Agenda - Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

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Agenda - Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Agenda
September 13, 2002
NOTE
This document contains recommendations and reports to the State Regents regarding items on
the September 13, 2002 regular meeting agenda. For additional information, please call 405225-9116 or to get this document electronically go to www.okhighered.org State System.
Materials and recommendations contained in this agenda are tentative and unofficial prior to
State Regents’ approval or acceptance on September 13, 2002.
2
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Research Park, Oklahoma City
AGENDA
Friday, September 13, 2002--9 a.m.
State Regents Conference Room
Chairman Carl Renfro Presiding
1.
Announcement of filing of meeting notice and posting of the agenda in accordance with the
Open Meeting Act.
2.
Call to Order. Roll call and announcement of quorum.
3.
Minutes of Previous Meetings. Approval of minutes.
4.
Student Preparation.
a.
Report on student performance--ACT and SAT scores, AP participation. Page 1.
b.
Presentation of report and recommendations from Achieve, Inc., sponsored by the
Oklahoma Business and Education Coalition, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher
Education, and the State Department of Education and discussion of State Regents’
preliminary response. Page 9.
ACADEMIC
5.
Learning Site and Electronic Media. Acceptance of reports on State System learning site and
electronic media activity. Page 17.
6.
Policy, System.
7.
a.
Approval of posted revisions to the “Policy Statement on Admission To, Retention In,
and Transfer Among Colleges and Universities of the State System” concerning
concurrent enrollment of high school students. Page 21.
b.
Posting of revisions to the “Policy Statement on Admission to, Retention In, and
Transfer Among Colleges and Universities of the State System,” discontinuing
the pilot allowing the substitution of Applied Biology/Chemistry for the science
college admission requirement. Page 27.
New Programs.
a.
University of Oklahoma. Approval of request to offer the Master of Arts in
Organizational Dynamics. Page 33.
i
b.
Oklahoma State University, Oklahoma City. Approval of request to offer the Certificate
in Early Care Education Administration, including electronic delivery. Page 37.
c.
Connors State College. Approval of request to offer the Associate in Science in
Computer Information Systems. Page 41.
8.
Programs--Electronic Delivery. Approval of request from the University of Oklahoma to offer
the Bachelor of Liberal Studies and Master of Liberal Studies via electronic delivery. Page 45.
9.
Program Deletions. Approval of institutional requests for program deletions. Page 47.
10.
Academic Plans. Acknowledgment of institutional academic plans. Page 49.
FISCAL
10.1
Budget Reduction. Approval of reduced FY 03 allocations and authorization to submit revised
budgets. Page 78.1
11.
E&G Budget. Approval of two-year strategic plan for submission to the Office of State Finance.
Page 79.
12.
Endowment. Approval of distribution schedule and FY 02 annual report. Page 81.
13.
Master Lease Program. Approval of Series 2002C for submission to Bond Oversight
Committee. Page 99.
14.
Research Match. Approval of matching funds for University of Oklahoma. Page 107.
15.
Allocation. Approval of Resident Teacher Professional Development funds distribution. Page
109.
16.
Tuition and Fees. Approval of exception to policy and posting of fee increase request for the
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Page 113.
17
Revenue Bonds. Certification of accuracy of Statement of Essential Facts for Revenue Bonds at:
a.
University of Oklahoma. Page 115.
b.
University of Oklahoma. Page 117.
c.
Oklahoma State University. Page 119.
STUDENT SERVICES,
SYSTEM ADVANCEMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT
18.
Policy. Repeal of the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program policy. Page 121.
ii
19.
Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF). Approval of modification to the Temporary
Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) contract with the Department of Human Services. Page
127.
EXECUTIVE
20.
Quality Initiative Grant. Approval of grants to institutions for partial support of the Fall
Faculty Arts Institute Scholarships. Page 129.
21.
Federal Issues. Report on Reauthorization and other federal issues affecting Oklahoma higher
education. Page 131.
22.
Student Learning. Report and announcement of selection of Oklahoma as a pilot state for the
National Forum on College-Level Learning sponsored by the Pew Charitable Trusts. Page 135.
23.
Guaranteed Student Loan Program. Ratification of final agreement between the Oklahoma
Guaranteed Student Loan Program and the U. S. Department of Education. Page 139.
24.
Grants. Acceptance of external funds. Page 149.
25.
Commendations. Recognition of State Regents’ staff for service and recognitions on state and
national projects. Page 153.
26.
Ethics Policy. Approval of modifications in the State Regents’ ethics policy. Page 155.
27.
Personnel Policy. Approval of modifications and updates in State Regents’ personnel policy
manual. Page 161.
28.
State Regents’ Meetings. Approval of 2003 State Regents’ meeting dates and authorization to
file with the Secretary of State in accordance with the Open Meeting Act. Page 169.
CONSENT DOCKET
29.
Consent Docket. Approval/ratification of the following routine requests which are consistent
with State Regents' policies and procedures or previous actions.
a.
b.
Programs.
(1)
Approval of institutional requests for program modifications. Page 171.
(2)
Ratification of approved institutional requests for program modification. Page
175.
(3)
Final approval and review schedule extension of degree programs. Page 177.
(4)
Ratification of approved degree program suspension. Page 181.
Cooperative Agreements. Ratification of approved institutional requests for cooperative
agreement modification. Page 183.
iii
c.
Ratification of approved course and program offerings for the Southern Regional
Education Board Academic Common Market and Electronic Campus. Page 185.
d.
Capital. Ratification of capital allotments. Page 191.
e.
Agreements.
f.
g.
(1)
Approval of FY03 EPSCoR contracts for fiscal agent services. Page 197.
(2)
Approval of FY 03 contract with the Department of Career and Technology
Education. Page 207.
(3)
Ratification of agreements relating to the Regents Training Center. Page 211.
Grants.
(1)
Eisenhower Program. Ratification of allocation of funds to the University of
Oklahoma for final evaluation of the Eisenhower program. Page 215.
(2)
Gear Up/Student Preparation. Ratification of matching grant funds for a pilot
middle school mentoring program. Page 217.
(3)
Math Incentive. Ratification of mathematics incentive grant to the University of
Oklahoma for the CITyS project. Page 219.
(4)
Minority Teacher Recruitment Center. Approval of grants to high school/junior
high school programs. Page 221.
Agency Operations.
(1)
Ratification of agency purchases over $25,000. Page 223.
(2)
Ratification of changes at or above director level. Page 231. 231
h.
Administrative Procedures Act. Adoption of revised rules for the Faculty Advisory
Committee and continue rule revocation process pursuant to the Oklahoma
Administrative Procedures Act. Page 233.
i.
Policy. Ratification of minor updates and reformatting for on-line posting of chapters in
the State Regents ‘ Policies and Procedures. Page 237.
30.
Reports. Acceptance of reports listed on Attachment "A."
31.
Chancellor Search. Report on status of Chancellor Search.
32.
Report of the Chancellor. (No Action, No Discussion).
33.
Report of the Chairman. (No Action, No Discussion).
iv
34.
Report of the Committees. (No Action, No Discussion).
a.
Academic Affairs and Social Justice and Student Services Committees
b.
Budget and Audit Committee.
c.
Strategic Planning and Personnel Committee.
d.
Technology Committee.
35.
New Business. Consideration of "any matter not known about or which could not have been
reasonably foreseen prior to the time of posting the agenda."
36.
Announcement of Next Regular Meeting--9 a.m., Thursday, October 31, 2002, at Ardmore.
37.
Adjournment.
v
ATTACHMENT "A"
30.
Reports.
a.
Programs.
(1)
Annual report on program requests. Page 239.
(2)
Status report on program requests. Page 249.
b.
Admission Policy Impact Study. Page 255.
c.
Academic Policy Exceptions Quarterly Report. Page 259.
d
Annual Reports.
e.
(1)
Regents Education Program. Page 263.
(2)
Faculty Salary Report. Page 265.
(3)
Student Cost Survey FY 2003. Page 267.
(4)
Tuition and Fees Book. Page 269.
(5)
Endowment Earnings Report. Page 271.
(6)
Oklahoma Teacher Enhancement Program (OTEP) Title II Grant Update. Page
273.
(7)
Smart Start and America Counts/America Reads Grant Report. Page 277.
(8)
Report of Financial Operations. Page 281.
Publications. Page 283.
vi
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #4-a:
SUBJECT:
Student Preparation
RECOMMENDATION:
This item of the Annual Reports on ACT and SAT scores and Advanced Placement
Participation is presented for State Regents’ information only.
BACKGROUND:
Staff annually shares the performance of Oklahoma students on the ACT and SAT assessments, two
assessments used in conjunction with other indicators for college admission. Further, data are presented
on Advanced Placement (AP) participation among Oklahoma high school students as well. ACT scores
are of particular importance to higher education in Oklahoma because such a substantial proportion of the
state’s high school graduates take the ACT Assessment for the purposes of college admission. A smaller
proportion of students take the SAT exam; therefore, data are presented for SAT scores in a summary
report that compare Oklahoma student performance to states with a similar percentage of participation.
ACT scores are of importance additionally because, while they serve as a predictive measure of success in
college in the first year, they also serve as outcome indicators of preparation for college. For nearly a
decade, State Regents have been involved with ACT as partners in the Educational Planning and
Assessment System (EPAS) with promising results that grow more substantial each year of the program.
Further, ACT scores are now used in consideration in the K-12 accountability system, the Academic
Performance Index (API). Because of the inclusion of ACT scores and participation in this API system,
more and more school districts are availing themselves of the technical assistance in guidance and
curriculum improvement afforded to them through EPAS and the State Regents’ Student Preparation
office.
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents annually review these indicators as a means to gauge student preparation and to examine
State System needs to improve student preparation in Oklahoma. Improving student preparation for
college is a high priority on the State Regents’ Work Plan and also forms the basis of Strategy 1 Brain
Gain 2010 goals and objectives.
ANALYSIS:
Attached to this item are separate summary pages for ACT and SAT scores. Broadly, the results show the
following:
•
Oklahoma scores remained steady on the Composite, Mathematics, and Reading areas of
the ACT assessment while the national average dropped.
1
Oklahoma scores on the Science Reasoning and English portions of the ACT assessment dropped by 0.1
of a point. However, the gap between Oklahoma scores and the national average narrowed because of the
drop in the national averages.
Mathematics remains Oklahoma’s primary need for increased attention to student preparation. This is not
just an Oklahoma issue, however. Nationally, most states see a gap between their students’ performances
and that of the nation as a whole.
Preparation in mathematics matters. When examining the courses students take in high school and in the
context of their ACT scores in mathematics, we see that students who take only the currently
recommended required mathematics core (Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry) are not sufficiently
prepared for college. Students taking these courses also, on average, do not achieve the score of 19
required for entry into college-level mathematics courses. Students who take more than three years of
mathematics, provided that those additional courses are of sufficient rigor, perform better on the ACT
assessment, particularly if Trigonometry and Calculus courses are offered.
As important as the course sequence is to mathematic achievement, it is equally important that the
expected content be taught in each mathematics course and that there is the substantially rigorous content
expected in Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. As more schools understand the competencies in the
Standards for Transition and integrate those skills into their classrooms, improved scores are likely.
Some evidence of grade inflation may be evident in mathematics. When examining the grades of students
who don’t meet the benchmark for entry into college-level mathematics, we see that the GPAs of those
students, on average, are higher than their performance on the ACT assessment would indicate.
Oklahoma minority students outscore their national counterparts on the ACT Assessment. However,
achievement gaps remain in minority student performance and the performance necessary for entry into
college-level courses. While gains in minority and low-income student performance have been seen over
the past decade, more work remains to be done to ensure college readiness.
Oklahoma schools are annually increasing the number of Advanced Placement (AP) courses available to
high school students. Annually, more students are taking AP courses and more students are taking AP
examinations for the purposes of gaining college credit in advance of attending college.
AP indicators are also considered in the state’s API – we expect to see a greater number of AP courses, a
greater number of students taking those courses, and a greater number of students who take the test and
score a 3 or above as this new accountability system takes root in Oklahoma schools.
In Oklahoma, only eight percent of the high school graduates take the SAT. Oklahoma students
outscored the national average on the mathematics and verbal portion of the SAT this year; however
among the six states who test less than 10 percent of the population, Oklahoma ranks fourth or fifth in
performance.
Full analyses of ACT and SAT scores, as well as a decade-long analysis of core course-taking is covered
in the attached summaries.
Attachments
2
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
of 2002 Oklahoma ACT Assessment Results
Overview
The mean ACT scores for 2001-02 high school graduating seniors who have taken the assessment are:
Oklahoma = 20.5
Nation = 20.8
Oklahoma
National
Gap
OK/Nat
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
20.0
20.6
0.6
20.2
20.7
0.5
20.3
20.8
0.5
20.3
20.8
0.5
20.5
20.9
0.4
20.6
21.0
0.4
20.5
21.0
0.5
20.6
21.0
0.4
20.8
21.0
0.2
20.5
21.0
0.5
20.5
20.8
0.3
Since 1992, the Oklahoma mean ACT score increased by 0.5 of a point while the nation increased by 0.2; the gap between
Oklahoma and national scores decreased from a high of 0.6 of a point in 1992 to 0.2 in 2000. In 2002, the gap between
Oklahoma's ACT composite score and the nations is 0.3 of a point.
The gap between Oklahoma and the nation from the 1992 to 2002 has closed in all subject areas except math, which
increased from 0.7 to 0.9. The gap in science reasoning scores decreased from 0.6 to 0.3 and in reading from 0.5 to 0.1. In
1992, the gap in English was 0.5, but in 2002, Oklahoma scores surpassed the nation by 0.1.
Student Participation
The following table compares Oklahoma high school graduates to the number taking the ACT.
participation rate increased from 65.3 to 72.3 percent.
No. of Test Takers
2
No. of HS Grads
% Taking ACT
1992
1993
1994
1995
1996
1997 19981
1999
21,924 20,746 21,854 23,038 22,897 24,134 24,874 25,755
33,566 31,653 32,459 34,081 33,744 33,645 36,254 37,396
65.3% 65.5% 67.3% 67.6% 67.9% 71.7% 68.7% 68.9%
2000
26,902
38,512
69.9%
NOTE: ACT revised the number of test-takers for 1998 through 2002. Actuals provided by SDE.
based on SDE enrollment data.
1
2
Since 1992, the
2001
26,908
38,344
70.2%
2002
26,717
3
36,953
72.3%
Estimate by OSRHE
3
Core Curriculum
Since 1992, the percentage of college-bound high school seniors taking the ACT core curriculum (4 units-English, 3 unitsmath, 3 units-social studies, 3 units-sciences) increased. The percentage of Oklahoma students taking the core in 2002
increased by eight percentage points compared to those taking the core in 1992. On average, students who planned to
complete the core curriculum scored 2.7 points higher than students who did not.
PERCENT TAKING CORE CURRICULUM
Racial-Ethnic Group
All
African American
Native American
Asian American
White
Mexican American
Hispanic American
1992
45%
38%
39%
62%
48%
43%
46%
1993
46%
39%
42%
67%
49%
40%
51%
1994
47%
40%
42%
64%
51%
47%
48%
1995
47%
44%
46%
60%
51%
47%
44%
1996
49%
47%
46%
66%
51%
43%
49%
1997
51%
46%
46%
67%
54%
52%
54%
1998
53%
47%
46%
65%
55%
49%
55%
NOTE: Percentages based on all test takers, including those not reporting courses.
3
1999
52%
48%
47%
69%
53%
49%
56%
2000
52%
49%
46%
67%
54%
52%
50%
2001
52%
47%
45%
66%
54%
47%
53%
2002
53%
51%
46%
70%
54%
49%
47%
Since 1992, the percentage of African American students taking the core curriculum increased 13 percentage points, more
than any other ethnic group. Of all ethnic groups, Asian Americans have the highest percentage of students taking the
core curriculum (70 percent). Oklahoma core takers scored the same as their national counterparts, 21.8. Non-core takers
lagged behind by 0.1 of a point.
Minority Students
The mean ACT for African Americans in Oklahoma increased from 17.0 in 1992 to 17.1 in 2002. The mean ACT for
Native Americans in Oklahoma rose from 18.8 in 1992 to 19.4 in 2002. Oklahoma African Americans and Oklahoma
Native Americans both scored above their national counterparts (16.8 and 18.6, respectively).
State Comparisons
Oklahoma ranks 13th in the nation in percentage of graduates tested. When compared to the 25 states with 50 percent or more
of their high school graduates taking the ACT, Oklahoma ranks 15th in the mean composite score. In the eight years for the
state-by-state rankings, Oklahoma was constant at 17th until moving to 15th this year.
When comparing Oklahoma students to their national counterparts, the greatest lag was between the highest scoring students.
Oklahoma's highest scoring students (those at the 75th percentile) were 0.5 of a point behind their peers (23.6 compared to
24.1). Oklahoma students at the 50th percentile were 0.4 of a point behind their counterparts (20.1 compared to 20.5). The
Oklahoma students scoring the lowest (those at the 25th percentile) were 0.2 of a point behind their national counterparts
(17.0 compared to 17.2)
.
4
2002 ACT Average Composite Scores by State
States With 50% or More of High School Graduates Taking ACT
Sorted by Composite ACT Score and Percent of Graduates Tested
Total
Core Completers
Non-Core Completers
No
Course
Data
Quartile Values
Quartile Values
Quartile Values
Average
% of
% of Total
% of Total
% of Total
State
Composite Graduates 25th 50th 75th
25th 50th 75th
25th 50th 75th
Tested
Tested
Tested
Score
Tested*
1 Wisconsin
22.2
68
18.9 22.0 25.2
60
19.8 22.7 25.9
36
17.7 20.6 23.9
3
2 Minnesota
22.1
65
18.8 21.9 25.2
66
19.8 22.7 25.8
28
17.1 19.9 23.1
5
3 Iowa
22.0
66
18.7 21.7 25.0
66
19.8 22.7 25.8
31
16.9 19.5 22.5
3
4 Montana
21.7
52
18.6 21.5 24.7
53
19.9 23.0 26.0
43
17.2 19.9 22.8
4
4 Nebraska
21.7
72
18.3 21.4 24.8
66
19.5 22.4 25.7
31
16.6 19.5 22.6
4
6 Kansas
21.6
76
18.1 21.4 24.9
66
19.3 22.4 25.7
30
16.4 19.1 22.4
4
7 Missouri
21.5
68
17.9 21.2 24.7
58
19.4 22.5 25.9
37
16.4 19.1 22.3
4
8 Ohio
21.4
62
18.0 21.1 24.5
61
19.2 22.2 25.5
35
16.4 19.0 22.2
4
8 South Dakota
21.4
71
18.1 21.2 24.4
61
19.4 22.1 25.2
36
16.5 19.4 22.7
3
8 Utah
21.4
66
18.0 21.1 24.5
42
19.0 22.1 25.4
53
17.2 20.2 23.7
5
8 Wyoming
21.4
64
18.3 21.2 24.4
55
19.6 22.4 25.4
41
16.9 19.6 22.7
3
12 Michigan
21.3
68
17.9 21.1 24.6
56
19.2 22.4 25.7
41
16.6 19.5 22.6
4
13 Idaho
21.2
57
17.9 21.0 24.3
48
19.5 22.3 25.4
47
16.8 19.5 22.8
5
13 North Dakota
21.2
78
17.9 21.0 24.3
61
19.7 22.4 25.5
36
15.9 18.4 21.4
3
15 Oklahoma
20.5
69
17.0 20.1 23.6
53
18.4 21.5 25.0
42
15.9 18.6 21.7
5
16 West Virginia
20.3
61
17.2 20.1 23.1
35
18.5 21.3 24.5
62
16.6 19.3 22.3
4
17 Arkansas
20.2
72
16.6 19.8 23.5
71
17.5 20.6 24.1
19
14.6 16.9 19.8
10
18 Alabama
20.1
71
16.7 19.6 23.1
66
17.7 20.7 24.1
31
15.1 17.6 20.5
3
18 Colorado
20.1
99
16.1 19.8 23.6
47
18.6 21.9 25.3
43
14.7 17.6 21.2
10
18 Illinois
20.1
99
16.0 19.7 23.8
42
18.9 22.3 25.9
50
14.7 17.7 21.4
8
21 Kentucky
20.0
72
16.5 19.6 23.1
58
17.5 20.4 23.9
39
15.4 18.2 21.5
3
21 New Mexico
20.0
63
16.3 19.4 23.2
54
17.6 20.7 24.4
41
15.2 17.9 21.2
5
21 Tennessee
20.0
79
16.4 19.6 23.2
60
17.5 20.6 24.2
36
15.1 17.9 21.1
3
24 Louisiana
19.6
79
16.0 19.3 22.6
71
17.1 20.2 23.4
25
14.1 16.3 19.3
4
18.6
84
15.1 17.8 21.3
53
16.2 19.2 23.0
43
14.3 16.4 19.2
3
25 Mississippi
National
20.8
39
17.2 20.5 24.1
58
18.4 21.6 25.1
36
15.7 18.6 22.1
7
Source: 2002 ACT Composite Average by State. Note: *percent of graduates based on WICHE estimates which tend to be lower
than SDE and OSRHE projections.
5
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
Research Park, Oklahoma City
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
of the 2002 Oklahoma SAT Results
Overview
The mean SAT scores for the 2001-02 Oklahoma high school graduates and their counterparts nationally were:
Verbal
565
504
Oklahoma
Nation
Math
562
516
Combined
1127
1020
In comparison to national scores, Oklahoma SAT verbal and math scores remained higher (61 points for verbal and 46
points for math). The higher scores were expected because only 8 percent of Oklahoma graduates took the SAT
compared to 46 percent nationally.
Those Oklahoma 2002 high school graduates taking the SAT numbered 3,065 compared to 3,199 in 2001, a decrease of
134 students or 4.2 percent.
SAT: State-by-State
Seventy-two percent of Oklahoma 2002 high school graduates took the ACT. Only 8 percent of the Oklahoma high
school graduating class took the SAT compared to 46 percent taking the SAT nationally. Due to this limited participation,
higher than average national SAT scores are expected and comparisons with test takers in states with greater or lesser
participation are not appropriate.
Of the six states with 8 to 10 percent of their graduates taking the SAT, Oklahoma ranked 4th in verbal and 5th in math and
combined mean scores.
2002 MEAN SAT SCORES
FOR STATES WITH 8 to 10 PERCENT PARTICIPATION
Ranked by Test Scores
Alabama
Kansas
Minnesota
Missouri
Nebraska
Oklahoma
NATIONAL
1
2
3
4
5
6
Minnesota
Kansas
Missouri
Oklahoma
Nebraska
Alabama
NATIONAL
Score
581
578
574
565
561
560
504
1
2
2
4
5
6
State
Minnesota
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Alabama
NATIONAL
Combined
Score
591
580
580
570
562
559
516
Rank
State
Math
Rank
Verbal
Rank
State
Percent of
Graduates
Tested
9
9
10
8
8
8
46
1
2
3
4
5
6
State
Score
Minnesota
Kansas
Missouri
Nebraska
Oklahoma
Alabama
NATIONAL
1,172
1,158
1,154
1,131
1,127
1,119
1,020
Note: Estimated number of 2002 high school graduates derived from Western Interstate Commission for
Higher Education (WICHE) projections.
6
SAT: Minority Students
As expected, due to a small percentage of students taking the SAT in Oklahoma, Oklahoma SAT test takers from
all ethnic groups continued to score higher on SAT verbal and math than their counterparts nationally.
Mean Verbal Scores
Total
OK Nation
568
505
567
505
563
505
567
506
565
504
Native
American
OK Nation
554
480
564
484
554
482
575
481
552
479
African
American
OK Nation
487
434
483
434
486
434
497
433
494
430
Year
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
% Change
-0.5% -0.2% -0.4% -0.2% 1.4% -0.9%
98 to 02
Mexican
American*
OK Nation
----539
453
561
451
525
446
--
--
Puerto
Rican*
OK Nation
----573
456
528
457
-455
--
--
Other
Hispanic*
OK Nation
----555
461
551
460
526
458
--
--
Asian
OK Nation
542
498
545
498
550
499
535
501
537
501
White
OK Nation
577
526
576
527
571
528
577
529
575
527
-0.9% 0.6% -0.3% 0.2%
Mean Math Scores
Total
OK Nation
564
512
560
511
560
514
561
514
562
516
Native
American
OK Nation
542
483
553
481
535
481
550
479
541
483
African
American
OK Nation
464
426
450
422
458
426
465
426
462
427
Year
1998
1999
2000
2001
2002
% Change
-0.4% 0.8% -0.2% 0.0% -0.4% 0.2%
98 to 02
Mexican
American*
OK Nation
----532
460
552
458
529
457
--
NOTE: '--' Norms not reported in these years. *New categories in 2000.
7
--
Puerto
Rican*
OK Nation
----566
451
458
451
-451
--
--
Other
Hispanic*
OK Nation
----553
467
555
465
519
464
--
--
Asian
OK Nation
601
562
595
560
605
565
596
566
619
569
3.0%
White
OK Nation
570
528
567
528
566
530
568
531
568
533
1.2% -0.4% 0.9%
8
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #4-b:
SUBJECT:
Student Preparation, K-16 Partnerships
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is presented for State Regents information only.
BACKGROUND:
State Regents funded a comprehensive policy, standards, and assessment review through Achieve, Inc.
with the State Department of Education and the Oklahoma Business and Education and support from the
Governor’s office. The year-long study and effort by Achieve, Inc. staff was completed and presented on
August 29, 2002 in the form of a state wide policy briefing by Achieve and the partners in Oklahoma.
The goal of this project was for Achieve to perform a comprehensive review of Oklahoma’s Priority
Academic Student Skills (PASS), the assessments used in the Oklahoma School Testing Program (the
testing system for K-12) and to study the policy framework for helping K-12 students improve academic
achievement.
Added to this study at the request of the State Regents was a review of how well students are being
prepared to perform well on the Core Competencies for Collegiate Success Framework adopted by the
State Regents in December 1999, the ACT Standards for Transition. As part of the policy analysis,
stakeholders from the following groups were invited to participate in interviews by the Achieve team: K12 education; higher education; career-technology education; business and industry; military; Hispanic,
Native American, and other minority communities; legislators and other community leaders.
POLICY ISSUES:
The report presented here follows State Regents action to fund the study in collaboration with the partners
identified here. The results, while aimed primarily at elementary and secondary education, will aid State
Regents in strengthening Student Preparation efforts, in better leveraging EPAS as a system for student
preparation at the state and local district level, and will aid State Regents in achieving the goals outlined
in Brain Gain 2010.
ANALYSIS:
Following is the Executive Summary from the Achieve Policy review. A full set of reports is provided to
State Regents, along with a presentation today by Phyllis Hudecki, Executive Director, Oklahoma
Business and Education Coalition. Staff will additionally present reaction to the findings. A written copy
of State Regents’ reactions is presented at the end of the Achieve, Executive Summary.
Attachments
9
AIMING HIGHER: LEVERAGING THE OPPORTUNITIES FOR EDUCATION REFORM IN
OKLAHOMA
Achieve, Inc.
EXECUTIVE SUMMARY
In 2001, the Oklahoma Business and Education Coalition, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher
Education, the Oklahoma State Department of Education, and the Governor’s Office, asked Achieve, Inc.,
to undertake an independent review of the state’s policies and practices to improve schools by setting high
academic standards and holding schools and students accountable for results.
In examining the state’s record of reform and talking with a wide cross-section of residents, it was clear to
Achieve’s team of experts that standards, assessments and accountability have been at the heart of
Oklahoma’s efforts to improve its schools for more than a decade. Landmark legislation in 1990 set the
state on a course to create content standards and begin statewide testing five years later. Along the way,
the state has sent a clear signal about its commitment to reform, enacting standards and tests and initiating
a limited accountability system despite its fiscal constraints. Both higher education and the private sector
have been significant contributors to the state’s success.
This is important context as Oklahoma enters the next phase of standards-based reform. The state is
preparing for a periodic review of its standards, which provides an ideal opportunity to strengthen them
and the tests aligned to them at a time when accountability based on academic results should increase. As
is the case with the other 49 states, Oklahoma will move forward in the context of the No Child Left
Behind Act, the new federal education law whose provisions include expansion of state testing, attention
to the achievement of all students and shared accountability for results.
While Achieve does not minimize the work that must be done or the challenges posed by doing it in a
large rural state with a diverse population, we consider Oklahoma well positioned to make significant
progress. As state government, K-12 and higher education, and the private sector work together to make
progress in Oklahoma’s next phase of reform, we urge policymakers and others interested in supporting
school improvement to focus their efforts on a few key goals:
Strengthen the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) so that standards provide a more
challenging foundation for school improvement efforts by the state and local school districts.
In addition to this review of its education reform policies, Oklahoma asked Achieve to conduct a
comprehensive study of its standards and tests in English and mathematics and their relationship to ACT,
which the state has used to good effect to communicate expectations for college preparedness and help
more students meet them. Measuring Up, the resulting report that serves as a companion to this policy
review, offers a road map to improving the state’s standards and tests. Oklahoma’s PASS has some strong
features on which to build. They are comprehensive, measurable, generally compatible with the ACT
Standards of Transition and
tests, and, in some areas, quite rigorous. In particular, Oklahoma’s math standards lay strong conceptual
foundations for grades K–5 and, overall, contain a well-developed sequence of knowledge and skills.
However, Achieve noted significant areas for improvement, which Oklahoma should strive to address
through the upcoming, legislatively mandated review of PASS. These include clarifying the level of rigor
expected by the standards through use of suggested reading lists or sample text in English language arts
10
and sample problems in math and restructuring the English language arts standards so that the
development of skills from grade to grade is explicit and the most important content receives the most
emphasis.
Leverage grade-by-grade testing provisions of the new federal education law to create a
coherent testing system that promotes challenging expectations for all students.
Oklahoma has made some good choices in constructing its assessment system, such as directly measuring
students’ ability to compose written prose and testing in subjects beyond reading and math.
While the state built a strong foundation with its assessment system, Achieve identified four major
challenges with which policymakers need to contend. First, while each test offers results that may be
useful in some settings, the mix of state standards-based, national norm-referenced and college
admissions tests may be sending a mixed signal about the primacy of the content found in Oklahoma’s
standards. Second, the level of rigor fluctuates from test to test. Third, Oklahoma lacks English and math
tests in grades 4, 6 and 7 required by the new federal law. Fourth, at the high school level, the state needs
to add to its battery of tests to cover coursework students pursue after 10th grade. Oklahoma’s goal should
be a set of tests from elementary to high school that are tightly aligned with PASS and can provide
consistent and comparable results to educators and parents. The State Department of Education is laying
the groundwork for such a coherent testing program and plans to take the worthwhile step of engaging
outside experts to ensure the tests are vertically aligned from one grade to the next, creating an
appropriate progression of skills and knowledge students are expected to master.
Enhance the accountability system to sharpen its focus on the achievement of all students and to
create incentives for improvement among more schools, teachers and students.
Oklahoma has seen results improve when consequences are attached to performance; the higher test
scores under the Reading Sufficiency Act and a 10-percentage point percent jump in the passing rate on
the 8th grade reading test after a passing score was required to obtain a driver’s license have shown that
accountability works. But beyond 8th graders and elementary school educators, there are no significant
consequences for performance — good or bad — for others in the education system. The state only
identifies the lowest performing schools, and the expectations for acceptable performance are so low that
few schools earn the rating for more than a year at a time. As a result, the accountability system does not
lead to effective targeting of assistance and resources to the schools most in need. In particular, minority
students may be at risk because the state historically did not produce achievement data that drew attention
to their lagging performance. We encourage Oklahomans to strengthen the state’s commitment to helping
all children achieve by bolstering the accountability system. A vital step would be the creation of a data
system to track students’ performance from grade to grade and place to place. Once it identifies schools as
low performing, the state must ensure they get adequate and effective assistance. If schools fail to
improve after receiving that assistance, more dramatic intervention should occur. The state should be
better positioned to take these steps now that test results are reported in disaggregated form and an
Academic Performance Index has been added to create incentives for all schools to improve.
Report achievement results clearly so that they are more useful to schools and to the public.
Oklahoma has made a commitment to report fully on school and student performance. While the supply
of information appears to be ample, its delivery may not be as effective as it could be. Achieve’s review
team heard differing opinions about the usefulness of performance reports to schools in planning for
improvement. Public accountability could be enhanced by replacing the separate reports produced by the
State Department of Education and the Governor’s Office with a single, jointly published report, based on
11
a common set of performance indicators and other data. It is needlessly confusing for the public to have to
sift and sort related information from two different sources.
Tie achievement of the state’s standards more closely to opportunities to succeed after high
school, such as college admissions and employment.
Oklahoma has taken important steps to tie its overall efforts to raise student achievement to its goal of
increasing the number of students who attend college. The state has steadily increased the percentage of
high school juniors and seniors taking the ACT and has seen its average scores rise at the same time. Not
surprisingly given their different purposes and origins, the ACT and Oklahoma’s standards and tests are
compatible, but not completely consistent. To increase the likelihood of students succeeding on both state
tests and the ACT, Oklahoma should judiciously add key elements of the ACT to its standards and tests.
In addition, to safeguard their academic rigor, the state’s career and technology education programs
should not be allowed to function apart from the accountability system for other schools and students.
Responsibility for CareerTech programs serving high school students should lie with the State
Superintendent of Public Instruction to ensure that they deliver solid academic preparation for the
resources allotted and prepare their graduates to succeed in higher education and to meet current
workplace demands.
Forge a statewide consensus in support of common, rigorous standards for all students.
Oklahoma has maintained efforts to raise standards for more than a decade, initiating innovative programs
such as the leveraging of the ACT exam to bring earlier attention to college preparation. The state faces a
time of transition, in terms of both revising its standards and selecting its political leadership. Some in
Oklahoma question whether the notion of raising all students to high standards is a universally accepted
view. Balancing accountability with the autonomy of the state’s more than 500 local school districts
remains a critical concern for many.
In our view, traditions of local control are not at odds with the idea that all students should master a
common body of knowledge and skills. Both state and local leaders bear the responsibility of ensuring
that a high school diploma in Oklahoma actually signifies readiness to succeed in higher education or
fulfilling careers. It will be critical for the business and postsecondary education communities to raise
their voices in support of this idea and to continue to make the connection between well-educated
citizenry and the state’s economic and civic vitality.
12
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
Response to Major Findings by Achieve
Standards and Assessment Analysis
Background and Current Efforts: The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are nationally
recognized for higher education leadership in student preparation for college through K-12 student and
school support efforts that include:
•
•
•
•
•
Strengthening middle and high school curriculum alignment with
o Collegiate-level expectations that are based on longitudinal student achievement data and
o A comprehensive predictive research system that identifies the skills and competencies
necessary for success in the first year of college;
Encouraging more students to take a challenging core curriculum in high school through
o Rigorous requirements of the Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program (OHLAP),
o Public awareness and school improvement work in the federal GEAR UP (Gaining Early
Awareness and Readiness for Undergraduate Programs) program;
o Increasing the State Regents’ core requirements for admission to college from 11 to 15
units and
o Feedback through State Regents’ Educational Planning and Assessment System (EPAS),
a statewide preparation program conducted in partnership with ACT, Inc.
Improving teacher preparation by requiring all elementary education, special education and early
childhood development majors to complete 12 credit hours in each of four subjects –
mathematics, English, science and social sciences;
Identifying specific skills and competencies expected from students enrolling in Oklahoma State
System institutions by identifying the ACT Standards for Transition as Oklahoma higher
education’s Core Competencies for Collegiate Success.
Aligning higher education policies with the approval of the Core Competencies for Collegiate
Success policy in December 1999. Through this, State Regents aligned college entry-level
expectations for demonstrated core skills and competencies with the ACT Assessment (used for
consideration in college admission) and with precollegiate preparation efforts through EPAS
impacting students as early as the 8th grade.
State Regents participated in this partnership between the Oklahoma Business and Education Coalition,
the Governor’s office, and the State Department of Education to conduct this standards and assessment
review because systemic change requires that all aspects of an educational system learn and work
together to promote student success, Pre-K-16.
National studies show that the most important predictor in college for students is the quality and rigor of
preparation in high school. State Regents’ commitment to student success means that we take seriously
our role in the success of future college students. Particularly important for this analysis by Achieve was
the inclusion of the ACT, Inc. standards and assessments. The ACT Standards for Transition provide
skill benchmarks in core content areas that are predictive of success in the first year of college. Not just a
number, a student’s ACT score represents specific ranges of skills that a student is likely to know and be
able to do. For the purposes of the Achieve, Inc. analysis, State Regents placed a high value on learning
13
how well the ACT Standards for Transition were being met in the middle school and high school
classrooms in Oklahoma.
Achieve’s Major Findings
1. Strengthen the Priority Academic Student Skills (PASS) so that standards provide a more
challenging foundation for school improvement efforts by the state and local school districts.
State Regents support a challenging core curriculum in all grade levels, K-12. Data indicate that students
who take challenging core courses in high school are more likely to be successful in postsecondary
education and work. Oklahoma’s economic future rests on the quality of its intellectual capital. Our
knowledge-based economy requires that students exit high school with high-level skills and that higher
education produce highly skilled graduates with critical thinking ability, as well as specific work-relevant
skills.
However, it is not enough for policy makers to simply set high standards. Policy requires action on the
ground to produce successful results. Assessments used to gauge student progress should be tied to
relevant core skills – especially those needed for postsecondary and workforce success. Additionally, a
comprehensive K-12 data system will be required in Oklahoma to tie student achievement to what is
being taught in the classroom. The Achieve analysis provides an excellent framework for the state to gain
this comprehensive data system.
2. Leverage grade-by-grade testing provisions of the new federal education law to create a coherent
testing system that promotes challenging expectations for all students.
It is equally important for the spirit and the letter of the No Child Left Behind legislation to be met in
Oklahoma. Achieve’s analysis has given Oklahoma a good road map for meeting the provisions of the
new federal legislation for elementary and secondary education. State Regents will be strong partners
with the State Department of Education and Oklahoma schools to help meet the provisions. We advocate
that the coherent testing system to be developed under the new law make academic and developmental
sense – requiring more and more complex skills to be demonstrated by students, and that the system
adequately measure progress by individual students, as well as the value added by instruction.
3. Enhance the accountability system to sharpen its focus on the achievement of all students and to
create incentives for improvement among more schools, teachers and students.
State Regents support and endorse this finding, as the State System of Higher Education has created a
transparent system-wide report card and accountability system to inform the public and education
stakeholders about the quality and progress of higher education in Oklahoma. The mark of a good
accountability system is its transparency to the public and its ability to achieve intended performance
outcomes.
4. Report achievement results clearly so that they are more useful to schools and to the public.
The newly created Academic Performance Index (API) rankings for K-12 schools are already beginning
to achieve their intended results – State Regents’ staff are in high demand for helping schools improve
curriculum and instruction in middle school and high school to improve performance. What remains is
the creation of a comprehensive data system and a means to make the school performance readily
14
accessible to the public and student performance easily accessible to parent. Cooperative efforts currently
underway to create such a system should yield the results recommended by Achieve.
5. Tie achievement of the state’s standards more closely to opportunities to succeed after high
school, such as college admissions and employment.
