Agenda - Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education

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Agenda - Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Agenda
September 12, 2003
NOTE
This document contains recommendations and reports to the State Regents regarding items on
the September 12, 2003 regular meeting agenda. For additional information, please call 405225-9116 or to get this document electronically go to www.okhighered.org State System.
Materials and recommendations contained in this agenda are tentative and unofficial prior to
State Regents’ approval or acceptance on September 12, 2003.
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
Research Park, Oklahoma City
AGENDA
Friday, September 12, 2003--10 a.m.
Associates Room, Student Union Third Floor, University of Oklahoma, Norman
Chairman Ike Glass Presiding
1.
Announcement of filing of meeting notice and posting of the agenda in accordance
with the Open Meeting Act.
2.
Call to Order. Roll call and announcement of quorum.
2.1.
Host President. Welcome remarks by host President David Boren.
3.
Minutes of Previous Meetings. Approval of minutes.
3.1.
Higher Education Partnerships. Presentation and discussion of partnership between
Northern Oklahoma College and Oklahoma State University, the NOC/OSU Gateway
Program.
ACADEMIC
4.
Policy - Institution.
5.
a.
Approval of request from the University of Oklahoma to require a higher
minimum score on the International English Language Testing System
examination for admission of students for whom English is a second language.
Page 1.
b.
Approval of request from Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College for revisions
to adult admission and assessment criteria. Page 3.
New Programs.
a.
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center. Approval of request to offer
the Certificate in Public Health (includes electronic delivery). Page 5.
b.
Oklahoma State University-Oklahoma City. Approval of request to offer the
Associate in Applied Science in Health Technology. Page 9.
c.
Eastern Oklahoma State College. Approval of request to offer the Certificate in
Surgical Technology. Page 13.
d.
Oklahoma City Community College. Approval of request to offer the
Certificate in Cyber/Information Security, Associate in Applied Science in
Cyber/Information Security, and Associate in Science in Cyber/Information
Security. Page 17.
e.
Tulsa Community College. Approval of request to offer the Certificate in
Management Leadership. Page 25.
6.
Program Deletions. Approval of institutional requests for program deletion. Page 29.
7.
Intensive English Program Review. Approval of report and recommendations for
continued accreditation of an Intensive English Program. Page 31.
8.
Student Preparation.
a.
Annual report on student performance and preparation for college, ACT and
SAT scores, Advanced Placement participation, and Southern Regional
Education Board Oklahoma Featured Facts. Page 35.
b.
Endorsement of proclamation of September 2003 as “Oklahoma Higher
Education Math and Science Month.”
FISCAL
9.
E&G Budgets. Allocation of residual FY 03 general revenue appropriations and FY 04
state funds. Page 47.
10.
Endowment.
a.
Approval of new accounts and increases in accounts. Page 51.
b.
Approval of distribution of matching funds for endowed chairs and
professorships for institutional expenditure from Endowment Trust Fund
accounts. Page 55.
c.
Approval of distribution for filled chairs that are unmatched by the State
Regents. Page 75.
11.
Investment Policy. Approval of posted amendment relating to earnings distribution.
Page 79.
12.
EPSCoR.
13.
a.
Approval of annual payment of the FY 03 EPSCoR Coalition dues. Page 81.
b.
Acknowledgment of additional appointments to the Oklahoma EPSCoR
Advisory Committee. Page 83.
Master Lease Program. Approval of equipment purchase for OneNet and approval of
Series 2003C for submission to Bond Oversight Committee. Page 85.
14.
Revenue Bonds. Certification of accuracy of Statement of Essential Facts for Revenue
Bonds at:
a.
University of Oklahoma. Page 95.
b.
Southeastern Oklahoma State University. Page 97.
15.
Tuition. Approval of institutional requests for corrections to the FY 04 tuition rates.
Page 99.
16.
Allocation.
a.
Approval of the first quarter FY 04 distribution of Motor Fuel Assessment
funds to the University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University. Page
119.
b.
Approval of Resident Teacher Professional Development funds distribution.
Page 123.
EXECUTIVE
17.
Economic Development Generating Excellence (EDGE). Report on project. Page
127.
18.
Public Higher Education Needs Assessment. Approval of plan to proceed with
higher education needs assessments and communications. Page 129.
19.
State Regents’ Work Plan. Approval of addition to the 2003-2004 State Regents’
Work Plan. Page 133.
20.
State Regents’ Meetings. Approval of 2004 State Regents’ meeting dates and
authorization to file with the Secretary of State in accordance with the Open Meeting
Act. Page 137.
21.
Grants. Acceptance of external funds. Page 139.
22.
