decathlon stores in 2013: 204,819 kWh.
95. Out of 788 people involved in this training on design and production skills.
96. New version of Decathlon’s toxicology specifications dated January 2014.
72 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Regulatory cross- reference table
Chapter
Page
1) Category: Company information
a) Employment
Total personnel and breakdown of employees by
gender, age and geographical area.
Decathlon in figures.
3
Recruitment and redundancy.
Our performance indicators.
67
Pay and pay trends.
Promoting employee
development.
53
Organising working time.
Promoting employee
development.
52
Absenteeism.
Our performance indicators.
69
Organising employee dialogue, including procedures
for informing, consulting with and negotiating with
personnel.
Our performance indicators.
71
Overview of collective agreements.
Our performance indicators.
71
b) Organisation of work
c) Employee relations
METHODOLOGY / 73
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Chapter
Page
d) Health and safety
Guaranteeing safety.
48
Our performance indicators.
69
Overview of agreements signed with unions and
employee representatives as regards occupational
health and safety.
Our performance indicators.
71
Accidents at work, including their frequency and
severity, as well as occupational illnesses.
Our performance indicators.
69
Guaranteeing safety.
48
Human responsibility
in production.
58
Adopting a progressive HR stance.
59
Our performance indicators.
70
Measures implemented to promote gender equality.
Promoting employee
development.
52
Measures implemented to promote the employment
and integration of those with disabilities.
Promoting employee
development.
53
Anti-discrimination policy.
Promoting employee
development.
53
Occupational health and safety conditions.
e) Training
Training-related policies implemented.
Total number of training hours.
f) Equality of treatment
g) Promoting and respecting the fundamental conventions of the ILO with regard to
Respect for the freedom of association and collective
bargaining rights.
Adopting a progressive HR stance.
59
Eliminating occupational and employment
discrimination.
Adopting a progressive HR stance.
59
Eliminating forced or compulsory labour.
Adopting a progressive HR stance.
59
Abolishing child labour.
Adopting a progressive HR stance.
59
74 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Chapter
Page
2) Category: Environmental information
a) General environmental policy
Interview.
6
Sustainable development
governance.
8
Understanding climate issues.
15
Employee training and awareness-raising initiatives
undertaken in the field of environmental protection.
Eco-design.
27
Resources allocated to the prevention of environmental
risks and pollution.
Sustainable development issues.
12
Total provisions and guarantees for environmental
risks, provided that this information is not likely
to cause serious damage to the company in any
ongoing disputes.
No provisions or guarantees
were made in 2014.
Company organisation for handling environmental
issues, and - if required - any environmental
assessment or certification procedures.
b) Pollution and waste management
Measures to prevent, reduce or rectify emissions to air,
water and land causing serious environmental damage.
Measures for preventing, recycling and eliminating
waste.
Addressing noise pollution and all other forms
of pollution specific to a particular activity.
Eco-design.
24
Environmental labelling.
28
Managing our sites.
39
Storage and transportation.
43
Wastewater treatment.
64
Eco-design.
24
Repairing your products.
34
Customer input events.
36
Managing our sites.
39
Managing our sites.
39
METHODOLOGY / 75
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Chapter
Page
c) Sustainable use of resources
Focus on product composition.
29
Wastewater treatment.
64
Focus on product composition.
29
Wastewater treatment.
64
Managing our sites.
39
Storage and transportation.
43
Our performance indicators.
72
Managing our sites.
39
Storage and transportation.
43
Greenhouse gas emissions.
Understanding climate issues.
15
Adapting to the consequences of climate change.
Understanding climate issues.
15
Eco-design.
24
Focus on product composition.
29
Water consumption and supplies to reflect local
conditions97.
Consumption of raw materials and measures
undertaken to improve their efficiency of use.
Energy consumption, measures undertaken
to improve energy efficiency and the use of
renewable energy.
Land use.
d) Climate change
e) Protecting biodiversity
Measures taken to preserve and develop biodiversity.
97. Our main water consumption categories relate to raw materials, an area we are targeting with reduction strategies (link to Focus on product
composition).