State Regents enthusiastically support this recommendation. The currency of the Oklahoma High School
diploma must be relevant to what Oklahoma high school graduates are “ready to do next,” whether that be
attending college, entering the military, or joining the workforce. Because most careers eventually
require further training throughout the lifespan, State Regents advocate that high school exit requirements
be as rigorous as possible. To do less for Oklahoma students would be to graduate young people from
high school without the skills to survive in the current work world. State Regents are prepared to
continue doing their part in making the high school experience as rigorous as possible.
State Regents continue to focus on improving mathematics skills. More than any other content area,
college level remediation is highest in mathematics; approximately one-third of all high school graduates
require remediation upon admission to an Oklahoma college or university. Opportunities for
postsecondary and workforce success are tied to mathematics skill levels. Regents look forward to
continuing to strengthen mathematics in high school. Current efforts, as well as those over the past few
years, have helped to reduce mathematics remediation. We must do more. We must resist any attempt to
reduce rigor of mathematics courses in high school. We must also pay equal attention to what is being
taught in high school math courses while we also focus on the number and progression of math course
sequences.
6. Forge a statewide consensus in support of common, rigorous standards for all students.
The act of conducting this analysis with Achieve, Inc. demonstrates that education and business leaders
are prepared to work together to achieve common educational goals and outcomes. This activity sets the
stage for more and stronger cooperative efforts. We are all focused on the same goal – student success.
15
16
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #5:
Report.
SUBJECT:
Learning Site and Electronic Media Reports.
RECOMMENDATION:
These reports are for information only. No action is needed.
BACKGROUND:
Learning Site
In response to a report conducted by the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems
(NCHEMS), the State Regents adopted the Learning Site Policy in April 1999. The policy and its related
initiatives are designed to meet the educational needs identified in the NCHEMS report through the
designations of learning sites at the twenty-five state college and universities, two higher education
centers, and an additional pilot site in Ponca City. In a related action, the State Regents began allocating
“receive site” funds to the designated learning sites. In both FY 1999 and FY 2000, $2.6 million was
allocated as an incentive to build the infrastructure necessary to import courses at the learning sites. The
Learning Site Policy calls for the collection of data to help ensure the policy’s effectiveness in meeting
the State Regents’ goals.
A survey was conducted in fall 2000 to determine the effectiveness and activity of Oklahoma’s learning
sites. It was determined after the 1998-2000 report was compiled that future information would be
collected through the annual Institutional Academic Plan.
Electronic Media
Oklahoma colleges and universities continue to be active in their use of distance learning technologies,
building on their history and traditions that date back to the establishment of the Oklahoma Higher
Education Televised Instruction System in 1970. The distance learning activity reported is taken from
data collected through the Unitized Data System (UDS). Previous reports required data collection through
time-consuming institutional surveys. Data collected through UDS provides information about the
courses offered using electronic media, their enrollments, and student achievement.
The State Regents’ Electronic Media Policy calls for regular policy review with benchmarks for
evaluating the policy’s effectiveness based on the academic quality of the courses and programs and the
cost and accessibility to Oklahoma citizens.
17
POLICY ISSUES:
These reports provide a baseline for status reports on the effectiveness of the State Regents’ "Policies and
Procedures Pertaining to the Electronic Delivery of Courses and Programs" and "Oklahoma Learning
Site Policies and Procedures.”
ANALYSIS:
Learning Site
Data from the Learning Site Accountability Report provide a picture of the campus activities in the 20012002 academic year related to the courses and programs received or imported from other institutions.
•
In this academic year, 802 courses and 58 degree programs were received from sister institutions.
Generally, the courses and programs received provide access to education that would not otherwise be
available to those communities.
•
Learning site activity involving the main campuses of the comprehensive universities was minimal
during the 2001-2002 academic year. The extensive academic programs represented by those
institutions indicate less need to import from other campuses.
•
The majority of the courses imported to OSU were in support of applied science degrees, such as
police science, municipal fire protection, and drug abuse counseling. Sharing engineering courses
between OU and OSU began with the Oklahoma Higher Education Televised Instruction System
(Talkback TV) in the 1970’s, and the data show the collaboration is continuing.
•
Regional universities accounted for 23.4 percent (188 courses) of classes imported for 2001-2002.
•
Of the 188 courses received at regional universities, 116 (61.7 percent) were imported from other
regional universities, while 39 (20.7 percent) were imported from the comprehensive universities. The
majority of these courses were in the fields of education, business, and nursing.
•
Two-year college offerings accounted for 208 (25.9 percent) of the 802 imported distance learning
classes. Western Oklahoma State College, Redlands Community College, Carl Albert State College,
and Northern Oklahoma College accounted for 18.5 percent of the courses imported. The majority of
these courses are in business, education, and nursing.
•
Offerings at the three centers in Ardmore, Idabel, and Ponca City account for 37.2 percent (298
courses) of the total for the system. The aggregated data reflect a reasonable mixture of courses from
all three tiers. The programs and courses offered at the centers cover a variety of discipline areas, but
education, nursing, and business account for the majority of courses.
Electronic Media
According to the data now collected through the UDS, Oklahoma colleges and universities remain very
active in the use of technology to deliver courses and programs. Every institution within the State System
provides courses and programs using distance-learning technology.
18
•
Of the 40,706 enrollments in electronic media courses, 16,741 (41 percent) were in computer-based
courses (which includes online or Internet-based offerings), 13,841 (34 percent) were in courses using
interactive video, and 10,124 (25 percent) were in telecourses.
•
Oklahoma’s two comprehensive universities continue to be national leaders in the delivery of courses
and programs using technology. The 14,719 student credit hours generated in 2001-2002 represent
12.5 percent of the system total. OU’s offerings covered a variety of disciplines with the largest (31.0
percent) number of courses offered in liberal arts and sciences. OSU’s offerings included a number of
disciplines, but the majority were engineering courses (46.2 percent).
•
Regional universities also showed growth and activity in electronic media offerings. The 1,386
courses offered by regional universities account for 39.1 percent of courses offered in the system.
•
The courses of study were varied, and virtually all disciplines were offered. Business, education, and
social sciences were the most prevalent subjects. Northwestern Oklahoma State University,
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, and Rogers State University reported significant numbers
of offerings comprising 24.0 percent of all courses offered in the State System.
•
In the national context, two-year institutions are considered leaders in innovation and use of
technology in instruction. Oklahoma’s community colleges are no different in that respect, and the
data indicate a strong distance learning effort within the community college tier. More than half of
distance education student enrollments are in community colleges.
•
While the community college tier leads the others, individual campuses have also been recognized as
leaders in electronic delivery. The study data show that Tulsa Community College generated the most
student credit hours using distance education (21,029). The course subject areas from community
colleges were diverse, and covered most areas of general education, business, and social science.
CONCLUSIONS
Learning Site
The data reported indicate that the goals of the policy are being met at the system level, with wide
variation among the different sites. Over 800 courses were shared among campuses. These courses
represent a significant collaborative State System effort to extend academic resources and increase access
to educational opportunities; promote quality offerings through technical, academic, and student support
standards; and realize efficiencies through sharing courses and programs.
•
Given that the need to provide support services for distance learning students at locations across
the state and continual demands for upgrading and replacing technology will continue to grow,
funding of the learning site capacity building grants should continue at the current level.
However, individual institutional allocations will be determined by demonstrated commitment to
the Learning Site Policy as evidenced by the importing of courses.
•
If funding is available, priority should be given to allocating more funding for service level
rewards. Many costs are variable based on the numbers of students served, courses received, and
institutional partnerships created.
19
•
Related to determining needs and effectiveness, learning site responsibilities should include
provisions for organized, formal, and systematic input by faculties from provider institutions,
students enrolled in the imported courses, and members of the community or area served.
•
State Regents’ staff should conduct an effort targeted to institutional staff to promote greater
utilization of imported programs using electronic media, including examples of strategies and
effective practices.
Electronic Media
Recommendations related to electronic media offerings are provided below.
•
•
The State Regents should continue to encourage the use of distance learning technologies to meet
the needs of Oklahoma citizens and provide more flexible learning options.
Investments in faculty development to better utilize the technologies should also be encouraged.
•
State Regents’ policies related to electronic media should continue to be monitored to ensure that
they provide the right balance of quality assurance, flexibility, and responsiveness.
•
Extensive distance learning programs require significant resources. Further growth and success
among colleges and universities in Oklahoma is contingent upon effective collaboration. The State
Regents’ Online College of Oklahoma (OCO) should be affirmed as the primary collaborative effort
related to distance education, and as resources are available, it should be strengthened to better meet
the needs of member institutions and the students they serve. The competitive advantage held by the
OCO and Oklahoma institutions through earlier progress and efforts will disappear without additional
attention and support.
20
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #6-a:
SUBJECT: Concurrent Enrollment Policy Revision.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the proposed concurrent
enrollment policy revision.
BACKGROUND:
In 1977, the State Regents adopted policies for institutions to offer concurrent enrollment opportunities to
high school seniors. In 1989, the State Regents expanded the policy to permit qualified high school
juniors to concurrently enroll and to allow the offering of off-campus and electronic media courses for
concurrent enrollment.
In 1993, the State Regents approved several revisions to the concurrent enrollment policy, including
defining the term “regular faculty” as it relates to faculty teaching concurrent courses. “Regular faculty”
is defined in policy as an individual qualified for appointment to the regular faculty of the institution
awarding credit for the course. Further, all appointments must be recommended by the academic unit
awarding the credit and approved through the established procedures for academic appointments.
In 1996, the State Regents expanded the policy to further delineate the definition and requirements of
providing a collegiate experience for concurrently enrolled students. Four environments were described
where the collegiate experience is presented:
1) Courses on a college or university campus with collegiate students enrolled;
2) Courses at an off-campus site that originates on campus with collegiate students enrolled;
3) Courses with collegiate students enrolled at an established off-campus site with a regular program
of study; or
4) Courses at other off-campus sites that are taught by regular faculty whose primary employment is
as a faculty member at the institution delivering the course.
Currently, institutions can ask for exceptions to the fourth environment on a case-by-case basis, allowing
faculty who are not primarily employed by the institution to teach concurrent enrollment courses at offcampus sites. Exceptions have been granted in the past for specific faculty members and for a set time
period.
21
POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents’ “Policy on Admission To, Retention In, and Transfer Among Colleges and
Universities of the State System” regulates admission standards for concurrent enrollment of high school
students. As noted above, the policy also prescribes the requirement of providing a collegiate experience
for concurrently enrolled high school students and the four environments in which the collegiate
experience can be presented. Additionally, the policy defines the term “regular faculty.”
ANALYSIS:
Changing the language of this policy will provide a mechanism to allow the teaching of concurrent
enrollment courses by individuals who are otherwise qualified to teach at the institution but are not fulltime faculty members at the institution offering the course. Many institutions utilize the expertise of field
experts such as attorneys or accountants, faculty from other institutions, or retired faculty members to
teach courses. These individuals are appointed at the institution, however the appointment is not their
primary employment. This policy revision will allow the Chancellor to approve institutional requests
related to these appointments on an ongoing basis, in addition to a case-by-case basis.
This policy revision is needed to help meet the rising demand for concurrent course offerings at offcampus sites, yet still maintain the safeguard of using qualified faculty to teach the courses. Additionally,
the current structure of high school block schedules sometimes precludes the use of full-time college
faculty for teaching concurrent enrollment courses at high school sites. This policy would provide the
flexibility of using other qualified individuals to teach on a regular basis. The footnote defining “regular
faculty” will remain as stated in the policy.
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the posted concurrent enrollment policy revision.
Attachment
22
Passed
Presidents Council: 5/1/02
Council on Instruction: 3/14/02
Excerpt from
“Policy Statement on Admission To,Retention In, and Transfer Among Colleges
And Universities of the State System” (II-2-54)
D. Concurrent Enrollment of High School Students11
1.
A twelfth grade student enrolled in an accredited high school may, if s/he meets the
requirements set forth below, be admitted provisionally to a college or university in The
Oklahoma State System of Higher Education as a special student.
Comprehensive
Universities
ACT/SAT at 67th percentile
OR
High School GPA 3.0
and
Class Rank - top 33.3%
Regional
Universities
ACT/SAT at 50th percentile
OR
High School GPA 3.0
and
Class Rank - top 50%
Two-Year
Colleges
ACT/SAT at 42nd percentile
OR
High School GPA 3.0
The University of Oklahoma (OU) is authorized to assume higher standards in fall 2000 (test
score and class rank) as set by the State Regents in October 1998.
a.
Additionally, students must have a signed statement from the high school principal
stating that they are eligible to satisfy requirements for graduation from high school
(including curricular requirements for college admission) no later than the spring of
the senior year. Students must also provide a letter of recommendation from their
counselor and written permission from their parents or legal guardian.
11 High school students wishing to enroll concurrently in college courses must meet the admission standards detailed below and
the assessment requirements in the “Policy on the Assessment of Students for Purposes of Instructional Improvement and State
System Accountability.” The American College Test (ACT) standard is based on Oklahoma norms and the Scholastic Aptitude
Test (SAT) standard is based on national norms.
23
2.
An eleventh grade student enrolled in an accredited high school may, if s/he meets
requirement (a) listed above and the additional requirements set forth below, be admitted
provisionally to a college or university in The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education
as a special student.
Comprehensive
Universities
ACT/SAT at 83rd percentile
OR
High School GPA
3.5
Regional
Universities
ACT/SAT at 72nd percentile
OR
High School GPA
3.5
Two-Year
Colleges
ACT/SAT at 58th percentile
OR
High School GPA
3.5
3.
A student receiving high-school-level instruction at home or from an unaccredited high
school may be admitted provisionally to a college or university in The Oklahoma State
System of Higher Education as a special student if s/he meets the requirements set forth
below:
a.
S/he must be 17 years of age or older and must meet the requirements set forth
below.
Comprehensive Universities
ACT/SAT at 67th percentile
Regional Universities
ACT/SAT at 50th percentile
Two-Year Colleges
ACT/SAT at 42nd percentile
b.
Or s/he must be 16 years of age and must meet the requirements set forth below.
Comprehensive Universities
ACT/SAT at 83rd percentile
Regional Universities
ACT/SAT at 72nd percentile
Two-Year Colleges
ACT/SAT at 58th percentile
Concurrent enrollment must include opportunities for high school students to achieve college
credit through a collegiate experience. The collegiate experience is evidenced by the rigor of
the course, the qualifications of the personnel delivering the course, and the student's
readiness for college. The college experience is present in four environments:
(1)
High school students enrolled on a college or university campus in a course with
collegiate students enrolled;
24
(2)
High school students enrolled at an off-campus site in a course that originates on
campus with collegiate students enrolled;
(3)
High school students enrolled in a course with collegiate students enrolled at an
established off-campus site with a regular program of study (defined as at least one
Associate of Arts, Associate of Science, or Baccalaureate degree).
(4)
High school students enrolled at other off-campus sites (including in the home and
including the use of synchronous or asynchronous instruction) and taught by regular
faculty12 whose primary employment is as a faculty member at the institution
delivering the course. Exceptions may be considered on a case-by-case basis upon
request to the Chancellor.
A high school student admitted under the provision set forth above may enroll in a combined
number of high school and college courses per semester not to exceed a full-time college
workload of 19 semester-credit-hours. A student may enroll in a maximum of nine semestercredit-hours during a summer session or term at a college or university of the State System
without the necessity of being concurrently enrolled in high school classes during the summer
term. For purposes of calculating workload, one-half high school unit shall be equivalent to
three semester-credit-hours of college work. Students wishing to exceed these limits may
petition the selected higher education institution. The appropriate institutional officials will
evaluate the student's academic performance and potential for success in determining the
student's load, which may not exceed the number of semester-credit-hours 50 percent greater
than the number of weeks in the applicable semester/term. The college should provide
appropriate academic advising prior to and continuing throughout the student's enrollment.
The completion of the high school curricular requirements set forth in Part I.A. of this policy
shall not be required of concurrently enrolled high school students for purposes of admission.
However, students may only enroll in curricular areas where they have met the assessment
requirements for college placement. Concurrently admitted high school students will not be
allowed to enroll in any zero-level courses offered by colleges and universities designed to
remove high school deficiencies.
A high school student concurrently enrolled in college courses may continue concurrent
enrollment in subsequent semesters if s/he achieves a college cumulative grade-point average
of 2.0 or above on a 4.0 scale. Following high school graduation, a student who has been
concurrently enrolled as a high school student may be admitted to the original institution of
concurrent enrollment or another institution in the State System if the student meets the
entrance requirements of the receiving institution, including the high school curriculum
requirements, and subject to the State Regents' retention standards.
All other students not qualified by grade level as specified in section I.D. might be considered
for full enrollment or concurrent enrollment under the Opportunity Admission Category.
12 "Regular faculty" is defined as a person qualified for appointment to the regular faculty of the institution proposing to award
credit. All appointments must be recommended by the academic unit awarding the credit and approved through the established
25
procedures for academic appointments.
26
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #6-b:
Policy – System.
SUBJECT:
Applied Biology/Chemistry
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents announce and post revisions to the
“Policy Statement on Admission To, Retention In, and Transfer Among Colleges and
Universities of the State System” discontinuing the pilot study allowing the
substitution of Applied Biology/Chemistry for the science college admission
requirement, beginning fall 2004.
BACKGROUND:
In October 1991, the State Board of Education recommended that, for purposes of college admission,
colleges and universities accept applied courses in mathematics and science in lieu of traditionally taught
courses in these fields. The State Regents were also interested in developing the potential for applied
courses to attract more students to mathematics and science. After staff consulted with advisory groups
and gathered information from other states, the State Regents approved a five-year pilot study for applied
mathematics beginning in fall 1992 and for two applied science courses beginning in fall 1994. In April
1997, the pilots were extended to six years, because a decision based on five years of study would come
during the summer after high school students had enrolled in courses for the fall semester.
Principles of Technology
In February 2000, Principles of Technology was approved to continue as a substitute for a science
course required for college admission, because the college performance of students taking this
course was comparable to the college performance of all freshmen.
Applied Mathematics
In March 2001, the State Regents discontinued the applied mathematics course as an alternative
for college admission, because a second review of data indicated that students taking this course
did not perform as well as all freshmen.
Applied Biology/Chemistry
In February 2000, the State Regents examined data on the performance of Applied
Biology/Chemistry students. When compared to all freshmen, the students had a greater
percentage of ACT science scores below 19, comparable or slightly lower retention rates, earned
about the same number of college credits, and had a higher percentage of college GPAs below
2.0. While these results indicated that students taking Applied Biology/Chemistry did not
perform as well as all freshmen, the State Regents determined that student performance was
sufficient to warrant an extension of the pilot for one more year, until new data were collected
27
and analyzed. In February 2002, the pilot was extended through the 2002-03 academic year with
reevaluation in fall 2002.
POLICY ISSUES:
To prepare students for the rigors of college courses, the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Admission
To, Retention In, and Transfer Among Colleges and Universities of the State System” required students
enrolling prior to fall 1997 to take an 11-unit high school core curriculum for college admission to
programs leading to baccalaureate, associate in arts, and associate in science degrees as follows: four
units of English, two units of laboratory science, three units of mathematics, and two history units. Since
fall 1997, students are also required to complete an additional four courses as follows: one citizenship
skills unit from economics, geography, government, or non-western culture and three additional units
from the previous list of courses or computer science or foreign language. Students enrolling in an
associate in applied science degree program are not required to meet these curricular requirements.
For science, the Admission Policy section titled, “Requirements Regulating the Substitution of Applied
Courses for the 15-Unit High School Core Curriculum Requirement” stipulates that students may
substitute one year of Applied Biology/Chemistry or one year of Principles of Technology for one of the
required lab science courses provided that students also complete a lab science listed in the policy.
Additionally, the policy requires that applied science teachers be certified to teach high school biology or
physics depending on the course taught. The Applied Biology/Chemistry pilot study will end in spring
2003 unless the State Regents take direct action to continue based on a study of the success rates of those
students entering college with applied science compared to all students.
ANALYSIS:
The data for the second study are now final. This report analyzes the pilot data for Applied
Biology/Chemistry students attending college in 1999-2000 and 2000-2001, comparing these students’
college performance to the performance of all fall freshmen, depending on the latest data available.
Methodology
The Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education supplied information on high school
students who completed the applied biology/chemistry courses. State Regents’ staff matched these data
with the Unitized Data System (UDS) to identify students who subsequently enrolled in Oklahoma
colleges or universities. A total of 96 students met the criteria for the study.
The college performance of these Applied Biology/Chemistry students was compared to the performance
of all first-time freshmen for which the latest data are available. The measures of success are: 1) ACT
composite score; 2) first-year college GPA; and 3) one-year retention rate, as defined by returning for a
second year within the State System. To account for other performance factors related to admission and
degree programs, the data were further analyzed by institutional tier. The first year GPAs and ACT
composite scores of Applied Biology/Chemistry students were available for comparison to all fall 2000
freshmen. One-year retention rates were available for comparison to all fall 1999 freshmen.
Findings
Nine percent of the total number of students who enrolled in the applied biology/chemistry course in high
school (n=96) enrolled in a State System institution between 1999-2000 and 2000-2001: 59 students (61
percent) at the universities and 37 students (39 percent) at the two-year colleges.
28
At universities, the mean ACT composite score for the Applied Biology/Chemistry students was 21, two
points lower than the mean of 23 for all fall 2000 freshmen. Additionally, a higher percentage of Applied
Biology/Chemistry students (47 percent) at the universities had a GPA less than 2.0 during the first year
compared to all fall 2000 freshmen (22 percent). A lower percentage of Applied Biology/Chemistry
students at the universities (53 percent) persisted for one year compared to all fall 1999 freshmen (85
percent).
Comparison Between 1999-2001 Applied Biology/Chemistry Students
and Fall 2000 First-Time Freshmen
Universities
College Performance Measures
1999-2001
Applied
Biology /
Chemistry
(n=59)
21
All Fall 2000
Freshmen
(n=10,361)
23
0.0-1.6
42%
18%
1.7-1.9
5%
4%
2.0-2.9
19%
30%
3.0 +
34%
48%
53%
85%
ACT Composite Mean Score
First-Year College GPA
One-Year Retention Rate (Fall 1999 Freshmen)*
At two-year colleges, the ACT composite mean score for Applied Biology/Chemistry students was also
two points lower than the mean score for all fall 2000 freshmen (17 and 19, respectively). Similarly, a
higher percentage of Applied Biology/Chemistry students at two-year colleges (40 percent) had a GPA
less than 2.0 during the first year compared to all fall 2000 freshmen (35 percent). A higher percentage of
Applied Biology/Chemistry students at two-year colleges (90 percent) persisted for one year than all fall
1999 freshmen (67 percent) at two-year colleges.
Comparison Between 1999-2001 Applied Biology/Chemistry Students
and Fall 2000 First-Time Freshmen
Two-Year Colleges
College Performance Measures
1999-2001
Applied
Biology /
Chemistry
(n=37)
17
All Fall 2000
Freshmen
(n=9,405)
0.0-1.6
35%
33%
1.7-1.9
5%
2%
2.0-2.9
38%
25%
22%
90%
40%
67%
ACT Composite Mean Score
19
First-Year College GPA
3.0 +
One-Year Retention Rate (Fall 1999 Freshmen)*
* The retention rate for Applied Biology/Chemistry students is based on 19 total students at the universities
and 10 total students at the two-year colleges.
29
SUMMARY AND CONCLUSION:
While the number of students who met the criteria for this study was relatively low, the performance of
Applied Biology/Chemistry students is comparable to the previous study and cause for concern. Study
results indicate that the first-year college performance of these students was lower than that of all
freshmen.
At both the universities and two-year colleges, the mean ACT composite score of Applied
Biology/Chemistry students was two points below that of all fall 2000 freshmen. The State
Regents set a minimum ACT score of 19 for remediation in the basic skills subjects (English,
science, and mathematics). At the two-year colleges, the mean ACT of 17 for Applied
Biology/Chemistry students indicates that remediation will likely be required.
A higher percentage of Applied Biology/Chemistry students at both the universities and two-year
colleges earned less than a 2.0 GPA during their first year of college than all fall 2000 freshmen.
These students are at significant academic risk.
The first study of Applied Biology/Chemistry students, examined by the State Regents in February 2000,
showed similar results. Applied Biology/Chemistry students from 1994-98 were compared to all fall
1998 freshmen. At both the universities and two-year colleges:
a higher percentage of Applied Biology/Chemistry students than all fall 1998 freshmen earned
ACT science subject scores below 19; and
a higher percentage of Applied Biology/Chemistry students than all fall 1998 freshmen earned
below a 2.0 GPA during their first year of college.
In order to provide high school students with sufficient notice for class scheduling, it is desirable to
approve any modification in college core course admission requirements in early spring. Acceptance of
applied biology/chemistry courses as a substitute for a laboratory science curriculum requirement will end
in spring 2003 unless the State Regents take direct action to continue.
State and national data show that students have a greater chance of success in college if they complete a
more rigorous curriculum. Because the Applied Biology/Chemistry pilot did not yield the desired student
performance in college, it is recommended that the pilot be allowed to expire in spring 2003. Consistent
with State Regents’ policy, one-year’s notice is provided to accommodate students currently in the
system. Effective fall 2004, applied biology/chemistry courses will no longer fulfill the science
requirement for college admission. Students who take Applied Biology/Chemistry will have the
opportunity to demonstrate science competency via the State Regents’ “Policy on Remediation and
Removal of High School Curricular Deficiencies.” Students scoring below the required competency
levels will be subject to the admission restrictions and remediation requirements detailed in policy.
30
Excerpt from the
POLICY STATEMENT ON ADMISSION TO, RETENTION IN, AND TRANSFER AMONG
COLLEGES AND UNIVERSITIES OF THE STATE SYSTEM
PART I: ADMISSION STANDARDS
Requirements Regulating the Substitution of Applied Courses
for the 15-Unit High School Core Curriculum Requirement
The use of the applied courses to meet the high school curricular requirements is to be considered an
alternative. College bound students are encouraged to take courses currently specified in the State
Regents' Admission Policy. As a pilot study, the applied science courses may substitute for one of the
lab science courses currently accepted as the State Regents’ high school curricular requirements for
college entry under the parameters detailed below2.
A. Applied Science
Principles of Technology:
One year of Principles of Technology may substitute for one of the currently required lab science
courses providing that students taking the course also successfully complete a lab science course
listed in the State Regents’ Admission Policy. Additionally, the Principles of Technology course
must be taught by a teacher certified or endorsed in physics who has completed the specialized
training to instruct the course.
Applied Biology/Chemistry:
Beginning fall 1994, Until fall 2004, one year of Applied Biology/Chemistry may substitute for one
of the currently required lab science courses providing that students also successfully complete a lab
science course listed in the State Regents’ Admission Policy. Additionally, the course in Applied
Biology/Chemistry must be taught by a teacher certified or endorsed in biology who has completed
the specialized training to instruct the course.
If the requirements detailed above are not met, then neither the Applied Biology/Chemistry nor the
Principles of Technology course will substitute for any of the required lab science courses for
college entry.
Effective fall 2004, Applied Biology/Chemistry will no longer be accepted for purposes of college
admission. The pilot study will only be continued by direct action on the part of the State Regents. The
success rates of those students entering college with the applied science courses will be incorporated into
the review of the Admission Policy with reports specifically directed to these students' success compared
to other students meeting the traditional 15-unit high school core curriculum. Should the State Regents
not continue the program, a mechanism for accommodating students currently in the system will be
provided.
The State Regents are interested in experimenting with alternative delivery systems that might facilitate
student interest and success. It must be noted that the State Regents request and expect high school
transcripts to be valid and reflective of the actual courses taken by students; anything less threatens the
integrity of the academic process.
_______________
2
Applied Biology/Chemistry course substitution is a pilot study beginning fall 1994 with an expiration
date of spring 2003. The Principles of Technology course may be substituted as detailed in this policy.
31
32
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #7-a:
Program.
SUBJECT:
University of Oklahoma (OU). Approval of request to offer the Master of Arts in
Organizational Dynamics.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OU’s request to offer the Master
of Arts in Organizational Dynamics with the stipulation that continuation of the
program beyond fall 2005 will depend upon meeting the criteria established by the
institution and approved by the State Regents. Specifically, the program will enroll
15 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 5 students in 2004-05.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
OU's Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
improving the quality of entering domestic graduate students;
sustaining the graduate population;
sustaining the quality, size, and diversity of faculty;
improving the University Libraries’ ranking within the Association of Research Libraries
to the top three;
improving all aspects of telecommunications and computing systems coordination;
increasing space for research and academics;
increasing graduation education and research opportunities in the Tulsa area; and
sustaining the University community as a unique intellectual community.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, OU has deleted 68 degree programs.
Program Review
OU offers 230 degree programs (105 baccalaureate, 74 master’s, 47 doctoral, and 4 certificates), all of
which were reviewed in the past five years with the exception of those programs receiving specialty
accreditation. For programs receiving specialty accreditation, OU aligns its program review schedule
with the accreditation cycles, so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an
accreditation visit. Thus, if a professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be
reviewed for ten years, which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
33
Program Development Process
OU faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional officials and OU’s
governing board.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
Master of Arts in Organizational Dynamics
Program purpose. The proposed program will prepare graduates with leadership skills necessary for
employment with successful technology-based businesses in the Tulsa area, and will focus on
organizational business ethics.
Program rationale/background.
With the emergence of a technologically-based economy, new
demands are being placed on organizational leaders to manage employees in a manner that will bring
forth a continuous stream of innovations from all members of the work force. As requested by business
leaders, this program is designed to meet these demands for post-baccalaureate students working in the
Tulsa area.
Employment opportunities. The program will provide opportunities for advancement in areas of team
development, innovation management, project planning, and employee development. Tulsa business
community representatives, including representatives from the Tulsa Chamber of Commerce, AOL Time
Warner, and Saber, have noted a pressing need to develop such leadership skills to support
technologically driven organizations.
Student demand. The proposed program is expected to enroll 15 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 5
students in 2004-05.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. No similar program are offered in the State System.
Curriculum. The proposed degree program consists of 33 credit hours, including 12 credit hours in core
course requirements, 12 credit hours in an option track, 6 credit hours of electives, and a 3 credit hour
capstone course (Attachment A). All courses for the program are modeled from current doctoral courses,
but revised for appropriate content and rigor for the master’s program. The program will be offered in
Tulsa in a compressed format that may be completed in 18 to 24 months.
Faculty and staff. Existing faculty in the Psychology Department will teach the proposed degree
program at the Schusterman Center in Tulsa.
Support services. Facilities, library resources, and equipment are adequate.
Financing. No additional funds are requested to implement the program.
Attachment
34
Attachment A
University of Oklahoma
Master of Arts in Organizational Dynamics
Core requirements
ODYN 5113
ODYN 5123
ODYN 5133
ODYN 5143
ODYN 5153
ODYN 5163
ODYN 5173
12 Hours
The psychology of leadership
Organizational behavior and organizational innovation
Teams and motivation
Human resource management techniques
Design, evaluation, and statistics
Applied measurement and analysis
Technology and organizations
Human Resource Management Track
ODYN 5213
ODYN 5223
ODYN 5233
ODYN 5243
ODYN 5253
ODYN 5263
ODYN 5273
12 Hours
Survey of industrial and organizational psychology
Performance management
Training and career development
Staffing, selection, and compensation
Organizational development
Human resource management systems
Emerging topics in human resource management
Technical Project Management Track
ODYN 5313
ODYN 5323
ODYN 5333
ODYN 5343
ODYN 5353
ODYN 5363
ODYN 5373
12 Hours
Planning processes and strategy development
The psychology and practice of project management
Customer service and market analysis
Organizational communication
Global business practices
Ethics
Technology management and industrial engineering
Information Management Track
LIS 5003
LIS 5043
LIS 5463
LIS 5103
LIS 5033
LIS 5813
LIS 5113
12 Hours
Information systems and networks
Organization of information
Information uses and services
Design and implementation of networked information systems
Foundations of information systems
Archives and records management
Knowledge representation
Capstone Project
ODYN 5183
3 Hours
Capstone Course
Total Credit Hours:
35
33
36
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #7-b:
Program.
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City (OSU-OKC). Approval of request to offer
the Certificate in Early Care Education Administration (includes electronic delivery).
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OSU-OKC’s request to offer the
Certificate in Early Care Education Administration with the stipulation that
continuation of the program beyond fall 2005 will depend upon meeting the criteria
established by the institution and approved by the State Regents. Specifically, the
program will enroll 15 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 5 students in 2004-05.
Continuation of the electronic offering beyond spring 2004 will depend upon the
successful completion of a “best practice” review prior to January 1, 2004.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
OSU-OKC's Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
improving the quality of the teaching/learning process;
continuing campus-wide program of assessment and improvement;
continuing effort to improve faculty diversity and recruit needed faculty and staff;
being identified as the premiere learning-centered institution;
providing resources necessary for outstanding distance learning programs;
enhancing articulation/cooperative agreements with area career technology centers and
developing new areas of cooperative agreements; and
developing strong linkages and partnerships.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, OSU-OKC has deleted 27 degree programs.
Program Review
OSU-OKC offers 45 degree programs (8 associate, 23 associate in applied science, and 14 certificates),
all of which were reviewed in the past five years with the exception of those programs receiving specialty
accreditation. For programs receiving specialty accreditation, OSU-OKC aligns its program review
schedule with the accreditation cycles, so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an
37
accreditation visit. Thus, if a professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be
reviewed for ten years, which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
OSU-OKC faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional officials
and OSU-OKC’s governing board.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval” and “Policies
and Procedures Pertaining to the Electronic Delivery of Courses and Programs.” The Electronic Media
Policy calls for a two-step approval process. Evidence of specified quality criteria must be provided at
the time of the initial request, with provisional approval granted if the criteria are addressed satisfactorily.
Following provisional approval, the institution must conduct a “best practices” review that provides
quantitative and qualitative analysis of the program through a rigorous review of exemplary programs
from other institutions. Continuing approval will depend on the results of this review.
ANALYSIS:
Certificate in Early Care Education Administration
Program purpose. The purpose of this program is to prepare individuals to work as program
administrators in the early care education field.
Program rationale/background. The Oklahoma Department of Human Services Division of Child Care
has mandated that all directors of Oklahoma licensed childcare facilities must have a minimum of six
credit hours in early care education administration courses by July 2004. With over 2,000 licensed
facilities and over 3,800 licensed family child care homes, demand for a program with both traditional
and electronic delivery capabilities will be high. Since OSU-OKC currently offers the Associate in
Applied Science in Early Care Education, the proposed certificate will use existing courses.
Employment opportunities. Training in the field of early care education administration will allow
current administrators to maintain or advance in the field, while also encouraging new students to enter
this growing sector. The 2000-2001 Occupational Outlook Handbook published by the Oklahoma
Department of Labor indicates all occupations in childcare are projected to grow faster than average
through the year 2008.
Student demand. The proposed program is expected to enroll 15 majors in fall 2004 and graduate five
students in 2004-05.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. No other institutions offer this certificate program.
Curriculum. The proposed program consists of 24 credit hours, including 21 credit hours in the
technical-occupational specialty and 3 credit hours in general education (Attachment A). No new courses
will be added; offerings in this program will come from the existing courses in the Associate in Applied
Science in Early Care Education.
Faculty and staff. Existing faculty will teach the proposed program. Faculty teaching online courses
hold the same academic qualifications as those required for faculty teaching traditional courses. Training
38
and support for faculty teaching via distance learning are provided by OSU-OKC’s instructional
technology and MIS departments.
Support services. The library, facilities, and equipment are adequate. Extensive library resources are
available electronically through state and institutional license agreements. Student services are available
on campus and electronically, including online enrollment and advising. Distance learning students may
interact with faculty and staff through video conferencing, telephone, email, fax, and traditional mail
service.
Financing. Since OSU-OKC currently offers the courses supporting the proposed program through the
Early Care Education program and has in place the necessary technology for electronic delivery, no
additional costs are expected.
Electronic delivery authorization. As outlined in the Electronic Media Policy, OSU-OKC will undergo
a rigorous “best practice” review during the first two years of the program’s online offering.
Continuation of the electronic delivery beyond spring 2004 will depend on the results of the review.
Attachment
39
ATTACHMENT A
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY-OKLAHOMA CITY
Proposed Program
CERTIFICATE IN EARLY CARE EDUCATION ADMINISTRATION
Technical Occupational Specialty
ECEA 1103
ECEA 1113
ECEA 1213
ECEA 1223
ECEA 2213
ECEA 2223
ECEA 2323
21 Credit Hours
Planning and Implementation of Administrative Systems
Personnel Supervision
Utilization of Community Resources
Communication Practices
The Exceptional Child
Legal and Ethical Aspects of Early Care Management
Budget Development & Finance Management
General Education Requirements
ENGL 1113
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3 Credit Hours
Freshman Composition I
3
Total to Graduate
24 Credit Hours
40
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #7-c:
Program.
SUBJECT:
Connors State College (CSC). Approval of request to offer the Associate in Science in
Computer Information Systems.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve CSC’s request to offer the
Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems with the stipulation that
continuation of the program beyond fall 2005 will depend upon meeting the criteria
established by the institution and approved by the State Regents. Specifically, the
program will enroll 26 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 6 students in 2004-05.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
CSC's Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
•
•
•
emphasizing distance learning alternatives;
integrating technological resources into the curriculum;
expanding program offerings to reflect workplace needs; and
exploring and coordinating academic programs with technical schools.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, CSC has deleted 29 degree programs.
Program Review
CSC offers 36 degree programs (26 associate, 6 associate in applied science, and 4 certificates), all of
which were reviewed in the past five years with the exception of those programs receiving specialty
accreditation. For programs receiving specialty accreditation, CSC aligns its program review schedule
with the accreditation cycles, so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an
accreditation visit. Thus, if a professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be
reviewed for ten years, which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
CSC faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional officials and
CSC’s governing board.
41
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems
Program purpose. The proposed program will prepare graduates with knowledge and skills in computer
science to enter the workforce, upgrade existing skills, or transfer into a baccalaureate program in
computer science.
Program rationale/background. CSC offers an Associate in Applied Science in Computer Information
Systems Technology and there is increasing student demand for the associate in science degree due to a
technologically advanced business environment. The associate in science degree provides more
flexibility for freshman students, adult students upgrading skills, and students interested in a transfer
program into a baccalaureate program in computer science.
Employment opportunities. The Oklahoma Employment Security Commission (OESC) indicates that
computer science is one of the fastest growing job fields in Oklahoma. Within the computer science area,
the OESC lists eight areas of job opportunities for graduates from computer science programs, including
computer and information systems managers, computer support specialists, programmers, webmasters,
and computer security specialists.
Student demand. The proposed program is expected to enroll 26 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 6
students in 2004-05.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. Langston University, Murray State College, Northern
Oklahoma College, Rogers State University, Redlands Community College, Oklahoma City Community
College, Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Seminole State College, Eastern Oklahoma State
College, and Oklahoma State University Technical Branch – Okmulgee offer computer science programs.
However, given the demand for the program, approval will not constitute unnecessary duplication.
Curriculum. The proposed degree program consists of 62 credit hours, including 38 credit hours in
general education courses and 24 credit hours in core course requirements (Attachment A). One new
course will be added and is asterisked in the attachment.
Faculty and staff. Existing faculty in the business and computer information systems division will teach
the proposed degree program.
Support services. Facilities, library resources, and equipment are adequate.
Financing. No additional funds are requested to implement the program.
Attachment
42
ATTACHMENT A
CONNORS STATE COLLEGE
Proposed Requirements for an Associate of Science Degree in Computer Information Systems.
