AGCNewsletter - Anglebrook Golf Club

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AGCNewsletter - Anglebrook Golf Club
AGC Newsletter
VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2—JUNE/JULY 2012
Lincoln Pro-Am Returns to AGC
Met PGA Arrives With a Field of Pros and Top-Flite Amateurs
F
OR JUST THE FOURTH
TIME IN THE 15 YEARS OF
CLUB HISTORY, ANGLEBROOK OPENED ITS FAIRWAYS
TO SOME OF THE BEST PLAYERS
IN THE NEIGHBORHOOD—THE
MET SECTION PGA PROS—AND
THIS TIME WE HAD THEM BRING
A FEW FRIENDS ALONG.
Anglebrook hosted the Lincoln Pro-Am
on Monday, May 14, and saw a steady stream
of players for the morning and afternoon
fields, which covered nearly 12 hours of play.
Despite the fact that most played through
downpours at some point, they came off the
golf course with the sunniest of dispositions,
knowing they had played one of the finest
golf courses in the Metropolitan area.
The last time AGC hosted this event, a
teaching pro from Chelsea Piers, Tom
Sutter, shot the course record of 65. This
time, despite the sporadic downpours, Greg
Bisconti, an assistant professional from the
St. Andrews club in Hastings-on-Hudson,
was medalist with a 68. The team competition was won by the Country Club of
The Lincoln Pro-Am came to Lincolndale in May, and a parade of golf carts carrying eager competitors
who waited in line for their turns at the first and 10 th tees. Inset: When it was all said and done, the Country
Club of Darien enjoyed a waltz to the winner’s circle, securing an eight-shot victory.
“There are plenty of courses where you can look at your scorecard
and decide then and there what clubs you are going to hit, but not
at Anglebrook.”
—Kevin Ausserlechner, head professional at the County Club of Darien
Darien, led by professional Kevin
Ausserlechner, which posted a team score
of 117, an astonishing 27-under-par. Darien
virtually lapped the field with St. Andrews
and Wheatley Hills each coming in at
125 (-19) to tie for second.
The field consisted of 49 teams
comprised of a club professional and three
of their members. The scoring format for
the 40-year-old event is one gross ball and
one net ball (with 80% course handicap)
per hole. The pros competed for cash prizes,
and the amateurs for gift certificates redeemable at the pro shop of their home club.
The Met Section runs approximately 12
of these events each year, and expected the
Anglebrook event would be the largest field
of the season—mostly due to the allure of
the coveted invitation to a venue most of the
field had never played.
Ausserlechner had played Anglebrook
once before during the club’s infancy, but
was clear that a big part of his team’s win was
that one of his group, Tom Kelly, had played
here enough to provide invaluable course
strategy.
“Anglebrook was a lot of fun to play,
and it isn’t a course you need to overpower as much as you need to think your
way around,” said Ausserlechner, who also
teamed with Brendan O’Rourke and Chris
Heaney. “With Tom’s guidance, it was much
easier for the rest of us to navigate. We knew
(Continued on page 3)
PAGE 2
VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2
Mother’s Day, Wine Tasting ShowAnother Side of AGC
W
E NEVER KNEW
ANYTHING WAS MORE
IMPORTANT TO OUR
MEMBERS THAN GOLF.We found
out, though, on Mother’s Day that the
Anglebrook Moms rank pretty high when
the crowd for our annual Mother’s Day
brunch nearly matched the crowd for golf
that day.
Some of those members put golf aside for
the day to focus on Mom. Others continued
the Mother’s Day festivities on the fairways,
and one—whose name we’ll never divulge—
took Mom home and snuck back later that
afternoon just in time to squeeze in 18 holes
before dark.
The crowd for the April wine tasting was
clearly quality over quantity, but members
and guests soaked up the various flavors
and the information by the knowledgeable
speakers who came from Winebow
and Southern Wines & Spirits, two of our
wine vendors.
One of our members enjoyed one particular bottle so much, he ordered three cases.
There’s no word yet on when he’ll be hosting
us at his place for a taste of those grapes!
AGC Moms Take Center Stage (Left to right): The Hass family; the Katos, Jack Parsons and
guests at the wine tasting; The Lanzettas, and The Pizers.
New Menu Items Soar to Top of Leaderboard
Chef Displays Versatility, Adds More Global Flavors
L
AST YEAR, FIRST-YEAR
CHEF STEVE QUATTROCCHI
DID WHAT ANY ROOKIE WAS
SUPPOSED TO DO: HE KEPT HIS
HEAD DOWN, LISTENED TO HIS
COACHES AND WORKED HARD.