Commendations and Agency Sponsored Events. Recognition of State Regents’ staff
for service and recognitions on state and national projects and ratification of agency
sponsored events. Page 141.
CONSENT DOCKET
23.
Consent Docket. Approval/ratification of the following routine requests which are
consistent with State Regents' policies and procedures or previous actions.
a.
Programs.
b.
(1)
Approval of institutional requests for program modifications. Page
145.
(2)
Ratification of institutional requests for program modifications. Page
147.
(3)
Ratification of institutional requests for program suspensions. Page
149.
(4)
Approval of institutional request for degree program inventory
reconciliation. Page 151.
Electronic Media.
(1)
Redlands Community College. Approval of request to offer existing
degree programs via electronic delivery. Page 159.
(2)
Tulsa Community College. Approval of request to offer existing
degree programs via electronic delivery. Page 161.
(3)
Cameron University. Approval of request to extend the best practices
review schedule for existing degree programs. Page 163.
(4)
Southern Regional Electronic Campus. Ratification of approved course
offerings. Page 165.
c.
Cooperative Agreements. Ratification of approved cooperative agreements.
Page 169.
d.
Administrative Procedures Act.
(1)
Minority Teacher Recruitment Center.
rules. Page 171.
Adoption of amendment to
(2)
Regents Education Program. Approval of revised administrative rules
and continuation of rule revocation process. Page 175.
e.
Capital. Ratification of capital allotments. Page 181.
f.
Agency Operations.
(1)
Ratification of purchases of $25,000 and above. Page 187.
(2)
Purchasing Policy. Approval of modification of purchasing policy
relating to a Guaranteed Student Loan Program contract. Page 195.
(3)
Approval of changes to Personnel Policies and Procedures. Page 197.
(4)
Ratification of changes at or above director level. Page 205.
(5)
g.
h.
Approval of Data Access and Management Policy. Page 207
Contract/Agreement.
(1)
Ratification of FY 04 agreement with the State Department of Career
and Technology Education. Page 215.
(2)
Ratification of agreement with the Office of Accountability. Page 221.
Grants. Allocation of Minority Teacher Recruitment Center funds. Page 228.1
24.
Reports. Acceptance of reports listed on Attachment "A."
25.
Report of the Chancellor. (No Action, No Discussion).
26.
Report of the Chairman. (No Action, No Discussion).
27.
Report of the Committees. (No Action, No Discussion).
a.
Academic Affairs and Social Justice and Student Services Committees
b.
Budget and Audit Committee.
c.
Strategic Planning and Personnel Committee.
d.
Technology Committee.
28.
Students. Recognition of new Student Advisory Board member.
29.
New Business. Consideration of "any matter not known about or which could not have
been reasonably foreseen prior to the time of posting the agenda."
30.
Announcement of Next Regular Meeting--9 a.m., Thursday, October 30, 2003, at
the State Regents’ Office.
31.
Adjournment.
ATTACHMENT "A"
24 .
Reports.
a.
b.
Programs.
(1)
Annual report on program requests. Page 229.
(2)
Status report on program requests. Page 241.
Annual Reports.
(1)
Heartland Scholarship Year-End Report, 2002-03. Page 249.
(2)
Deleted Item. Page 251.
(3)
Student Cost Survey, FY 04. Page 253.
(4)
Tuition and Fees Book. Page 255.
(5)
Regents Education Program. Page 257.
c.
Teacher Education.
Update on Oklahoma
Program(OTEP) Title II grant activities. Page 259.
Teacher
Enhancement
d.
Correspondence. Communications regarding State Regents’ May allocation cut
action. Page 263.
e.
Publications. Page 269
NOTE: The State Regents will meet socially on September 11 on the campus of the University
of Oklahoma as follows: 6 p.m. reception at Boyd House, 7 p.m. dinner at Oklahoma Museum
of Natural History, immediately after dinner for coffee at Bell Court Room. There will be no
action or discussion of State Regents’ business.
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM # 4-a:
Policy - Institution
SUBJECT:
University of Oklahoma (OU). Approval of request to require a higher
minimum score on the International English Language Testing System (IELTS)
examination for admission of students for whom English is a Second Language.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that OU be permitted to adopt higher standards in
accordance with the “Policy Statement on Admission of Students for Whom
English is a Second Language,” requiring a higher minimum score on the
International English Language Testing System (IELTS) examination.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents adopted the ESL Policy in May 1979 to facilitate the success of students
whose primary language is not English. In March 1983 and again in September 1992 the State
Regents authorized OU to adopt higher standards for both undergraduate and graduate
admission under the ESL Policy.