Section I General Education Requirements
English Composition
ENGL 1113
ENGL 1213
Communications
SPCH 1113
American History
HIST 1483
HIST 1493
US Government
POLS 1113
Natural Science
Humanities
English Composition I
English Composition II
Intro to Oral Communications
US History to 1865 or
US History from 1865
Credit Hours: 38
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
American Federal Government
Any 2 from:
BIOL 1114
BIOL 1404
BIOL 1604
CHEM 1315
CHEM 1515
GPS 1104
PHYS 1114
PHYS 1214
(Must have at least one lab)
General Biology
General Botany
General Zoology
General Chemistry I
General Chemistry II
General Physical Science
General Physics I
General Physics II
4
4
4
5
5
4
4
4
Any 2 from:
HUMN 1113
HUMN 1123
HUMN 2113
HUMN 2223
HUMN 2413
Art in Life
Music in Life
General Humanities to 1350
General Humanities from 1350
World Literature
3
3
3
3
3
8
6
Mathematics/Quantitative
Analysis
3
MATH 1513
College Algebra
3
GEOG 2243
PSYC 1113
SOCI 1113
Introduction to Geography
General Psychology
Principles of Sociology
3
3
3
Social Sciences
3
Computer Literacy
3
COMS 1133
Fundamentals of Computer Usage
Section II Program Requirements
Program Core
COMS 1503
3
Credit Hours: 24
Programming in Basic
43
Hours 12
3
COMS 1513
COMS/BUSN
1543
COMS 1823
COMS 2143
Visual Basic
Database Management
COBOL or
C++
3
3
3
3
4 of the following: Minimum Hours 12
Guided Electives
BUSN 2113
BUSN 2153
BUSN 2213
BUSN 2543
BUSN 2643
COMS/BUSN
1533
* COMS 2013
COMS 2300
MATH 2215
MATH 2235
STAT 2013
Economics I
Human Relations
Economics II
Elements of Accounting I
Elements of Accounting II
Spreadsheet Analysis
Web Development
Special Topics (1-3)
Calculus I
Calculus II
Elementary Statistics
Total to Graduate
44
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
1-3
5
5
3
Minimum of Hours 62
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #8:
Electronic Delivery of Degree Programs.
SUBJECT:
University of Oklahoma (OU). Approval of request to offer existing degree programs via
electronic media.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OU’s request to offer the
Bachelor of Liberal Studies (231) and Master of Liberal Studies (232) via electronic
media with the stipulation that continuation of the electronic offerings beyond
spring 2004 will depend upon the successful completion of “best practice” reviews
prior to January 1, 2004.
BACKGROUND:
OU has delivered selected courses and programs using distance learning since the 1970’s as part of the
Oklahoma Higher Education Televised Instruction System. More recently, offerings have been broadcast
to various sites via OneNet with a growing number of Internet-based courses.
OU requests authorization to offer the existing Bachelor of Liberal Studies (231) and Master of Liberal
Studies (232) via electronic media. These programs represent OU’s first degrees to be offered completely
online.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policies and Procedures Pertaining to the Electronic
Delivery of Courses and Programs.” The Electronic Media Policy calls for a two-step approval process.
Evidence of specified quality criteria must be provided at the time of the initial request, with provisional
approval granted if the criteria are addressed satisfactorily. Following provisional approval, the
institution must conduct a “best practice” review that provides quantitative and qualitative analysis of the
program through a rigorous review of exemplary programs from other institutions. Continuing approval
will depend on the results of this review.
ANALYSIS:
OU’s College of Liberal Studies was established specifically to address the needs of adult learners.
Curricula for both the Bachelor of Liberal Studies (BLS) and Master of Liberal Studies (MLS), approved
in 1961 and 1971, respectively, currently require several traditional, on-site courses. Faculty and staff
have determined that offering these programs in a fully online format will eliminate educational barriers
for adult students who are employed full-time.
45
The BLS, which consists of 126 credit hours, is already a successful program, enrolling the most students
in the College. Maintaining adequate enrollment in the MLS, which consists of 32 credit hours, has been
a challenge during the last few years. Offering these programs via electronic delivery is expected to
significantly increase student interest, which may in turn increase enrollment and number of graduates.
OU’s request addresses satisfactorily the criteria listed in the Electronic Media Policy. These criteria
include faculty qualifications and training, student services, adequacy of resources, and funding. OU’s
responses are summarized below:
•
Faculty. College faculty hold graduate or terminal degrees in the disciplines taught, and faculty
teaching online courses hold the same academic qualifications as required for those teaching
traditional courses. OU instructional technology staff provide training and support for faculty
teaching via distance learning.
•
Student Support Services. Students will have access to support services through web pages, email, fax, traditional mail, and telephone. Student-faculty interaction will be conducted through
asynchronous and real-time Internet discussion, e-mail, telephone, and fax. Extensive electronic
library resources are available, as are online financial aid, academic advising, counseling,
admission, and placement services. These services are readily accessible through the College’s
home page, which provides links to the online student support system.
•
Demand. Through the proposed electronic offerings, OU will address the need for anytime,
anywhere education by providing flexibility to students who would otherwise be unable to pursue
higher education. The BLS and MLS are presented for electronic delivery authorization in
response to student inquiries and the results of several recruiting surveys. A spring 2002
recruiting campaign revealed substantial student demand for online undergraduate and graduate
degree programs in Liberal Studies.
•
Funding. OU has augmented its bandwidth, server space, and infrastructure, and the software,
equipment, and support staff for the electronic offerings are already in place. Operating costs will
be recovered through student tuition.
OU’s Board of Regents approved this request. As indicated above, OU will undergo rigorous “best
practice” reviews during the first two years of the programs’ online offerings. Continuation of the
electronic delivery beyond spring 2004 will depend on the results of the reviews.
46
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #9:
Program Deletions.
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve institutional requests for
program deletions, as listed below.
BACKGROUND:
Tulsa Community College (TCC) requests authorization to delete the Certificate in Medical Office
Administration (183).
Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU) requests authorization to delete the Bachelor of Arts
in Geography (017) and the Bachelor of Arts in Library Media Specialist (023).
Eastern Oklahoma State College (EOSC) requests authorization to delete the Associate in Arts in Art
(004).
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College (NEOAMC) requests authorization to delete the Certificate in
Management/Marketing Skills (101), the Associate in Science in Education/Secondary (017), the
Certificate in Surgical Technology (065), the Associate in Applied Science in Medical Assistant (116),
the Certificate in Medical Assistant (115), and the Associate in Arts in Journalism (028).
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval” and
“Policy Statement on Program Review.”
ANALYSIS:
TCC’s request to delete the Associate in Applied Science in Medical Office Administration was approved
at the June 29, 2001 State Regents’ meeting and folded the program into the Medical Assistant program.
The Certificate in Medical Office Administration (183) was also to be deleted, but complete
documentation was not received until July 15, 2002. There are nine students in the program that have
been moved to the Medical Assistant program and will graduate in December 2002. No courses will be
deleted and no funds will be available for reallocation.
NWOSU suspended the Bachelor of Arts in Geography (017) program in August 1999. No students
remain in the program and no courses will be deleted. No funds will be available for reallocation. The
47
Bachelor of Arts in Library Media Specialist (023) has only one student who will graduate in December
2002. No courses will be deleted and $53,000 will be available for reallocation to the library.
EOSC suspended this program in October 1999. No students remain in the program and no courses will
be deleted. No funds will be available for reallocation.
NEOAMC requests to delete six programs.
• The Certificate in Management/Marketing Skills (101) has no students remaining in the
program. No courses will be deleted and no funds will be available for reallocation.
• The Associate in Science in Education/Secondary (017) students have been advised into
disciplinary content areas to meet current teacher preparation requirements. The 40
students remaining in the program will graduate in May 2004 through the discipline
content area. No courses will be deleted and no funds will be available for reallocation.
• The Certificate in Surgical Technology (065) has no students remaining in the program.
Seven courses will be deleted and $55,000 will be reallocated to areas effected by
institutional budget cuts.
• The Associate in Applied Science in Medical Assistant (116) and the Certificate in
Medical Assistant (115) have no students remaining in the programs and seven courses
will be deleted. Funds totaling $58,243 will be reallocated to faculty needs in the
business areas.
• The Associate in Arts in Journalism (028) has been combined into the Associate in Arts
in Television (053) and renamed the Associate in Arts in Mass Communications (053).
The change will be transparent to students. No courses will be deleted and no funds will
be available for reallocation.
48
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #10:
Academic Planning/Resource Allocation
SUBJECT:
Disposition of institutional academic plans.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents acknowledge receipt of the following 20022003 academic plans:
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State University College of Osteopathic Medicine
University of Central Oklahoma
East Central University
Northeastern State University
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Rogers State University
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
Carl Albert State College
Connors State College
Murray State College
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Northern Oklahoma College
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma State University - Oklahoma City
Oklahoma State University Technical Branch - Okmulgee
Redlands Community College
Rose State College
Seminole State College
Tulsa Community College
Western Oklahoma State College
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents approved the Academic Planning/Resource Allocation (APRA) concept in 1991.
Institutional academic plans are developed each year and provide the context for decision-making within
APRA principles. The academic plans outlined below represent the ninth cycle of the system’s academic
planning and reflect institutional priorities. New program requests are evaluated within the context of a
current and complete institutional academic plan.
49
Institutions are provided an outline for the next academic year (see Attachment A). Plans are due in the
State Regents' office on July 15. The Academic Plan 2003 Outline is provided below.
PART I (Report)
mission, history, function, tradition, and
distinctive characteristics;
institution’s expectations for students;
objectives of the general education program;
student and faculty profiles;
institution’s organizational chart;
process used to develop the academic plan;
learning site accountability; and
business program and economic development.
PART II (Future Plans)
academic priorities for the next five years;
opportunities and external constraints;
use of new or reallocated funds;
technology plans; and
learning site information.
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions support and further the goals of the APRA initiative.
ANALYSIS:
With this action, the State Regents will accept 23 academic plans from 1 comprehensive university and its
branch campuses and constituent agency, 8 regional universities, and 11 community colleges. The
remaining academic plans will be provided in the October 2002 agenda. Highlights of the institutional
plans follow. Specific responses related to implementation of the Sytemwide Business Program and
Economic Development Review recommendations will be compiled in a separate report to the State
Regents at a future date and are therefore excluded here.
50
Oklahoma State University (OSU)
Academic Priorities
improving student retention and
graduation rates;
incorporating technology into learning
to enhance educational opportunities,
both on-campus and at a distance;
continuing the sensor research
initiative and expanding research
opportunities; and
maintaining critical academic
experiences in the face of budget
reductions.
Technology
Plans include:
providing faculty technology training,
incentives, and support staff;
improving technology infrastructure;
converting ETS to a total digital
operation;
supporting increased programming
using H.323;
upgrading classroom and laboratory
equipment and software;
purchasing/upgrading computers for
faculty/staff;
expanding multimedia classrooms;
completing an MSTM laboratory at
OSU-Tulsa and upgrading the
Stillwater lab;
completing the student information
network at OSU-Tulsa;
increasing utilization of the Dynegy
Trading Floor;
increasing automation of Academic
Student Services operations in the
Graduate College; and
adding software and hardware to
support the federally required visa
tracking mechanism (SEVIS).
Student Profile
Note: Enrollment data excludes OSU-Tulsa,
and undergraduate/graduate data do not
include 290 (1.3%) College of Veterinary
Medicine students.
21,872 students enrolled
Undergraduate Students
17,211 (78.7%) are undergraduates;
8,967 (52.1%) are male;
8,244 (47.9%) are female;
90.2% are full-time;
9.8% are part-time;
13,795 (80.2%) are Caucasian;
1,433 (8.3%) are Native American;
806 (4.7%) are international;
569 (3.3%) are African American;
324 (1.9%) are Hispanic; and
284 (1.7%) are Asian.
Graduate Students
4,372 (20.0%) are graduate students;
2,432 (55.6%) are male;
1,940 (44.4%) are female;
44.8% are full-time;
55.2% are part-time;
2,703 (61.8%) are Caucasian;
1,158 (26.5%) are international;
200 (4.6%) are Native American;
151 (3.5%) are African American;
92 (2.1%) are Asian; and
68 (1.6%) are Hispanic.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing scholarship endowments;
increasing number of faculty and staff
positions to support new programs
and increasing enrollments;
establishing new degree programs for
OSU-Tulsa;
constructing new classroom and student
facilities at OSU-Tulsa;
constructing/equipping new engineering
laboratories and interior design
studios;
upgrading sensor research facilities;
equipping/staffing the new Library
Annex;
providing instructional technology
training to faculty;
increasing research programs;
pursuing grants and other external
funding sources; and
increasing student recruitment.
51
Faculty Profile
Note: OSU-Tulsa data are not included.
1,403 faculty positions, including
vacancies;
740 (52.7%) are tenured;
332 (23.7%) are tenure-track; and
331 (23.6%) are non-tenure track.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
collaborating with North Texas
University and LU to offer a
Therapeutic Recreation program;
expanding delivery of MS in Early
Childhood Education offered in
conjunction with DHS.
pursuing distance education opportunities,
including delivery of MSTM program,
with corporate partners;
participating in the Great Plains
Interactive Distance Education Alliance
(GPIDEA) for delivery of graduate
programs via distance education;
continuing development of the College of
Vet Med’s web-based, multi-media
degree and continuing educ. programs;
expanding into broadband, asynchronous
Internet, and synchronous and
asynchronous video/audio streaming by
OSU-Tulsa;
increasing the number of Internet and ITV
courses delivered to OSU-Tulsa;
sharing courses with TCC & OSU-Tulsa;
and
continuing to offer the Executive MBA
with emphasis in E-commerce to Zayed
University in the United Arab Emirates
in a consortium with the University of
Kentucky and Clemson University.
Oklahoma State University - College of Osteopathic Medicine
Academic Priorities
Sustaining and strengthening core
programs in education and research;
developing research opportunities;
applying educational technology
innovations to academic programs;
recruiting talented faculty and
supporting administrative staff;
expanding the funding and resource
base;
continuing development of the Center
for Health Sciences;
developing associated health
programs;
completing the Biomedical Research
Facility, Early Childhood
Development Center, and Oklahoma
Rural Health Policy and Research
Center; and
developing a statewide campus
program through interactive
telecommunications.
Technology
Plans include:
continuing partnership in the OSU
SCT project;
completing improvements to the
multi-media lecture halls;
expanding distance learning and
telemedicine through the Oklahoma
Rural Health Policy and Research
Center and the Department of Family
Medicine; and
integrating Osteo-Admit into the
admission process.
Student Profile
346 medical students enrolled;
203 (58.7%) are male;
143 (41.3%) are female;
275 (79.5%) are Caucasian;
31 (9.0%) are Native American;
17 (4.9%) are Asian;
12 (3.5%) are African American;
6 (1.7%) are Hispanic; and
5 (1.5%) are Unknown;
42 graduate students enrolled;
32 (76.2%) are female; and
10 (23.8%) are male.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
hiring additional clinical and basic
science faculty;
hiring additional staff support;
funding mandatory increases in health
benefits, utilities, and operational
expenses;
increasing tuition and fee waivers;
seeking research funding from
external private sources; and
applying reallocated funds toward
instructional and research equipment
and facilities to meet growth needs.
52
Faculty Profile
66 full-time faculty;
52 (78.8%) are male;
14 (21.2%) are female; and
100% have a doctorate.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
expanding the use of telemedicine
from an academic activity to actual
patient care, including use of
teleradiology and TeleCardiology
techniques;
redesigning Family Medicine
Residency and Rural Ambulatory Care
Experience programs for distance
education;
delivering Masters in Health
Administration program to OSU in
Stillwater;
expanding the number of continuing
medical education programs offered;
and
considering importation of continuing
medical education courses.
University of Central Oklahoma
Academic Priorities
enhancing student learning with focus
on student success and improving
general education;
valuing people by encouraging faculty
development and using adjunct faculty
effectively;
understanding students’ and other
stakeholders’ needs; and
measuring effectiveness.
Technology
Plans include:
enhancing learning, teaching,
research, and service activities through
instructional technologies;
increasing access to information by
students, faculty, staff, and the
community;
facilitating communications among
students, faculty, staff, and the
community; and
creating an efficient and effective
information system infrastructure.
Student Profile
14,741 students enrolled;
12,288 (83.4%) are undergraduate
students;
2,453 (16.6%) are graduate students;
9,013 are full-time;
4,664 are part-time;
8,678 (58.9%) are female; and
6,063 (41.1%) are male.
Note: The ethnicity data below also include
audit-only students.
10,647 (72.1%) are Caucasian;
1,652 (11.2%) are international;
1,028 (7.0%) are African American;
632 (4.3%) are Native American;
414 (2.8%) are Asian; and
400 (2.7%) are Hispanic.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing the Temporary Lecturer
project until funding levels improve;
pursuing external funds; and
increasing grant activity.
53
Faculty Profile
386 full-time faculty;
223 (57.8%) are female;
163 (42.2%) are male;
12% are ethnic minorities; and
73% have a terminal degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing to offer courses at the
Downtown Consortium, Mercy Health
Center and Tinker;
expanding use of web-based
technologies in courses;
involving E-Learning Task Force in
evaluating UCO’s capacity to receive
courses; and
considering requests to export courses
and/or programs in business and
education.
East Central University
Academic Priorities
improving the quality of
baccalaureate, pre-professional, and
graduate degree programs;
implementing a student retention
program;
infusing technology into academic
programs and updating technological
equipment;
maintaining quality library services;
and
expanding community involvement.
Technology
Plans include:
maintaining and upgrading 25 student
computer labs;
purchasing library equipment and
computers;
integrating computer technology into
teacher preparation programs through
PT-3 grant; and
providing faculty technology training
through the Center of Excellence in
Teaching and Learning.
Student Profile
4,195 students enrolled;
2,574 (61.4%) are female;
1,621 (38.6%) are male;
3,107 (74.1%) are full-time;
1,088 (25.9%) are part-time;
3,159 (75.3%) are Caucasian;
701 (16.7%) are Native American;
174 (4.2%) are African American;
69 (1.6%) are Hispanic;
42 (1.0%) are Asian;
50 (1.2%) are unknown; and
average undergraduate student age is
23.9.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing faculty salaries;
expanding and improving technology;
increasing library acquisitions;
strengthening the funding base of the
university; and
assessing the Instructional Technology
Fee.
54
Faculty Profile
162 full-time faculty;
102 (63.0%) are male;
60 (37.0%) are female;
12 (7.4%) are ethnic minorities
(excludes Non-Resident Alien);
115 (71.0%) have a doctorate; and
82 (50.6%) are tenured.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing off-campus delivery of
courses and programs in the areas of
education, nursing, criminal justice,
psychology, human resources,
business administration, and
languages;
developing programs for delivery in
the areas of social work, foreign
languages, physics, geography, and
political science;
continuing to import courses and
programs from CU, SEOSU, OUHSC,
UCO, NSU, and MSC; and
redesigning courses in psychology and
teacher preparation for online
delivery.
Northeastern State University
Academic Priorities
improving academic quality through
strategic planning;
increasing overall enrollment and
retention and graduation rates;
improving delivery of technologically
enhanced instruction and
academic/instructional support;
continuing quality initiatives to
evaluate and improve curricular
offerings;
improving the physical facilities; and
increasing participation in
communities supporting NSU and its
educational endeavors.
Technology
Plans include:
increasing and enhancing faculty
development in instructional
technology;
enhancing the technological delivery
of academic programs and services;
and
adding/updating facilities and
instructional technology support.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
8,603 students enrolled;
60.4% are female;
40.6% are male.
7,417 (86.2%) are undergraduate
students;
• 5,734 (77.3%) are full-time;
• 1,683 (22.7%) are part-time;
1,096 (12.7%) are graduate students;
• 288 (26.3%) are full-time;
• 808 (73.7%) are part-time;
90 (1.1%) are professional students,
all of whom are full-time.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
reallocating funds from unfilled
positions and transferring faculty to
needed areas;
funding merit increases in salary;
encouraging faculty to increase their
grant activities; and
seeking private funds to maintain
NSU’s standing and achieve priorities.
55
Faculty Profile
317 full-time faculty;
194 (61.2%) are male;
123 (38.8%) are female;
9.8% are ethnic minorities;
218 (68.8%) have a doctorate;
95 (30.0%) have a master’s degree;
4 (1.3%) have a baccalaureate degree;
130 (41.0%) are tenured;
81 (25.6%) are tenure-track; and
106 (33.4%) are non-tenure track.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
redesigning courses in Industrial
Operations Management, Meetings &
Destination Management, and English
for online/ITV delivery;
formulating uniform procedures for
test proctoring distance students;
sharing/exchanging courses and
programs in business, philosophy,
political science, foreign languages,
and physics with UCO, ECU, USAO,
SEOSU, SWOSU, NWOSU, RSU,
NEOAMC, TCC, and OPSU; and
importing courses in low enrollment
areas.
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Academic Priorities
recruiting and retaining high quality
faculty;
balancing full- and part-time faculty;
recruiting and retaining a diverse and
well prepared student body;
retaining accreditation;
providing state-of-the-art technology
for faculty and students;
continuing improvement in access,
networking, connectivity, hardware,
and software;
enhancing educational opportunities
for citizens in the surrounding area;
pursuing grants more actively;
reviewing academic programs for
market opportunity with a focus on
graduate education, agriculture,
technology, and developmental
programs;
continuing development of the
endowed faculty chair program; and
continuing development of Wellness
Center programming.
Technology
Plans include:
replacing and upgrading computer
laboratories;
continuing the conversion to H.323
technology; and
replacing the library’s computer
system which includes an online
catalog service.
Student Profile
2,051 students enrolled;
82.4% are Caucasian;
4.1% are Native American;
3.3% are African American;
2.2% are Hispanic;
0.9% are Non-Resident Alien; and
0.9% are Asian.
Faculty Profile
93 full-time faculty;
45 (48.4%) are male;
48 (51.6%) are female;
51 (54.8%) have a doctorate; and
34 (36.6%) are tenured;
36 (38.7%) are tenure track; and
21 (22.6%) are non-tenure track.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
pursuing private funds for new
endowed faculty chairs;
increasing faculty salaries, particularly
in e-commerce and business;
seeking grant funds to enhance
academic programs;
providing enrichment programs;
delivering distance education to
various constituencies in the region;
and
adding/upgrading ITV studios.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing online course offerings;
delivering courses in many areas
including business administration,
education (graduate level), and
concurrent enrollment courses;
collaborating with other institutions to
offer joint programs, courses, and
modules in physics, geography,
political science, foreign languages,
business, and e-commerce;
considering collaboration with
technology centers for certified
technology programs;
continuing importation to Woodward
and Enid campuses of MBA programs
from SWOSU, OSU, and CU, and
OSU master’s program in
telecommunications administration;
and
collaborating with regional institutions
to import low productivity degrees.
56
Rogers State University
Academic Priorities
academic innovation and integrity;
supportive student services;
planning and effective use of
resources;
effective use of technology; and
community outreach.
Technology
Plans include:
completing construction of new
computer room;
installing specialized software;
continuing upgrades to desktop,
hardware, and software;
providing network connectivity to
classrooms as needed;
completing cable management
project;
installing bandwidth management
system;
developing automated integration
with eCollege;
expanding Liberal Arts computer lab
to include 24 PCs and SPSS;
converting faculty/staff domain to a
Win 2K Domain;
installing a Centralized Backup Unit;
implementing interface of employee
health insurance information with
state insurance plan; and
furthering implementation of
SPEEDE.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
2, 852 students enrolled;
Note: 85 (3.0%) concurrent enrollment
students are not included in the gender and
FT/PT data below.
1,754 (63.4%) are female;
1,013 (36.6%) are male;
1,342 (48.5%) are part-time students;
1,425 (51.5%) are full-time students.
Note: The following data include
concurrent enrollment students.
2,032 (71.3%) are Caucasian;
679 (23.8%) are Native American;
64 (2.2%) are African American;
50 (1.8%) are Hispanic; and
27 (1.0%) are Asian.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
employing faculty to support new and
restructured programs and to reduce
the number of courses taught by
adjunct faculty;
expanding library materials and
improving technology;
supporting student development
outside the classroom in the areas of
social activities, cultural, development,
counseling, and career guidance; and
funding student scholarships.
57
Faculty Profile
78 full-time faculty;
48 (61.5%) are male;
30 (38.5%) are female;
44 (56.4%) have a doctorate or
terminal degree;
28 (35.9%) have a master’s degree;
6 (7.7%) have a bachelor’s degree;
10 (12.8%) are tenured;
42 (53.9%) are tenure track; and
26 (33.3%) are non-tenure track.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
expanding delivery of Bachelor of
Applied Technology program;
discussing opportunities to provide
joint programs in education, business,
and criminal justice and to provide
general education to correctional
facilities, area technology centers, and
high schools;
considering importing programs,
courses, or modules from other
institutions in the areas of education,
business, criminal justice, and the
MBA; and
continuing current discussions with
NSU on the AA in Education and
ways to enhance opportunities for
education transfers.
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Academic Priorities
continuing strategic planning;
developing a comprehensive
recruitment/marketing plan;
increasing student enrollment to
maximum capacity, in part by
increasing retention efforts;
enhancing the student-centered
learning and living environment;
implementing a technology plan that
promotes educational excellence and
enhances all aspects of the university;
collaborating with internal and
external constituencies to promote
research, active learning, and
partnerships;
promoting faculty excellence and
providing professional development;
enhancing academic programs; and
providing student placement services.
Technology
Plans include:
adding/upgrading hardware and
software;
implementing Phase I of the H.323
conversion;
implementing a Messaging and
Collaboration Server for faculty and
staff;
offering individual network accounts
for students;
implementing Phase I of the Campus
Network Infrastructure Upgrade;
create a computer science and
technology laboratory;
create a continuing education
computer laboratory; and
continuing progress on the Title III
grant project.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
4,025 students enrolled;
2,162 (53.7%) are female;
1,863 (46.3%) are male;
2,981 (74.1%) are full-time;
1,044 (25.9%) are part-time;
2,461 (61.1%) are Caucasian;
1,201 (29.8%) are Native American;
198 (4.9%) are African American;
88 (2.2%) are international;
52 (1.3%) are Hispanic;
< 1% are Asian; and
25 is the average age.
Faculty Profile
141 full-time faculty;
65.2% are male;
34.8% are female;
15.6% are ethnic minority;
45.4% are tenured; and
66.7% have a terminal degree.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
funding mandatory salary increases,
academic programs, accreditation,
strategic planning, and marketing;
completing the new Biological Sciences
Building;
constructing a new student union;
seeking additional funds through private
fundraising, alumni relations, and
through the Southeastern Foundation,
Inc.; and
renovating the Chickasaw and Choctaw
Tower dormitories.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing IETV offerings at the
higher education centers;
exporting and importing aerospace
courses to/from Tinker;
exporting the MBA program to
ECU;
redesigning general education
courses for distance learning; and
continuing to import courses in
nursing, library science,
occupational health and safety, a
continuing education program from
the State Department of
Environmental Quality, and low
productivity programs.
58
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
Academic Priorities
maintaining the Interdisciplinary
Studies program;
enhancing freshman year experiences
through the Freshman Seminar and
the Academic Resources Center;
enhancing student learning support
interventions (student tracking,
academic counseling, advising, and
upgraded learning labs) and faculty
development opportunities targeted
toward student success; and
continuing the Distinguished Faculty
Program.
Technology
Plans include:
offering faculty and curriculum
development activities.
Student Profile
60% are female;
40% are male; and
22.9 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing private giving through
efforts of the Office of Development;
continuing multi-year project to
upgrade campus facilities;
initiating additional freshman year
retention efforts;
enhancing the Deaf Education
program; and
exploring additional funding sources to
support needed foreign language
faculty positions, science faculty
positions and staff labs, and a new
theatre faculty position.
59
Faculty Profile
52 full-time faculty;
64% are male;
36% are female;
56% are tenured; and
87% have a terminal degree, including
80% with a doctorate.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
negotiating with other institutions to
import nursing programs;
offering Deaf Education and American
Indian Studies courses via distance
learning; and
continuing importation of coursework
from sister institutions to supplement
undergraduate offerings.
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
Academic Priorities
strengthening the teacher education
program;
strengthening faculty development;
strengthening assessment and
utilizing the feedback for program
improvements;
training faculty and requiring
freshman seminars to assist “at-risk”
students; and
addressing the needs of the growing
Hispanic population in the Panhandle
area.
Technology
Plans include:
faculty training for use of ITV
equipment.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
1,226 students enrolled;
80% are Caucasian;
10% are Hispanic;
4% are African American;
2% are Native American; and
4% are Other.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing faculty salaries; and
utilizing private funds for:
•
renovation and repair of existing
facilities,
•
starting a Student Scholarship
Endowment,
•
faculty development,
•
instructional technology and
telecommunications, and
•
library and learning resources
enhancement, and
•
constructing a new student
activities center.
60
Faculty Profile
56 full-time faculty;
37 (66.1%) are male;
19 (33.9%) are female;
2 (3.6%) are ethnic minorities;
24 (42.9%) have a terminal degree;
and
12 (21.4%) are tenured.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
offering EMT/EMS Training,
Paramedic, Parenting, Insurance, Fire
Safety, general education, and
concurrent enrollment courses;
collaborating with other institutions
for an architecture re-certification
program;
redesigning College Algebra course to
meet distance education needs; and
importing courses from OSU-OKC,
SWOSU, and NWOSU as needed.
Carl Albert State College
Academic Priorities
providing general education for all
students;
providing university-parallel fields for
students transferring to four-year
institutions;
providing technical/occupational
education for immediate entry into the
labor market;
providing remedial and development
programs as needed; and
providing programs for continuing
education.
Technology
Plans include:
continuing to equip multimedia
classrooms;
upgrading computer labs;
offering faculty training in
instructional technology and relevant
equipment and software;
purchasing faculty computers;
upgrading software;
installing DL lab; and
purchasing portable LCD projectors.
Student Profile
2,451 students enrolled;
69% are female;
31% are male;
30% are either African American
(4%), Hispanic (2%) or Native
American (24%); and
28 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
funding increased costs in utilities and
benefits;
funding a small salary increase for
faculty and staff; and
pursuing additional federal grants.
61
Faculty Profile (full-time)
34 full-time faculty;
19 (56%) are male;
15 (44%) are female;
2 (5%) have a doctorate;
24 (71%) have a master’s degree; and
8 (24%) have a baccalaureate degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
delivering courses to area public
schools;
developing 15 general education
courses for delivery via the Internet to
facilitate the agreement with the U.S.
Navy;
requesting that a master’s program in
education be delivered electronically
to CASC;
working with SEOSU to develop the
Electronic Telecommunication
Intranet to assist economic
development in a 16-county area;
importing courses/services necessary
to enhance economic development in
southeastern Oklahoma;
importing prerequisite courses as
needed for student transfer to
baccalaureate degree granting
institutions; and
continuing efforts to share low
enrollment courses/programs through
the MECCA consortium.
Connors State College
Academic Priorities
emphasizing quality instruction and
academic support services;
focusing on global education and the
value of diversity in curriculum and
support activities;
expanding program offerings to
reflect workplace needs;
integrating technology into the
curriculum;
enhancing distance learning;
emphasizing student retention; and
exploring and coordinating academic
programs with technical schools.
Technology
Plans include:
continuing upgrades/enhancement of
technology equipment and
infrastructure;
linking campus network to new
housing facility;
continuing faculty training in distance
and multimedia education;
seeking funds to attend state and
national conferences;
continuing implementation of SCT
Plus 2000 Administrative Software
including automation of degree plans
and web access for student
enrollment;
obtaining external funding for
multimedia and online curriculum
development;
converting all online courses to a
common platform; and
increasing the number of online, ITV,
and blended courses.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
1,954 students enrolled;
1,125 (57.6%) are full-time;
829 (42.4%) are part-time;
1,335 (68.3%) are female;
619 (31.7%) are male;
1,237 (63.3%) are Caucasian;
504 (25.8%) are Native American;
179 (9.2%) are African American;
25 (1.3%) are Hispanic;
8 (0.4%) are Asian;
1 (0.1%) is unknown; and
average age is 24.6.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
replenishing full-time faculty ranks;
emphasizing technology acquisition in
support of academic programs;
introducing new programs;
seeking grant funds for enhanced
student services;
operating/maintaining the physical
plant; and
obtaining grant funds in the areas of
economic development, global
education, curriculum development,
professional development, technology,
and student services.
62
Faculty Profile
63 full-time faculty;
37 (50.7%) are female;
26 (41.3%) are male;
20.6% are ethnic minorities;
5 (7.9%) have a doctorate;
44 (69.8%) have a master’s degree;
13 (20.6%) have a baccalaureate
degree; and
1 (1.6%) has an associate’s degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing delivery of general
education courses;
studying the possible importation of
upper-division undergraduate- and
graduate-level courses; and
Continuing efforts to share low
enrollment courses/programs through
the MECCA consortium.
Murray State College
Academic Priorities
increasing enrollment in occupational
education programs;
addressing student support services
for distance education delivery;
developing additional programs to
meet business and community needs;
introducing Academic Systems for
computer assisted developmental
mathematics; and
piloting a computer-assisted reading
program.
Technology
Plans include:
adding multimedia classrooms;
upgrading computer laboratories and
network;
adding new student services software
for internet access;
purchasing new staff computers and
an optical scanner;
implementing online enrollment; and
providing home access to institutional
computers for staff and students.
Student Profile
1,909 students enrolled;
1,139 (59.7%) full-time students;
770 (40.3%) part-time students;
1,203 (63.0%) are female;
706 (37.0%) are male;
1,408 (73.8%) are Caucasian;
315 (16.5%) are Native American;
96 (5.0%) are African American;
45 (2.4%) are Hispanic; and
15 (0.8%) are Asian.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
reducing administrative costs and
seeking increased support from
external sources;
funding faculty and staff salaries,
OTRS contributions, and health
insurance;
funding increased utilities costs;
increasing Professional Tutor Services;
supporting instruction and technology;
purchasing equipment; and
providing faculty training and
development.
63
Faculty Profile
44 full-time faculty;
4 (9.1%) have a doctorate;
30 (68.2%) have a master’s degree;
9 (20.5%) have a bachelor’s degree;
1 (2.3%) has less than a bachelor’s
degree; and
28 (63.6%) are tenured.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing courses offered to
concurrent enrollment students;
supplying asynchronous general
education courses for Michelin
employees pursuing the Industrial
Maintenance Technology degree;
continuing offering courses for the
Joint Freshman Enrollment Project at
SEOSU;
exporting the Child Development
associate’s degree program to ECU;
partnering with secondary and higher
education institutions to meet No
Child Left Behind program needs;
continuing to import courses/programs
as needed, particularly in business and
education; and
developing existing programs in
distance education format.
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Academic Priorities
continuing to develop and implement
the strategic plan;
increasing enrollment;
increasing retention and graduation/
certificate completion rates;
providing technology development
workshops for faculty;
providing multimedia technology
resources in classrooms;
developing more courses via OneNet
to meet student and community
needs; and
improving interactivity among
distance learning faculty and students.
Technology
Plans include:
training faculty to utilize
technological media in instruction;
and
utilizing the new wireless networking
system on campus for enrollment,
curriculum access and storage, and
Internet research.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
1,908 students enrolled;
1,353 (70.9%) are full-time;
555 (29.1%) are part-time;
1,067 (55.9%) are female;
841 (44.1%) are male;
1,255 (65.8%) are Caucasian;
392 (20.6%) are Native American;
148 (7.8%) are African American;
66 (3.5%) are international;
13 (0.7%) are other; and
26 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
supporting a new position in the
workforce development and AAS in
Integrated Technology programs; and
continuing to seek external funding
through grants and private donations.
64
Faculty Profile
77 full-time faculty;
45 (58.4%) are male;
32 (41.6%) are female;
8 (10.4%) are ethnic minority;
9 (11.7%) have a doctorate;
3 (3.9%) have a specialist’s
designation;
50 (64.9%) have a master’s degree;
and
15 (19.5%) have a baccalaureate
degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
developing general education courses
to support AA, AS, AAS, and
certificate programs;
working with area institutions to
provide workforce development;
seeking additional undergraduate and
graduate programs to import;
continuing redesign of courses and
programs for distance education; and
focusing on courses with low
enrollment and courses needed at
more than one site.
Northern Oklahoma College
Academic Priorities
expanding degree programs on both
campuses;
continuing development of articulation
agreements;
increasing workforce development/
economic development activities;
promoting/marketing new programs;
considering suspension of low
enrollment programs;
perpetuating global education and
Campus Compact activities;
increasing student retention; and
developing additional online degree
programs and ITV course offerings.
Technology
Plans include:
upgrading classrooms and student lab
computers;
adding 2 ITV studios;
adding a wireless network and FTP
server;
providing a student information
Kiosk;
adding video conferencing equipment
to provide increased tutoring services;
providing faculty training in
instructional technology;
adding a multimedia curriculum
development lab;
adding an observatory with
remote/Internet controlled telescope;
and
increasing online and ITV course
offerings.
Student Profile (Spring 2002)
2,265 annualized FTE;
61% female;
39% male;
85% are Caucasian;
8% are Native American;
3% are African American;
2% are Hispanic;
.07% are international;
.07% are Asian; and
average student age is 28.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
increasing private funding to support
academic programs; and
utilizing OSRHE funding to further
develop the AAS in Engineering
Technology and Process Technology.
65
Faculty Profile
67 full-time faculty;
12 (17.9%) have a doctorate;
39 (58.2%) have a master’s degree;
and
16 (23.9%) have a baccalaureate
degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
providing more than 100 ITV classes
to more than 40 sites, including higher
education campuses, technology
centers, corporations, and high
schools; and
collaborating with Enid campus,
University Learning Center, OSUOKC, Rose, and NWOSU for program
delivery and/or importation.
Oklahoma City Community College
Academic Priorities
implementing the Integris Health LPN
to RN track;
implementing the ACDelco
Knowledge Center;
expanding high-tech student services
using Web Advisor;
increasing credit enrollments by 7%;
increasing student retention rates to
above the national average for peer
institutions;
increasing the number of graduates by
10%;
demonstrating student competencies
of remedial, general education, and
transfer students;
attaining or exceeding national
average pass rates for students taking
national licensure exams;
increasing the number of programs
with global awareness components;
and
earning student satisfaction ratings
above the national average for peer
institutions.
Technology
Plans include:
expanding the integrated information
system;
continuing the annual replacement
program for 1/3 of the computers;
increasing the number of faculty
served in the Center for Learning and
Teaching; and
enhancing 6 classrooms with
multimedia and Internet technologies,
adding 2 new computer classrooms,
and upgrading hardware and software
upgrades.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
10,663 students enrolled;
6,797 (63.7%) are part-time;
3,866 (36.3%) are full-time;
Note: Not all students reported gender
(1,460) or ethnicity (1,290). Percentages
are based on total number reporting.
5,205 (56.6%) are female;
3,998 (43.4%) are male;
6,660 (71.1%) are Caucasian;
805 (8.6%) are African American;
711 (7.6%) are Asian;
663 (7.1%) are Native American;
534 (5.6%) are Hispanic; and
26.1 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
funding mandatory cost increases such
as insurance, retirement, utilities, and
contractual services;
funding activities, programs and
services that support enrollment,
retention, and student success; and
continuing to pursue external funds.