76 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Chapter
Page
3) Information relating to corporate commitments in the field
of sustainable development
a) The geographical, financial and social impact of the company’s business activity
In terms of employment and regional development.
From local or neighbouring populations.
Stores and their
community involvement.
46
Promoting employee
development.
50
Working sustainably
with our subcontractors.
55
Stores and their
community involvement.
46
Promoting employee
development.
50
Working sustainably
with our subcontractors.
55
b) Relations maintained with people or organisations involved in the company's activity,
particularly social and employment support services, educational establishments, environmental
protection associations, consumer associations and neighbouring communities
Conditions governing dialogue with these people
or organisations.
Partnerships and sponsorships.
Sustainable development governance.
8
Environmental labelling.
28
Decathlon Foundation.
18
METHODOLOGY / 77
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Chapter
Page
Working sustainably with
our subcontractors.
55
Adopting a progressive
HR stance.
59
Wastewater treatment.
64
Working sustainably with
our subcontractors.
55
Adopting a progressive
HR stance.
59
Wastewater treatment.
64
Working sustainably with
our subcontractors.
58
Focus on product
composition.
29
Continuously improving
customer satisfaction.
32
Adopting a progressive
HR stance.
59
c) Subcontractors and suppliers
An awareness of social and environmental issues
when devising purchasing policies.
The importance of sub-contracting and being aware of
suppliers’ and subcontractors’ CSR as part of the relations
management process.
d) Fair practices
Actions undertaken to prevent corruption.
Measures taken to enhance consumer health and safety.
e) Human rights
Other actions carried out to promote human rights.
78 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Methodological note
GENERAL ORGANISATION OF REPORTS
Decathlon is bound by the extra-financial reports obligation via the Decathlon SA company following the
publication of article 225 of the Grenelle II law98 and the order of 24 April 201299.
By virtue of its personnel numbers100, Decathlon SA is required to submit reports on the financial year
commencing after 31 December 2012.
Decathlon SA is not listed on the stock exchange. For this report, we took into account the following criteria,
which listed companies are obliged to fulfil: company information (fundamental/basic conventions of
the ILO), environmental information (total provisions and guarantees for environmental risks, land use,
adapting to climate change) and CSR information (sub-contractors and suppliers, fair practices, human
rights, etc.). In terms of the fundamental conventions of the ILO, we apply the same standards across all of
our 9 factories as those required of our suppliers.
Decathlon is not listed on the stock exchange. For the 2014 financial year report, we took into account the
criteria that listed companies are obliged to fulfil.
This extra-financial report is the second of its kind for Decathlon. We’re therefore on a learning curve,
adopting a continuous improvement approach over several years in order to reinforce the reporting
process internally and enhance data reliability.
This report illustrates Decathlon’s commitments, achievements and projects in terms of CSR for the 2014
financial year.
To expand this area, we have implemented the following organisation:
• two report project leaders (communications and technical) and a project officer responsible for internal
reporting,
• a network of contributors covering the various activities within the business (design, production,
distribution, logistics, property, legal, etc.),
• a management committee at strategy level (manufacturing dept. director and advocate of sustainable
development within the business, communications director, sustainable development manager).
Indicators are supplied by the contributors from the relevant operational activity, before being consolidated
by the report project leaders.
Some of the extra-financial indicators are drawn from information that has already been coordinated
internally by the business’s employees. Indicators have been reviewed and organised every year since
2013 in order to align them with the legislative requirements and observations of the independent third
party body.
A voluntary mock audit based on three indicators was conducted in April 2014 by PwC101 in order to review
processes and identify priority areas for improvement.
98. Law governing national environmental commitment n°2010-788 of 12 July 2010, article 225.
99. Decree n°2012-557 of 24 April 2012.
100. Higher than 2000 but less than 5000.
101. PricewaterhouseCooper: Independent Third Party Body for our sustainable development report 2014.
METHODOLOGY / 79
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
PRINCIPLES GOVERNING THE PRODUCTION OF THE SUSTAINABLE
DEVELOPMENT REPORT:
In line with GRI G4 sustainable development reporting guidelines, Decathlon applies the following
principles when writing its Sustainable Development report:
• Completeness: to be as exhaustive as possible on relevant topics, in order to enable readers of the
report to assess the business’ CSR performance.