At the May 30, 2003 meeting, the State Regents authorized the addition of the IELTS exam to
the ESL policy as an alternative for admission. Previously, only the Test of English as a
Foreign Language (TOEFL) was accepted for admission.
POLICY ISSUES:
The ESL Policy requires undergraduate students to demonstrate competency in English in one
of the following ways:
1. Standardized Testing – Score 500 or higher on the TOEFL or 6.0 or higher on the
IELTS;
2. Intensive English Program (IEP) – Score a 460 or higher on the TOEFL or 5.0 or
higher on the IELTS and immediately prior to admission successfully complete a
minimum of 12 weeks of study at an IEP approved by the State Regents;
3. High School Performance – Complete the high school core requirements in an
English-speaking high school and demonstrate competency through the State Regents’
“Policy on Remediation and Removal of High School Curricular Deficiencies;” or
4. Institutional Discretion – In extraordinary and deserving cases, the president of the
institution or his/her designee may admit a student who fails to meet the above
requirements if proficiency has been demonstrated in some other way prior to
admission.
1
Graduate students may demonstrate competency in one of the following ways:
1. Standardized Testing – Score 550 or higher on the TOEFL or 6.5 or higher on the
IELTS;
2. IEP – Score a 500 or higher on the TOEFL or a 5.5 or higher on the IELTS and
immediately prior to admission successfully complete a minimum of 12 weeks of study
at an IEP approved by the State Regents;
3. College Performance – Earned a baccalaureate or graduate degree from an accredited,
English-speaking college or university; or
4. Institutional Discretion – In extraordinary and deserving cases, the president of the
institution or his/her designee may admit a student who fails to meet the above
requirements if proficiency has been demonstrated in some other way prior to
admission.
Transfer students may demonstrate proficiency by passing at least 24 semester college credit
hours at an accredited, English-speaking college or university before admission to a State
System institution.
According to policy, institutions may not waive these requirements and may set higher
standards with State Regents’ approval.
ANALYSIS:
The proposed change allows OU to require a score of 6.5 on the IELTS for regular admission of
undergraduate students and a score of 5.5 on the IELTS for admission for undergraduate
students who successfully complete 12 weeks of study at an IEP approved by the State Regents.
The request for higher standards is consistent with OU’s higher standards on the TOEFL
previously approved by the State Regents. OU has not requested increased standards for
graduate students since the minimum IELTS required by the policy is consistent with OU’s
current standards for the TOEFL. Approval of this request will ensure that undergraduate
students at OU have the same level of competency whether they demonstrate English
proficiency through the TOEFL or the IELTS.
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OU’s request to adopt increased minimum
IELTS scores for undergraduate students. The proposed higher standards will become effective
upon State Regents’ approval.
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM # 4-b:
Policy - Institution
SUBJECT:
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College (NEOAMC).
Approval of
modifications to NEOAMC’s assessment of students admitted under the adult
admission category.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve NEOAMC’s request for
modification to the assessment of students admitted under the adult
admission category of the “Policy Statement on Admission To, Retention In,
and Transfer Among Colleges and Universities of the State System.”
BACKGROUND:
In 1990, the State Regents approved revisions to the Admission Policy allowing students who
are 21 years of age or older or on active military duty to be admitted based on criteria
established at the campus level and approved by the State Regents. In 1991, the State Regents
approved NEOAMC’s criteria for adult student admission, requiring adult students to submit
ACT scores as part of the admission process.
Also in 1991, the State Regents adopted the “Policy Statement on the Assessment of Students
for Purposes of Instructional Improvement and State System Accountability,” which requires
institutions to adopt policies for assessment at four levels: entry-level, mid-level, program
outcomes, and student satisfaction. In 1993, the State Regents approved changes to the
Assessment Policy requiring institutions to use an established minimum ACT score in certain
subjects for entry-level assessment. The revisions included a footnote that students admitted
under the special admission adult provision may be exempt from this requirement.
POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Admission To, Retention In, and Transfer Among
Colleges and Universities of the State System” allows institutions to establish criteria at the
campus level for the admission of students who are over 21 years of age or on active military
duty based on the probability of the academic success of the student.
The State Regents’ “Policy Statement on the Assessment of Students for Purposes of
Instructional Improvement and State System Accountability” establishes the criteria to be used
in the assessment of students at various levels.
3
ANALYSIS:
Currently, NEOAMC students whose ACT scores are below the established cut scores
participate in secondary testing using the nationally established College Placement Tests (CPT).
NEOAMC has administered the CPT to adult students for approximately 10 years and has
determined that the CPT has adequately demonstrated proficiency in the curricular areas for
adult students.