66
Faculty Profile
112 full-time faculty;
50.0% are female;
50.0% are male;
12.6% are ethnic minority;
17.0% have a doctorate;
74.0% have a master’s degree;
6.3% have a baccalaureate degree; and
2.7% have less than a baccalaureate
degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
receiving SWOSU’s BS in Nursing
program;
offering approximately 60 telecourse
sections via Cox Cable and OETA;
expanding online course offerings;
offering ITV courses to area
institutions/career technology centers;
piloting 12 web-enhanced courses in
fall 2002; and
continuing membership in the
Oklahoma City Educational
Television Consortium and SREB’s
Electronic Campus.
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
Academic Priorities
improving quality of the
teaching/learning process;
continuing improvement of
instructional assessment;
continuing efforts to improve faculty
diversity and full-time/adjunct ratio;
being identified as THE learning
centered institution;
providing resources necessary for
effective distance learning programs;
enhancing articulation/cooperative
agreements with area Career
Technology Centers and developing
new areas of collaboration with area
businesses; and
developing strong linkages and
partnerships.
Technology
Plans include:
utilizing technology for more efficient
and effective use of instruction time,
personnel, and training;
integrating hands-on use of
technology into instructional learning
objectives and articulated student
outcomes;
providing off-campus student access
to quality academic programs and
courses; and
utilizing technology to provide access
and connectivity.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
4,522 students enrolled;
69% are part-time;
31% are full-time;
56% are female;
44% are male;
75% are Caucasian;
11% are African American;
6% are Native American;
3% are Hispanic;
3% are Asian;
1% are Non-Resident Alien; and
1% are unknown.
Faculty Profile
60 (24%) are full-time faculty;
190 (76%) are adjunct;
Note: the following data applies to full-time
faculty only:
60% are female;
40% are male;
12% are ethnic minorities;
15% have a doctorate;
65% have a master’s degree;
18% have a bachelor’s degree; and
2% have an associate’s degree.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
supporting existing high-cost
programs and related general
education courses;
enhancing equipment;
providing for personnel needs;
and
seeking private/external funds
to help support and enhance
academic programs and related
technology.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
delivering programs to CU, Ardmore
Higher Education Center, NOC, OSU,
and OPSU;
collaborating with the Ardmore
Higher Education Center, MSC, and
Noble Research Foundation to offer
the Horticulture Technology program;
importing bachelor degree program
courses from OSU and business
courses from RSU; and
developing noncredit partnerships
with the Northern Alberta Institute of
Technology (Canada).
67
Oklahoma State University Technical Branch - Okmulgee
Academic Priorities
emphasizing professional faculty
development to integrate advancing
technologies into general education
classes and advanced technological
programs of study;
aligning academic curriculum and
rigor;
improving student access to curricula
and support services through online,
web-based learning;
increasing student success through
appropriate placement;
implementing a targeted student
recruitment and retention program;
fostering an applications-focused
approach to learning across the
curriculum; and
enhancing business and industry
partnerships to remain technologically
current.
Technology
Plans include:
continuing progress of the Title III
grant to be concluded in 2003;
providing faculty development;
deploying new learning technologies
across the curricula; and
field-testing the capability of different
web-based delivery platforms.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
2,331 students enrolled;
60.8% are male;
39.2% are female;
72.5% are Caucasian;
16.1% are Native American;
6.5% are African American;
4.9% are Other; and
25.5 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
implementing an Early Retirement
Incentive Program and internal
reorganization to generate savings;
using private funds to renovate the
Culinary Arts dining room, increase
student scholarships and instructional
equipment, fund 10 endowed
lectureships, and establish the
Corporate Technology Center; and
seeking grants and private sector
funds.
68
Faculty Profile
120 full-time faculty members;
80 (70.8%) are male;
35 (29.2%) are female;
23 (19.2%) are ethnic minorities;
7 (5.8%) have a doctorate;
42 (35.0%) have a master’s degree;
41 (34.2%) have a bachelor’s degree;
and
30 (25.0%) have an associate’s degree,
and most of these are credentialed by
industry-specific certifications.
Learning Site Initiatives
Note: OSUTB-OKM is not explicitly
designated as a learning site; however, the
following initiatives are underway or
planned:
redesigning prototype web-based
delivery modules in hydraulics and
electronics for distance and oncampus delivery; and
collaborating with a test-group of
international corporations and colleges
in Texas and New Mexico for course/
program offerings.
Redlands Community College
Academic Priorities
increasing student success;
continuing technological
improvements;
developing cooperative relationships
with other institutions;
fostering community relationships;
updating existing programs; and
developing new programs.
Technology
Plans include:
implementing electronic student
enrollment;
integrating a grade book system with
student retention;
initiating student retention activities
by faculty; and
developing faculty Web pages and
Internet instructional resources.
Student Profile
2,188 students enrolled;
1,333 (60.9%) are female;
855 (39.1%) are male;
1,748 (79.9%) are Caucasian;
203 (9.3%) are Native American;
127 (5.8%) are African American;
54 (2.5%) are Hispanic;
29 (1.3%) are Asian;
22 (1.0%) are Non-Resident Alien; and
5 (0.2%) are unknown.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
implementing a portfolio model
assessment plan;
preparing for the nursing program’s
professional accreditation (NLNAC)
review;
seeking external resources; and
developing external partnerships.
69
Faculty Profile
32 full-time faculty;
6% have a doctorate;
59% have a master’s degree;
29% have a baccalaureate degree;
3% have an associate’s degree; and
3% have specialty certification.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
collaborating with other institutions to
fill low enrollment courses;
receiving courses from SWOSU and
UCO;
implementing electronic delivery of
AA in Family Studies and Child
Development;
expanding bachelor degree offerings
through existing and future
partnerships; and
implementing delivery of desk-top
based learning for business through
VideoCast software.
Rose State College
Academic Priorities
providing full-time professors in a
majority of classes;
maintaining the quality of existing
programs;
providing effective and accessible
enrollment/advising services;
increasing technology equipment
funding;
providing quality academic support
services;
providing remedial courses; and
implementing cooperative agreements
with local career technology centers
and interacting with local high
schools.
Technology
Plans include:
installing a server to host WebCT online courses.
Student Profile
7,518 students enrolled;
4,990 (66.4%) are part-time;
2,528 (33.6%) are full-time;
4,538 (60.4%) are female;
2,980 (39.6%) are male;
4,865 (64.7%) are Caucasian;
1,175 (15.6%) are African American;
441 (5.9%) are Native American;
298 (4.0%) are Hispanic;
235 (3.1%) are Asian;
134 (1.8%) are multi racial;
370 (4.9%) are unknown; and
27 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing special endowment funding
for the Business and Information
Technology Division;
implementing Closed-Captioned Pilot
Program;
remodeling Health and Environmental
Sciences building; and
reallocating funds from the
discontinued Physical Therapist
Assistant program to remaining health
science programs.
70
Faculty Profile (full-time)
137 faculty members;
80 (58.4%) are female;
57 (41.6%) are male;
92 (67.1%) are tenured;
26 (19.0%) have a doctorate;
98 (71.5%) have at least a master’s
degree;
11 (8.0%) have a bachelor’s degree;
and
2 (1.5%) have less than a bachelor’s
degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing articulation agreements
with baccalaureate degree granting
institutions;
exploring additional opportunities for
importing bachelor’s degree programs
and/or upper-level courses;
considering OneNet enhanced
telecourses for use with state
correctional centers;
offering classroom space to OU for
the liberal studies weekend program;
enhancing online curriculum and
delivery of LPN-ADN Nursing
program; and
developing additional online courses
to meet Tinker and community needs.
Seminole State College
Academic Priorities
increasing use of instructional
technology;
increasing collaboration with other
educational institutions;
restructuring instructional offerings;
and
reducing administration and support
costs.
Technology
Plans include:
purchasing computer hardware and
software;
upgrading existing equipment;
completion of the Technology
Training Center;
improving access to student data
through POISE software;
expanding student access to Internet
and campus networks;
creating a computer laboratory for
student use; and
implementing an annual computer
replacement program.
Student Profile
1,958 students enrolled;
54% are full-time;
46% are part-time;
1,297 (66.2%) are female;
661 (33.8%) are male;
1,428 (72.9%) are Caucasian;
376 (19.2%) are Native American;
95 (4.9%) are African American;
32 (1.6%) are Hispanic;
17 (0.9%) are Non-Resident Alien;
10 (0.5%) are Asian; and
30 is the average age.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
expanding external funding resources
through grant applications;
purchasing programming and
equipment for the Enoch Kelly Haney
Center;
funding the Art and Cultural Center;
expanding athletic facilities;
supporting alcohol and drug abuse
prevention;
pursuing grant funding for the
Seminole County Economic
Development Center; and
improving staff benefits and conditions
of employment.
71
Faculty Profile
45 full-time faculty;
6 (13.3%) have a doctorate;
35 (77.8%) have a master’s degree;
and
4 (8.9%) have a bachelor’s degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
continuing development of distance
ITV and web-based courses as part of
the grant partnership with the
University of Texas;
adding Medical Laboratory
Technology and Child Development
to IETV course offerings;
working with area career technical
centers to develop new program
opportunities;
investigating the use of H.323
technology to deliver courses to area
correctional facilities and to offer the
Child Development program to RCC
students;
continuing to import courses from
ECU, Mid-America Bible College,
OSU, Rose, and UCO;
working with ECU to offer more
upper-level business/management
courses;
importing CU’s MBA; and
importing courses/programs for
employee degree completion, training
and development.
Tulsa Community College
Academic Priorities
developing and assessing
courses/programs for workforce
development;
providing a state-of-the-art learning
environment;
assessing student learning;
designing and implementing
professional development to increase
student learning; and
meeting student learning needs in a
variety of settings.
Technology
Plans include:
integrating online student services;
adding wireless notebook computers
to several ITV classrooms;
converting from analog video to
digital video;
providing support staff, technology,
and ITV support equipment for
receive site efforts;
implementing a video-streaming
server; and
implementing Voyager Automated
Library System and integrating library
research databases into a single search
engine.
Student Profile (Fall 2001)
20,817 students enrolled;
12,490 (60%) are female;
8,327 (40%) are male;
14,089 (68%) are part-time;
6,728 (32%) are full-time;
15,418 (74%) are Caucasian;
1,784 (9%) are African American;
1,263 (6%) are Native American;
704 (3%) are Other;
625 (3%) are Hispanic;
560 (3%) are Asian; and
463 (2%) did not respond.
New Funding Initiatives
Plans include:
hiring additional faculty;
developing curriculum;
purchasing equipment and materials;
continuing faculty and staff
development;
increasing alternative delivery
opportunities for students;
purchasing information and research
databases and support equipment;
expanding the music and arts programs
in collaboration with the Tulsa Public
Schools;
implementing the TCC-NSU Broken
Arrow cooperative program;
expanding orientation programs and
retention initiatives;
creating new student orientation/
welcome centers;
strengthening partnership with Tulsa
Technology Center; and
sponsoring training for infusing
technology and media into classrooms
at the Eighth Floor professional
development center for educators.
72
Faculty Profile (full-time)
60% are female;
40% are male;
8% are ethnic minorities;
17% have a doctorate;
69% have a master’s degree;
12% have a baccalaureate degree; and
2% have less than a baccalaureate
degree.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
conducting an assessment of the
unmet educational needs of the area;
developing programs for online
delivery in transportation
management, child development,
international business,
telecommunications, computer
science, foreign languages, liberal arts,
and applied technology;
cooperating with NSU to provide
coursework at the Broken Arrow
campus;
providing off-campus general
education courses as part of
cooperative agreements;
providing coursework to Tahlequah,
Pawnee, Claremore, and Bartlesville
as requested by the Cherokee and
Delaware tribes;
establishing an online testing system;
collaborating to provide educational
opportunities in such countries as
Israel, Mexico, and Germany;
seeking graduate-level ITV courses
targeting underserved student
populations;
exploring market potential for online
Non-Profit Organization Management
program; and
collaborating with high schools,
federal agencies, and the military to
meet their higher education needs.
Western Oklahoma State College (WOSC)
Academic Priorities
increasing student enrollment through
enhanced enrollment management
processes;
increasing student retention rate;
improving student graduation/
completion rates;
promoting faculty development; and
increasing acquisition and application
of technology.
Technology
Plans include:
increasing the number of media
enhanced teaching rooms;
providing network accessible laptops
to faculty;
enhancing software and hardware
tools for faculty preparation and
instruction; and
improving network capabilities.
Student Profile (Spring 2002)
2,092 students enrolled;
1,205 (57.6%) are female;
887 (42.4%) are male;
1,479 (70.7%) are part-time;
613 (29.3%) are full-time;
1,622 (77.5%) are Caucasian;
225 (10.8%) are Hispanic;
145 (6.9%) are African American;
59 (2.8%) are Native American;
36 (1.7%) are Asian;
5 (0.2%) are Non-Resident Alien; and
40% are Altus Air Force Base
personnel or dependents.
New Funding Initiatives
No new projects planned (due to
budget reductions)
73
Faculty Profile (2002-03)
38 full-time faculty;
23 (60.5%) are male;
15 (39.5%) are female;
3 (7.9%) have a doctoral degrees;
30 (78.9%) have at least a master's
degree; and
5 (13.2%) have baccalaureate degrees.
Learning Site Initiatives
Plans include:
discussing feasibility of delivering
computer based programs to
Comanche Nation;
expanding web course availability by
implementing WebCT program for
use with computer related degree
programs;
continue receiving upper-division
courses from CU, SWOSU, and Mid
America Bible College;
receiving 2+2 business completion
program from SWOSU;
expanding delivery of developmental
math and English courses, including
possible concurrent enrollment
offerings; and
meeting educational needs of Altus
Air Force Base, Oklahoma State
Reformatory, and additional western
sites including Blair, Duke, Eldorado,
Frederick, Granite, Hollis, Mangum,
Olustee, and Tipton.
74
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Institutional Academic Plan 2003 Outline
Part I. Annual Report
I.
A brief summary of the institution’s mission, function, history, and traditions
emphasizing distinctive characteristics, if there have been revisions in the past year.
II.
A statement containing the aspirations and expectations the institution has for its
students.
III.
The objectives of the general education program, if changed from last year's plan.
IV.
An updated student profile delineating relevant features of the institution’s clientele.
Include the number of full-time students, part-time students, gender and race information.
V.
An updated faculty profile. Include the number of faculty, a breakdown of their
education by type of degree (associate, baccalaureate, masters, or doctoral), tenure status
(tenure, tenure track, non-tenure track).
VI.
An organizational chart of the institution, if it has changed.
VII. A description or flowchart of the process used to develop the plan, if the process has
changed.
VIII. Learning Site Accountability Report:
A. Please respond to the following questions as a learning site (your institution is
hosting the courses offered by another institution):
1.
2.
3.
Include a list of the courses and programs received electronically from other
institutions.
Provide detailed information about how the learning site is ascertaining and
meeting employer needs and student demands.
Describe in detail how the learning site spent the receive site funding.
B. Please respond to the following questions on behalf of the learning site(s) that your
institution serves (your institution's faculty teach the courses that are delivered to a
sister institution). Break down the responses by individual learning site.
1.
2.
3.
Describe student satisfaction in the areas of instruction, facilities, academic
support services, technology, and value (tuition cost vs. satisfaction with
education).
Describe faculty satisfaction with facilities, services, and technology.
Describe how the results of the student and faculty satisfactions surveys were
communicated to the learning site host and how any problems identified in
those surveys were resolved.
75
IX.
Business Program and Economic Development Review - Progress Report:
Describe institutional progress on the implementation of the following Business Program
and Economic Development Review teams' recommendations:
A. Programs:
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
6.
7.
8.
9.
10.
11.
12.
13.
14.
15.
Establish experiential learning projects for each student and advisory boards
for each program.
Improve university retention and graduation rates with community colleges
focusing on student transfer rates.
Develop student outcome standards and tie to graduation requirements.
Eliminate unnecessary duplication of effort and encourage lead institutions to
outsource their programs.
Benchmark Oklahoma program performance with institutions outside the
state.
Assure sufficient number of academically and professionally qualified
faculty.
Increase the ethnic and gender diversity of faculty.
Offer competitive salaries to high-demand faculty.
Provide faculty development in technology.
Provide comprehensive career services that include career counseling, job
fairs, and placement services.
Provide student access to internships or similar experiences that connect the
classroom experience and work environment.
Track alumni.
Assure adequate financial resources for instructional technology.
Provide support to effectively integrate and infuse technology into curricula.
Develop a technology investment policy based on desired student outcomes.
B. Economic Development:
1.
Promote entrepreneurship and enterprise development.
Part II. Academic Plan for Coming Year
I.
The institution’s four or five academic priorities for the next three to five years and the
objectives that will be used as benchmarks to achieve the priorities. Please include, if
appropriate, how these academic priorities relate to high priority academic programs.
II.
A section outlining special opportunities, constraints, or regularities that the external
environment will present to the institution. In recent years and for the foreseeable future,
limited funding represents the major constraint for most institutions. Please include in
this section any constraints in addition to fiscal with which the institution expects to
contend and how these constraints may impact the institution’s academic priorities.
76
III.
Summarize how new or reallocated funds will be used. New revenues should include
new state monies and private funds, such as contracts, grants, and endowments. What are
the institution’s plans to increase private funds? How will new or reallocated funds
support academic program priorities?
IV.
Summarize the institution’s plans for the coming year with respect to technology,
including its use in the classroom, faculty and curriculum development, student support
services, and distance education including planned external sites for offering programs
and courses and courses and programs the institution plans to receive.
V.
As a requirement for designation as a learning site, institutions should list and describe
the following:
A. programmatic areas in which the institution has or intends to develop the
capacity to deliver high-quality learning opportunities at sites distant from the
campus;
B. areas where the institution should consider collaborating with other institutions to
develop joint programs, courses, or modules for both distance and on-campus
delivery;
C. areas in conjunction with the institution’s learning site designation, where the
institution should “import” programs, courses, or modules from other institutions
to serve both learning site and on-campus students; and
D. programs or courses for redesign (perhaps in collaboration with other
institutions) to be better suited to distance delivery and/or to enhance the
effectiveness, efficiency, and flexibility of on-campus delivery.
77
78
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #10.1:
Educational and General Budgets
SUBJECT:
Approval of reduced FY 03 allocations and authorization to submit revised budgets.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents (1) approve revised allocations to the
institutions and programs in the state system as a result of state-mandated budget
reductions and (2) authorize the Chancellor to submit revised budgets to the Office
of State Finance, to be ratified at the meeting of October 31, 2002.
BACKGROUND:
In response to the declaration of a revenue shortfall by the Office of State Finance for the current fiscal
year, the Chancellor on September 12, 2002, notified institutional presidents that in accordance with 70
O.S. Supp., §3903(g), institutional allotments of state appropriations would be reduced by an annualized
4.34 percent for the remainder of the fiscal year. The letter required submission of budget revisions
reflecting the reduced allotment for State Regents’ approval to be submitted by September 27, 2002, for
transmittal to the Office of State Finance no later than September 30.
POLICY ISSUES:
The recommendation is consistent with Regents’ policy and actions.
ANALYSIS:
The reduction for General Revenue funding for the current year is 4.75 percent. As General Revenue is
89.4 percent of the original appropriation and shortfalls are not anticipated in other funding sources at this
time, the overall reduction to higher education is 4.25 percent.
All institutions and nearly every program will see a reduction of 4.34 percent. Once again, the
recommendation is to hold the allocations to financial aid programs at the original FY03 amount, in order
to fulfill commitments to students. It is necessary to make the full payments for debt service to OCIA,
regardless of the revenue shortfall, and full funding is likewise required for two other small line items, the
Master Lease administrative costs and the Academic Library databases. All other programs, as well as
the institutions, will see the same 4.34 percent reduction, as shown on the attached schedule.
0
78.1
78.2
78.3
78.4
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #11:
Strategic Plan
SUBJECT:
Approval of FY04 Strategic Plan for Office of State Finance
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the strategic plan requested by
the Office of State Finance as contained in the attached document.
BACKGROUND:
The Executive Branch is in the process of initiating a statewide strategic plan. Each agency has been
asked to submit a multi-year strategic plan document and associated budget request. The period requested
is FY2004-2007. Regents’ staff have met with OSF staff to discuss a number of issues related to higher
education’s contribution to this effort. Regents’ strategic planning efforts such as the Citizens’
Commission and the Brain Gain 2010 initiative have been widely publicized and acknowledged as
consistent with both State Regents’ constitutional responsibilities and with this new statewide effort.
Topics of discussion with OSF have focused on adapting the current State Regents’ efforts to the generic
state agency format and integration of the decentralized activities and disparate missions of colleges and
universities into a unified higher education presentation. The material in the plan is essentially
established Regents’ initiatives, as well as the Academic Plans submitted annually by institutions,
reworked to fit the new format. This effort will provide an opportunity to highlight for both the executive
branch and the legislative branch the many activities that support the Brain Gain and other initiatives.
The focus of this document is Brain Gain 2010, the major long-term goal of the State Regents. The key
agency performance measures directly support this goal. They include numbers of graduates, retention
rates, graduation rates and high-school-to-college-going rate. Actual data for FY01 and FY02 are shown,
with projections to 2010. OSF has requested goals only through 2007, but the entire period is included
here. State Regents have previously approved all action plans, with the exception of the student
preparation plan, which is brought forward for approval at today’s meeting. These action plans are
likewise tightly tied to the long-term Brain Gain 2010 goal. Assumptions on demographics, economic
development, the Oklahoma Teacher’s Retirement System and Technology rely heavily on the work of
the Citizens’ Commission.
The main sections of the plan include:
Mission
Vision
Values and Behavior
Long-Term Goals and Agency Key Performance Measures
79
Agency-wide Action Plans
Assumptions
The budget request for FY04 will likewise be tied to the Strategic Plan and be brought to the Regents for
approval at the October meeting.
It is anticipated that Regents will review this plan from time to time and make modifications as they
develop new initiatives. OSF has announced that the plan is to be scheduled for formal revision in two
years.
80
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #12:
SUBJECT:
Endowment Trust Fund Annual Distribution
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve a distribution in the amount of
$9,170,709.21 for Fiscal Year 2002 and $11,806,536 for prior years’ carryover-totaling approximately $21 million--for institutional expenditure from eligible
Endowment Trust Fund accounts.
BACKGROUND:
With the allocation at the May 24, 2002, meeting, the State Regents have allocated a total of $140.9
million to the Endowment Trust Fund for chairs, professorships and lectureships and $9.96 for the
Langston University Endowment from state appropriations since inception of the program in 1988. These
allocations are to support the establishment of faculty chairs and professorships and for related activities
to improve the quality of instruction and research at colleges and universities in the State System. In
addition to state funding, the fund contains private matching funds and unrestricted gifts.
In October 1992, the State Regents authorized the investment of trust fund monies in asset classes other
than fixed income. The Common Fund was selected as the primary provider of investment vehicles,
while staff continues to invest on-hand cash through the State Treasurer’s Office. Also, included for the
fourth year is the available distribution for the Langston University Endowment.
POLICY ISSUES:
Investments for the Endowment Trust Fund have been made in compliance with the State Regents’
investment policy and relevant State Statutes.
STAFF ANALYSIS:
The State Regents’ investment policy provides that “the investment committee shall determine the
distribution...The distribution will not necessarily be equivalent to actual earnings during the year, but to
maintain a distribution rate from year to year that, as a goal, will approximate 5 percent of the asset values
for the endowment trust fund.”
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the attached distribution schedule for eligible
Endowment Trust Fund accounts.
81
82
83
84
85
86
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
95
96
97
98
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #13:
SUBJECT:
Master Lease Purchase Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents authorize submission to the Bond
Oversight Commissions the final 2002 series of institutional project agreements and
approve the use of the Master Lease Purchase Program. The total projects from six
institutions amount to approximately $25.15 million.
BACKGROUND:
In the spring of 1997, work began on development of a systemwide Master Lease Purchase Program to
provide a method of financing major personal property acquisitions by the State System entities. The
Oklahoma State Legislature approved in May 1999, Senate Bill 151, which authorized the State Regents
to establish a master lease program. State System entities may enter into lease agreements for projects
having a project value of at least a minimum of $50,000 up to a maximum of $10 million. The terms of
the lease agreements will vary by the useful life of the equipment purchases.
The State Regents’ office works in conjunction with the Oklahoma Development Finance Authority
(ODFA) to administer this program with each institutional lease purchase agreement submitted to the
State Bond Oversight Commissions for approval. The institutional governing boards have given prior
approval of all equipment purchases submitted under this program.
POLICY ISSUES:
Recommendation is consistent with current State Regents’ policy.
ANALYSIS:
The Master Lease Purchase Program provides the State System entities a method of financing major
personal property acquisitions at significant efficiencies from both financing aspects and administration.
This program is designed to provide flexibility in acquiring new capital equipment by allowing lease
purchase payments or debt service payments to be made on a monthly basis from current capital and
operating funds. Individual sub-lease agreements will be entered into with each participating institution
and the State Regents, under the terms of the Master Lease Purchase Agreement. The institution’s fee
structure shall be based on the individualized purchase package and interest rates available on the day of
bond pricing.
The final series for calendar year 2002 includes six system institutions with an estimated total of
approximately $25.15 million of equipment purchases. “Attachment B” includes the individual entities’
listings of proposed equipment purchases. All equipment proposals are subject to the approval of Bond
99
Counsel and the Bond Oversight Commissions. The following table summarizes the participating entities
and estimated total purchase amounts submitted for the December issue.
Institution
Total Amount to be Financed in December
Issue
$3,000,000
$5,000,000
$1,750,000
$403,000
$5,000,000
$10,000,000
$25,153,000
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma State University
East Central University
Langston University
Total for December Issue
100
101
102
103
104
105
106
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #14:
Research Matching Program
SUBJECT:
Approval of Allocation to Institutions
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify an allocation of matching funds to
the University of Oklahoma in the amount of $1 million, with $500,000 payable in
FY03 and $500,000 in FY04.
BACKGROUND:
For FY 2002, the State Regents approved an allocation of approximately $4.3 million for the
Research Matching Program; the amount has been reduced to $4.2 million. The program funds
both individual researcher grants and collaborative multi-institution EPSCoR grants.
Approximately $3 million is budgeted annually for EPSCoR projects.
POLICY ISSUES:
The recommendation is consistent with State Regents’ policy (II-1-25.2).
ANALYSIS:
In FY99 the University of Oklahoma submitted a proposal to the National Science Foundation for
acquisition of a phased array weather radar analysis test bed. The equipment was to be used not only for
research, but also to educate students on an instrument that foreshadows the long-term weather
environment. The State Regents’ commitment was for $1 million, contingent on federal matching funds.
Although not funded by NSF, matching funds for a modified proposal were awarded by the National
Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration in the amount of $1 million. The university will contribute
$500,000, and Lockheed Martin will provide additional equipment.
Funding is available from prior-year Research Match Program allocations held in reserve in the event
federal funding materialized. Half of the commitment will be paid in the current year; half in the next
fiscal year.
107
108
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #15:
Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Professional Development Program
SUBJECT:
Allocation of Funds for FY 2003.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the reimbursement of $1,885,127
as shown on Resolution No. 4292 and authorize the Chancellor to approve revised
budgets for State System institutions to incorporate the reimbursement.
BACKGROUND:
The provisions of House Bill 1549, creating the Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Act, authorize the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education to provide funding to upgrade the quality of teacher
preparation in Oklahoma. The purpose of the Act is to improve the caliber of elementary and secondary
school teachers certified to teach in Oklahoma public school systems.
The Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Act provides for a three-member Residency Committee for each firstyear teacher licensed by the State Board of Education. A Residency Committee consists of 1) a mentor
teacher; 2) a principal or assistant principal designated by the local board; and 3) a teacher educator from
a college or university in Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
The above recommendation is consistent with State Regents' policy.
ANALYSIS:
The Residency Committee reimbursement to each institution is based on the workload of the previous
year in terms of both the number of committees served and miles traveled. Effective January 1, 2002, the
mileage reimbursement rate increased from 34.5 to 36.5 cents per mile traveled, and is reflected in the
reimbursement calculations. The 2002-03 allocations total $1,697,550 to 12 State System institutions and
$187,577 to eight independent institutions. The combined total of $1,885,127 is the amount allocated by
the State Regents from lump-sum appropriations and represents a reduction of $133,205 from the
previous year, reflecting both the standard two percent reduction and the 4.7 percent mandated budget
reduction. Resolution No. 4292 is attached.
Attachments
109
Ok la h o m a S ta te Re g e n ts fo r Hig h e r Ed u c a tio n
Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Professional Development Residency Program
2002-2003 Institutional Allocations
2001-2002
2002-2003
Average
Number
Committees
Served
Percent of Total
Committees
Served
Miles
Traveled
University of Oklahoma
159
7.80%
27,358
Oklahoma State University
304
14.92%
121,389
42,923
264,081
262,483
(1,598)
University of Central Oklahoma
295
14.47%
46,119
16,320
276,785
229,380
(47,405)
East Central University
138
6.77%
61,704
21,815
149,535
121,484
(28,051)
Northeastern State University
586
28.75%
207,879
74,375
520,448
497,606
(22,842)
5,452
INSTITUTION
2000-01
Reimbursement
Mileage
Reimburse-ment
$
9,731 $
112,575
Difference in
2001-02
Funding from
Proposed
FY 02
Reimburse-ment
$
124,567
$
11,992
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
63
3.09%
25,883
9,142
49,191
54,643
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
133
6.53%
41,297
14,721
111,607
110,779
(828)
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
121
5.94%
52,365
18,524
116,097
105,915
(10,182)
Cameron University
109
5.35%
17,720
6,259
78,276
84,983
6,707
Langston University
36
1.77%
6,281
2,232
44,296
28,233
(16,063)
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
33
1.62%
13,872
4,894
27,859
28,728
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
61
2.99%
13,296
4,694
66,750
48,750
2,038
100.00%
635,163
$
225,630
$
1,817,500
$
1,697,550
$
Oklahoma Baptist University
43
11.08%
13,301
$
4,687
$
17,807
$
22,854
$
Oklahoma Christian University
22
5.67%
3,393
1,200
10,514
10,495
Oklahoma City University
40
10.31%
6,415
2,276
17,329
19,175
1,846
Oklahoma Wesleyan University
29
7.47%
5,883
2,086
18,684
14,338
(4,346)
Oral Roberts University
152
39.18%
16,911
6,003
73,336
70,220
(3,116)
Total State System Institutions
869
(18,000)
(119,950)
5,047
(19)
Southern Nazarene University
27
6.96%
3,914
1,387
20,028
12,794
(7,234)
University of Tulsa
63
16.24%
11,669
4,136
38,233
30,752
(7,481)
Mid-America Bible College
12
3.09%
5,267
1,880
4,900
6,950
2,050
Total Independent Institutions
388
100.00%
66,753
110
$
23,655
$
200,831
$
187,577
$
(13,254)
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
RESOLUTION NO. 4292
Pursuant to the authority granted under the Constitution of Oklahoma by Articles XIII-A adopted March 11, 1941, which vests in the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education the allocation of funds appropriated by the Legislature for use in The Oklahoma State System of
Higher Education and to the provisions of Section 3 of House Bill 2433, of the Forty-Eighth Oklahoma Legislature,
The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education hereby ALLOCATE the sums set out below for the respective institutions of the
Oklahoma State System of Higher Education, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2002, and ending June 30, 2003, said funds to be subsequently
allotted for encumbrance and expenditure during said fiscal year, as provided by law.
From: 210-605
To: 290-000000 As Listed
Professional Development Program
Institution
University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma State University
University of Central Oklahoma
East Central University
Northeastern State University
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Cameron University
Langston University
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
Total Public Institutions
Agency No.
Amount
Allocation
760
010
120
230
485
505
660
665
100
420
531
150
$124,567
$262,483
$229,380
$121,484
$497,606
$54,643
$110,779
$105,915
$84,983
$28,233
$28,728
$48,750
of
$1,697,550
Private Institutions
$187,577
Adopted by the State Regents in the meeting of September 13, 2002.
SEAL:
ATTEST:
Jimmy Harrel, Secretary
Carl Renfro, Chairman
I, Hans Brisch, do hereby certify that the above is a correct statement of the action authorized by the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education as
set forth in the minutes of the regular meeting on September 13, 2002.
Hans Brisch, Chancellor
Duly subscribed and sworn to before me this 13th day of September, 2002.
____________________________________
Notary Public
My commission expires _______________________________________________.
111
112
113
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #16:
Tuition and Fees
SUBJECT:
Posting of Institutional Request for Student Activity Fees for FY2003
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve an exception to policy and post
the institutional requests for student facility fees for FY2003 as outlined below.
BACKGROUND:
In May 2000, the Board of Regents for the University of Oklahoma approved the construction of a third
floor to the Health Sciences Center’s Student Center and renovations to approximately 3,000 sq. ft. of
space in the existing facility and the development of a pavilion and intramural playing field. The $3.4
million estimated cost of construction is to be repaid through the Student Facility Fee. The existing
current debt, at that time, was to be paid from a $2.75 per credit hour facility fee. Upon completion of the
projects, a student facility fee of $7.30 per credit hour would be necessary to meet the required debt
service and pay for operating expenses. The State Regents approved the $2.75 per credit hour Student
Facility Fee on May 26, 2000. The OUHSC has notified this office that the construction of said projects
will be completed in September 2002 and requests the Student Facility Fee be increased from $2.75 per
credit hour to $7.30 per credit hour effective the spring semester of 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents policy (II-4-37) requires institutions to submit requests for authorization to change tuition
and fees to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education by November 1 preceding the beginning of
the fiscal year in which the change is to be effective. Although the University of Oklahoma notified this
office on May 9, 2000 of the pending fee change, the request to authorize the fee increase for the spring
2003 semester was not received in time for the May 24, 2002 public hearing and for public notice.
ANALYSIS:
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center requests a change to the Student Facility Fee from
$2.75 per credit hour to $7.30 per credit hour. The increase in revenue will provide additional funds to
pay the debt service of a bond issue and the operating expenses for the addition of a third floor and
renovations to approximately 3,000 sq. ft. of existing space to the Student Center. A pavilion and
intramural playing field are also included in the debt service. The HSC Student Association Government
requested these projects and agreed to fund the costs through the Student Facility Fee. The Board of
Regents for the University of Oklahoma approved the projects and the proposed fee increases in May
2000.
114
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #17-a:
University of Oklahoma - Student Housing
SUBJECT:
Review of Statement of Essential Facts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents certify to the Attorney General of
Oklahoma that the Statement of Essential Facts for the University of Oklahoma,
Series 2002, in the amount of $8,000,000 is substantially accurate.
BACKGROUND:
For revenue bonds issued pursuant to Title 70, Oklahoma Statutes, Section 4001 through 4014, a
Statement of Essential Facts shall be prepared by the issuing Board of Regents for the use of and
information of prospective bond purchasers. Section 4014 of this statute requires that the State Regents
examine the Statement of Essential Facts and, if found to be substantial accurate, certify such to the
Attorney General of Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
None
ANALYSIS:
The proceeds received from the sale of the Series 2002 bonds will be used (a) to construct, renovate,
remodel, expand and equip the student housing facilities located on the Norman and Oklahoma City
campuses, or (b) to reimburse the University for recent improvements and (c) make required deposits into
the Bond Reserve Fund, and (d) for payment of costs of issuance.
The bonds to be issued as serial bonds will be payable on May 1 and November 1 for each of the years
2003 through 2027 with interest payments commencing on May 1, 2003, and annually each year
thereafter. The bonds are special obligations of the Board of Regents for the University of Oklahoma.
The University has pledged, as security for the issuance, net revenues derived from the ownership and
operation of the Student Housing Facilities, less $500,000 annual revenue pledged to a 1998 Series
Bonds. Also, the University has pledged as security a Debt Service Reserve Fund in the form of a Debt
Service Reserve Fund Surety Policy. The pledged revenues as anticipated by the University’s Board, will
provide sufficient revenue to: (1.) pay the reasonable cost of the project; (2.) pay principal of and interest
on the Bonds; and, (3.) maintain the reserve required in the Reserve Account for securing any bonds
payable.
The Statement of Essential Facts as reflected in the Preliminary Official Statement for the Student
Housing Facilities has been reviewed and found to be substantially accurate. Projected revenue, as
projected in the Statement, will assure that revenues will be adequate to cover debt service requirements
at a minimum coverage ratio of 3.68.
A concurrent resolution authorizing issuance of the bonds has been approved by the legislature. A copy
of the Preliminary Official Statement is available for review.
115
116
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #17-b
University of Oklahoma
Tulsa Campus Revenue Bonds
SUBJECT:
Review of Statement of Essential Facts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents certify to the Attorney General of
Oklahoma that the Statement of Essential Facts for the University of Oklahoma
Tulsa Campus, Series 2002, in the amount of $21,900,000 is substantially accurate.
BACKGROUND:
For revenue bonds issued pursuant to Title 70, Oklahoma Statutes, Section 4001 through 4014, a
Statement of Essential Facts shall be prepared by the issuing Board of Regents for the use of and
information of prospective bond purchasers. Section 4014 of this statute requires that the State Regents
examine the Statement of Essential Facts and, if found to be substantial accurate, certify such to the
Attorney General of Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
None
ANALYSIS:
The proceeds received from the sale of the Series 2002 bonds will be used (a) to acquire, construct,
renovate, remodel, expand and equip the academic facilities located on the Tulsa campus, or (b) to
reimburse the University for recent improvements and (c) make required deposits into the Bond Reserve
Fund, and (d) for payment of costs of issuance. It is estimated that 15% of the issue may be deemed
taxable.
The bonds to be issued as serial bonds will be payable on May 1 and November 1 for each of the years
2003 through 2022 with interest payments commencing on May 1, 2003, and semi-annually each year
thereafter. The bonds are special obligations of the Board of Regents for the University of Oklahoma.
The University has pledged, as security for the issuance, gross revenues derived from the Tulsa Clinical
operations. The pledged revenues are defined as primarily derived from fees generated by the faculty of
the College of Medicine—Tulsa. The revenue is composed of payments from Medicare, Medicaid,
Oklahoma Health Care Authority, commercial insurance payers, managed care contracts, professional
service contracts and support from the Tulsa Medical Education Foundation. Also, the University has
pledged as security a Debt Service Reserve Fund in the form of a Debt Service Reserve Fund Surety
Policy. The pledged revenues as anticipated by the University’s Board, will provide sufficient revenue to:
(1.) pay the reasonable cost of the project; (2.) pay principal of and interest on the Bonds; and, (3.)
maintain the reserve required in the Reserve Account for securing any bonds payable.
117
The Statement of Essential Facts as reflected in the Preliminary Official Statement for the Tulsa Medical
Campus has been reviewed and found to be substantially accurate. Projected revenue, as projected in the
Statement, will assure that revenues will be adequate to cover debt service requirements at a minimum
coverage ratio of 2.63.
A concurrent resolution authorizing issuance of the bonds has been approved by the legislature. A copy
of the Preliminary Official Statement is available for review.
118
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #17-c:
Oklahoma State University - Atherton Hotel Renovation
SUBJECT:
Review of Statement of Essential Facts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents certify to the Attorney General of
Oklahoma that the Statement of Essential Facts for Oklahoma State University,
Series 2002, in the amount of $2,400,000 is substantially accurate.