In year two, however, Quattrocchi has
emerged as more of an impact player here
at Anglebrook. For instance, who knew he
could introduce two new dishes that would
win the hearts of the Japanese members,
including even Masatoshi Sugio, who
happens to own three successful sushi
restaurants in Manhattan?
The Katsudon with steamed rice, a pork
cutlet with onion and egg in traditional
broth, and the Japanese Korokke have
in fact awakened the palettes of members
of all ethnicities. The Korokke, a potato
croquette, seems to be coming out of the
kitchen as fast as Chef can make them.
“It wasn’t a matter of finding a new
Japanese appetizer,” said Quattrocchi. “It
was more a matter of finding a new item that
was the perfect kick-off to the Anglebrook
dining experience. The croquette recipe
was a little different, but the mushroom,
the carrots, the wagyu beef, and the spicy
flavored Tonkatsu dipping sauce provide a
taste that really sets the tone for many of the
main courses on the menu.”
Chef Q was seeking Mr. Sugio’s input
on the Katsudon when he researched and
experimented with the Korokke recipe.
When he put both items in front of Sugio,
who when not playing golf at AGC oversees
the operations at Sushi of Gari on the
Upper Eastside, Gari, on the Upper Westside, and Sushi of Gari 46 in the Theater
District, it was thumbs-up all around.
The Korokke has crunchy texture, but
inside might remind some of Shepherd’s pie.
“It’s got a nice texture and earthy tone to
it,” said Quattrocchi. “While the dumplings
and shumai, both steamed items, have always
been popular here, the Korokke has been a
bigger hit than I expected from the first day
it was on the menu. Some of the Japanese
members have told me that the taste really
reminds them of home,” he said. “And that’s
the most terrific feedback I could ever hear.”
The croquette will go down nice and
easy, but its wonderful flavor will be nicely
complemented by some of our new beverage
choices here.
In addition to the crisp and refreshing
Sapparo beer AGC has always stocked, we’ve
added Asahi, Japan’s No. 1-selling beer, a
dry beer billed as a taste for “all seasons.”
Members can try it for themselves both in
the grill room and at the halfway house.
For something after your round, you
might consider a glass of Hibiki, a blended
whisky we began carrying last year. With
its vanilla, honey and peach undertones,
the Hibiki has proven so popular, we’ve
also added Yamazaki, an 18-year-aged
single malt by Suntory, from Japan’s
oldest distillery.
If there’s anything to celebrate—say,
a hole-in-one, or even just a wonderful day
on the course with your favorite playing
partners—we’ll recommend Kubota Sake
Manjyu, not only Japan’s top sake but
perhaps the best on the planet. The Kubota
is available only by the bottle, but for smaller
thirst, we also offer Gekkeikan sake by
the glass, and also sassy and sweet Choya
plum wine.
Chef Q, and dining room supervisor
Mariana Tavares look forward to your
feedback—in any language!
VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2
(Continued from cover)
when and where we could be aggressive,
and what clubs were the smartest play.”
With heavy rain overnight and rain on
and off throughout the entire day, the
greens were less of an adventure than they
ordinarily are.
“With all the rain the greens were
slower than they could have been, but that
probably helped the entire field,” he said.
“The greens were what really stood out.
When they get fast, I imagine you have a lot
of options—and firing right at the flag prob-
PAGE 3
ably isn’t the right choice. There are plenty
of courses where you can look at your scorecard and decide then and there what clubs
you are going to hit, but not at Anglebrook.”
The biggest moment for the Darien team
came on the toughest hole on the course
when Kelly poured in an approach from 160
for an eagle at No. 4.
It’s been many moons since AGC saw that
many players in one day, but not nearly that
long since the club and course captivated
the imaginations of so many core golfers.
Cherry Blossom Cup: New
Names Capture Old Tourney
The Team of Matt Collins and Masatoshi Sugio
Cruise to Victory
F
OR A NET, TEAM EVENT, IT
WAS A VERITABLE RUNAWAY.
Matt Collins and Masatoshi Sugio
may not have crossed paths yet, but they
combined for a net score of 60 to capture
this year’s edition of the Cherry Blossom
Cup, played over the weekend of May 13-14.