• Relevance: topics considered to be relevant are those that we feel are most important for our own
activities.
• Clarity: to be universally understood.
• Punctuality: to deliver the report on the same dates every year.
• Balance: to be able to have a fair idea of the business’ overall performance by reflecting both positive
and negative aspects.
• Accuracy: to give precise, detailed information to enable readers to gain a better understanding.
REPORT SCOPE:
Decathlon has a presence in 21 distribution countries, with over 64,934 employees and a turnover of
€8.2 billion excl. VAT in 2014.
As of 31/12/2014, there were 909 points of sale in the Decathlon SA Group, 884 of which fall under the scope
of Decathlon102, as well as 40 warehouses and 4 logistics platforms and 4 cross-docking distribution hubs.
Within the context of extra-financial reporting, the scope excludes from the Group any companies not
controlled by at least a 50% share in 2014, and companies contributing an insignificant turnover amount.
Regarding the latter, we consider that the cost of obtaining environmental, social and societal data is
disproportionate to the importance they represent. Excluding these companies has no significant effect on
the representativeness of our data.
As a result, Decathlon’s extra-financial data consolidation scope comprises:
• companies controlled by at least a 50% share as of 30 September 2014.
• companies contributing 98.3% to Decathlon’s turnover.
METHODOLOGICAL CLARIFICATIONS:
1- Suppliers and sub-contractors mentioned in these reports are those with whom we have direct or
indirect commercial relations, within the context of manufacturing our Passion Brand products and their
components. The product development strategy (eco-design, quality, human responsibility in production,
etc.) presented concerns solely those products manufactured for our Passion Brands.
2- In terms of our employees, it should be noted that:
• Most of the qualitative and quantitative is produced within France and Spain using the SAP tool, as
opposed to on a global basis, due to the non-availability of global data. France and Spain accounted
for 57.7% of turnover and 52% of personnel worldwide in 2014.
• The majority of personnel data is drawn from the MyIdentity tool, except for our distribution activities
in India and for Decathlon Easy, the data for which was obtained in Excel format. Personnel data for
Decathlon Easy will be incorporated into the MyIdentity tool in 2015, which will facilitate consolidation
at group level for our third sustainable development report.
102. Other points of sale are our Passion Brand stores and the “other sales forms” stores (e.g. Terres & Eaux, Cabesto, Chullanka, etc.)
80 / METHODOLOGY
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
• Work is currently underway to implement an internal global group report system for a selection of HR
indicators, led by senior management and relevant at international level in terms of consolidation.
These social indicators will, as far as possible, focus on:
– our existing information systems, to avoid multiple data entries and to facilitate implementation at
international level.
– indicators from the winning team member survey carried out annually.
In addition, given the diversity of local legislation and organisations, and available tools, each country will
define and develop its own HR indicators - in line with their organisation and growth – which will enable
them to coordinate their own activity.
The extra-financial report should enable us to carry out one or more detailed studies on certain countries
every year, such as France and Spain in 2014, so as to communicate good HR practices and encourage
other countries to improve their HR statistics.
To this end, work will begin in 2015 with the aim of conducting a more in-depth examination of social data
in Italy and China in the third sustainable development report to be published in 2016.
3- For figures relating to logistics, the majority of data is drawn from within Europe, due to the non-availability of global data. Europe accounted for 83% of item quantities shipped during 2014.
Logistics data gathering for 2015 will concentrate on the Europe zone, as other zones are only gradually
emerging, transferring responsibilities and skills.
From 2016 onwards, logistics data in the Asia and Russia zones will be gathered and added into the existing
database. The same will happen in 2017 for the America and India zones, and in 2018 for the Africa zone.
4- As regards the greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions report, carbon footprint calculations were carried
out using the GHG protocol103 method, which splits emissions into three areas (scopes 1, 2 and 3).