BACKGROUND:
For revenue bonds issued pursuant to Title 70, Oklahoma Statutes, Section 4001 through 4014, a
Statement of Essential Facts shall be prepared by the issuing Board of Regents for the use of and
information of prospective bond purchasers. Section 4014 of this statute requires that the State Regents
examine the Statement of Essential Facts and, if found to be substantial accurate, certify such to the
Attorney General of Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
None
ANALYSIS:
The proceeds received from the sale of the Series 2002 bonds will be used (a) to construct, improve,
renovate, expand and equip the Student Union hotel located on the Stillwater campus, or (b) to capitalize
thirteen months of interest on the Bonds, and (c) make required deposits into the Bond Reserve Fund, and
(d) for payment of costs of issuance.
The bonds to be issued as serial bonds will be payable on January 1 and July 1 for each of the years 2003
through 2023 with interest payments commencing on July 1, 2003, and annually each year thereafter. The
bonds are special obligations of the Board of Regents for the Oklahoma Agricultural and Mechanical
Colleges. The University has pledged, as security for the issuance, (a) $1.80 per student credit hour of
The Student Facility Fee earmarked for the Student Union, (b) $191,000 annual transfer of revenue
collected from the Student Activity Fee, and (c) net revenues derived from the ownership and operation of
the Atherton Hotel and Student Union Building. The pledged revenues as anticipated by the University’s
Board, will provide sufficient revenue to: (1.) pay the reasonable cost of the project; (2.) pay principal of
and interest on the Bonds; and, (3.) maintain the reserve required in the Reserve Account for securing any
bonds payable.
The Statement of Essential Facts as reflected in the Preliminary Official Statement for the Atherton Hotel
Project has been reviewed and found to be substantially accurate. Projected revenue, as projected in the
Statement, will assure that revenues will be adequate to cover debt service requirements at a minimum
coverage ratio of 1.35.
A concurrent resolution authorizing issuance of the bonds has been approved by the legislature.
A copy of the Preliminary Official Statement is available for review.
119
120
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #18:
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents repeal the APA rules and State Regents'
policy for the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program.
BACKGROUND:
The 1985 Oklahoma Legislature created the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program (OTELP) and
authorized the State Regents to provide forgivable loans to students who declared their intention to serve
the State of Oklahoma by teaching in the public schools in specific subject areas that were declared to be
teacher shortage areas. Recipients were required to teach one year for each year they received a loan or to
repay the loan. The program provided forgivable loans beginning in the 1986-87 academic year and
continued through the 1988-89 academic year. The Oklahoma Legislature discontinued new funding for
the program in FY89 and no new loans were issued after that year. A total of 135 students received
forgivable loans totaling $485,141.
The 2001 Oklahoma Legislature repealed the statutory language authorizing OTELP and replaced it with
language authorizing the Teacher Shortage Employment Incentive Program (TSEIP).
POLICY ISSUES:
With the statutory language for the OTELP repealed, the APA rules and State Regents' policy for the
program are no longer required.
ANALYSIS:
OTELP did not prove to be efficient in encouraging students to pursue teaching careers in shortage areas.
For recipients who subsequently changed their educational pursuits or chose not to teach, the program
created a financial burden. Staff activities to track the students once they ended their higher education
pursuits and to collect repayments proved to be both administratively inefficient and a financial burden
for the agency.
In the 2000 and 2001 legislative sessions, the Oklahoma Legislature again considered programs to attract
teachers to shortage areas. Teacher supply and demand studies showed that the problem was not
primarily in attracting students to teacher shortage areas in college, but rather in getting those students to
actually teach in the shortage areas once they graduated. Based on the experience with the OTELP a
decade earlier, Regents staff recommended the creation of a Teacher Shortage Employment Incentive
Program (TSEIP), which the Legislature adopted in 2000 and amended in 2001. The Legislature also
repealed the OTELP statutes in 2001.
121
The TSEIP, unlike OTELP, provides for a financial incentive only after teaching service has been
rendered for five years, eliminating the need to collect repayments. The amount of the incentive is not to
exceed the equivalent of three times the annual cost of tuition and fees. TSEIP provides for the incentive
to repay student loans secured through other sources or offers a cash payment to students not holding
unpaid student loans. College students began enrolling in TSEIP in 2001-02. The first incentive
payments are not anticipated until 2006. TSEIP is expected to be a more efficient and effective means of
providing incentives for the pursuit of teaching careers in shortage subject areas.
122
II-6-16
POLICY AND PROCEDURES FOR THE
OKLAHOMA TEACHER EDUCATION LOAN PROGRAM
Senate Bill No. 368 of the 1984 Oklahoma Legislature appropriated funds to the Oklahoma State Regents
for Higher Education to
. . . establish a program for making available forgivable loans . . . to students enrolled in a
major course of study at the graduate or undergraduate level who declare an intention to serve
and who subsequently serve this state by teaching in the subject areas of mathematics, science,
computer learning, or foreign languages at the elementary or secondary level in the public
schools of this state . . . The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are authorized to
provide student loans to persons who are enrolled at institutions of higher education in this
state for the purposes specified (above). The loans shall be applied to the cost of said
education. It is the intent of the Oklahoma Legislature that only those undergraduate and
graduate students who are enrolled full time be eligible for said loans.
The implied purpose of this legislation is to make forgivable postsecondary education loans available to
undergraduates and graduates who demonstrate an interest in teaching in the fields in which there is a
teacher shortage as specified in the legislation. Further, the purpose is to enable and encourage those
individuals to pursue elementary or secondary level teaching careers in the public schools of Oklahoma.
Eligibility
1. Eligibility is restricted to Oklahoma resident students.
2. Individuals must meet the objective standards of education for admission to an approved
teacher education program at a higher education institution in Oklahoma.
3. Eligible individuals must have a grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in courses
taken while enrolled full time at an institution of higher education and completed not later
than the semester before the term in which the loan is granted.
4. Certification of applicant eligibility must be provided by the participating institution.
5. Individuals must sign a statement of intent to teach in an Oklahoma public school in a
teaching field of critical shortage.
6. Eligible individuals must comply with all provisions of these rules as are required.
Applications
Application forms may be obtained from the office of financial aid or the administrative office
of the college, school, or department of education at one of Oklahoma's teacher education
preparation institutions of higher education or from the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher
Education, 500 Education Building, State Capitol Complex, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 731054503.
123
II-6-17
Terms and Conditions of Loans
Senate Bill No. 228 authorizes the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education to forgive
eligible loans to
persons who actually render service as teachers in the public schools of this state if not less
than seventy-five percent (75%) of the teaching assignment is in a subject area specified in
subsection A of this section. Loan forgiveness shall be one (1) year's loan for each school
year of service rendered. One-half (1/2) school year of service shall be required for
forgiveness of a summer term loan. The first year of teaching will forgive the first year's
loan; the second year of teaching will forgive the second year's loan; and the third year of
teaching will forgive the third year's loan.
Annual Loan Limit
Provided that funds are available, loans of up to $3,400 per academic year (two semesters or two
trimesters) and up to $1,100 for the summer term may be made to students pursuing full-time study
under the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program.
Aggregate Loan Limit
No person shall receive more than three (3) annual loans nor more than three (3) summer term loans
for an aggregate loan amount of $13,500.
Study Load Requirements
Borrowers must be enrolled as full-time students at their respective institutions and must maintain
satisfactory progress toward the completion of their academic program as certified by institutional
officials.
Certifications of Compliance
Proper certification that the in-school borrowers have fully met the study load requirements noted
above must be received by the State Regents' office prior to each disbursement. In-school
certification forms will be furnished to the borrowers by the State Regents' office. Persons who
actually render service as teachers in the public schools must submit to the State Regents' office a
certificate for teaching service credit at the end of each contract year. The in-service certification
forms will be provided to the borrowers by the State Regents' office. It will be the individual
borrower's responsibility to ensure that the appropriate forms are properly signed and returned to the
State Regents' office as requested above.
For Further Information On This Program, Contact:
Student Affairs Division
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
500 Education Building
State Capitol Complex
Oklahoma City, Oklahoma 73105-4503
(405) 521-2444
124
TITLE 610. STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
CHAPTER 25. STUDENT FINANCIAL AID AND SCHOLARSHIPS
SUBCHAPTER 13. OKLAHOMA TEACHER EDUCATION LOAN PROGRAM [REVOKED]
610:25-13-1. Purpose [REVOKED]
(a) Senate Bill No. 368 of the 1984 Oklahoma Legislature appropriated funds to the Oklahoma State
Regents for Higher Education to ". . . establish a program for making available forgivable loans. . . to
students enrolled in a major course of study at the graduate or undergraduate level who declare an intention
to serve and who subsequently serve this state by teaching in the subject areas of mathematics, science,
computer learning, or foreign languages at the elementary or secondary level in the public schools of this
state . . . The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are authorized to provide student loans to
persons who are enrolled at institutions of higher education in this state for the purposes specified (above).
The loans shall be applied to the cost of said education. It is the intent of the Oklahoma Legislature that
only those undergraduate and graduate students who are enrolled full time be eligible for said loans." [70
O.S., § 698.2 (A) and (B)]
(b) The implied purpose of this legislation is to make forgivable postsecondary education loans available to
undergraduates and graduates who demonstrate an interest in teaching in the fields in which there is a
teacher shortage as specified in (a) of this Section. Further, the purpose is to enable and encourage those
individuals to pursue elementary or secondary level teaching careers in the public schools of Oklahoma.
610:25-13-2. Eligibility [REVOKED]
Provisions for eligibility for the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program are as follows:
(1) Eligibility is restricted to Oklahoma resident students.
(2) Individuals must meet the objective standards of education for admission to an approved teacher
education program at a higher education institution in Oklahoma.
(3) Eligible individuals must have a grade point average of at least 2.5 on a 4.0 scale in courses taken
while enrolled full time at an institution of higher education and completed not later than the semester
before the term in which the loan is granted.
(4) Certification of applicant eligibility must be provided by the participating institution.
(5) Individuals must sign a statement of intent to teach in an Oklahoma public school in a teaching field
of critical shortage.
(6) Eligible individuals must comply with all provisions in this Section as are required.
610:25-13-3. Application procedure [REVOKED]
Application forms for the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program may be obtained from the office
of financial aid or the administrative office of the college, school, or department of education at one of
Oklahoma's teacher education preparation institutions of higher education or from the Oklahoma State
Regents for Higher Education, 500 Education Building, State Capitol Complex, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma
73105-4503.
610:25-13-4. Terms and conditions of loans [REVOKED]
Senate Bill No. 228 authorizes the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education to forgive eligible
Oklahoma Teacher Education loans to . . . "persons who actually render service as teachers in the public
schools of this state if not less than seventy-five percent (75%) of the teaching assignment is in a subject
area specified in subsection A of this section. Loan forgiveness shall be one (1) year's loan for each school
year of service rendered. One-half (½) school year of service shall be required for forgiveness of a summer
term loan." [70 O.S., § 698.2] "The first year of teaching will forgive the first year's loan; the second year of
teaching will forgive the second year's loan; and the third year of teaching will forgive the third year's loan."
[O.S.L. 1985, c. 354 § 4]
610:25-13-5. Annual loan limit [REVOKED]
125
Provided that funds are available, loans of up to $3,400 per academic year (two semesters or two
trimesters) and up to $1,100 for the summer term may be made to students pursuing full-time study under
the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program.
610:25-13-6. Aggregate loan limit [REVOKED]
No person who is participating in the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program shall receive more
than three (3) annual loans nor more than three (3) summer term loans for an aggregate loan amount of
$13,500.
610:25-13-7. Study load requirements [REVOKED]
Borrowers participating in the Oklahoma Teacher Education Loan Program must be enrolled as
full-time students at their respective institutions and must maintain satisfactory progress toward the
completion of their academic program as certified by institutional officials.
610:25-13-8. Certification of compliance [REVOKED]
Guidelines for certification of compliance are as follows:
(1) Proper certification that the in-school borrowers participating in the Oklahoma Teacher Education
Loan Program have fully met the study load requirements must be received by the State Regents' office
prior to each disbursement.
(2) In-school certification forms will be furnished to the borrowers by the State Regents' office.
(3) Persons who actually render service as teachers in the public schools must submit to the State
Regents' office a certificate for teaching service credit at the end of each contract year.
(4) The in-service certification forms will be provided to the borrowers by the State Regents' office.
(5) It will be the individual borrower's responsibility to ensure that the appropriate forms are properly
signed and returned to the State Regents' office as requested in this Section.
126
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #19:
TANF.
SUBJECT:
Modification to the Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) contract with the
Department of Human Services.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the contract modification with
the Department of Human Services in the sum of $100,000 to increase the contract
amount to $3.4 million dollars.
BACKGROUND:
At their May 25, 2001 meeting, the State Regents approved the FY02 contract between the Department of
Human Services and the State Regents, in the amount of $3.3 million dollars, for purposes of continuing the
TANF program throughout the State. The contract contained a renewal clause extending the contract on an
annual basis for three years (from July 1, 2002 through June 30, 2005) at the same level of funding.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents commitment to the enhancement of educational
opportunities, as well as coordination/cooperation between State Regents’ institutions and other state
agencies.
ANALYSIS:
After a review of the two-year college TANF program continuation applications by DHS and State Regents’
staff, the State Regents approved funding for the two-year college programs in the amount of $3,299,299.
The difference in the contract amount and the amount funded is $701. In previous years the difference
between the contract amount and the funded amounts has allowed for a larger “cushion” in case one of the
programs should need additional funding during the year for unforeseen reasons. In that regard, the attached
contract addendum has been entered into between the Department of Human Services and the State Regents
in the sum of $100,000 and is presented for approval for unforeseeable expenses.
Attachment
127
128
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #20:
Quality Initiative Grants
SUBJECT:
Grant Awards
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve a Quality Initiative Grant Award as detailed below.
BACKGROUND/POLICY ISSUES:
In 1988, the State Regents established the Quality Initiative Grant Program and approved a policy for
operating the program. The purpose of the Quality Initiative Grants is to support quality initiatives that
contribute to the accomplishment of priorities and goals established by the State Regents.
At the May 2002 meeting, the State Regents allocated $601,515 to the Quality Initiative Grant Fund. At
the June 2002 meeting, the State Regents approved nine QIG awards.
ANALYSIS:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the following Quality Initiative Grant
allocation. Another QIG grant recommendation is made on Item 20-b of this agenda.
AWARDEES
Oklahoma public
colleges and
universities
PROJECT
AMOUNT
The Council of Presidents joins the Oklahoma Arts
Institute in requesting State Regents’ funding for
Faculty Scholarships for the Oklahoma Fall Arts
Institutes at Quartz Mountain. The State Regents have
provided such funding on five previous occasions: 1)
$52,000 provided in 1992 were matched by private
funds to provide 150 faculty scholarships, 2) $26,250
provided in 1993 to be matched with $26,250 from
institutions for faculty scholarships, 3) $13,165
provided in 1994 to be matched from institutions for
faculty scholarships, 4) $52,000 provided in 1998 to
provide a full faculty scholarship for each institution
and a half scholarship to be matched by the applying
institution, and 5) up to $37,500 provided in FY 02 to
be matched by the institution. Only $14,750 of the FY
02 authorization was expended. It is recommended that
up to $37,500 be provided in FY 03 to be matched by
the institution. QIG funds will be remitted directly to
the institutions upon presentation of institutional
scholarship attendees at the Fall Arts Institute
up to
$37,500
129
REGENTS’
WORKPLAN
Supports previous
Workplan Items
relating to faculty
development and
quality.
130
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #21:
SUBJECT:
Federal Issues
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is presented for State Regents’ information only.
BACKGROUND:
Staff periodically update State Regents on federal issues that impact The Oklahoma State System of
Higher Education. A number of recently passed and upcoming federal laws are of interest to higher
education in general and to the State System specifically.
No Child Left Behind Act of 2001
In January 2001 the No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 was passed to reauthorize the Elementary and
Secondary Education Act (ESEA). The new law aims to substantially reform the role of the federal
government in elementary and secondary education. Broad priorities under this new law are clear –
Improving Teacher Quality; School Accountability tied to teacher quality and student academic
achievement; reading proficiency in the early grades; and local control of resources aimed at the priorities
of the law. Reducing achievement gaps through scientifically based research, studying the value added by
instruction, and using test data for individual student progress is also included in the law.
Higher education only has one place in the law where a specific allocation is made to the State Regents.
This is in the Title II, Part A, State Grant Program. This program was previously authorized as the
Dwight D. Eisenhower Professional Grant Program. Under the new law, several programs were
combined to create the state grant program, which requires partnerships between higher education
institutions and high-need school districts to improve teacher quality in areas that states deem as priorities
for improvement.
The State Higher Education Executive Officers (SHEEO) worked diligently on behalf of higher education
systems to retain this one direct allocation to higher education during the reauthorization process. Their
success means that State Regents continue to have a means of improving the professional development of
teachers in the state. The Request for Proposals for the Title II, Part A State Grant Program was made
available to institutions in July and requires proposals for two high priority foci: (1) Creating modules,
courses, or professional development programs in higher education pre-service and/or graduate teacher
education programs that teach Oklahoma teachers how to use standardized test data in the context of
improving teaching, learning, and student academic achievement; and (2) Creating regional content
institutes, particularly in mathematics and integrated mathematics and science, to improve content
knowledge and instructional capabilities of teachers.
The continued focus on mathematics for this program is due to the continued data on middle school and
high school mathematics performance gaps, as well as the continued high college remediation rate in
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mathematics. The content institutes are also expected to contribute to the national body of knowledge for
scientifically based research.
Other provisions in the law, especially those aimed at improving teacher and paraprofessional quality,
provide formula resources to school districts. School districts will choose appropriate providers for
delivery of these services; higher education institutions are well positioned to be such providers. Staff
presented this information to the Council on Instruction in March. The ability of Oklahoma higher
education institutions to gain resources through these provisions of No Child Left Behind will depend
largely on their active engagement with public schools.
State Regents staff were involved during the reauthorization of this law with the SHEEO efforts and were
also selected to write the guidance for the U.S. Department of Education for Title II, Part A. Staff are
also involved with supplementary activities that tie into the successful implementation of the No Child
Left Behind Act, including serving on state and national level teacher quality committees.
Higher Education Act (HEA) Reauthorization
At a recent SHEEO meeting, the Assistant Secretary for Postsecondary Education for the U.S.
Department of Education announced that the timeline for HEA reauthorization would be approximately
18 months for the Congress to consider changes to the law. Work has already begun, however, to ensure
appropriate notification to Congress on state and policy organization’s positions with respect to the law’s
provisions.
The largest portion of the HEA is devoted to financial aid issues. Discretionary programs such as GEAR
UP, TRIO, the Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE), and the Title II Teacher
Quality Enhancement Program, will also be considered for reauthorization.
Three broad foci are anticipated for reauthorization: Access, Affordability, and Accountability. In
keeping with the sprit and letter of NCLB, it is expected that greater accountability for higher education
outcomes will become part of the HEA. While higher education organizations nationwide expect this
focus, work is being done to ensure that the new law does not simultaneously over-regulate higher
education delivery. The role of the federal government in higher education is substantially different from
that in elementary and secondary education. The higher education community expects that states will be
asked to take a stronger role in ensuring accountability for higher education outcomes. Also expected is a
re-evaluation of the role that accrediting agencies play in ensuring quality educational delivery.
Financial aid law and policy is the federal government’s primary lever for driving outcomes in higher
education. In addition, the creation of discretionary programs ensures that federal goals and objectives
are met by states and higher education institutions in such a way that respects the state’s role in higher
education.
Staff are working with a number of national policy organizations on all aspects of HEA reauthorization
already. In addition to assisting SHEEO with developing their HEA position statement, staff are working
on teacher quality committees, with GEAR UP and TRIO policy committees, as well as with student loan,
distance education and financial aid position committees. Staff involved coordinate the work on HEA
reauthorization and regularly communicate with the Chancellor on developments. As the date for HEA
reauthorization nears, State Regents will receive more detailed updates on specific issues.
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Other federal laws and programs
State Regents also have more limited interest in other federal laws and programs due to indirect funding
from those federal sources. Even before the HEA is reauthorized, the Perkins Act is due for consideration
by Congress. Staff are working to develop positions for Perkins tied to State System interests,
particularly as they apply to the role of the two-year colleges and cooperative agreements. Along these
lines, State Regents will host the Assistant Secretary for Adult and Vocational Education in September
for a day-long meeting to discuss ways in which Oklahoma’s higher education institutions can contribute
more to the state’s success under the requirements of the Perkins Act.
Further, State Regents’ staff are involved in work on the reauthorization of the Welfare Reform Act.
Congress is actively working on reauthorizing this bill presently; House and Senate versions differ from
one another and President Bush’s proposal differs on the expected work hours and time frames for TANF
families. State Regents have two contracts with the Oklahoma Department of Human Services for TANF
programs and, while the nature of services will change over time, it is not yet clear what the final
outcomes of the new law will be.
POLICY ISSUES:
Monitoring federal issues and participating actively in federal legislation fulfils the State Regents’
responsibility to leverage state and federal funding for higher education goals, and additionally ensures
that Oklahoma students’ benefit is considered in the context of federal legislation.
ANALYSIS:
State Regents have a responsibility to monitor, participate in, and seek resources from federal programs.
Staff actively pursue federal resources consistent with State Regents’ educational goals and objectives
and work to notify institutions about federal issues that impact campuses. Further, staff actively work to
ensure that institutions are aware of discretionary opportunities for funding.
Federal laws impacting higher education either directly or indirectly sunset at different times. With the
recent passage of the NCLB act, Congress is expected to place its attention educationally on higher
education. With the improvements in accountability recently in the State System, with the student
preparation focus of the State Regents, and with the continued work to achieve K-16 alignment, the State
System is well positioned to both provide substantial input into reauthorization and to reap the benefits of
federal funding to achieve state goals and objectives.
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134
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #22:
Student Learning
SUBJECT:
National Forum on College-Level Learning
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify participation in this pilot project.
BACKGROUND:
The first national higher education report card, Measuring Up 2000, was released November 30, 2000, by
The National Center for Public Policy and Higher Education. One of the intended uses of this state-bystate comparison was as a diagnostic tool to identify state higher education strengths and weaknesses.
The report card issued grades in six categories: preparation, participation, affordability, completion,
benefits, and learning. All states received an “incomplete” grade for learning because there are no
common assessment benchmarks for state comparisons.
In a supplement to Measuring Up 2000 called Assessing Student Learning Outcomes, Oklahoma was
described as one of two states with mandated statewide assessment with institutional choice and some
nationally normed tests. Six states had a common nationally normed test, while the other states were
developing assessment processes, had institutionally developed tests, or no reporting requirements. Since
1991, the State Regents have had a mandated system-wide student assessment policy. The institutions
report annually on entry-level course placement, general education competencies, and program outcomes
findings and the impact this information has had on decision-making. There are some common measures
among institutions.
The State Regents also are involved in several nationally developed assessment projects:
•
•
•
Through EPAS, Oklahoma high schools are piloting ACT’s WorkKeys in the 11th grade to assess
student skill levels and, along with results on the ACT, will design a 12th grade core curriculum
for each student. WorkKeys also is being used by two-year colleges in partnership with Tinker
Air Force Base as a means of matching graduates with employment opportunities at Tinker.
State Regents partnered with the Oklahoma Business and Education Coalition (OBEC) and the
State Department of Education for Achieve, Inc., a national organization, to perform a
comprehensive standards and assessment benchmarking study. The results of this study will be
used to improve K-16 student learning policy and practice.
State Regents’ staff members have contributed their expertise in numerous efforts to develop
common state-level measures with the U.S. Department of Education and the Southern Regional
Education Board data exchange.
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A new assessment endeavor is a project to address the “incomplete” in the national report card.
Oklahoma will be one of six states to participate in a pilot study that will be reported in Measuring Up
2004.
POLICY ISSUES:
At the top of the 2001-2002 State Regents’ Workplan is “improve the reporting and use of college student
assessment, focusing particularly on outcomes assessment or the capacity of college graduates to enter the
workforce.”
ANALYSIS:
Over the next two years the National Forum on College-Level Learning, funded by The Pew Charitable
Trusts and housed at the Institute for Educational Leadership, will develop and test a model for collecting
comparable information across states to assess college-level learning for purposes of national
benchmarking. For this purpose, the National Forum will work in partnership with six states, including
Oklahoma, Kentucky, and Illinois, to collect state-level aggregate results from a number of measures:
• Existing graduate and professional school admissions tests and licensure examinations,
• ACT’s WorkKeys and possibly another examination of general intellectual skills, administered to
a representative sample of community-college graduates and four-year college sophomores,
• The National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE),
• The Collegiate Results Survey (CRS), and
• The National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL).
Responsibility for this effort will be shared between the states and the National Forum. The following are
among the responsibilities of the National Forum:
• Collect from the sponsoring organizations data for admissions and licensure tests for which stateby-state results exist or can be obtained.
• Purchase WorkKeys from ACT and arrange for ACT to score the exam, analyze the results, and
communicate them to the test-takers.
• Work with the National Center for Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) to develop a
strategy for collecting and analyzing information from the National Survey of Student
Engagement (NSSE) and the National Assessment of Adult Literacy (NAAL), and for
administering WorkKeys and the Collegiate Results Survey (CRS),
• Contract with Peterson’s for the use and analysis of the CRS.
• Coordinate the work of the six states, consult with each on an on-going basis, and arrange a
meeting of representatives of all the states.
The states’ responsibilities include the following activities, the direct and on-going involvement of seniorlevel State Regents’ staff, and some institutional staff participation:
• Work with institutions to send students solicitation letters to take WorkKeys and/or another
examination of general intellectual skills, as well as letters to graduates requesting that they
respond to the on-line CRS.
• Administer WorkKeys and another examination.
• Work with the project staff, NCHEMS, the other states, and the National Center for Public Policy
and Higher Education to refine the indicators of state performance on college-level learning.
• Collect state-level results on admissions and licensure tests that are available at that level, and
from institutions’ test results that are available only to them.
• Clean and edit data before sending it on to NCHEMS.
• Supply lists of students and graduates from each institution to NCHEMS according to a protocol.
• Provide raw data files on any oversample of the NAAL.
• Help the National Forum staff and NCHEMS fill in any gaps in NSSE data.
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Analysis on the various measures must be completed by April 2003. The National Forum will cover the
cost for most instruments and the travel for State Regents’ staff. The State Regents will cover the
institutional participation costs.
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify participation in this pilot project.
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138
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #23:
SUBJECT:
Ratification of Guaranteed Student Loan Program participation in the USDE “48 Hour”
Settlement Agreement
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the participation of the Oklahoma
Guaranteed Student Loan program in the USDE “48 Hour” Settlement Agreement.
BACKGROUND:
When Congress amended the Higher Education Act (HEA) during the 1998 Reauthorization, a new rule
required guaranty agencies to deposit the Department’s share of collections on loans into the Federal
Fund within 48 hours of receipt. Regulations for this new 48 Hour requirement became effective on July
1, 2000.
A dispute developed between the Department and many (approximately 34 of the 36) guaranty agencies
as to the treatment of earnings on the Department’s share of the collections on loans prior to the effective
date of the new regulations on July 1, 2000. It was the Department’s position that it was entitled to
receive the percentage of any earnings on collections received by a guaranty agency equivalent to the
Departments share of the collections beginning with the passage of the amendment to the HEA (October
1, 1998) The guaranty agencies contended that the Department’s position represented a retroactive
application of the Department’s regulations that went into effect on July 1, 2000 and that the Department
is not entitled to any of the earnings on the Department’s share of the collections between October 1,
1998 (date of Reauthorization) and July 1, 2000 (date of implementation of the 48-Hour rule). The
Department and the guaranty agencies, represented by the National Council of Higher Education Loan
Programs (NCHELP), agreed to resolve the dispute under the terms set forth in the Settlement
Agreement.
The Settlement Agreement requires that all affected guaranty agencies agree to the settlement. The
Settlement Agreement also requires that the guaranty agencies agree not to pursue further legal action
against the Department on this issue. A compromise on the amounts previously determined by the
Department as due from the agencies was also struck, thereby reducing by one half, those amounts.
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents’ policy requires State Regents’ action on contracts and expenditures greater than $25,000.
The settlement issue was discussed with the Strategic Planning and Personnel Committee and
communicated to all State Regents during the summer months. The Chancellor has entered the agreement
which is being submitted for board ratification.
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ANALYSIS:
The Oklahoma Guaranteed Student Loan Program has determined that pursuing litigation against the
Department on this issue is not cost feasible to the agency. The settlement agreement reduces from
$181,948.08 to $90,974.04 the amount of funds that will be moved from the OGSLP Operations Account
into the OGSLP Federal Fund Account to satisfy the Department’s now revised requirement to receive
earnings on it’s share of collections for the October 1, 1998 – June 30, 2000 time period. OGSLP has
benefited from its membership and resulting representation on this issue by the NCHELP staff and is
pleased with the outcome.
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142
143
144
145
146
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148
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #24:
Grants
SUBJECT:
Acceptance of Grants
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept the grants as detailed below:
BACKGROUND/POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents are authorized (70:3206) to “accept Federal grants and use the same in accordance with
Federal requirements; and accept and disburse grants, gifts, devises, bequests and other monies and
property from foundations, corporations and individuals. . .”
ANALYSIS:
The following grants have been received by the State Regents. It is recommended that the State Regents
receive the funds and authorize their disbursement consistent with applicable grant requirements.
Grantor
Project
Amount
U. S. Department of Education
Leveraging Educational Assistance Partnership
(LEAP) Program, Higher Education Act of 1965,
as amended.
$ 403,733.00
U. S. Department of Education
Special Leveraging Educational Assistance
Partnership (SLEAP) Program, Higher Education
Act of 1965, as amended. State Student Incentive
Grants Program (an increase from $336,444 last
year)
$ 497,937.00
U. S. Department of Education
Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for
Undergraduate Programs (GEAR-UP) (Year 4 of 5year grant)
$4,355,714.00
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150
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152
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #25:
Commendations
SUBJECT:
Staff Recognitions
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept this report and commend staff for state and national
recognitions.
State Regents’ staff have received the following state and national recognitions:
The Oklahoma Guaranteed Student Loan Program and the State Regents, along with their other
partners, received the National Association for Student Financial Aid Administrators State Award
in the category of Service to Parents and Students. The award was given for the 2002 production
of “Cash for College” aired by OETA.
GEAR UP and communications staff received the following awards at the 2002 Oklahoma
College Public Relations Association: 1st place for the GEAR Up student activity booklet, the
GEAR UP web site, and the OHLAP Campaign; 2nd place for the GEAR UP radio commercial
and the GEAR UP conference agenda.
Dr. Phil Moss has been invited to serve on the Current Issues Committee for EDUCAUSE.
EDUCAUSE is a nonprofit association whose mission is to advance higher education by
promoting the intelligent use of information technology.
Dr. Dolores Mize has been elected to the Education Advisory Board for ACT.
Kyle Dahlem will keynote the Oklahoma Association of Teacher Educators conference on
October 4 at UCO
Dr. Debra Stuart has been invited to serve on the National Postsecondary Education Cooperative
(NPEC) Communications Subcommittee. The National Center for Education Statistics (NCES)
established NPEC to promote the quality, comparability, and utility of data for postsecondary
decision-making at the national, state, and institutional levels.
It is recommended that the State Regents accept this report and commend staff for state and national
efforts noted above.
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154
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #26:
State Regents Ethics Policy
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the proposed amendments to the
State Regents’ Ethics Policy, as submitted
BACKGROUND:
At their March 25, 2002 Strategic Planning Retreat, the State Regents noted that the agency’s Ethics
Policy, which has not been updated since 1995, should be reviewed and that recommendations for
necessary or desirable changes should be brought forward in a timely manner. Chairman Mayer
designated Regents Burgess and Hunter to work with the General Counsel in this undertaking. The
General Counsel has reviewed the recent history of this policy, and its interpretation, and has conferred
with Regents Mayer, Burgess and Hunter. The attached policy revisions are presented for consideration
by the State Regents.
POLICY ISSUES:
The proposed changes are consistent with the applicable Oklahoma Ethics (OEC) Commission Rules,
with comparable provisions of the previously approved State Regents’ Employee Handbook, and with the
interpretive history of the State Regents’ Ethics Policy.
ANALYSIS:
The proposed revisions are designed to clarify some ambiguities in the current policy, to clarify the
relationship between this policy and comparable OEC Rules, to codify some of the interpretive history of
the Ethics Policy, and to harmonize the Ethics Policy with a key provision of the Employee Handbook.
The changes also reflect a desire by the State Regents to continue to exert State System leadership in this
arena. The major changes are as follows:
•
The current policy does not expressly state that the rules of conduct for State Regents and
employees will be fully consistent with the OEC Rules. The proposed revision provides (2.1) for
such consistency absent an express statement to the contrary.
•
The current policy does not specifically address business transactions between State Regents and
State System institutions. These transactions are permitted by the OEC Rules. The proposed
revision also permits these transactions (2.1) but requires a higher degree of disclosure (3.5),
reviewed annually by the Strategic Planning and Personnel Committee (3.6), than do the OEC
Rules.
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•
The current policy prohibits all State Regents’ employee business relationships with State System
institutions. The Employee Handbook (7-21), approved as revised by the State Regents on
October 26, 2001, authorizes the Chancellor to waive this prohibition upon a determination that
the after-hours employment (typically adjunct teaching, test proctoring, and the like) does not
conflict with the employee’s work assignments with the State Regents. The proposed revision
(4.2) to the Ethics Policy recognizes the authority recently given the Chancellor by the State
Regents via the Employee Handbook.
•
The proposed revision includes (4.4) the statutory prohibition against “dual office holding.” It is
included to prevent confusion when Regents are asked to serve in local governmental capacities.
•
New language is proposed (4.3) to make clear that the prohibition against service as an officer or
director of a State System institution-related foundation does not prohibit Regents from serving as
ordinary members of alumni associations or foundations or from making donations to institutions.
•
New language is included (5.4) recognizing the statutory prohibition against recommendations by
Regents and employees of persons for positions at State System institutions.
The Ethics Policy has also been re-formatted for ease of reference. A copy of the policy, showing the
changes, and with explanatory comments on the proposed changes, is attached. The explanatory
comments (italicized) are not part of the policy. The Ethics Policy revisions are recommended for
approval.
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STATE REGENTS' ETHICS POLICY
1.0 Purpose
1.1. [NEW] The State Regents embrace, as part of their ongoing agenda for exerting strong State System
leadership, the goal of exemplifying the highest standards of ethical conduct. [Comment: See, Policies
and Procedures, Oklahoma Higher Education: Mission and Goals, Goal 1(A), Leadership: Ethics: “The
State Regents, Chancellor, and state higher education leaders will infuse the System with the spirit of
success … [c]omitting to the ideal of moral and ethical integrity in all activities of the higher education
system … .” Page II-1-36]
1.2. The State Regents recognize that while ethics rules have an important proscriptive role to play, the
conduct of State Regents and State Regents' employees should also be shaped by a positive vision of
ethics.
2.0 Relationship to Oklahoma Ethics Commission Rules
2.1. The State Regents herewith acknowledge the Oklahoma Ethics Commission Rules and incorporate
them by reference into this policy. Conduct that is prohibited by the Oklahoma Ethics Commission Rules
is likewise prohibited by this policy. Conduct permitted by the Rules of the Oklahoma Ethics
Commission is permitted by this policy unless expressly prohibited by another part of this policy
[Comment: This is intended to clarify the relationship between the OEC Rules with the State Regents
Ethics Policy. This codifies the rule of interpretation that the General Counsel has applied since 1995.
Compare, §3.1.]
2.2. In addition to the sanctions provided by law for the violation of the Rules of the Ethics Commission,
the State Regents expressly reserve the right to take any additional disciplinary action, when it is
warranted by the facts, for violations of the Rules of the Oklahoma Ethics Commission or such other
ethics policies as may be adopted by the State Regents.
3.0 Relations with Institutions and Institutional Representatives
3.1. Each and every segment of The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education is entitled to objective,
impartial, fair, and equitable treatment by the officers and employees of the State Regents. The State
Regents are determined that those attributes of fundamental fairness should not be compromised, in fact
or in appearance, by inappropriate interactions between officers and/or employees of the State Regents
and institutional representatives. Regents or employees should not accept any direct or indirect personal
gift or personal benefit resulting from or in any transaction involving any institution, board or office in the
State System.
[See §2.1, above. This amendment clarifies that this section deals with the acceptance of gifts.]
3.2. This does not prohibit the occasional acceptance, unless otherwise prohibited by the Ethics
Commission Rules, of items of nominal value (generally less than $50.00) which are not intended to
influence the officer or employee in the conduct of the public's business.
3.3. Conversely, the receipt of gifts of nominal value is improper if taken with knowledge of an improper
motivation on the part of the giver.
3.4. State Regents' employees are expected to be especially sensitive to issues that may arise with respect
to their ability to conduct a particular job assignment with the requisite appearance of impartiality.
Employees are expected to bring any such circumstances to the attention of the Chancellor in a timely
manner.
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3.5 [New] In addition to any disclosures required by the Oklahoma Ethics Commission Rules, Regents
and employees at the Director level and above will, upon their initial appointment or employment, and
annually thereafter, disclose the following information, in the following form:
3.5.1. I, the undersigned member/employee of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education,
in order to assure that any appearance of conflict of interest is avoided, and in order to assure that
any indirect interests are publicly acknowledged, hereby make the following statements and
assurances:
3.5.2. I am related to the following officers or employees of institutions within The Oklahoma
State System of Higher Education:
3.5.3. I have an ownership interest in or serve on the Board of the following corporations,
partnerships, sole proprietorships, associations, institutions of higher education, or any other
entities, which either do business with the State Regents or, to my knowledge, do business with
postsecondary institutions coordinated or licensed by the State Regents:
3.5.4. In my household and among my dependents, to my knowledge, the following have an
ownership interest as stated in 3.5.3 above.
3.5.5. By my signature below, I affirm that all of the above statements are true and correct to the
best of my knowledge and belief.
Signature
Date
3.6 [New] The annual disclosure statements required by Section 3.5, above, will be reviewed annually by
the Strategic Planning and Personnel Committee of the State Regents.
[Sections 3.1 through 3.5 are closely modeled on the Tennessee Higher Education Commission
Disclosure Statement for Indirect Interests of Commission Members. Section 3.6 was added at the
request of the SPP Committee to provide assurance that the disclosures would be subject to internal
review.]
4.0 Outside Employment or Compensation
4.1. No Regent or employee may receive or ask for any outside employment or compensation that would
impair the independence of judgment of the officer or employee in rendering service as a state employee
from any source other than the State, unless otherwise provided by law to the State Regents. Nor should
employees accept outside employment that would impair their ability to meet their work-related
obligations to the State Regents.
4.2. Neither State Regents nor employees may not accept employment from institutions within the State
System except and only to the extent permitted by Section 7-21 of the State Regents Personnel Policies
(“Outside Employment/Consultation”). [This amendment harmonizes the Ethics Policy with the
Personnel Policy, which permits such employment in limited instances.]
4.3. This prohibition also extends to service as an officer or director of a higher education-related
foundation of institutions for which the State Regents have regulatory authority. This prohibition does
not extend to ordinary membership in alumni associations or institution-related foundations; nor does it
prohibit donations or bequests to institutions within the State System. [This amendment clarifies the
current intent of the first sentence. The prohibition is not intended to limit Regents or employees in
individual acts of generosity to State System institutions.]