They held off formidable challenges
from the Luppino brothers, Carmine and
Angelo, who just happened to wind up as
playing partners in a blind draw. The
Luppinos joined forces to shoot a net 64,
good enough to narrowly edge the team of
John Schaeffer and Eamon Lynch (65).
The event format was a net best-ball per
team, hence the low scores. Angelo Luppino
had best low individual net (69) while the
low gross went to Lynch (76).
In all, we had 14 participants—most of
whom played with their regular guests and
turned in their attested scorecards. The
most intriguing pairing of the day was the
grouping of defending club champ Dan
Wolfman and Steve Greenbaum, the club
champ from two years ago.
Neither fared as well in the team event
as they have as individuals. Wolfman and
teammate Larry Kaplan posted a net 70 and
Greenbaum and Mitti Liebersohn shot a 71.
Collins had a strong finish to his round,
which keyed the victory for he and Sugio.
His gross score of 42 included a birdie on
No. 16, and pars on No. 11 and 15—which
translated into two eagles and a birdie, and
an incredible team score of 26 on the back
nine. Sugio got the ball rolling by opening
his round with two pars, and paring No. 5
and 9 to set the stage for Collins’ back-nine
heroics.
You can spot all the winners from a
distance—likely all sporting new softgoods
or shiny new clubs after using their
winnings in the AGC golf shop. As always,
however, all the participants were winners,
and we’re indebted to all the members
who support our
club events.
THE EVENTS
Lincoln Pro-Am, 2003: Tom Sutter
fires a 65 to establish the professional
course record, which still stands
nearly a dozen years later.
U.S. Amateur Qualifier, 2007: The
amateur course record of 66 is set by
Phillipe-Andre Bannon, A 19-year-old
from Quebec, Canada, who had
played the golf course just two days
earlier in a practice round. With dicey
pin positions and a combination of
teeing areas of blues and blacks, this
might have been the most impressive
round AGC has ever seen. Hours later,
however, walking 36 on a steamy
day in July, he ballooned to a 76 for
his second round, and held on to his
qualifying spot by one stroke to
advance to the U.S. Amateur at the
Olympic Club in San Francisco.
New York State Open Qualifier:
Mike Quagliano, former Duke
University golf team captain, fired a
66 to medal and advance to NYSO at
the Bethpage Black.
Cherry Blossom contestants
(clockwise from lower left): Pete Liedel and guest;
co-winner Masatoshi Sugio, Kiyoshi Sugasawa, and Atsushi Ito; Three Luppinos and George
Ponte; Larry Kaplan and guest, Steve Greenbaum and Dan Wolfman; Mitti Liebersohn and guests.
VOLUME 13 ISSUE 2
Anglebrook Golf Club
P.O. Box 700, Lincolndale, NY 10540
P (914) 245-5588 F (914) 245 5592
To:
Club News
& Notes
July 4th at AGC
The 4th of July is on a Wednesday this year,
meaning it will not be a three-day weekend
at AGC. July 4th will be considered a
Holiday, meaning the club is open to Full
Members only.
Dress Code
Show up in your flip flops and we’ll give you
directions to the beach. Show up in gym
clothes and we’ll find you a spin class. Arrive
at Anglebrook looking like you belong in this
five-star setting, and we’ll extend you the
heartiest of AGC welcomes. That also means
shirts tucked in, and cell phones nestled safely
away deep in your pocket.
Member Referral
Help us grow the club, have someone new to tee
up with and get a nice healthy credit on your
next member statement. Sound like a good
deal? Recommend your friends to AGC, and
have them tell us you sent them.
Lessons
Before you know it, it’ll be time for the annual
Member-Guest and the Club Championship.
If you want to be playing your best in
September, there’s never a better time than
now to schedule a lesson or series of lessons
with one of our three golf pros. You’ll never
know what these guys can do for you until
you experience expert instruction.
Private Dinners
It’s barely June, and Chef Q’s private dinners
are more popular than ever. If you like the
food on the menu, wait until you see what
Chef Quattrocchi can do on 24 hours of
notice. Again, if you’d like to schedule a
dinner for between two and 92, contact Chef
or Dining Room Supervisor Mariana Tavares,
and if you’d like something other than what’s
on the menu, give Chef a day’s notice to
order and prepare what will likely be one of
the best meals you’ve ever had.
Tee Times
Even though our tee sheet is seldom booked
solid, we urge our members to make tee times
so that we can greet you and your guests at the
bag drop, and start your day with the first-class
service our members deserve. Same-day
reservations are fine, just call us before you
reach the bag drop area, please.

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