Calculation GHG emissions involves multiplying activity data by an emission factor. Activity data was
gathered from within the pre-defined scope area. Data that proves unavailable or contains errors is then
the subject of assumptions, which have been extrapolated using real data.
Apart from calculations of our product impacts, most emission factors come from the Carbon database
managed by ADEME104. Product impact modelling is done using simplified lifecycle assessments.
Calculations are carried out using an in-house tool along, assisted by several specialist research firms,
who contribute their expertise and widely recognised databases (e.g. EcoInvent, Gabi, Buwal and Wisard).
The scope used involves non-subcontracted Decathlon sites that opened before 1 January 2014, i.e. 736
Decathlon stores and 35 warehouses.
In order to optimise our data gathering system, we have been working to computerise our collection and
consolidation processes using a software solution that we hope to roll out in 2015.
We calculated our sites’ energy data using actual energy consumption for 88% of Decathlon stores (i.e.
644 stores) and for 51% of warehouses (i.e. 18 warehouses).
Calculations for the kWh/m2 ratio were updated to ensure that monthly management control remained
relevant. Calculating the 2013 ratio involved dividing kWh consumption for stores operational since
1 January 2013 by the sum of the square metre area of these stores.
The new ratio takes into account the concept of comparability over a 12 month period. This new ratio,
calculated by month, includes sites that have been open for 12 months as of the reporting month. The
annual indicator is equal to the sum of monthly ratios.
103. http://www.ghgprotocol.org/standards/corporate-standard
104. http://www.bilans-ges.ademe.fr/
METHODOLOGY / 81
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
This means that in 2013, the kWh/m2 ratio included all sites open before 1 January 2013, whilst the new
ratio only includes sites that have been open a year since the reporting month.
For example, consumption for a site that opened in May 2013 would not be taken into account when
calculating the kWh/m2 ratio for the month of January 2014.
The kWh/m2 ratio for 2013 has therefore been updated in this current report, so as to enable comparison
between 2013 and 2014.
For waste tonnage and reclamation and recycling indicators, we used actual data for 47% of stores 23 (i.e.
349 stores) and for 46% of warehouses (i.e. 16 warehouses). All other data was extrapolated or estimated
using actual consumption data gathered.
5- Restatement of 2013 SD report data and error correction:
• There is a small chance that some data from 2013’s records may differ from that published in our first
extra-financial report after calculation errors were detected. These modifications are not significant in
any way.
• Regarding the ABC % indicator for human responsibility in production:
once the voluntary process review had been carried out for the 2014 financial year as regards this
indicator, a discrepancy was noted across 28 tier 1 supplier sites (out of the 1,065 assessed) with no audit
report in the supplier database.
This discrepancy will need to be followed up by a corrective action plan that aims to guarantee that all
social audit reports for any suppliers concerned are correctly uploaded and available in the supplier
database tool, so as to eradicate any risk of error in the published data.
REPORT PERIOD
The report period for extra-financial data is based on the calendar year (1 January to 31 December 2014), so
as to ensure consistency with the trading year of Decathlon’s companies as well as the business's existing
reports.
In cases where data refers to a reporting period different to the calendar year, this must be specified in the
body of the report.
METHODOLOGICAL LIMITS OF THE INDICATORS:
Being Decathlon’s second extra-financial report, this report forms part of an improvement drive
implemented over several years, with the aim of structuring and reinforcing the process internally.
Environmental, social and societal indicators can present methodological limits caused by:
• non-harmonised definitions, national/international legislation and local practices.
• problems in retrieving certain data without data gathering software solutions.
• manual data entry: reliability depends on the quality of the information gathering carried out by teams,
• the availability of certain data within a limited field of study,
• extrapolating and estimating certain data in cases where actual data is not available.
• gradual implementation of our internal reporting protocol to cover the gathering, consolidation and
management of indicators.
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2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
Statement made in the presence of one of the statutory auditors, appointed as an independent
third party body, relating to the social, environmental and societal information contained in the
management report.