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4.4. [NEW] Regents and the Chancellor shall not hold any other public office unless expressly permitted
by law. [“Dual office holding” is prohibited by statute. 51 O.S. 2001, §6. Nonetheless, Regents are
occasionally uncertain with respect to local offices. Hopefully, this section will help flag that issue and
encourage Regents to seek advice before accepting other positions. Other employees are not included
because they are not officers.]
4.5. [NEW] Regents and employees who are licensed professionals shall not accept professional
engagements with State System institutions. Regents may accept professional engagements with entities
doing business with State System institutions, subject to the disclosure rules of §3.5. [This section
prohibits Regents and employees from accepting professional engagements that would create a fiduciary
duty, or other trust-based relationship, with a State System institution. Representation of entities doing
business with State System institutions would be treated the same as Regents doing business directly with
those institutions.]
5.0 Use of State Titles/Political Activities
5.1. While higher education officers and employees have significant political rights under applicable state
and federal statutory and constitutional law, an individual's political activities must not be represented or
implied to represent that the individual is speaking on behalf of the State Regents, the State System, or
any of its institutions.
5.2. In exercising these rights, Regents and employees should act in a manner that does not compromise
the neutrality, efficiency, or integrity of their official duties.
5.3. Regents and employees may not, at any time:
5.3.1. Imply, directly or indirectly, that the State System, or any of its governing boards or
institutions, endorses the individual's personal political beliefs or activities, or any political party
candidate, cause, or partisan or nonpartisan activity.
5.3.2. However, it is recognized that public officers in the State System have a duty to advise the
Legislature and citizenry as to the needs of higher education in Oklahoma. Such activities are
permitted where they are directly related to fulfilling the duties and obligations set forth under the
Oklahoma Constitution, or the statutes of the State, and as they may be specifically authorized by
the State Regents for Higher Education.
5.3.3. Notwithstanding any of the foregoing, the Chancellor shall not endorse any candidate nor
shall the Chancellor contribute to a political campaign.
5.4. [NEW] Regents and employees may not attempt to influence, directly or indirectly, the employment
status of persons at State System institutions. Such activities are also prohibited by law.
Comment: This section reflects the statutory prohibition contained in 70 O. S. 2002, §3203(c). The
General Counsel will continue to provide advice to Regents, the Chancellor and staff who have questions
about the scope and application of this prohibition.
Adopted in 1988. Revised August 16, 1991, June 28, 1995, and September 13, 2002
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160
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #27:
Policy
SUBJECT:
Updates and changes
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the changes and updates in the
State Regents’ personnel policy manual effective immediately.
BACKGROUND/POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents’ Personnel Policy Manual was last updated by the board in October 2001. State law
(70 O. S. 1991, Section 3205(a)) empowers the State Regents to “establish and maintain plans for tenure
and retirement of its employees and for payment of deferred compensation of such employees, and may
provide hospital and medical benefits, accident, health, and life insurance, and annuity contracts for such
employees, and pay for all or part of the cost thereof, with funds available for payment of its operating
expenses.”
ANALYSIS:
A copy of the proposed amended Personnel Policy Manual is provided as a supplement to the agenda.
The amendments are largely the result of changes in state law and other housekeeping or clarification
adjustments. The changes of note are briefly summarized on the attachment
Attachment
161
PROPOSED AMENDMENTS TO PERSONNEL
POLICIES AND PROCEDURES AND BENEFIT PLANS
SEPTEMBER 13, 2002
Personnel Policies and Procedures
Proposed amendments to the Personnel Policies and Procedures Handbook include substantive changes
and non-substantive changes such as updates to statutory cites, correction of titles, and reformatting. The
substantive changes are detailed below:
1. Amendments to Section 2-1 permit flexibility in advertising vacant positions:
Section 2-1. Recruitment
2-1-1. All vacancies will be announced internally in a Job Opportunity Announcement. Current
employees may apply for vacant positions without fear of adverse consequences from any
State Regent or staff member, and such application will in no way jeopardize the current
employment status of the applicant. (See also Section 3-3 2-5 Transfers.)
2-1-2. Positions not filled by internal candidates will be advertised externally as required. The
Human Resources Director will be responsible for all recruitment activities, including
advertising and receipt of applications.
2-1-3. Vacancies will be advertised for a minimum of one week internally and externally and (if
necessary) until a representative pool of applicants is received, unless an emergency exists
and the Chancellor authorizes a shorter advertisement period.
2-1-4. Openings of executive and professional positions will be advertised in local, state and
national publications and will be posted on the Oklahoma Marketplace website, as deemed
appropriate by the Chancellor. The placement services of the state and regionally accredited
Oklahoma colleges and universities may also be notified. Secretarial/clerical and other
support positions may be advertised in appropriate newspapers and with the Oklahoma
Employment Security Commission.
2-1-3.
The Human Resources Director will receive all applications and perform initial review to
ensure that applicants possess the minimum qualifications needed for consideration. The
selecting supervisor will review applications of qualified individuals referred by the Human
Resources Director and determine candidates to be interviewed. A screening committee may
be established by the Chancellor to review applications and interview finalists for positions
of executive, director, coordinator or equivalent level positions. If a screening committee is
utilized, the committee will recommend finalists for the Chancellor's approval. Positions at
the director level and above require ratification by the State Regents.
2-1-4. All applicants will be notified when the position is filled.
2. Amendment to Section 2-2 requires applicant records retention as required by state and federal
law.
Section 2-2. Personnel Records Applicant Processing
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2-2-2. The application, Affirmative Action/EEO applicant profiles, all accompanying
documentation, the memorandum of recommendation (or Personnel Request Form), as well
as the reasons for rejection or selection of applicants will be recorded and maintained in the
Human Resources files for not fewer than five years after the closing date for the position for
at least the minimum period of time required by applicable state and federal law.
3. Amendment to Section 2-3 changes the numbering and deletes language requiring written
notification of termination to employee serving probationary period.
Section 2-34. Probationary Period
2-4-1. Every employee appointed to a position, except executive level staff members and those
employed on a temporary basis, shall serve a probationary period of six months (180 days).
The probationary period is part of the selection process for all regular appointments and is for
the purpose of determining an employee's suitability for the position.
2-4-2. Written performance evaluations will be performed during the probationary period as
required. The probationary period may be extended by the division head due to extenuating
circumstances up to a maximum of 12 months (365 days).
2-4-3. If the employee is not deemed suitable for the position, he/she shall be notified in writing of
the date employment will be terminated. In cases of termination, an employee shall not have
recourse to the grievance process, except as may be otherwise provided by law.
2-4-4. New employees shall be employed at a salary ranging from the minimum rate to the
maximum mid-point in hire rate, based on experience, education, budgetary considerations
and recommendations from the selecting supervisor and division head. The Chancellor may
appoint individuals at a rate above the maximum in-hire rate. If the probationary period is
completed successfully, the supervisor may request a salary adjustment to the maximum inhire rate. This approach helps assure that higher compensation is based on merit and also
serves as an incentive to motivate new employees to maximum performance levels.
4. Amendment to policy on fraud amends the section to permit disciplinary action other than
termination.
Section 2-67. Fraud
Any employee who misrepresents facts or states false information on his or her resume/application
will be subject to disciplinary action up to and including termination. Theft of agency property or
false statements in connection with job duties or in conjunction with receipt of any agency benefit
may also result disciplinary action up to and including in termination or other disciplinary action.
5. Amendment to policy on involuntary separation deletes language setting out general causes for
termination of employment and the procedure for termination.
Section 2-78. Involuntary Separation
2-8-1. All individuals employed by the Agency are considered at-will employees who serve at the
pleasure of the Chancellor.
2-8-2. An employee who is absent for three days without notifying his or her supervisor or the
Human Resources Director of the reason for the absence will be presumed to have abandoned
his or her position. Abandonment may result in disciplinary action up to and including
immediate termination of employment.
163
2-8-3. Violations of any State Regents’ policy can provide the basis for disciplinary action, up to
and including termination. Many individual policies contain such a provision. In addition,
the following general causes may provide independent grounds for suspension without pay,
involuntary demotion or discharge of any Agency employee.
2-7-3-1. Misconduct
2-7-3-2. Insubordination
2-7-3-3. Inefficiency
2-7-3-4. Inability of failure to perform the duties of the position in which employed
2-7-3-5. Conduct unbecoming a public employee
2-7-3-6. Conviction of a crime involving moral turpitude
2-7-3-7. Any other cause.
2-7-4. It is the intent of the Agency to provide notice to an employee before he or she is demoted
involuntarily or suspended without pay. The notice will consist of:
2741.
A statement of the specific acts or omissions that re the causes or reasons for the
proposed action,
2742.
An explanation of the Agency’s evidence
2743.
An opportunity to present reasons why the proposed action is improper and should
not take place.
2-7-5. Pending completion of this notice and response procedure an employee may be suspended
without warning to avoid undue disruption of work or to protect the safety of persons or
property or for other serious reasons.
6. Deletion of current Subsections 2-8 and 2-9 removes process for suspending employees with or
without pay. The Chancellor would have discretion to suspend employees when deemed
appropriate.
2-8-2. If the employee is suspended in conjunction with an internal investigation and is subsequently
cleared, the Agency shall reinstate the employee to the former position with full rights and without
loss of pay or other benefits. The agency shall fully clear any of the employee’s recorded in its
custody. If the charges against the employee are confirmed, in whole or in part, a suspension in
conjunction with an internal investigation shall not preclude the Agency from extending the period of
suspension up to a maximum of sixty (60) days or taking other disciplinary action.
Section 2.9. Suspension With Pay
2-9-1. The Agency may suspend an employee from duty with pay for internal investigatory
purposes. The Agency may require the employee to remain available during specified
working hours to meet with investigators or other Agency officials as required. A notice of
suspension with pay, stating the beginning and ending dates and times and specifying any
reporting requirements shall be issued to the employee in writing. An employee shall not be
placed on suspension with pay for more than a total of twenty (20) working days within any
twelve (12) month period.
164
2-9-2. If the changes against the employee are not confirmed, in whole or in part, the Agency shall
fully clear any of the employee’s records in its custody. If the charges against the employee
are confirmed, in whole or in part, the Agency may take disciplinary action, as it deems
appropriate.
7. Amendment to Subsection 3-2 deletes time period for performance evaluations.
3-2-1. All Agency employees shall receive a performance evaluation at least once a year
(normally between February and April) from their immediate supervisors. Evaluations
may be conducted more frequently if a supervisor determines it necessary. New
employees may receive an evaluation at the end of their probationary period. Each
employee will be evaluated by his or her supervisor. Performance evaluations are to be
separated sufficiently in time from the Agency's budgeting process so that the focus of
the evaluation is on employee development. However, the evaluation should be close
enough to the budgeting process so that the results are meaningful when used in the merit
salary recommendation process.
8. Amendment to Section 5-1, Insurance Benefits, caps health insurance benefits to be paid by the
State Regents at the rate for Health Choice.
5-1-1. Medical insurance is provided available for full-time regular employees. Effective January 1,
2003, the Agency will pay premiums for employee coverage up to the then current rate for
Health Choice High Option. Employees selecting a different plan must pay the additional
cost of that plan expense with dependent. Dependent coverage is available at the expense of
the employee.
9.
Amendment to Section 5-2 deletes the requirement that graduate courses are subject to
withholding for federal and state income tax.
5-2-5. Reimbursement for tuition for post baccalaureate degrees is presumed taxable under
applicable federal tax law and is subject to withholding for federal and state income tax and FICA.
Employees obtaining reimbursement for resident tuition are responsible for determining whether or
not tuition is deductible on their individual tax returns.
10. Amendment to Section 5-7-5 limits health insurance premiums for future retirees to the Health
Choice High Option.
5-7-5. Health and Dental Insurance Program
For an employee retiring after March 12, 1999, who has: (1) been a full-time Agency employee for
not less than ten (10) years immediately preceding the date of retirement from the Oklahoma State
Regents for Higher Education organization, and (2) has been a member of the Oklahoma Teachers’
Retirement System (OTRS) during that time and has elected to receive a monthly life annuity under
the provisions of the OTRS regulations immediately upon retirement, the Agency will pay on behalf
of the retiree, the group health insurance benefit cost, including dental and vision, less any amount
paid by OTRS for that purpose, through the month in which the retiree attains age 65 and becomes
eligible for Medicare. If the retiree receives Medicare benefits, the Agency will continue to pay on
behalf of the retiree the Medicare supplemental insurance cost, less any amount paid by OTRS for
that purpose, for the remaining life of the retiree. The retiree has an option to purchase
spouse/dependent coverage at his/her own expense.
For employees retiring or becoming eligible to retire after September 13, 2002, the benefit under this
section for group health insurance will not exceed the then current rate for Health Choice High
Option.
165
11. Amendment to Section 6-3 conforms policy language to agency practice of transferring
accumulated sick leave balances of individuals transferring to the State Regents from
institutions within the State System.
6-3-2. Employees who transfer to the Agency from another state agency or institution of higher
education within the State System may transfer their accumulated sick leave balance to the State
Regents. The Agency will require a letter from the sending agency certifying the employee’s unused
sick leave accumulation.
12. Legislation passed in the last session requires state agencies to grant paid leaves of absence for
bone marrow and organ donors. Section 6-11 prooses a new section to comply with that
requirement.
Section 6-11. Paid Leave of Absence for Bone Marrow and Organ Donors.
An employee may request a paid leave of absence of up to five workdays to serve as a bone marrow
donor and up to 30 workdays to serve as a human organ donor. Leave will be granted only when
requested in writing to the Director of Human Resources and supported by the physician’s statement,
including the length of time the employee will be absent and the physician’s certification that the
procedure is medically necessary. Requests for leave under this section must be approved by the
Chancellor.
13. Amendments to Section 7-2, Alternative Work Schedules, delete periods for alternative work
schedules, require all staff to be present during certain core hours, and require all employees to
take at least a 30-minute lunch break.
7-2-1. Alternative work schedules allow supervisors and division heads to vary the times at which an
employee begins and ends work. Any employee may request an alternate work schedule. The
Agency will specify the limits within which employees may be permitted to select an alternative
work schedule . Notwithstanding the granting of permission to work an alternative schedule, all
full-time employees are required to work forty (40) hours per week Other limitations are noted
below.
7-2-2. The periods for which an alternative work schedule may be approved are January through May,
June through August and September through December and will remain in effect for the duration
of that time period. Employees may elect to participate or renegotiate a schedule a the beginning
of each period. Minor deviations from an alternative work schedule may be approved by the
employee’s supervisor.
7-2-2.
All employees must be present during the core office hours. Core office hours are 9:00 a.m. to
3:30 p.m. Any exceptions to this subsection must be approved by the Chancellor.
7-2-3. All employees are required to take at least a one-half (1/2) hour lunch period. IT IS NOT
PERMISSIBLE TO SKIP LUNCH IN AN EFFORT TO FURTHER ADJUST YOUR
SCHEDULE.
7-2-4. A supervisor may temporarily adjust an employee's working hours to the normal 8:00 a.m. - 5:00
p.m. schedule if necessary during extended periods of sick leave or vacations within the division.
166
7-2-5. Individual schedules may be altered by the supervisor if (1) it becomes evident that alternative
work scheduling hampers the productivity and efficiency of office operations, (2)it becomes
evident an employee is not present during hours agreed to on the participation form, or (3) the
schedule change will benefit the employee and the Agency. The supervisor must notify the
division head and Human Resources of schedule changes made during a work period.
7-2-6. Alternative work schedules under this section are voluntary. Approval for participation rests with
the employee's supervisor.
7-2-7. A supervisor must be on duty from 8:00 a.m. - 5:00 p.m. in each division.
7-2-8. Executive level employees may select an alternative work schedule if and when work and
meeting schedules allow and when approved by the Chancellor.
7-2-9. All offices must be staffed and operational during the public office hours of 8:00 a.m.- 5:00 p.m.
7-2-10. A participating employee must complete a request form and forward it to his/her supervisor at
least two (2) weeks prior to the beginning of the alternative work schedule each calendar period
described in subsection 7-2-2. These forms should be used by the supervisor to develop a
comprehensive office schedule.
7-2-11. Supervisors should must prepare the comprehensive office schedule listing ALL staff and route
the schedule to the appropriate supervisor and division head and to Human Resources for
compilation of a master schedule prior to the beginning of each calendar period year and must
report changes in individual work schedules to the division head and Director of Human
Resources whenever they occur during the year. described in subsection 7-2-2. Sick and annual
leave should be requested and reported in the normal manner.
7-2-12. When determining alternative schedules, consideration will be given to those whose duties are
dependent upon one another to maintain efficient operations.
7-2-13. An alternative work schedule shall not be justification for any employee to work overtime or earn
compensatory time. If necessary, work hours should be temporarily adjusted to allow sufficient
coordination and planning time by staff involved in special projects.
7-2-14. Should several employees be interested in a particular schedule, consideration should be given to
rotating those assigned to the most popular schedule each period quarter so as to allow all
employees the opportunity to enjoy their first choice in scheduling.
14. Amendment to Section 8-1 provides notice to employees that they may be required to bare the
expense for any travel that is not pre-approved. Reimbursement for Travel
8-1-1. All travel requests are subject to the requirements of the State Travel Reimbursement Act, 74 O.S.
1991 2001, § 500.1, et seq., as amended and must be authorized in advance by the division head
and the Chancellor. If an employee pre-pays or incurs an obligation to pay for travel expenses or
conference registrations before the travel or registration has been approved, the employee may be
required to pay those expenses. Commercial air travel must be purchased from travel agencies
designated by the State's Central Purchasing Division.
8-1-2. Advanced payment against travel expenses is prohibited by state law. Upon completing a trip, an
employee should complete a State Regents' Travel Claim and submit it to the accounts payable
supervisor business office, along with all receipts for lodging, registration, public transportation
and authorization for staff travel. Benefit Plans
167
The excess benefit plan adopted by the State Regents effective November 1, 1997, delegates the
responsibility for plan administration to the Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer. That
office no longer exists and it is necessary that the Regents appoint another office to administer the plan.
The attached addendum proposes that the Regents delegate plan administration to the Director of Human
Resources and, in the absence of that individual, to the Payroll/Benefits Manager.
168
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #28:
2003 Meeting Dates
SUBJECT:
Regular State Regents' Meetings
RECOMMENDATIONS:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the 2003 schedule of regular
meetings.
STAFF ANALYSIS:
The following times and dates for State Regents' regular meetings in 2003 are proposed.
DATE
Friday, February 21, 2003
TIME
9 a.m.
LOCATION
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, April 3, 2003
9 a.m.
Ardmore Higher Education Program
Ardmore, OK
Friday, May 30, 2003
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Monday, June 30, 2003
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Friday, September 12, 2003
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, October 30, 2003
9 a.m.
Ardmore Higher Education Program
Ardmore, OK
Thursday, December 4, 2003
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
169
170
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-a (1):
Program Modifications.
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve modifications to existing
programs, as described below.
BACKGROUND:
Tulsa Community College
2 option deletions
2 degree program name changes
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
1 option addition
1 degree program name change
2 degree program requirement changes
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
2 degree program name changes
1 degree program requirement change
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
2 degree program name changes
4 option additions
1 option deletion
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
2 degree program requirements changes
University of Oklahoma
2 degree program requirement changes
3 option additions
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
171
ANALYSIS:
TCC – Associate in Science in Child Development and Family Relations (246)
Degree program name change:
• change program name to Associate in Science in Child Development;
• name change more accurately reflects program content;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
TCC – Associate in Applied Science in Electrical Engineering Technology (116)
Degree program name change:
• change program name to Associate in Applied Science in Electronics Technology;
• name change more accurately reflects program content;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
TCC – Associate in Applied Science in Digital Video (098)
Certificate in Computer Information Systems (133)
Option deletion:
• delete “AS400 programming” option;
• no student demand for option;
• recommendation of advisory committee to delete option;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OPSU – Bachelor of Business Administration (001)
Option addition:
• add “accounting information systems” option;
• option will expand the accounting curriculum to meet professional needs;
• two new courses will be added; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OPSU – Bachelor of Science in Natural Science (018)
Degree program name change and program requirement changes:
• change program name to Bachelor of Science in Physical Science;
• change program requirements to include more earth science content;
• revisions are in response to certification requirements for physical science teachers;
• total credit hours remain unchanged;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OPSU – Bachelor of Science in Biology (004)
Degree program requirement changes:
• change program requirements to add flexibility for students to pursue further study in
medicine, veterinary science, or other graduate programs;
• revisions are also in response to certification requirements for biology teachers;
• total credit hours remain unchanged;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
172
OSU-OKC – Associate in Science in Fire Protection Technology (067)
Degree program name change and program requirement changes:
• change program name to Associate in Science in Fire Protection and Safety Technology;
• name change better aligns program to articulate into a baccalaureate program in fire
protection and safety at OSU in Stillwater;
• revisions in curriculum will facilitate articulation to baccalaureate program;
• total credit hours will decrease from 70 to 65;
• specialization credit hours will increase while elective credit hours will decrease;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Interpreter Training (063)
Degree program name change:
• change program name to Associate in Applied Science in Sign Language Interpretation;
• name change more accurately reflects program content;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
NEOAMC – Associate in Arts in Television (053)
Degree program name change and option additions:
• change program name to Associate in Arts in Mass Communications;
• name change more accurately reflects program content;
• add “electronic media” and “print media” options;
• revisions will expand curriculum to include television and print journalism;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
NEOAMC – Associate in Arts in Social Science (044)
Degree program name change, option addition, and option deletion:
• change program name to Associate in Arts in History;
• name change more accurately reflects program content;
• add “political science” option;
• delete “social work” option;
• revisions will better serve students with interests in public service;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
NEOAMC – Associate in Arts in Psychology and Sociology (041)
Option addition:
• add “social work” option;
• addition will provide curricular offering under the appropriate programmatic area;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
173
NWOSU – Bachelor of Music Education – Instrumental (026)
Bachelor of Music Education – Vocal (027)
Degree program requirement change:
• update curriculum to meet national standards;
• total credit hours will increase from 58 to 63 in the major content area;
• no courses will be added or deleted; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OU – Bachelor of Science in Geology (094)
Degree program requirement change and option addition:
• delete one course where content is covered in other courses;
• decrease total credit hours from 127 to 125;
• add “paleontology” option;
• new option will prepare students for employment or graduate work in paleontology;
• two new courses will be added; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OU – Bachelor of Arts in Ethics and Religion (078)
Option addition:
• add “religious studies” option;
• new option will provide students study in a broad variety of religious traditions and
familiarize students with a variety of approaches to the academic study of religion;
• three new courses will be added; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
OU – Master of Education in Instructional Psychology and Technology (055)
Degree program requirement change and option addition:
• increase total credit hours from 32 to 36;
• add “educational psychology and technology” option;
• new option will increase the rigor of the program;
• no new courses will be added; and
• no new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
174
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-a (2):
Program Modifications.
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approved modifications to
existing programs, as described below.
BACKGROUND:
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
1 option name change
Tulsa Community College
2 option name changes
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Police Science (015)
Option name change:
• Change option name from “technical investigation” to “crime scene investigation;”
• Modification reflects the recommendations of faculty and advisory committee members;
• Five courses will be deleted and two courses will be added to update the curriculum;
• Total number of credit hours required will decrease from 71 to 62; and
• No new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
TCC – Associate in Applied Science in Digital Video (098)
Option name change:
• Change option name from “application software/MOUS preparation” to “Microsoft
Office user specialist preparation, MOUS certification preparation;”
• Change option name from “PC help desk” to “certified systems support technician;”
• Name changes more accurately reflect the content of the options;
• No courses will be added or deleted;
• Total number of credit hours will remain the same; and
• No new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
175
TCC – Certificate in Computer Information Systems (133)
Option name change:
• Change option name from “application software/MOUS preparation” to “Microsoft
Office user specialist preparation;”
• Change option name from “PC help desk” to “certified systems support technician;”
• Name changes more accurately reflect the content of the options;
• No courses will be added or deleted;
• Total number of credit hours will remain the same; and
• No new funds and no funds available for reallocation.
176
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-a (3):
Programs.
SUBJECT:
Approval of request for final approval of programs.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve Oklahoma Panhandle State
University’s (OPSU) request for final approval of the Bachelor of Science in Nursing
(053) and Oklahoma City Community College’s (OCCC) request for final approval
of the Associate in Science in Pre-Education (116).
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents approve new programs provisionally with institutionally established and State Regents
approved criteria to be met prior to final approval. Examples of final program approval criteria include:
minimum number of enrollments, graduates, and/or full-time equivalent enrollments (FTEs); accreditation
from a regional or national accrediting agency; post-graduation employment rates; specific academic
achievement profiles; and/or minimum ranking or pass rates on standardized tests or licensure
examinations.
A summary of the recommendations is provided below. The accompanying table outlines the criteria,
productivity, and recommendations for each degree program.
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
As noted above, the following recommendations are included in the table (Attachment A), which lists the
degree program, date of approval, criteria established by the institution and approved by the State
Regents, productivity level, status of other criteria, and recommendation for the program.
Recommendation: Final Approval
•
Oklahoma Panhandle State University – Bachelor of Science in Nursing (053)
This program was granted an extension of the review period in October 1999. At that time, it met the
enrollment criterion, but only half the graduate criterion. In this review, the program exceeded the
enrollment requirement and was two students short of the graduation requirement. The program enrolled
29 students for fall 2001, which is a strong enrollment, and graduated eight students. It is viable and
meeting a local demand. Final approval is recommended.
177
•
Oklahoma City Community College - Associate in Science in Pre-Education (116)
This program exceeded the graduate and enrollment productivity criteria with 13 graduates and 175
majors. Final approval is recommended.
Attachment
178
ATTACHMENT A
Productivity Criteria
Graduates
Headcount Enrollment
FTE
Other
Program Reviews
Recommendation
AS Program Name
Date
Approved
Criteria
Achieved
Criteria
Achieved
Criteria
Achieved
Criteria
Achieved
OPSU – Nursing (053)
6/28/96
10 in
98-99
5
40 in
F98
40
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
1999
2002
Review Extension
10 in
01-02
8
20 in
F01
29
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
2002
2007
Final
Approval
7 in
01-02
13
12 in
F01
175
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
2002
2007
Final
Approval
Extension granted
10/15/99
OCCC – Pre-Education
(116)
6/27/97
179
Last
Next
Review Review
180
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-a (4):
Program Suspension.
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional request to suspend a degree program.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approved institutional request to
suspend an existing academic program, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
Northern Oklahoma College (NOC) requests authorization to suspend the Associate in Arts in Native
American Leadership (072).
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Review,” which was
revised at the January 29, 1999 meeting to include a “suspend” category for academic programs. Students
may not be recruited or admitted into suspended programs. Additionally, suspended programs may not be
listed in institutional catalogs and will be reinstated or deleted within three years.
ANALYSIS:
Northern Oklahoma College
NOC requests suspension of the Associate in Arts in Native American Leadership. The program will be
reviewed and possibly restructured into a certificate program to meet the needs of Native American
leaders and governments in the community. No students are currently in the program.
It is understood that in accordance with the Program Review Policy, no students will be recruited or
admitted to the program, and the program will not be listed in the college catalog. It is further understood
that NOC will reinstate or delete the suspended program within three years (by September 2005).
Authorization was granted by the Chancellor for the above request.
requested.
181
State Regents’ ratification is
182
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-b:
Cooperative Agreement.
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional request for modifications to an existing cooperative
agreement.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify Seminole State College’s (SSC)
request for modifications to an existing cooperative agreement, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
In 1988, the State Regents approved the “Guidelines for Approval of Cooperative Agreements Between
Technology Centers and Colleges.” The policy was designed to expand Oklahoman’s educational
opportunities, and to encourage colleges and technology centers to develop resource-sharing partnerships.
The policy guides the creation of cooperative agreements between Oklahoma’s colleges and technology
centers. Currently, 365 cooperative agreements (involving 125 associates in applied science programs)
are offered through 18 colleges and 29 career technology centers (CTC).
At the January 24, 1997 meeting, the State Regents approved revisions to the cooperative agreement
policy that allow high school students meeting specified requirements to enroll in cooperative agreements.
SSC requests authorization to modify an existing cooperative agreement with Gordon Cooper Technology
Center (GCTC) involving the Associate in Applied Science in Applied Technology (120).
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Guidelines for Approval of Cooperative Agreements”
(II-2-107).
ANALYSIS:
SSC requests authorization to modify its existing cooperative agreement with GCTC involving the
Associate in Applied Science in Applied Technology (120), to include the following areas: E-Commerce
Web Programming, Networking Systems Technology, and Computer Graphic Design. Up to 31 technical
specialty credit hours may be awarded for coursework completed at GCTC, consistent with the current
agreement for other option areas.
Institutional and CTC faculty and staff will serve on oversight and evaluation committees for the
cooperative agreement. The committees will meet at least annually to review course content, relevance,
and instructional methods as related to the established course and program competencies.
Approval was granted by the Chancellor. State Regents’ ratification is requested.
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184
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-c:
Course and Program Inclusion.
SUBJECT:
Ratification of the approval of courses and programs for inclusion in the Southern
Regional Education Board (SREB) Academic Common Market and Electronic Campus.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approval of courses and
programs for inclusion in the SREB Academic Common Market and Electronic
Campus.
BACKGROUND:
In June 1986, the State Regents approved Oklahoma’s participation in the SREB Academic Common
Market (ACM). Under the ACM, Oklahoma college students wishing to pursue degree programs not
offered by State System institutions are able to attend out-of-state institutions at in-state tuition rates. In
exchange, students from 15 other SREB states - Arkansas, Alabama, Delaware, Georgia, Florida,
Kentucky, Louisiana, Maryland, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia,
and West Virginia - are eligible for similar participation in designated degree programs at State System
colleges and universities in Oklahoma.
The SREB Electronic Campus was created in 1997 as an “electronic marketplace” for courses, programs,
and services offered electronically by accredited colleges and universities in the SREB member states. At
the September 5, 1997 meeting, the State Regents approved the inclusion of three courses from Oklahoma
institutions in the Electronic Campus pilot offerings for spring 1998. Over time, participation in the
program has expanded, and the State Regents have periodically approved inclusion of programs and
courses offered by Oklahoma institutions.
POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents’ “Rules of Operation” delegate authority to the Chancellor to approve courses and
programs for inclusion in the SREB ACM and Electronic Campus. This action is consistent with the
State Regents’ “Policy and Procedures Pertaining to the Electronic Delivery of Courses and Programs”
and commitment to expand web-based learning opportunities as prescribed in the Brain Gain 2010
initiative.
ANALYSIS:
SREB Academic Common Market
The ACM enables students to pursue unique majors offered at public institutions in other SREB states,
yielding significant state and student advantages. Oklahoma benefits from participation in the ACM,
because the consortial agreement provides student access to specialized, often costly degree programs
185
that Oklahoma State System institutions, facing reduced allocations, may be unable to offer.
Additionally, ACM students from other participating states who attend Oklahoma institutions generate
supplemental revenue through both tuition dollars and local spending in Oklahoma communities.
Students benefit from the out-of-state tuition waiver, which allows them to pursue educational
opportunities that many could not otherwise afford.
Oklahoma students have access to a total of 12 undergraduate and 51 graduate degree programs offered
by public institutions in 14 participating states. From April 2001 to March 2002, 17 Oklahoma students
were certified to pursue degree programs at institutions in Texas, Tennessee, Arkansas, and South
Carolina. The majority of Oklahoma ACM students pursue graduate degree programs in various health
sciences.
In the last year, 40 out-of-state students have been certified for ACM benefits at participating State
System institutions, which include the University of Oklahoma (OU), the OU Health Sciences Center,
Oklahoma State University (OSU), the OSU Center for Health Sciences, East Central University, the
University of Central Oklahoma (UCO), Southeastern Oklahoma State University, and the University of
Science and Arts of Oklahoma. The Oklahoma degree programs most utilized by ACM students from
other states are OSU’s Bachelor of Science in Fire Protection, to which nine participating states have
access, and UCO’s Master of Science in Forensic Science Administration, to which five states have
access. A comprehensive list of Oklahoma programs approved for ACM inclusion is provided in
Attachment A.
SREB Electronic Campus
In 1996, the SREB began plans to develop the Electronic Campus (originally called the Electronic
Common Market), a distance education consortium. The Electronic Campus serves as a centralized listing
of approved distance education courses and programs from participating SREB states; thus it does not
grant credit or degrees. Institutions provide the education and services, and as such determine tuition and
fees, set enrollment procedures, and provide related student services. The Electronic Campus has
continued to expand and now lists over 7,000 courses and 250 degree programs from more than 250
colleges and universities in the south. Offerings from Oklahoma institutions listed within the Electronic
Campus now total 324 courses and 12 programs.
Proposals for new Electronic Campus offerings were received from two institutions, which comprise 70
individual courses. Each provided information concerning the quality of the courses to be offered and
affirmed that the submissions comply fully with the Electronic Campus Principles of Good Practice. A
list of the proposed courses for Electronic Campus inclusion is provided in Attachment B.
Authorization was granted by the Chancellor for the above requests. State Regents’ ratification is
requested.
Attachments
186
Attachment A
Oklahoma Programs - Academic Common Market
September 2002
PROGRAM
Architecture
Architecture
Aerospace Engineering
Anthropology
Art (Media: Filmmaking, Photography, Video)
Dance
Dance (Ballet Pedagogy)
Dance (Ballet Performance)
Electrical Engineering (Meteorology Emphasis)
Environmental Science
International Relations
Meteorology
Meteorology
Music (Piano Pedagogy)
Music Theatre
Petroleum Engineering
Petroleum Land Management
Regional and City Planning
Spanish
Library Information Studies
Physician Associate Program
Aerospace Engineering
Agricultural Communications
Applied Educational Studies, Aviation & Space Education
Civil Engineering - Environmental Option
English (TESL)
Environmental Science
Environmental Science
Fire and Emergency Management Administration
Fire Protection and Safety Technology
History
Mechanical Engineering (Aerospace)
Natural and Applied Science (Aviation/Space)
Russian Language and Literature
Sociology
Zoology
Forensic Science Administration
Environmental Health Science
Legal Studies
Cartography
Human Services Counseling
Aviation
Forensic Science
Forensic Science
Funeral Service
American Indian Studies
187
DEGREE
BArch
MArch
BS
PhD
BFA
BFA
BFA
BFA
PhD
MES
MA
MSM
PhD
DMA
BFA
BS
BBA
MRCP
PhD
MLIS
MHS
BS
BS
EdD
BS
MA
MS
PhD
MSFEMA
BS
PhD
BS
MS
BA
PhD
BS
MSFSA
BS
BS
BS
BA
BS
BS
MS
BS
BA
INSTITUTION
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OU
OUHSC
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU-CHS
ECU
ECU
ECU
ECU
SOSU
UCO
UCO
UCO
USAO
Attachment B
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Courses for SREC Inclusion
ACCT 1103
ACCT 1203
BADM 2113
CRJU 1113
CRJU 2133
CS 2103
MATH 0113
MGMT 1123
MGMT 2213
MLAT 1304
OIS 1113
OIS 2523
PHTA 1203
PHYS 0123
SOSC 1213
Financial Accounting Procedures I
Financial Accounting Procedures II
Business Communication I
Introductory to Criminal Justice
Criminal Investigation
Computer Concepts
Introductory Algebra
Salesmanship
Principles of Management
Basic Hematology
Medical Terminology
Microsoft Word 7.0/Win
Anatomy & Physiology for Physical Therapy Assistant
Fundamentals of Science
College Life and Success
Rose State College
Courses for SREC Inclusion
ACCT 1123
ACCT 2603
ACCT 2903
ART 1103
CIT 1073
CIT 1093
CIT 1103
CIT 1133
CIT 1203
CIT 1503
CIT 1523
ECON 2303
ECON 2403
ENGL 1113
ENGL 1213
ENGL 2093
ENGL 2213
ENGL 2223
ENGL 2233
College Accounting Procedures
Computer Accounting
ACAT Review Course
Art Appreciation
Introduction to Internet
Microcomputer Applications
Introduction to Computers
Introduction to Multimedia
Introduction to JavaScript
Introduction to Networks
Micro Hardware & Operating Systems
Principles of Microeconomics
Principles of Macroeconomics
English Composition I
English Composition II
Journal Writing
American Literature to 1865
American Literature from 1865
Literature of the American Indian
188
Rose State College, cont.
ENGL 2313
ENGL 2323
HES 2323
HIST 1303
HIST 1483
HIST 1493
HIST 2093
HIST 2303
HIST 2503
HPER 1202
HSNS 1101
HSNS 1103
HSNS 2105
HSNS 2205
HSNS 2222
LS 2833
LTA 1303
LTA 1312
LTA 1313
LTA 1322
LTA 1323
LTA 1333
LTA 1353
LTA 2091
MATH 1513
MULT 1423
MUS 1203
PHIL 1103
PHIL 2203
PHSC 1123
POLS 1113
POLS 2103
PSYC 1113
PSYC 2213
SOC 1113
WEB 1153
English Literature to 1798
English Literature from 1798
Nutrition
History of American Woman
U.S. History to 1877
U.S. History Since 1877
The American West
History of Oklahoma
History of Native Americans
Health and Wellness
Beginning Dosage Calculation
Nursing Process
Nursing III
Nursing IV
Contemporary Issues in Health Care
Legal Word Processing
Special Publications
Library Services for Children and Young Adults
Introduction to Library Resources and Services
Introduction to the LTA Field
Introduction to Library Technical Services
Introduction to AV Equipment & Services
Library Management Skills
Introduction to the Internet
College Algebra
Advanced Digital Imaging
Music in Life
Introduction to Philosophy
Religious Philosophy of the World
Introduction to Meteorology
American Federal Government
Introduction to Political Science
Introduction to Psychology
Developmental Psychology
Introduction to Sociology
HTML
189
190
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-d:
SUBJECT:
Ratification of Capital Allotments for FY2003.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the capital allotments made during
the period of June 12, 2002, through August 29, 2002.
BACKGROUND:
The Chancellor has been authorized by the State Regents to approve routine changes and allot funds for
capital projects subject to ratification at the next scheduled meeting. A listing summarizing allotments for
the period June 12, 2002, through August 29, 2002, is attached. This listing is provided to the Regents for
ratification.
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents’ Delegation of Authority Policy (II-1-25.1) authorizes the Chancellor to approve routine
changes to capital projects and to allot funds for capital projects.
ANALYSIS:
The attached listing includes allotments made from State Funds, Section 13/New College Funds and
Section 13 Offset Funds. The total amount of capital allotments made for this period is $7,464,659. This
total is represented by $3,356205 in Section13/New College allotments and $4,108,454 in State Fund
allotments.
191
192
193
194
195
196
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-e (1)
Research Matching Funds
SUBJECT:
Approval of Contracts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the FY 2002 and the FY2003
contracts with Oklahoma State University to serve as the fiscal agent for the
National Science Foundation EPSCoR Research Infrastructure Improvement Plan
and (2) approve the FY2002 and FY2003 contracts with the University of Oklahoma
to serve as the fiscal agent for the National Institutes of Health Bioinformatics
Research Infrastructure Network.
BACKGROUND:
At the April 4, 2002 and June 27, 2002 meetings, the State Regents approved the contracts for FY2002
and 2003, respectively. Since the original approval dates, the EPSCoR Committee has agreed that there is
a need for a change in the budget reporting structure identified in the contracts. These changes have been
made to both the FY2002 and FY2003 contracts. This is a routine housekeeping change to the original
contract.
197
Agreement Between the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
and
Oklahoma State University
Pertaining to
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research
This agreement is between the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), the
party of the first part, and Oklahoma State University (OSU), the party of the second part,
executed this 13th day of September 2002.
WHEREAS the Oklahoma EPSCoR Committee, together with Oklahoma State
University, the University of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and
the University of Tulsa, initiated a Research Infrastructure Improvement Plan proposal
under the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) of the
National Science Foundation;
WHEREAS the National Science Foundation has made an award of monies based on
scientific merit for the Oklahoma EPSCoR proposal, the grant being conditioned on the
availability of matching funds;
WHEREAS the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education have allocated monies for
the Research Matching Program sufficient to meet the matching obligation; said allocated
monies will be distributed by OSRHE for these program pursuant to the constitutional
authority vested in OSRHE, the coordinating board of control for higher education;
WHEREAS the expanding number of Oklahoma EPSCoR programs and activities have
likewise achieved a degree of statewide and national visibility;
THEREFORE, the parties agree that:
1)
The OSRHE, as the coordinating board of control for higher education, shall allocate a
sum of monies up to $625,000 million for fiscal year 2002. Said monies represent the
matching monies to the National Science Foundation grant to the Oklahoma EPSCoR
Program and to institutional monies allocated to the purposes of the project.
2)
OSU will act as the fiscal agent for this program for fiscal year 2002 and shall distribute
monies as appropriate to the other program participants including the University of
Oklahoma and The University of Tulsa, subject to the following provisions:
a.
The Principal Investigator (PI), Frank Waxman, shall have final budget authority for all
expenditures of State Regents matching funds.
198
b.
OSU shall provide monthly reports in a timely manner on all expenditures on the
Award to the PI.
c.
OSU shall request prior approval from the PI for any State Regents matching
funds expenditure that differs from what was included in the budget submitted to
NSF.
d.
Any unspent monies remaining at the end of the fiscal year may be spent in the
next fiscal year.
e.
OSU shall provide an annual report in a format to be determined jointly by the
OSRHE and OSU, accounting for all monies expended under the terms of the
agreement.
3)
This agreement shall be subject to continuing approval by the National Science
Foundation of the scientific and technical merits of the program.
4)
OSU further agrees that by accepting said funds it will abide by the terms and provisions
of the National Science Foundation grant as set forth in grant number 0132534.
THE PARTIES HAVE READ THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT
AND HEREBY GIVE THEIR VOLUNTARY CONSENT TO THAT AGREEMENT.
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
By: ____________________
President
By: _____________________
Chancellor
199
Agreement Between the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
and
Oklahoma State University
Pertaining to
Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research
This agreement is between the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), the
party of the first part, and Oklahoma State University (OSU), the party of the second part,
executed this 13th day of September 2002.
WHEREAS the Oklahoma EPSCoR Committee, together with Oklahoma State
University, the University of Oklahoma, the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation and
the University of Tulsa, initiated a Research Infrastructure Improvement Plan proposal
under the Experimental Program to Stimulate Competitive Research (EPSCoR) of the
National Science Foundation;
WHEREAS the National Science Foundation has made an award of monies based on
scientific merit for the Oklahoma EPSCoR proposal, the grant being conditioned on the
availability of matching funds;
WHEREAS the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education have allocated monies for
the Research Matching Program sufficient to meet the matching obligation; said allocated
monies will be distributed by OSRHE for these program pursuant to the constitutional
authority vested in OSRHE, the coordinating board of control for higher education;
WHEREAS the expanding number of Oklahoma EPSCoR programs and activities have
likewise achieved a degree of statewide and national visibility;
THEREFORE, the parties agree that:
1)
The OSRHE, as the coordinating board of control for higher education, shall allocate a
sum of monies up to $1.5 million for fiscal year 2003. Said monies represent the
matching monies to the National Science Foundation grant to the Oklahoma EPSCoR
Program and to institutional monies allocated to the purposes of the project.
2)
OSU will act as the fiscal agent for this program for fiscal year 2003 and shall distribute
monies as appropriate to the other program participants including the University of
Oklahoma and The University of Tulsa, subject to the following provisions:
a.
The Principal Investigator (PI), Frank Waxman, shall have final budget authority for all
expenditures of State Regents matching funds.
200
b.
OSU shall provide monthly reports in a timely manner on all expenditures on the
Award to the PI.
c.
OSU shall request prior approval from the PI for any State Regents matching
funds expenditure that differs from what was included in the budget submitted to
NSF.
d.
Any unspent monies remaining at the end of the fiscal year may be spent in the
next fiscal year.
e.
OSU shall provide an annual report in a format to be determined jointly by the
OSRHE and OSU, accounting for all monies expended under the terms of the
agreement.
3)
This agreement shall be subject to continuing approval by the National Science
Foundation of the scientific and technical merits of the program.
4)
OSU further agrees that by accepting said funds it will abide by the terms and provisions
of the National Science Foundation grant as set forth in grant number 0132534.
THE PARTIES HAVE READ THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT
AND HEREBY GIVE THEIR VOLUNTARY CONSENT TO THAT AGREEMENT.
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
By: ____________________
President
By: _____________________
Chancellor
201
Agreement Between the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
and
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Pertaining to
Institutional Development Award
This agreement is between Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), the party of
the first part, and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), the party of the
second part, executed this 13th day of September 2002.
WHEREAS the Oklahoma EPSCoR Committee, together with the University of
Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, the University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, the
University of Tulsa, Northeastern State University, Southwestern Oklahoma State
University, Langston University and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation,
initiated a research proposal under the National Institutes of Health Institutional
Development Award (NIH IDeA);
WHEREAS the National Institutes of Health has made an award of monies based on
scientific merit for the Oklahoma proposal;
WHEREAS the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education have allocated monies for
the Research Matching Program sufficient to meet the matching obligation; said allocated
monies will be distributed by OSRHE for these programs pursuant to the constitutional
authority vested in OSRHE, the coordinating board of control for higher education;
THEREFORE, the parties agree that:
1)
The OSRHE, as the coordinating board of control for higher education, shall allocate a
sum of monies up to $78,686 for fiscal year 2002. Said monies represent the matching
monies to the National Institutes of Health to the Oklahoma EPSCoR Program and to
institutional monies allocated to the purposes of the project.
2)
The OUHSC will act as the fiscal agent for this program for fiscal year 2002 and shall distribute
monies as appropriate to the other program participants including the University of Oklahoma,
Oklahoma State University, The University of Tulsa, Northeastern State University,
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Langston University and the Oklahoma Medical
Research Foundation subject to the following provisions:
a) The Principal Investigator (PI), Frank Waxman, shall have final budget authority for
all expenditures of State Regents’ matching funds.
b) The OUHSC shall provide monthly reports in a timely manner on all expenditures on
the Award to the PI.
202
c) The OUHSC shall request prior approval from the PI for any State Regents matching
funds expenditure that differs from what was included in the budget submitted to
NIH.
d) Any unspent monies remaining at the end of the fiscal year may be spent in the next fiscal
year.
e) The OUHSC shall provide an annual report in a format to be determined jointly by
the OSRHE and the OUHSC, accounting for all monies expended under the terms of
the agreement.
3)
This agreement shall be subject to continuing approval by the National Institutes of
Health of the scientific and technical merits of the program.
4)
The OUHSC further agrees that by accepting said funds it will abide by the terms and
provisions of the National Institutes of Health grant as set forth in grant number 1 P20
RR16478-01.
THE PARTIES HAVE READ THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT
AND HEREBY GIVE THEIR VOLUNTARY CONSENT TO THAT AGREEMENT.
University of Oklahoma
By: ____________________________________
President
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
By: ____________________________________
Provost
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
By: ____________________________________
Chancellor
203
Agreement Between the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
and
The University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Pertaining to
Institutional Development Award
This agreement is between Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), the party of
the first part, and the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC), the party of the
second part, executed this 13th day of September 2002.
WHEREAS the Oklahoma EPSCoR Committee, together with the University of
Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, the University of Oklahoma Norman Campus, the
University of Tulsa, Northeastern State University, Southwestern Oklahoma State
University, Langston University and the Oklahoma Medical Research Foundation,
initiated a research proposal under the National Institutes of Health Institutional
Development Award (NIH IDeA);
WHEREAS the National Institutes of Health has made an award of monies based on
scientific merit for the Oklahoma proposal;
WHEREAS the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education have allocated monies for
the Research Matching Program sufficient to meet the matching obligation; said allocated
monies will be distributed by OSRHE for these programs pursuant to the constitutional
authority vested in OSRHE, the coordinating board of control for higher education;
THEREFORE, the parties agree that:
1)
The OSRHE, as the coordinating board of control for higher education, shall allocate a
sum of monies up to $121,691 for fiscal year 2003. Said monies represent the matching
monies to the National Institutes of Health to the Oklahoma EPSCoR Program and to
institutional monies allocated to the purposes of the project.
2)
The OUHSC will act as the fiscal agent for this program for fiscal year 2003 and shall distribute
monies as appropriate to the other program participants including the University of Oklahoma,
Oklahoma State University, The University of Tulsa, Northeastern State University,
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Langston University and the Oklahoma Medical
Research Foundation subject to the following provisions:
f) The Principal Investigator (PI), Frank Waxman, shall have final budget authority for
all expenditures of State Regents’ matching funds.
g) The OUHSC shall provide monthly reports in a timely manner on all expenditures on
the Award to the PI.
204
h) The OUHSC shall request prior approval from the PI for any State Regents matching
funds expenditure that differs from what was included in the budget submitted to
NIH.
i) Any unspent monies remaining at the end of the fiscal year may be spent in the next fiscal year.
j) The OUHSC shall provide an annual report in a format to be determined jointly by
the OSRHE and the OUHSC, accounting for all monies expended under the terms of
the agreement.
5)
This agreement shall be subject to continuing approval by the National Institutes of
Health of the scientific and technical merits of the program.
6)
The OUHSC further agrees that by accepting said funds it will abide by the terms and
provisions of the National Institutes of Health grant as set forth in grant number 1 P20
RR16478-01.
THE PARTIES HAVE READ THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT
AND HEREBY GIVE THEIR VOLUNTARY CONSENT TO THAT AGREEMENT.
University of Oklahoma
By: ____________________________________
President
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
By: ____________________________________
Provost
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
By: ____________________________________
Chancellor
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206
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-e (2):
Agreements
SUBJECT:
FY 2003 agreement with the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the agreement with the
Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education for FY 2003.
BACKGROUND:
For the past several years, the State Regents have entered into an annual agreement with the State Board
of Career and Technology Education whereby certain State System institutions carry out programs and
services of a technical education nature utilizing funds provided by the Department of Career and
Technology Education.
POLICY ISSUES:
State law (70 O.S. 1991, Section 2264) provides for the State Board of Career and Technology Education
(formerly Oklahoma Board of Vocational and Technical Education) to contract with the State Regents for
the administration of the amount of funds set aside for supplementing the funding of postsecondary
programs. The State Regents assume responsibility for allocation of the funds.
ANALYSIS:
The attached contract provides for the transfer of approximately $2.2 million in state and federal funding
from the Oklahoma State Board of Career and Technology Education to the Oklahoma State Regents for
Higher Education in exchange for services. The services provided by Oklahoma colleges and universities
relate to the operation of Tech Prep programs, Carl D. Perkins programs, and teacher inservice and
professional development for new CareerTech teachers.
Effective FY 03, the Department of Career and Technology Education deleted contractual provisions that
provided $100,000 to underwrite the costs of one or more professional positions on the staff of the State
Regents for the purpose of working with institutions to promote and develop technical and occupational
education.
Attachment
207
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209
210
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-e (3):
Agreement
SUBJECT:
Regents Training Center
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents serve as fiscal agent for the Regents
Training Center and terminate the existing FY 03 agreement.
BACKGROUND:
In response to new Department of Labor regulations in 1994, the State Regents’ Council of Business
Officers under the leadership of Executive Vice Chancellor and Chief Operating Officer Gary Smith
organized the Regents’ Training Center for Occupational Safety and Health and Environmental
Compliance (RTC). For an annual membership fee of $2,225, each institution has access to technical and
consultative services; assistance in the conduct of jobsite analyses for the purpose of identifying safety,
health, and environmental hazards; services and training programs to assist member institutions in
eliminating workplace hazards; and other activities to promote safety, health, and environmental activities
which can lead to lower worker compensation costs. All institutions (with the exception of the five
institutions governed by the A&M Board which have established their own safety council) are members
in RTC. The State Regents’ office and the centers are also members.
POLICY ISSUES:
The Regents’ Training Center is an efficiency initiative designed to pool the collective resources and
expertise of higher education entities to meet Department of Labor regulations and ensure safety. The
collaborative initiative results in lower higher education costs and improved services. The Center is
classified as an advisory body to the State Regents and colleges and universities in The Oklahoma State
System. As such, it is an integral part of the operations of the State Regents and institutions.
Responsibility for the operation is coordinated by the State Regents’ office and can be appropriately
lodged with the State Regents or any member of the State System. The employee will be an employee of
the State Regents with operational control of the RTC and its coordinator and functions thereto remaining
with the RTC Advisory Board of Directors as delegated to the Executive Board.
ANALYSIS:
In February 2002, the State Regents renewed the annual agreement with the University of Oklahoma to
house and serve as fiscal agent for the Regents’ Training Center. Since that time, the RTC Board of
Directors has acted to request that RTC be housed and administered by the Oklahoma State Regents for
Higher Education. Current arrangements with OU are satisfactory, but RTC is a system initiative, and the
211
board believes that the enterprise will improve its System perspective and appearance if lodged and
administered by the State Regents.
Currently the State Regents annually assess and collect institution and center dues and forward an
approximate annual amount of $53,400 to OU. FY 03 budgeted expenditures for RTC total $53,400 and
are reflected as follows:
Staff Salaries (1 Director)
Staff Benefits
Hourly Staff Wages
Hourly Fringe Benefits
Supplies & Materials
Equipment
Travel
Communications
Postage
Computing & Related Expenses
Professional & Technical Fees
Contractual & Related Expenses
Overhead Expenses
TOTAL
$30,600
8,000
2,000
150
2,000
3,450
2,000
1,200
500
500
1,000
2,000
0
$53,400
In assuming fiscal responsibility for RTC, the State Regents will continue the institutional dues
assessment and collection and will also:
1) Provide office space, furniture, computer and telephone, and OneNet connection for the
Coordinator at the State Regents’ office in Research Park 3.
2) Provide payroll, human resource, purchasing, and fiscal services for RTC. Specifically, the State
Regents will:
a.
Distribute monies pursuant to a budget prepared by the RTC Advisory
Board.
b.
Prepare monthly and annual financial reports which will account for all
monies expended by the RTC and provide the report to the RTC Advisory
Board.
c.
Manage the RTC investment account.
d.
Manage the RTC inventory.
The RTC Board will authorize the funding of a full-time State Regents’ office employee position to carry
out the mission and daily operations of the RTC. The supervision of such position, job description, work
program, and performance review shall be the responsibility of the RTC Board, through its Chairperson.
The RTC Chair may delegate day-to-day supervision to the State Regents as occasion and need may
dictate. The RTC Board, its Chair, or the Director as delegated by the board, may also direct the hiring of
temporary consultants or other service providers as may be necessary to carry out the RTC mission and
consistent with the RTC budget.
All personnel and operations of RTC
of the State Regents.
will be administered consistent with all policies and procedures
To offset costs incurred by the State Regents in housing and providing support for RTC, the State
Regents’ annual assessment will be waived.
212
In summary, at the request of the RTC board, staff recommends that 1) the FY 03 agreement with OU be
terminated October 1, 2002 and that 2) the State Regents house and assume fiscal and administrative
responsibility for RTC effective October 1, 2002
213
214
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-f (1):
SUBJECT:
Dwight D. Eisenhower Professional Development Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify funding of the Eisenhower program
evaluation project as indicated below.
BACKGROUND:
As the final allocation under the Dwight D. Eisenhower Professional Development Program, staff created
a special program evaluation priority for funding. The RFP required proposals for a comprehensive
evaluation of the State Regents’ Dwight D. Eisenhower Professional Development grants since the last
reauthorization of the Elementary and Secondary Education Act. This evaluation will encompass four
years’ worth of projects funded under this law. The evaluation project will take approximately one year to
complete and will contain qualitative and quantitative analyses of the professional development projects
supported under this federal program. The results of the study will aid staff and mathematics and science
stakeholders in Oklahoma determine best practices, promising strategies, and identify the degree to which
the projects impacted teaching and learning in mathematics. The project will also inform the state and
institutions of higher education on remaining needs, gaps and weaknesses in mathematics and science
professional development in Oklahoma. Data from this report will additionally aid the state in meeting
the provisions of the newly reauthorized Elementary and Secondary Education Act, the No Child Left
Behind Act of 2002. A final report will be delivered by fall 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
This project award is consistent with the goals and requirements of the Dwight D. Eisenhower
Professional Development Program.
ANALYSIS:
Staff recommends funding a grant in the amount of $100,000 to The Education Training Evaluation
Assessment and Measurement Department (ETEAM), Department of Public and Community Services,
College of Continuing Education, University of Oklahoma to be paid from the Dwight D. Eisenhower
Professional Development Program budget.
215
216
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 23, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-f (2):
SUBJECT:
Student Preparation
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve funding for the middle school
mentoring initiative as outlined below.
BACKGROUND:
An important part of the State Regents’ student preparation activities is to ensure equitable preparation for
college by all students. Students in urban education settings come with particular needs for additional
assistance in preparing for college, as urban students are more likely to be first generation and/or lowincome students. The Council for Great City Schools (an organization focused on student achievement in
urban schools) and ACT have conducted several studies examining the factors that help urban students
better prepare to be successful college students. In each study, it was clear that urban students who had
access to academic support and who took challenging core courses overcame any barriers due to
socioeconomic or demographic factors.
Oklahoma City Public Schools, a member district of the Council of Great City Schools, shares some of
the same needs for young people as indicated in the national studies discussed above. In particular,
middle school is a critical time for students to make decisions about high school course taking and begin
making career plans. EPAS and State Department of Education data show that achievement gaps in all
content areas exist in Oklahoma City middle schools. To provide the in-depth support for Oklahoma City
middle school students, the Christian Leadership Foundation has presented a proposal to the State
Regents for consideration that will provide the social and academic supports needed by urban students in
the middle school setting.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with State Regents’ student preparation goals and objectives, with the goals of
the Brain Gain 2010 initiative, with the goals of the federal GEAR UP program, and with the federal
objective of linking faith-based communities with public schools to provide support for academic
achievement.
ANALYSIS:
The foundation proposes to raise $50,000 in total to support a comprehensive on-site
mentoring/comprehensive community support program for an initial high-need/high challenge middle
school site in Oklahoma City Public Schools. The foundation requests $15,000 from the State Regents, to
be matched with private and public sector contributions to fully implement the first site. Additional
funding has been matched for the foundation upon successful completion of the first pilot middle school
to allow full implementation in all of the other middle schools in Oklahoma City. The goals and
217
objectives of the proposed project are fully in line with State Regents’ goals for middle school academic
performance.
In addition to the seed funding requested, State Regents’ staff will provide additional training in the areas
of EPAS, academic planning and guidance for middle school students, and working with families in
poverty in academic settings. State Regents will additionally work to place Smart Start mentors within the
middle school programs in Oklahoma City.
State Regents’ funding will be contingent on the Christian Leadership Foundation documenting match
from the other public and private sector partners involved. It is recommended that the State Regents
approve $15,000, divided equally between GEAR UP and Student Preparation funding, to be funded only
upon receipt of documented match by the other partners in the project.
218
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-f (3):
Student Preparation
SUBJECT:
Math Incentive Grant Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended the State Regents ratify a $16,208 matching grant from the
Student Preparation’s Math Initiative Grant Program for a CITyS (Computer
Information Technology Services) bridging project.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents’ Math 2001 Committee has identified as a priority for improving mathematics
teaching, the need for a comprehensive portfolio system that can be utilized statewide by all institutions,
for teachers and other students who could benefit from such a system. This priority is being incorporated
into a comprehensive proposal to the National Science Foundation (NSF) for a Mathematics and Science
Partnership (MSP) proposal to fully implement such a system, deliverable through OneNet, which can
serve the entire state. However, developmental activities are necessary to position the state’s proposal for
competitiveness in the NSF program. The University of Oklahoma has agreed to begin systems
development on one of the main components of this proposal involving CITyS (Computer Information
Technology Services).
The system, though aimed at preservice and inservice teachers initially, will also serve as models of
documenting professional growth for adult education and be adaptable for use by all student needs. With
the institutionalization of the America Counts/Reads programs, State Regents’ Math Incentive Grant
Program is now aimed at innovative projects such as the CITyS program. The total cost for this
developmental project is $55,829 of which OU will fund $39,621. State Regents’ matching funds total
$16,208 from the Math Incentive Grant Program budget.
OU will work on the initial development of the technology systems in direct collaboration with OneNet
staff and staff within the OU College of Education and College of Engineering. The systems developed
through the project will be piloted in the preservice technology education courses at OU.
POLICY ISSUES:
Funding this project is consistent with the aims of the Math Incentive Grant Program, State Regents’
student preparation priorities, and with OneNet’s role in serving education and government statewide.
ANALYSIS:
The goal of this project is to develop the framework for the CITyS project and improve the
competitiveness of the state’s proposal to NSF by documenting initial development of the project.
Beginning with teacher interface for preparing classroom teachers for National Board Certification, as
219
well as preservice portfolio development, the CITyS project can then easily adapt to the inclusion of
broader uses and aim the project for potential system wide use.
OneNet staff will be involved in all aspects of the project to ensure compatibility of the project with
OneNet’s delivery capabilities. The NSF project in development would, if funded, fully fund the next
steps, including the hardware, software, and staff necessary to move the system statewide.
It is recommended that State Regents ratify the allocation identified above for the CITyS project.
220
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-f (4):
Minority Teacher Recruitment Center
SUBJECT:
Grants to Oklahoma public school sites participating in the Pro Team and Teacher Cadet
programs.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve $250 grants to each of the
Oklahoma public school sites participating in the Pro Team and Teacher Cadet
programs.
BACKGROUND:
The Minority Teacher Recruitment Center supports the implementation of two pre-collegiate teacher
recruitment programs in Oklahoma schools:
•
PRO TEAM MIDDLE SCHOOLS PROGRAM. As a teacher recruitment program, the Pro Team
Middle School program is significant in that it targets adolescents while career choices are still
being formulated but prior to the selection of their high school courses. Pro Team lays the
foundation for the path from school-to-career by encouraging students to prepare for successful
completion of high school and college entry. The Pro Team program is modular. For example,
each module provides opportunities for student self-discovery and to develop skills needed to
help achieve personal and academic success. The curriculum also provides a strong emphasis on
communication, working with others, and goal setting. Most schools involve students in a
community service learning project as a way to strengthen learned skills. In 2002-03, the Pro
Team program will be implemented in 29 school sites.
•
TEACHER CADET HIGH SCHOOL PROGRAM. The Teacher Cadet program in Oklahoma
high schools is a year-long course designed to create an interest among high school students in
teaching careers and to promote an understanding of our nation’s education system. The course
carries high school credit and is taught by a selected teacher from among the school’s regular
faculty. In 2002-2003 Teacher Cadet classes will be offered in 34 high school sites.
The Minority Teacher Recruitment Center provides the curriculum for both programs, some printed
resources and videos products to supplement the curriculum, along with a small grant to each site to
support implementation of the program. Additionally, MTRC provides professional development on how
to use the curriculum for both Pro Team/Cadet teachers.
A list of Pro Team and Teacher Cadet school sites for 2002-03 is attached.
221
POLICY ISSUES:
The Minority Teacher Recruitment Center has a legislative directive (HB2557) to develop recruiting
programs for potential teachers, including pre-collegiate curricular courses that emphasize school success
and the opportunity to investigate teaching as a career choice.
ANALYSIS:
In previous years, the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center has provided grants to initiate school projects
and activities associated with the curriculum as well as collaborative activities with college partners. This
year, the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center recommends, with support from the MTRC Advisory
Committee, that each school site (Pro Team and Teacher Cadet) receive a $250 grant to be used for the
following purposes:
• Purchase materials used by students as required in the curriculum (notebooks, poster board, color
markers, puppet making supplies, etc.);
• Provide student transportation for field trips and travel to schools in the district; and
• Pay for substitute teachers when Pro Team and Teacher Cadet teachers attend training
conferences or meetings sponsored by the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center.
Schools must use the grant funds on activities directly related to the Pro Team and Teacher Cadet
curriculum and may not use the grant funds to supplement teacher salaries or to purchase equipment
normally furnished by the school district. Each school is required to provide a report of expenditures at
least once during the academic year.
In an environment of limited school budgets, it is anticipated that schools will use the site grants to
provide additional learning opportunities for students and to ease the burden on teachers and
administrators working with a shrinking pool of school resources.
222
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-g (1):
Agency Operations
SUBJECT:
Ratification of Purchases
Not Available Electronically
223
Not Available Electronically
224
Not Available Electronically
225
Not Available Electronically
226
Not Available Electronically
227
Not Available Electronically
228
Not Available Electronically
229
230
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-g (2):
SUBJECT:
Agency Operations
Not Available Electronically
231
232
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-h:
Revocation of Rules
SUBJECT:
Faculty Advisory Committee
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents adopt the revised rules for the Faculty
Advisory Committee, as submitted, and continue the rule revocation process
pursuant to the Oklahoma Administrative Procedures Act.
BACKGROUND:
Pursuant to a directive by the state legislature, a review was conducted of the OSRHE’s Administrative
Code Rules to identify rules that do not meet the APA definition of a rule. The Faculty Advisory
Committee rule is an internal policy statement and does not meet the definition of a rule; therefore it
should remain as a Regent’s policy, but be revoked as an administrative rule. In the May 24, 2002,
Regent's meeting, approval was given to begin the rule revocation process. Pursuant to the Oklahoma
Administrative Procedures Act, a comment period and request for hearing period was published and has
expired. No comments or requests for hearing were received. Therefore, final adoption of the rules can
be made.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is necessary to comply with the definition of rules as defined by the Administrative
Procedures Act.
ANALYSIS:
Approval by the State Regents would allow the process of revocation of the unnecessary administrative
rule to continue as defined by the Administrative Procedures Act.
233
TITLE 610. STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
CHAPTER 1. ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS
SUBCHAPTER 5. FACULTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE [REVOKED]
610:1-5-1. Purpose [REVOKED]
(a) The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education recognize the value of a formal structure for
faculty input and a strengthened linkage to an important constituency-faculty. Consequently, the State
Regents have created a Faculty Advisory Committee to assist the State Regents.
(b) The purpose of the Faculty Advisory Committee is to communicate to the Chancellor and the State
Regents the views and interests of all Oklahoma college and university faculty on those issues that relate
to the constitutional and statutory responsibilities of the State Regents. In representing faculty, the
Faculty Advisory Committee shall attempt to accurately represent the positions of faculty and develop the
best proposals and recommendations to the State Regents.
610:1-5-2. Membership [REVOKED]
(a) The Faculty Advisory Committee consists of seven members elected by tier by the State Faculty
Assembly at its fall annual meeting and appointed by the Chancellor. Guidelines for election of Faculty
Advisory Committee members by a State Faculty Assembly will be as follows:
(1) Election of the two Faculty Advisory Committee members from the two-year colleges will be by a
delegation of individuals representing each of the 13 two-year colleges and the Technical Branch
in Oklahoma City and the Technical Branch in Okmulgee.
(2) Election of the two Faculty Advisory Committee members from the four-year universities will be
by a delegation of individuals representing each of the 10 four-year universities.
(3) Election of the two Faculty Advisory Committee members from the two comprehensive
universities will be by delegates from the two comprehensive universities and delegates from the
Health Sciences Center, the College of Osteopathic Medicine and Surgery, and the College of
Veterinary Medicine.
(4) Election of the one Faculty Advisory Committee member from the independent college/university
sector will be by a delegation of individuals representing each of the 15 independent colleges and
universities in Oklahoma.
(5) Delegates from the colleges and universities in Oklahoma shall be the current faculty organization
president or its immediate past president.
(6) The Assembly shall meet once a year in the fall for the purpose of electing representatives to the
Faculty Advisory Committee.
(b) Members will be selected as follows:
(1) Two members will be elected at large to represent the comprehensive universities in The
Oklahoma State System of Higher Education.
(2) Two members will be elected at large to represent the regional universities in the State
System.
(3) Two members will be elected at large to represent the junior colleges in the State System.
(4) One member will be elected at large to represent the accredited independent colleges and
universities in the state.
(c) The term of office of the Faculty Advisory Committee member is two years. Until such time as
formal elections are held, interim members will be selected by an informal faculty assembly in
accordance with provisions as set forth in (b) of this Section. Such interim members shall hold office
until replaced by members elected as follows:
(1) The first elections in fall 1991 to the Faculty Advisory Committee as provided in (a) of this
Section will be to fill the following positions to serve a two-year term:
(A) one comprehensive university position,
(B) one four-year university position, and
234
(C) one two-year college position.
(2) The second elections in fall 1992 to the Faculty Advisory Committee as provided in (a) of this
Section will be to fill the following positions:
(A) one comprehensive university position,
(B) one four-year university position,
(C) one two-year college position, and
(D) one independent college/university position.
(d) A member must be a faculty member and should at the time of selection be a present or immediate
past officer of the institution's faculty organization. In the event an institution does not have an official
faculty organization, an individual may still represent an institution with the consent and support of the
faculty of that institution. A member must be employed by the type of institution that he/she is selected
to represent.
(e) Terms of office will be from January 1 to December 31.
(f) A member who wishes to resign before his/her term expires must notify the Chancellor and the Faculty
Advisory Committee in writing. Replacements to fill vacant, unexpired terms may be made by the
Chancellor consistent with the rules in this Chapter and with the advice of the Faculty Advisory
Committee.
(g) A member must be removed from office if he/she does not continue to meet the requirements listed in
the bylaw provisions during the term of office.
(h) The Faculty Advisory Committee members shall have the power to recommend to the General Faculty
Assembly removal of a fellow Faculty Advisory Committee member for violations of the provisions of
this Chapter.
610:1-5-3. Duties [REVOKED]
(a) Members of the Faculty Advisory Committee are encouraged to visit and become familiar with other
institutions in the state.
(b) The Faculty Advisory Committee will serve as an avenue for the faculty community to express input
to the State Regents.
(c) The Faculty Advisory Committee will elect an individual to serve as chair according to the following
guidelines:
(1) A chair will be elected from the comprehensive university members to serve January through
April.
(2) A chair will be elected from the four-year university members to serve May through August.
(3) A chair will be elected from the two-year college members to serve September through
December.
(d) The chair will work with the State Regents' office through a staff liaison designated by the Chancellor.
(e) The Faculty Advisory Committee will elect a reporter at its first meeting following election to take
official minutes of the Faculty Advisory Committee meetings and maintain a file of Faculty Advisory
Committee actions.
(f) Members of the Faculty Advisory Committee will be called upon by the Chancellor to provide
informal counsel and advice and to make presentations at public hearings, legislative meetings, etc.
(g) The Faculty Advisory Committee, by a majority vote of its members, may submit recommendations to
the Chancellor on matters relating to the duties and responsibilities of the State Regents.
(h) A representative of the Faculty Advisory Committee is encouraged to attend regularly scheduled
meetings of the State Regents.
(i) The Faculty Advisory Committee will work with the Chancellor and the designated liaison in
developing an annual list of priorities and goals for rendering advice to the State Regents.
(j) The Faculty Advisory Committee will submit an annual written report of its activities to the
Chancellor and will also maintain regular contact with the state's faculty organizations to apprise them of
significant developments.
235
(k) Clerical and administrative assistance to the Faculty Advisory Committee will be provided by the
Chancellor's office and the designated liaison in the conduct of the Faculty Advisory Committee business.
(l) The chair or designated spokesman for the Faculty Advisory Committee may develop a written and
oral presentation to the State Regents on at least a quarterly basis or more frequently as needed. Written
reports will be submitted in timely fashion to the Chancellor for inclusion in the official bound agenda for
the Regents. For purposes of compliance with the state's Open Meeting Act [25 O.S., § 301 et seq.],
reports and recommendations for Regents' action should be submitted to the Chancellor at least three
weeks prior to State Regents' meetings.
610:1-5-4. Operation guidelines [REVOKED]
The Faculty Advisory Committee will operate under guidelines established by the Faculty Advisory
Committee with the concurrence of the Chancellor.
610:1-5-5. Meetings [REVOKED]
(a) A schedule of regular meetings of the Faculty Advisory Committee will be filed annually with the
State Regents' office.
(b) A record of the Faculty Advisory Committee meetings shall be kept on official file in the office of the
State Regents.
(c) An individual designated by the Chancellor shall be invited to attend official meetings of the Faculty
Advisory Committee.
610:1-5-6. Amendments [REVOKED]
The provisions of this Subchapter may be amended by a majority vote of the Faculty Advisory
Committee and concurrence of the Chancellor.
236
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #29-i:
SUBJECT:
Policy
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify minor updates and reformatting of
Part I and Part II, Chapter 1 of the State Regents’ Policies and Procedures Manual
for on-line posting.
BACKGROUND:
The Policies and Procedures manual of the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education is the official
operational guide for the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education. The primary purpose of this
manual is to compile the legal framework that guides the operation of the colleges and universities in the
State System. For many years, the policy manual has been distributed to the public and institutions in
hard copy format. Updates to the manual have also been distributed in hard copy format on a frequent
basis. In an effort to improve policy communications and reduce copying and postage costs, an effort is
under way to place the policy manual on-line on the State Regents’ web site. Part II, Chapter 2,
containing Academic Affairs related policies has already been placed on-line in its entirety. Part I and
Part II, Chapter 1 will be placed on-line as soon as minor updates are approved by the board.
POLICY ISSUES:
Regents’ Rules of Operation require board action on any policy change. All of the changes being
proposed in Part I and Part II, Chapter I, are non-substantive in nature and are indicated with strikeouts
and underlining in the supplement to this agenda.
ANALYSIS:
The changes indicated by strikeouts and underlining represent reformatting and some content
rearrangement. They also reflect updates in state statutes and current operations. They are nonsubstantive or housekeeping in nature. There are several additions. The Regents’ indemnification policy
which was approved recently is now included. Bylaws for several of the Regents’ advisory groups were
already in the policy book, and bylaws for the remainder of the advisory groups that have them are now
being added.
237
238
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-a (1):
Reports.
SUBJECT:
Annual Status Report on Program Requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
Oklahoma State System institutions submitted 122 program requests from July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002.
Two requests are carried over to 2002-03. The following schedules, which detail requests on which the
State Regents acted in 2001-02, are attached.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
Approved New Program Requests
Approved Degree Program Deletions
Approved Degree Program Name Changes
Completed Cooperative Agreements
Approved Requests to Take Existing Programs to New Locations
Suspended Programs
Reinstated Programs
2001-02 submissions. In 2001-02, institutions requested 40 new programs, 34 program deletions, 27
degree program name changes, 11 cooperative agreements, 1 request to take an existing program to new
locations, 7 program suspensions, and 2 program reinstatements.
2001-02 actions. In 2001-02, the State Regents approved 120 program requests. The State Regents
approved 38 requests for new programs, 34 requests to delete programs, 27 degree program name
changes, 11 cooperative agreements, 1 request to take an existing program to new locations, 7 program
suspensions, and 2 program reinstatements. The following tables detail the State Regents’ 2001-02
actions.