FINANCIAL YEAR ENDED 31 DECEMBER 2014
TO OUR SHAREHOLDERS,
In our capacity as auditor for Decathlon SA, and as
a designated independent third party body, accredited by COFRAC (n°3-1060), we have drawn up this
statement of consolidated social, environmental
and societal information relating to the financial
year ended on 31 December 2014, presented in the
management report, (hereafter referred to as "CSR
Information") in accordance with the provisions of
article L.225-102-1 of the Commercial Code.
CORPORATE RESPONSIBILITY
The Supervisory Board is responsible for drawing
up a management report containing CSR Information stipulated under article R.225-105-1 of the
Commercial Code, prepared in accordance with the
guidelines used by the company, (hereafter referred
to as the “Reporting Protocol”) and available on
request from head office, a summary of which
appears in the appendices of the management
report.
INDEPENDENCE AND QUALITY CONTROL
Our independence is defined by regulatory frameworks, the professional code of conduct and the
provisions laid down in article L.822-11 of the Commercial Code. Furthermore, we have implemented
a quality control system that includes documented
policies and procedures aiming to ensure compliance with this code of conduct, our professional
standards and the applicable legal and regulatory
frameworks.
NATURE AND SCOPE OF THE WORK
We performed our work in accordance with the
French professional auditing standards related
to labour and environmental information falling
within the scope of procedures directly related to
the statutory audit engagement (NEP 9090), with
the decree of May 13, 2013 setting out the ways
in which an independent third party body should
conduct its mission:
- By conducting interviews with managers of the
departments concerned, we were informed about
various sustainable development directions, in line
with the social and environmental consequences
of the company's activity, its commitments to
society and the wider community and, where
necessary, actions and programmes resulting
from these.
- We compared the CSR data presented in the
management report with the list stipulated by
article R.225-105-1 of the Commercial Code.
- In the absence of certain data, we checked that the
explanations were supplied in accordance with
the provisions of article R.225-105 paragraph 3 of
the Commercial Code.
- We checked that the CSR data covered the scope,
with the scope limits outlined in the methodological
note presented on page 79 of this report.
Based on this work and given the limitations
mentioned above, we confirm that the management report contains the required CSR information.
RESPONSIBILITY OF THE AUDITOR
It is our responsibility, on the basis of our work, to
certify that the CSR Information required is present
in the management report, or, if not, that it is fully
explained in accordance with the third paragraph
of article R.225-105 of the Commercial Code. We
are not responsible for verifying the relevance and
accuracy of CSR Information.
Our work was carried out by a team of six people
between December 2014 and May 2015, for a total
duration of around three weeks.
To assist us in these efforts, we called on experts in
CSR.
Neuilly-sur-Seine, 22 may 2015
Auditor at PricewaterhouseCoopers
OLIVIER AUBERTY
Partner
SYLVAIN LAMBERT
Sustainable Development
Departement Partner
AUDITOR'S STATEMENT / 83
2014 SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT REPORT
THANKS
Decathlon would like to thank everyone who has helped to
produce this report:
• members of the dedicated management committee (Isabelle
Guyader, Charlotte Mory, Nicolas Roucou and Philippe
Dourcy),
• internal contributors, for providing information about their
activities and strategies, their monitoring and performance
indicators, images, photos and videos,
• Romain Poivet, GHG assessment specialist at ADEME (French
environment and energy management agency), for his kind
contribution,
• those interviewed for the writing of this report (Mélanie Czepik
and Lydie Recorbet from ORSE [French study centre for CSR],
and Marie-Madeleine Carpentier from Le Réseau Alliance),
• Philippe Cornet, CSR reporting expert for AFNOR,
• and many others.
THOSE RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS PUBLICATION:
Corporate communication director: Philippe Dourcy
Sustainable development communication manager: Claire Fouillé
Sustainable development reporting manager: Rahel Damamme
Graphic design: NTMY Lille
Production: StudioPrint
Photo credits: Decathlon communication department, Sebastien Sindeu,
Jean-Michel André and Samuel Dhote.
84 / THANKS
4, boulevard de Mons - 59650 Villeneuve d’Ascq
www.corporate.decathlon.com

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