239
APPROVED NEW PROGRAM REQUESTS
Program Level
Number of New Programs
8
3
2
11
8
4
2
38
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM DELETIONS
Program Level
Number of Program Deletions
10
8
0
3
5
7
1
34
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM NAME CHANGES
Program Level
Number of Program Name Changes
4
7
1
0
6
6
3
27
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
240
APPROVED REQUESTS TO OFFER EXISTING PROGRAM
AT NEW LOCATIONS
Number of Existing Programs Taken
to New Locations
Program Level
1
Master's
APPROVED PROGRAM SUSPENSIONS
Program Level
Number of Program Suspensions
3
2
0
0
1
1
0
7
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM REINSTATEMENTS
Program Level
Number of Program Reinstatements
0
1
0
0
1
0
0
2
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
241
A. Approved New Program Requests
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Date
Rec'd
Date Approved
Oklahoma State University Doctor of Philosophy in Education
10/30/00
September 14, 2001
Oklahoma Panhandle State
Bachelor of Fine Arts
University
5/24/01
September 14, 2001
East Central University
Master of Education in Library Media
7/24/01
September 14, 2001
Murray State College
Certificate in Medical Office
Transcriptionist
7/24/01
September 14, 2001
Murray State College
Certificate in Medical Office Coding
7/24/01
September 14, 2001
Tulsa Community College
Associate in Applied Science in
Transportation Management
8/10/01
September 14, 2001
Tulsa Community College Certificate in Transportation Management 8/10/01
September 14, 2001
Institution
Oklahoma State University
Technical BranchOkmulgee
Oklahoma State University
Technical BranchOkmulgee
Northeastern Oklahoma
A&M College
Langston University
Langston University
Langston University
Langston University
Degree Program
Associate in Science in Pre-Education
6/29/01
October 26, 2001
Associate in Science in Business
6/29/01
October 26, 2001
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
Associate in Arts in Early Childhood
Education
Bachelor of Science in International
Studies
Associate in Science in Computer and
Information Technology
Associate in Science in Financial
Planning
Associate in Science in Pre-Veterinarian
Science
Langston University
Associate in Science in Horticulture
9/20/01
October 26, 2001
East Central University
Bachelor of General Studies
9/25/01
October 26, 2001
Certificate in Technical Supervision and
9/25/01
Management
Southwestern Oklahoma Associate in Science in Early Childhood
9/28/01
State University
Care and Development
Master of Science in Educational
Oklahoma State University
10/31/01
Leadership Studies
Rose State College
Oklahoma State University Master of Science in Leisure Studies
242
10/31/01
October 26, 2001
October 26, 2001
February 7, 2002
February 7, 2002
Oklahoma State University
- Oklahoma City
Northeastern Oklahoma
A&M College
Oklahoma State University
- Oklahoma City
Southwestern Oklahoma
State University
Associate in Applied Science in Turfgrass
12/17/01
Management
1/14/02
April 4, 2002
2/19/02
April 4, 2002
2/13/02
April 4, 2002
Tulsa Community College Associate in Science in Pre-Pharmacy
1/22/02
April 4, 2002
Tulsa Community College Certificate in Geriatric Technician
2/21/02
April 4, 2002
2/21/02
April 4, 2002
3/12/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
4/2/02
May 24, 2002
4/2/02
May 24, 2002
4/2/02
May 24, 2002
4/16/02
May 24, 2002
4/16/02
May 24, 2002
10/31/01
June 27, 2002
5/7/02
June 27, 2002
5/23/02
June 27, 2002
6/6/02
June 27, 2002
Tulsa Community College
Certificate in Childhood Development
February 7, 2002
Certificate in Office Automation
Technician
Bachelor of Arts in Interdisciplinary
Studies
Associate in Science in Child
Development and Family Relations
Associate in Arts in Family Studies and
Child Development
Redlands Community
College
Oklahoma State University
Associate in Science in Information
Technical Branch Technologies
Okmulgee
Connors State College
Associate in Science in Horticulture
Southeastern Oklahoma
Bachelor of Science in Biotechnology
State University
University of Oklahoma
Master of Science in Genetic Counseling
Health Sciences Center
Northeastern State
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Training
University
Northeastern State
Bachelor of Science in Environmental
University
Science
Oklahoma State University Doctor of Philosophy in Geography
Southeastern Oklahoma
Bachelor of Business Administration in
State University
General Business
Oklahoma City Community
Certificate in Spanish
College
Associate in Applied Science in
Tulsa Community College
Technology
B. Approved Degree Program Deletions
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Institution
Cameron University
Southwestern Oklahoma
State University
Degree Program (program code)
Associate in Applied Science in Nursing
(560)
Associate in Applied Science in Medical
Assistant (124)
243
Date
Rec'd
Date Approved
N/A
September 14, 2001
N/A
September 14, 2001
Southwestern Oklahoma
State University
Certificate in Medical Technology (127)
N/A
September 14, 2001
Oklahoma State University
Doctor of Education in Curriculum and
Instruction (059)
10/30/00
September 14, 2001
6/11/01
September 14, 2001
6/11/01
September 14, 2001
7/12/01
September 14, 2001
7/18/01
September 14, 2001
7/18/01
September 14, 2001
8/14/01
September 14, 2001
9/24/01
October 26, 2001
Oklahoma State University Master of Civil Engineering (248)
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
Oklahoma State University Master of Electrical Engineering (250)
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
Oklahoma State University Master of Mechanical Engineering (255)
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
Oklahoma State University Master of Biosystems Engineering (232)
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
10/31/01
December 7, 2001
University of Science and
Bachelor of Science in Accounting (001)
Arts of Oklahoma
University of Science and
Bachelor of Science in Management (013)
Arts of Oklahoma
Northeastern Oklahoma
Certificate in Criminal Justice (073)
A&M College
Associate in Applied Science in Business
Connors State College
and Industry Technology (056)
Certificate in Business and Industry
Connors State College
Technology (084)
Eastern Oklahoma State Associate in Science in Wildlife
College
Conservation (047)
Associate in Science in Business
Tulsa Community College
Education (004)
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State University
Master of Industrial Engineering and
Management (253)
Master of Environmental Engineering
(234)
Oklahoma State University Master of Chemical Engineering (235)
University of Central
Oklahoma
Murray State College
Oklahoma City
Community College
Oklahoma City
Community College
Oklahoma City
Community College
Southwestern Oklahoma
State University
Connors State College
Rose State College
Northeastern Oklahoma
A&M College
Bachelor of Science in Biology Education
11/29/01
(006)
Associate in Applied Science in
11/29/01
Business/Office Technology (028)
Certificate in Case Management (112)
February 7, 2002
February 7, 2002
2/8/02
April 4, 2002
2/8/02
April 4, 2002
2/8/02
April 4, 2002
2/18/02
April 4, 2002
Associate in Science in Pre-Medical (031) 2/26/02
Associate in Applied Science in Physical
4/1/02
Therapist Assistant (106)
Associate in Applied Science in Metal
4/8/02
Fabrication (031)
April 4, 2002
Certificate in Gerontology Technology
(061)
Associate in Applied Science in
Gerontology Technology (018)
Bachelor of Science in Pharmacy (042)
244
May 24, 2002
May 24, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma
Certificate in Machine Shop (099)
4/8/02
A&M College
Northeastern Oklahoma
Certificate in Machine Shop (081)
4/8/02
A&M College
Northeastern Oklahoma
Certificate in Welding/Metal (106)
4/8/02
A&M College
Northeastern Oklahoma
Certificate in Welding/Metal (086)
4/8/02
A&M College
Northeastern State
Bachelor of Science in Education in
4/8/02
University
Speech/Language Pathology (099)
Oklahoma State University Associate in Applied Science in Industrial
4/24/02
– Oklahoma City
Laboratory Technology (074)
Certificate in Family Services and Child
Rose State College
5/29/02
Development (109)
C.
Institution
May 24, 2002
May 24, 2002
May 24, 2002
May 24, 2002
May 24, 2002
June 27, 2002
June 27, 2002
Approved Degree Program Name Changes
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Current Program Name
Proposed Program Name
(program code)
Date
Rec'd
Date Approved
USAO
Bachelor of Science in Business Bachelor of Science in Business
6/11/01
(004)
Administration
September 14,
2001
OPSU
Bachelor of Specialty in
Bachelor of Specialty in
Industrial Business Management
Industrial Technology
(029)
8/6/01
September 14,
2001
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in
Respiratory Therapy (073)
Associate in Applied Science in
Respiratory Care
9/6/01
October 26,
2001
CASC
Associate in Applied Science in
Computer Science (040)
Associate in Applied Science in
9/13/01
Computer Technology
October 26,
2001
CASC
Certificate in Word Processing
(045)
Certificate in Specialized
Studies
9/13/01
October 26,
2001
CASC
Certificate in Office
Administration (049)
Certificate in Business
Technologies
9/13/01
October 26,
2001
OSU
Master of Science in Health,
Physical Education and
Recreation (117)
Master of Science in Health and
10/31/01
Human Performance
December 7,
2001
UCO
Bachelor of Fine Art in Dance
Education (173)
Bachelor of Fine Art in Dance
11/29/01
February 7,
2002
Associate in Applied Science in
12/17/01
Early Care Education
February 7,
2002
Associate in Applied Science in
OSU-OKC Early Care Education &
Administration (081)
Master of Science in Industrial &
UCO
Applied Physics (147)
Master of Science in
Engineering Physics
245
11/29/01
April 4, 2002
Certificate in Computer Aided
Certificate in Computer Aided
2/7/02
Design/Drafting-Manufacturing- DesignArchitectural (084)
Manufacturing/Architectural
Associate in Applied Science in
Associate in Applied Science in
2/28/02
EOSC
Administrative Office
Office Administration (045)
Technology
Bachelor of Science in Athletic Bachelor of Science in Athletic
SWOSU
3/25/02
Trainer (143)
Training
OCCC
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
OSU
ECU
OU
OU
OU
Rose
Rose
Doctor of Education in
Doctor of Education in School
Educational Administration (067) Administration
April 4, 2002
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
3/25/02
May 24, 2002
5/15/02
June 27, 2002
5/15/02
June 27, 2002
5/15/02
June 27, 2002
Associate in Applied Science in
5/29/02
Clinical Laboratory Technology
June 27, 2002
Associate in Applied Science in
5/29/02
Computer-Aided Drafting
June 27, 2002
Master of Science in
Master of Science in Human
Occupational and Adult
Resources and Adult Education
Education (204)
Doctor of Education in
Doctor of Education in Human
Occupational and Adult
Resources and Adult Education
Education (206)
Bachelor of Science in Family
Bachelor of Science in Human
Relations and Child Development Development and Family
(094)
Science
Master of Science in Family
Master of Science in Human
Relations and Child Development Development and Family
(095)
Science
Bachelor of Science in
Bachelor of Science in Business
Business/Office Technology
Education and Office
(009)
Technology
Master of Education in History
Master of Education in
and Philosophy of Education
Educational Studies
(115)
Master of Science in
Master of Science in
Telecomputing (339)
Telecommunications Systems
Doctor of Philosophy in History
and Philosophy of Education
(116)
Associate in Applied Science in
Medical Laboratory Technology
(030)
Associate in Applied Science in
Graphics Communication
Technology (024)
April 4, 2002
Doctor of Philosophy in
Educational Studies
RSU
Associate in Arts in Broadcasting Associate in Arts in Radio(053)
Television
6/5/02
June 27, 2002
RSU
Associate in Applied Science in
Paramedic Technology (094)
Associate in Applied Science in
Emergency Medical Service
6/5/02
June 27, 2002
RSU
Certificate in EMT-Paramedic
(102)
Certificate in EMS-Paramedic
6/5/02
June 27, 2002
246
D. Completed Cooperative Agreements
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Area Vocational
Date
Date
Inst.
Degree Program (program code)
Date Ratified
Technical
Rec'd
Approved
School/Center
October 26,
Central Technical
Associate in Applied Science in
9/28/01
9/20/01 NEOAMC
2001
Center
Electronics (019)
Green County
Associate in Applied Science in Child
October 26,
9/20/01
CSC
9/28/01
Technology Center Development (063)
2001
February 7,
Moore-Norman
Associate in Applied Science in
1/14/02
12/19/01 SSC
2002
Technology Center Nursing (110)
Canadian Valley
Associate in Applied Science in
2/26/02
RCC
3/15/02 April 4, 2002
Technology Center Applied Technology (081)
OSU- Canadian Valley
Associate in Applied Science in
3/15/02 April 4, 2002
3/1/02
OKC Technology Center Municipal Fire Protection (009)
Pioneer Technology Associate in Applied Science in
3/4/02
NOC
3/15/02 April 4, 2002
Center
Information Technology (083)
Northwest
Associate in Applied Science in
3/15/02 April 4, 2002
3/4/02
NOC
Technology Center Information Technology (083)
Chisholm Trail
Associate in Applied Science in
3/4/02
NOC
4/5/02 April 4, 2002
Technology Center Information Technology (083)
Canadian Valley
Associate in Applied Science in
4/18/02 May 24, 2002
3/29/02
RCC
Technology Center Emergency Medical Technology (076)
Tulsa Technology
Associate in Applied Science in
4/25/02
RSU
6/3/02 June 27, 2002
Center
Applied Technology (111)
Caddo Kiowa
Associate in Applied Science in
6/3/02 June 27, 2002
5/20/02
RCC
Technology Center Emergency Medical Technology (076)
Institution
E. Approved Requests to Take Existing Program to New Location
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Degree Program (program
New Location
Date Rec. Date Approved
code)
Cameron University
Master of Business
Administration (630)
USMC-Various
Sites
247
4/5/2002 May 24, 2002
F. Suspended Programs
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Institution
Program (program code)
OSU-OKC Certificate in Freelance Writing (078)
OSU-OKC Certificate in Systems Maintenance Administration (051)
Date by
which
Date Date Suspension program
must be
Susp.
Ratified
reinstated
or deleted
February
1/14/02 February 7, 2002
2005
February
1/14/02 February 7, 2002
2005
February
1/14/02 February 7, 2002
2003
OU
Master of Natural Science (181)
CSC
Associate in Applied Science in Criminal Justice/Police Science
3/15/02
(019)
April 4, 2002
April 2005
CASC
Associate in Applied Science in Office Administration (027)
3/15/02
April 4, 2002
April 2005
CASC
Certificate in Secretarial Administration (050)
3/15/02
April 4, 2002
April 2005
NSU
Bachelor of Arts in Education in History (043)
5/13/02
May 24, 2002
May 2005
G. Reinstated Programs
July 1, 2001 to June 30, 2002
Date
Institution
Rec'd
6/29/01
3/19/02
Program (program code)
Original
Suspension
Date
Date
Reinstatement
Ratified
OSUTB- Associate in Applied Science in Telecommunications
10/31/00 September 14, 2001
OKM Technology (088)
OPSU
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology (016)
248
2/18/99
May 24, 2002
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-a (2):
Reports.
SUBJECT:
Status Report on Program Requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
The Status Report on Program Requests tracks the status of all program requests received since July 1,
2002, as well as requests pending from the previous year.
POLICY ISSUES:
This report lists pending requests regarding degree programs as required by the State Regents’ “Policy
Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
The following pages contain the Current Degree Program Inventory and the following schedules:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
Letter of Intent
Degree Program Requests Under Review
Requested Degree Program Deletions
Requested Degree Program Name Changes
Suspended Programs
249
CURRENT DEGREE PROGRAM INVENTORY
September 13, 2002
Institution
OU
OUHSC
OU Law
OSU
OSUTB-OKC
OSUTB-OKM
OSU Vet Med
OSU-COM
ECU
NSU
NWOSU
RSU
SEOSU
SWOSU
UCO
CU
LU
OPSU
USAO
CASC
CSC
EOSC
MSC
NEOAMC
NOC
OCCC
RCC
Rose
SSC
TCC
WOSC
System Total
Associate in Associate
No. of
Arts/Associate in Applied Baccalaureate Master's
Programs
in Science
Science
229
59
1
213
45
29
1
4
41
87
46
33
61
70
90
43
37
33
25
36
36
35
32
69
39
66
38
62
24
103
15
1,702
8
3
Doctoral
105
6
73
31
47
16
88
70
43
2
9
16
5
1
First
Professional
4
1
23
26
15
10
5
7
2
6
4
9
4
24
26
24
18
24
21
21
17
26
18
23
2
7
6
9
10
13
18
22
13
28
4
47
12
287
268
32
63
39
5
52
41
62
28
28
25
25
599
250
1
9
16
26
4
2
263
1
1
1
1
107
10
Total
Certificates
225
57
1
201
31
29
1
4
41
80
44
30
61
70
88
43
37
33
25
31
32
33
28
37
39
43
30
54
22
70
14
4
2
1,534
12
14
7
2
3
2
5
4
2
4
32
23
8
8
2
33
1
168
I. Letter of Intent
Institution
Degree Program
Date Received
Tulsa Community College
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma City Community College
Redlands Community College
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center
Associate in Applied Science in International Music Management
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre
Certificate in Bioinformatics
Certificate in Leadership
Associate in Applied Science in E-Commerce
Certificate in E-Commerce
Associate in Applied Science in Information Technology
Master of Science in Geriatrics
Certificate in Geriatrics
9/19/00
4/13/01
4/25/01
7/2/01
8/24/01
8/24/01
8/27/01
9/19/01
9/19/01
Rose State College
Tulsa Community College
Associate in Applied Science in Engineering Technician
Associate in Science in Preprofessional Science
11/13/01
12/13/01
Oklahoma State University -Oklahoma City
Rose State College
Redlands Community College
Northeastern State University
Associate in Applied Science in Public Transportation Security
Associate in Applied Science in Industrial and Business Security
Associate in Science in Agriculture Farm & Ranch Management
Bachelor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship
Associate in Applied Science in Telecommunications
Management
Associate in Applied Science in Chemical Laboratory
Technology
Associate in Science in Geosciences
2/15/02
2/15/02
3/15/02
5/15/02
Tulsa Community College
Tulsa Community College
Rose State College
Rose State College
Rose State College
Rose State College
Oklahoma City Community College
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma State University
Associate in Science in Meteorology
Associate in Applied Science in Geographic Information Systems
Technology
Associate in Applied Science in Laboratory Science Technology
Certificate in Website Technology
Associate in Applied Science in Space Industry
Bachelor of Science in Space Technologies
Bachelor of Science in Space Information Systems
Associate in Applied Science in Hotel and Restaurant
Administration
Certificate in Hotel and Restaurant Administration
Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies
Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies
251
6/12/02
6/12/02
6/12/02
6/12/02
6/12/02
6/12/02
7/3/02
7/3/02
7/3/02
7/3/02
7/24/02
7/24/02
8/9/02
8/9/02
II. Degree Program Requests Under Review
July 1, 2002 to present
Degree Program
Institution
Oklahoma State University
Date Rec'd
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre
Status
10/31/2001 undergoing review
Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Associate in Science in General Studies
4/24/2002
University of Oklahoma
Master of Arts in Organizational Dynamics
6/26/2002 September 13, 2002
Connors State College
Associate in Science in Computer Science
7/12/2002 September 13, 2002
Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City Certificate in Early Care Education Administration
undergoing review
8/5/2002
September 13, 2002
Date Rec'd
Scheduled for
Action
Northwestern Oklahoma State University Bachelor of Arts in Geography (017)
6/17/02
September 13, 2002
Tulsa Community College
Certificate in Medical Office Administration (183)
7/18/02
September 13, 2002
Eastern Oklahoma State College
Associate in Arts in Art (004)
7/22/02
September 13, 2002
Northwestern Oklahoma State University Bachelor of Arts in Library Media Specialist (023)
8/6/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Certificate in Management/Marketing Skills (101)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Associate in Science in Education/Secondary (017)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Certificate in Surgical Technology (065)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Associate in Applied Science in Medical Assistant (116)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Certificate in Medical Assistant (115)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
Associate in Arts in Journalism (028)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
III. Requested Degree Program Deletions
July 1, 2002 to present
Institution
Degree Program (program code)
252
IV. Requested Degree Program Name Changes
July 1, 2002 to present
Inst.
OSU-OKC
OSU-OKC
TCC
TCC
OPSU
Current Program Name (program code)
Proposed Program Name
Associate in Science in Fire Protection Associate in Science in Fire Protection and
Technology (067)
Safety Technology
Associate in Applied Science in
Associate in Applied Science in Sign
Interpreter Training (063)
Language Interpretation
Associate in Science in Child
Development and Family Relations
Associate in Science in Child Development
(246)
Associate in Applied Science in
Associate in Applied Science in Electronics
Electrical Engineering Technology
Technology
(116)
Bachelor of Science in Natural Science
Bachelor of Science in Physical Science
(018)
Date Rec'd
Status
7/1/02
September 13, 2002
7/1/02
September 13, 2002
7/16/02
September 13, 2002
7/16/02
September 13, 2002
7/31/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Arts in Television (053)
Associate in Arts in Mass Communications
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Arts in Social Science
(044)
Associate in Arts in History
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
X. Suspended Programs
July 1, 2002 to present
Institution
Program (program code)
Date
Susp.
NOC
Associate in Arts in Native American Leadership (072)
8/15/02
253
Date
Suspension
Ratified
Date by which
program must
be reinstated or
deleted
9/13/2002
September 2005
254
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM: 30-b:
Report.
SUBJECT:
Admission Policy Impact Study.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept this report.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Admission to, Retention in, and Transfer Among Colleges and
Universities of the State System” requires a periodic review of State System admission requirements.
This review accomplishes two important tasks: 1) to ensure that implementation of the admission
standards is consistent with the intent of the policy; and 2) to document the policy’s impact on student
achievement. Admission standards began increasing in 1990. This report covers the past ten years.
Admission standards vary by tier and in 1991, the admission standards at the comprehensive universities
required an ACT score in the top 50 percent or high school rank in the top 40 percent or high school GPA
of 3.0 or higher. The standards at the comprehensive universities reflected in this study are a high school
rank in the top 33.3 percent and a GPA of 3.0 or an ACT score in the top 33.3 percent. Due to the
improved performance of Oklahoma high school students, the top one-third ACT score increased to 22 in
fall 1996. In fall 2000, the minimum ACT score at the University of Oklahoma was increased from 22 to
24 and rank increased to top 30 percent as requested by the institution. In May 2002, OU requested and
was granted an increase in admission standards that requires automatic admissions to have a 3.0 high
school GPA and rank in the top 25 percent of the class, instead of the top 30 percent. Students with a 3.0
GPA and high school class rank in the top 26 to 30 percent or a 3.0 GPA in the 15-unit core curriculum
and a 22 ACT score may be admitted on a space available basis.
In 1991, the regional universities required for admission an ACT score in the top 66.6 percent or high
school rank in the top 66.6 percent or high school GPA of 2.7 or higher. For admission to a regional
university, a student must achieve a high school rank in the top 50 percent and a GPA of 2.7 or an ACT
score in the top half. Due to the improved performance of Oklahoma high school students, the top onehalf ACT score increased to 20 in fall 2000. Northeastern State University has required an ACT score of
20 since 1990.
POLICY ISSUES:
This report provides a study of the effectiveness of the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Admission to,
Retention in, and Transfer Among Colleges and Universities of the State System.”
255
ANALYSIS:
The Admission Policy Impact Study examines the effects of the increased admission standards on students
within the State System. Information generated through this review process is used by the State Regents
to determine whether the admission standards are appropriate and if the goal of enhancing student success
is being met. Some general findings of the study are provided below:
•
As seen with national enrollment trends, total fall semester enrollment peaked in fall 1992 with
163,988 students, representing a 3.0 percent increase from fall 1991.
•
The enrollment numbers for the state’s comprehensive universities remained relatively stable with
only minor fluctuations between fall 1991 and fall 1995.
•
Enrollment increased at two-year institutions by 3.5 percent between 1991 and 1992.
•
The number of first-time freshmen was relatively high in 1992 at 26,743.
•
First-time freshman enrollment decreased between 1992 and 1995, with the largest decrease of 7.1
percent occurring between 1992 and 1993.
•
First-time freshman enrollment began to increase in 1996 and in 2000 reached an all time high of
29,086.
•
In 1999, the number of Oklahoma high school graduates peaked at 38,512, followed closely by
38,344 in 2000.
•
Projections indicate that the number of high school graduates will generally decrease between 2004
and 2012. By 2013, the number of high school graduates may fall to the 1995 level of 32,459.
•
Consistent with national enrollment rates, minority first-time freshman enrollment has increased in all
Oklahoma public higher education institutions.
Conclusions:
As noted in previous versions of the Admission Policy Impact Study, the study addresses a few of the
many factors that can affect student admission and retention. However, the following conclusions can be
made:
•
Data support continuation of current admission standards.
•
National and state data support the finding of a direct relationship between core high school courses
and performance on the ACT.
•
Because taking more challenging core courses improves ACT scores, the number of students with
ACT scores at or above the minimum should continue to climb. The State Department of Education’s
incentive program for Advanced Placement (AP) courses in the high schools should also continue to
increase high school performance.
256
•
Any student aspiring to engage in higher education has access via the State Regents’ three roads of
entry as represented by the three tiers: comprehensive universities, regional universities, and two-year
colleges. Additionally, any student desiring to attend and or graduate from comprehensive or regional
universities has access via special admission provisions.
•
The State System could see a decrease in first-time freshmen directly from high school due to the
downturn projected of high school graduates between 2004 and 2012.
•
Minority freshman enrollment and dropout rates are not negatively impacted by the increased
admission standards, especially at the comprehensive universities.
257
258
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-c:
Report.
SUBJECT:
Academic Policy Exceptions Quarterly Report.
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is for information.
BACKGROUND:
At the May 1994 meeting, the State Regents delegated to the Chancellor authority to approve minor
exceptions/clarifications to State Regents’ policy that will not result in a broadscale circumvention of
policy. All exceptions so granted are to be reported to the State Regents. This is the twenty-first report of
exceptions to academic policy granted by the Chancellor.
POLICY ISSUES:
Thirteen exceptions to the State Regents’ academic policy have been granted by the Chancellor since the
last report in May 2002.
ANALYSIS:
University of Oklahoma (OU)
April 22, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which requires 15 of the final 30 credit
hours applied toward a baccalaureate degree be completed at the degree-granting institution, was granted
to waive this requirement for a student who moved out-of-state. The exception allows OU to count
between 6 and 16 credit hours of correspondence courses in mathematics and foreign language for general
education requirements. The exception was based on the student’s completion of 128 hours in residence
at OU, the completion of all other degree requirements, and the student’s relocation.
June 7, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which requires 15 of the final 30 credit
hours applied toward a baccalaureate degree be completed at the degree-granting institution, was granted
to allow OU to waive this requirement for a student who completed 13 of the last 30 hours at OU. The
exception allows the waiver of two hours of the residency requirement and is based on the student’s
completion of all other coursework in residence at OU, the student’s relocation, and the completion of all
other degree requirements.
259
Oklahoma State University (OSU)
April 29, 2002
An exception to the Admission Policy, which states that a student must be in the eleventh grade or above
to be eligible for concurrent enrollment, was granted to allow OSU to concurrently enroll a sophomore
student in a college-level mathematics course. This exception was based on the student’s ACT
mathematics score of 32 and the fact that the student had completed all mathematics courses offered by
the high school.
May 20, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which requires that baccalaureate
degrees be based on a minimum of 60 hours at a baccalaureate degree-granting institution, was granted to
allow OSU to waive 12 credit hours of the 60-hour requirement for a student. The exception was based
on advising errors, the student’s academic performance and total credit hours earned, and the completion
of all other degree requirements.
Northeastern State University (NSU)
April 22, 2002
NSU was granted authorization to establish the date of posting for the degree of a student who did not
complete one course for a second minor, but met the degree requirements for a first minor in 1973. The
student was not aware of the deficiency until recently, when an official copy of the transcript was
requested. This action is consistent with the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy which states
that “degrees shall be conferred upon students satisfactorily completing prescribed courses of study.”
May 31, 2002
NSU was granted authorization to establish the date of posting for the degree of a student who met all
necessary degree requirements in December 1992 but failed to apply for graduation. The student was
unaware that the degree was not posted to the transcript. This action is consistent with the Undergraduate
Degree Requirements Policy which states that “degrees shall be conferred upon students satisfactorily
completing prescribed courses of study.”
Northwestern Oklahoma State University (NWOSU)
February 21, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which requires that 15 of the final 30
credit hours applied toward a baccalaureate degree be completed at the degree-granting institution, was
granted to allow NWOSU to waive this requirement for a student who took 14 of the last 30 hours at the
institution. The exception was based on the student’s completion of 33 credit hours in residence at
NWOSU, the completion of more than the 60 hours required at a baccalaureate degree-granting
institution, and the completion of all other degree requirements.
Oklahoma Panhandle State University (OPSU)
July 25, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which requires that 15 of the final 30
credit hours applied toward a baccalaureate degree be completed at the degree-granting institution, was
granted to allow OPSU to waive this requirement for a student who has completed 14 of the last 30 hours
260
at the institution. The exception was based on the student’s completion of 112 of his 119 credit hours at
OPSU and the hardship it would cause the student to attend traditional courses.
Rogers State University (RSU)
May 2, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which states that general education
requirements include six hours of English composition, was granted to allow RSU to accept the Olympic
College course ENGL 104—Technical Writing as the equivalent of the RSU course ENGL 1213—
Composition II for Navy students completing an associate degree in technical arts at Olympic College and
transferring to RSU’s Bachelor of Applied Technology degree. This exception was based on the fact that
the course is recognized as a second composition course equivalent in the state of Washington and at
other institutions with articulation agreements with Olympic College.
University of Central Oklahoma (UCO)
March 14, 2002
An exception to the Undergraduate Degree Requirements Policy, which states that baccalaureate degrees
shall be based on a minimum of 30 hours of resident credit, was granted to allow UCO to waive the last
three hours of the requirement for a student placed on full military alert after the September 11, 2001
terrorist attack. The exception was based on the student’s inability to complete the last elective course at
UCO and the completion of all other degree requirements.
Connors State College (CSC)
February 13, 2002
Two exceptions to the Admission Policy, which states that a student who is academically suspended twice
from the same institution may not return to that institution until the GPA is raised by attending another
institution, were granted to allow CSC to readmit students who did not attend another institution. One
exception was granted based on family medical conditions contributing to the second suspension and the
recommendations of the CSC Appeals Committee. The other exception was granted based on the
student’s increased maturity since the second suspension, placebound status, and education/career plans,
which fit within a specific program.
August 8, 2002
An exception to the Admission Policy, which states that a student who is academically suspended twice
from the same institution may not return to that institution until the GPA is raised by attending another
institution, was granted to allow CSC to readmit a student who did not another institution. The exception
was based on the recommendation of the CSC Appeals Committee.
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262
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (1):
SUBJECT:
Regents Education Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve/ratify the Regents Education
Program 2001-2002 Annual Report.
BACKGROUND:
According to Regents’ policy, the State Regents will publish a Regents Education Program Annual
Report each fiscal year. The annual report for FY2001-2002 is attached for approval/ratification.
POLICY ISSUES:
The Regents Education Program 2001-2002 Annual Report is a routine item for consideration and no
policy issues are in question.
ANALYSIS:
The Regents Education Program 2001-2002 Annual Report has been prepared in accordance with State
Regents’ policy and outlines the courses offered, notable speakers, offering locations, regent/trustee
participation, and a summary.
263
264
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (2):
SUBJECT:
Faculty Salary Report
Not Available Electronically
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266
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (3):
SUBJECT:
Student Cost Survey FY 2003
Not Available Electronically
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268
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (4):
SUBJECT:
Tuition and Fees Book
Not Available Electronically
269
270
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (5):
SUBJECT:
Endowment Earnings Report
Not Available Electronically
271
272
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (6):
Student Services
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma Teacher Enhancement Program (OTEP) Title II Grant Update
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
Authorized in October 1998 under the Higher Education Act, the United State Department of Education’s
(USDE) Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant program is designed to improve student achievement by
implementing comprehensive approaches to improving teacher quality. The State Grant program
promotes innovative reforms that meet the mandates of “No Child Left Behind” which holds institutions
of higher education (IHE) with teacher preparation programs accountable for preparing teachers who are
highly competent in the academic content area and who have strong teaching skills that impact student
learning. In August 2000, the USDE awarded a higher education Title II grant in the amount of $787,073
for the State Regents’ OTEP proposal; funds were made available in January 2001. First year funding
was $107,274. Added to this amount was a Supplemental fund award of $181,405. Second year funds
were awarded in the amount of $374,275. The third and final year of grant funds expected to be awarded
to the Oklahoma Teacher Enhancement Program are $371,461. Total funds awarded to the State Regents’
OTEP by the USDE are $1,034,415.
By way of reminder, the purpose of OTEP is to create and implement evaluation methods to assess the
impact of teacher preparation programs on K-12 student learning. Using data from Resident Year
Teachers (RYT) and their Resident Year Committees (RYC), a report is given to the participating
institutions’ teacher preparation programs to identify areas of needed improvement in teacher preparation.
Specifically, OTEP grant funds are used to create a systematic method of monitoring classroom
experiences of participating novice teachers. The project includes the following:
• Implementation of the Educational Testing Services’ “Pathwise Induction Program,” and
assessment system to evaluate the pedagogical impact of Resident Year Teachers on K-12
students’ progress. The RYC, which includes a school administrator, a higher education faculty
member, and a mentor teacher use “Pathwise” to assess the effectiveness of the RYT.
• Implementation of the Teacher Work Sample Methodology (TWSM), an in-class assessment
system, to be used by RYT’s to evaluate student learning on a unit-by-unit basis; and
• Evaluation of the higher education teacher preparation program by RYT graduates of the
program.
Data collected through the three assessments help to identify strengths and weakness in
Oklahoma’s teacher education preparation programs.
273
POLICY ISSUES:
The activities of the Title II Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant are consistent with the State Regents’
teacher education reform efforts.
ANALYSIS:
Key Findings in Statistical Analysis Report
1. Although this is a very small pilot study with 46 participants, PK-12 student learning gains can be
associated with specific teaching competencies. Teacher’s knowledge of content and pedagogy,
assessment, instructional design, their students, and the ability to reflect and grow as a
professional educator is key to impacting student learning.
2. The Teacher Work Sample (TWS) is a multi-week teaching unit that beginning teachers develop,
implement, and analyze to assess the impact they had on student learning gains. These work
samples then are scored by higher education faculty to determine the level of impact the teacher’s
preparation had on the students’ learning. The other two assessments, Portfolio and Pathwise
Induction program, provided different perspectives on the same question. The Portfolio prompts
allowed for teachers to give personal reflections on the level of competency they felt the teacher
preparation program had given them and their own impact on their students. The Pathwise
training provided the Resident Year Committees a systematic process for mentoring and
evaluating Resident Year Teachers through classroom observations.
a. Of the 46 RYTs, only two dropped out of teaching during or after the first year: one
accepted a position with an oil company paying twice her teaching salary and the second
teacher chose to stay home with a new baby. This 4% attrition is much lower than the
Southern Regional Education Board’s (SREB) report in the Regents’ 2002 Supply and
Demand study which shows 13% of all regularly certified teachers leave the teaching
profession during or immediately following the first year.
b. The grant partners were sensitive to the needs of the Resident Year Teachers and
modified the process as the year progressed.
3. The 15 competencies required for graduation from a teacher preparation program are not closely
aligned with the teacher effectiveness criteria on which public school teachers are evaluated. In
the Teacher Quality Institute held at UCO in May, grant participants attempted with much
difficulty to crosswalk the two sets of competencies.
Impact on Student Learning
PK-12 students’ pretest scores were used as a baseline to measure the amount of learning gained
over a period of time. RYTs measured students’ pretest scores against their post-test scores to
calculate the students’ learning gain. Student learning gains increased 72.3%. Subsequently,
analysis of the three OTEP assessments (TWS, Pathwise, and Portfolio) confirmed the amount of
learning gain made and connected the student learning gains to teacher preparation. Significant
predictors of student learning gain were the student’s pretest (the best predictor), the TWS, and
the Pathwise observation form. The portfolio score was not significantly related to the pre-post
difference.
274
The following participating Institutions of Higher Education will receive an individual program
report.
Cameron University
East Central University
Langston University
Mid America Bible College
Northeastern State University
Northwestern State University
Oklahoma Baptist University
Oklahoma Christian University
Oral Roberts University
Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma University
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Southern Nazarene University
University of Tulsa
University of Central Oklahoma
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
University of Arts and Sciences of Oklahoma
Notification of third year funding, in the amount of $371,461, for the Title II Teacher Quality
Grant entitled Oklahoma Teacher Enhancement Program (OTEP) is expected in September 2002.
All teacher preparation programs are participating. Resident year teachers, recent graduates of
these teacher education programs are being recruited. Year three grant activities are on schedule
according to the grant action plan.
• The Oklahoma Teacher Work Sample prompt and rubric are developed and in use.
• The Resident Year portfolio has been modified to meet the information needs of the
grant.
• Year Three TWSM Resident Year Teacher and higher education faculty trainings are
scheduled.
• Pathwise mentoring trainings for public school administrators and higher education
faculty took place on July 16 and July 30, 2002, and will continue in September. The
mentor teacher and resident year teacher training begins in September at different
regional sites and will continue to take place throughout the remainder of the 2002-2003
school year.
• Recruitment for Year Three Resident Year Teacher participants is underway.
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276
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (7):
Mentorship Initiative
SUBJECT:
Smart Start and America Counts/America Reads Incentive Grants
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is provided for the State Regents information only.
BACKGROUND:
In August 1999 the State Regents approved support for a pilot program toward a potential statewide
initiative for the America Counts and America Reads Federal Work Study programs. The America Reads
and America Counts programs enable college students to serve as tutors and mentors for students needing
assistance in reading and mathematics in elementary and/or middle school using Federal Work Study
funds to pay wages.
As part of the Mathematics Preparation Initiative, the State Regents approved several pilot grants, totaling
1999 and 2000 to create the infrastructure necessary to sustain effective programs of the America Counts
and America Reads programs.
In April 2000, the State Regents were awarded an Education Award from Americorps to begin the state
initiative, Smart Start for Brain Gain 2010. The goal of this initiative is to identify, recruit, train and
place 3,600 mentors and tutors with Oklahoma children, youth and adults in existing school and
community programs aimed at reducing educational failure and increasing chances for success.
In June 2001, the State Regents approved $40,000 to fund mini-grants to enhance the America Counts,
America Reads, and/or Smart Start programs at the participating institutions for higher education for
recruitment, training, materials, supplies, or innovative uses to enhance the Smart Start, America Counts
and America Reads programs in the institutions in the state.
POLICY ISSUES:
Under the State Regents coordinating role, support of Smart Start, America Counts and America Reads is
an important function in developing partnerships between common and higher education, as well as in
promoting coordination and use of federal, state, and local resources. These programs also support the
role of public service in higher education in Oklahoma, an important function for colleges and universities
in the state. Public and private institutions were eligible for participation, in keeping with the State
Regents’ leadership in linking private institutions with statewide goals and activities.
277
ANALYSIS:
The America Counts and America Reads programs are proving to be successful in Oklahoma by
providing tutoring and mentoring in the areas of reading and mathematics for students in grades K-9.
Leveraging these important state and federal programs brings a true K-16 focus to the Brain Gain 2010
goals of enhancing student preparation toward collegiate success and localizing efforts on campuses.
The recipients of the $4,000 mini-grants were the University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma Christian
University, Rose State College, Murray State College, Panhandle State University, Southwestern
Oklahoma State University, East Central University, and Oklahoma City Community College. These
grants resulted in the following at the end of the 2001-02 school year:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
More than 120 college students tutored approximately 1,400 K-9 students in reading or
mathematics.
The college students earned a total of approximately $132,000 in work-study and education
awards for their efforts.
Tutors had materials and training to support their efforts.
The University of Oklahoma provided tutoring services for five elementary schools, four middle
schools, and one high school in the Norman, Purcell, Lexington, and Oklahoma City area.
Oklahoma Christian University provided one-on-one mentoring as well as small group support
for students at Western Village Academy.
Twenty-five high school students attended ACT Preparation workshops at Panhandle State
University. Ninety three percent of these students increased their composite ACT scores by at
least 2 points.
Murray State College provided tutoring services to eight surrounding public elementary and
middle schools.
East Central University recruited nine tutors who worked with approximately 237 students from
four schools.
o One tutor’s students improved their classroom grades by two letter grades.
o Another tutor utilized her ability to speak Spanish to work with bilingual students.
o One tutor was a law-enforcement major who reported that the experience was a positive
community service experience in preparation for that career.
Oklahoma City Community College provided eleven tutors at two elementary schools, four
middle schools, and one high school.
Rose State College established a resource center to support America Counts/Reads activities and
had twenty tutors providing services in five school districts.
Southwestern Oklahoma State University provided reading and math learning resources for Sayre
Elementary School and supported America Reads activities to enhance reading in Weatherford
and Sayre Public Schools.
All programs involved the participation of federal work-study students, Smart Start members, or a
combination thereof. New requirements for federal work-study allow the continuation of these partnership
efforts between Oklahoma higher education institutions and local schools. By creating the campus-based
training and infrastructure with State Regents’ initial funding, the institutions are able to continue
bringing bring tutors and mentors to the schools identified here, as well as expanding efforts into other
local schools.
278
While the federal focus on America Counts and America Reads has changed, these efforts will remain
localized in Oklahoma institutions and student preparation resources allocated to the Math Incentive
Grant program will now fund other innovative programs that have a high promise of institutionalization
on Oklahoma campuses. All programs will additionally promote close relationships between higher
education institutions and local public schools.
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280
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-d (8):
SUBJECT:
Report of Financial Operations.
Not Available Electronically
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282
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 13, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #30-e:
Published Materials
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program flyer and poster
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is for information only.
BACKGROUND:
The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education produce and distribute more than 35 publications each
year to inform various audiences and constituencies of higher education policies, programs, services and
benefits and to increase awareness and support of higher education’s objectives, goals, accomplishments
and needs.
POLICY ISSUES:
The production and distribution of these materials is consistent with a recommendation made by the
Citizens' Commission on the Future of Oklahoma Higher Education to better publicize higher education
services and benefits. These activities are also consistent with the State Regents’ Brain Gain 2010
initiatives.
ANALYSIS:
The State Regents produced and distributed the following publications during August 2002.
Oklahoma Higher Learning Access Program flyer and poster
Two hundred twenty thousand (220,000) flyers and 4,000 posters describing the Oklahoma Higher
Learning Access Program have been produced and distributed to 8th-10th grade counselors at nearly
1,275 public and private Oklahoma schools. The flyer provides students and their parents with
information on how to qualify for the program and its benefits. Additionally, it encourages individuals
who have questions about the program to call the State Regents’ toll-free hotline or visit Oklahoma higher
education’s Web site. This publication was formerly a brochure but was converted this year to flyer
format in order to reduce printing and mailing costs. The posters briefly describe the program and
encourage students and parents to contact the hotline or Web site for more information.
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