The proposed revision allows NEOAMC to assess adult students aged 21 or older solely on the
results of the CPT. Adult students who choose to submit ACT scores will continue to be
assessed following the currently established criteria. The revision is consistent with policy,
which allows institutions to set the criteria for adults at the campus level with State Regents’
approval.
It is recommended that the State Regents approve NEOAMC’s request to modify its policy on
the assessment of adult students, effective upon State Regents approval.
4
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #5-a:
Programs
SUBJECT:
University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center (OUHSC). Approval of
request to offer the Certificate in Public Health (includes electronic delivery).
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OUHSC’s request to
offer the Certificate in Public Health, pending approval by its governing
board, with the stipulation that continuation of the degree program
beyond fall 2005 will depend upon meeting the criteria established by the
institution and approved by the State Regents. Specifically, the degree
program will enroll a minimum of 40 majors in fall 2004 and graduate a
minimum of 20 students in 2004-05. Continuation of electronic delivery
authorization beyond spring 2005 will depend upon the successful
completion of a “best practices” review prior to December 31, 2004.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
OUHSC’s last Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities (OUHSC’s 2002-03
Academic Plan has not been received):
•
•
•
•
recruiting high quality applicants for undergraduate medical programs;
including critical thinking (research and problem-solving) opportunities in the
undergraduate medical curriculum;
increasing the number of primary care physicians; and
strengthening the existing residency programs.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, OUHSC has deleted 12 degree programs.
Program Review
OUHSC offers 56 degree or certificate programs (7 baccalaureate, 23 master’s-level, 15
doctoral, 9 first professional, and 2 certificate programs), all of which were reviewed in the past
five years with the exception of those programs receiving specialty accreditation. For programs
receiving specialty accreditation, OUHSC aligns its program review schedule with the
accreditation cycles, so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an
5
accreditation visit. Thus, if a professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would
not be reviewed for ten years, which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
OUHSC faculty developed the proposal, which will be reviewed and approved by institutional
officials and OUHSC’s governing board on September 10, 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval,”
“Standards of Education Relating to Credit for Extrainstitutional Learning,” and “Policies and
Procedures Pertaining to the Delivery of Electronically Delivered and Traditional Off-Campus
Courses and Programs.” The Electronic Media Policy calls for a two-step approval process.
Evidence of specified quality criteria must be provided at the time of the initial request, with
provisional approval granted if the criteria are addressed satisfactorily. Following provisional
approval, the institution must conduct a “best practice” review that provides quantitative and
qualitative analysis of the electronic media offerings through a rigorous review of exemplary
programs from other institutions. Final approval will depend on the results of this review.
Consistent with revisions to the Electronic Media Policy approved at the State Regents’ May
30, 2003 meeting, once an institution has successfully completed a best practice review process
and received final approval of an electronic delivery program, separate reviews will not be
required to offer additional existing programs via electronic media.
ANALYSIS:
Certificate in Public Health
Program purpose. The proposed program will serve individuals who can benefit from formal
public health instruction beyond the baccalaureate level, but for whom the Master of Public
Health degree is either not desirable or necessary for their career path.
Program rationale/background. OUHSC has been approached by state agencies, especially
the Oklahoma State Department of Health, to provide educational opportunities to working
professionals in public heath positions. It is estimated that 30 percent of the state’s public
health employees will be eligible for retirement within the five to seven years, so this program
will provide a means to prepare and sustain a qualified public health workforce in the future.
Employment opportunities. The proposed program will prepare professionals currently
working in public health areas, as well as prepare students to continue into the Master of Public
Health program at OUHSC. The Oklahoma State Department of Health is expected to be the
primary supplier of students for this program from current employees, so these employees
would be prepared to move into management level roles. Opportunities for graduates will also
be found in Native American public health organizations. The graying of public health officials
is not unique to Oklahoma, so there are opportunities for graduates outside of the state as well.
Student demand. The new program is expected to enroll a minimum of 25 majors in fall 2004
and graduate a minimum of 20 students in 2004-05.
6
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. No similar programs exist in Oklahoma.
Curriculum. The proposed graduate certificate program consists of 18 total credit hours from
the College of Public Health (Attachment A). No new courses will be added.
Faculty and staff. Existing faculty will teach the proposed program. All faculty involved in
distance delivery have had the necessary training and experience to provide instruction in this
format.
Support services. The library, facilities, and equipment are adequate to support the proposed
curriculum, including the use of interactive video. Additionally, the University has unlimited
site licenses for WebCT and BlackBoard, which are housed on a server with 24/7 technical
support. Technical support is also provided through three full-time Information Technology
support personnel and one instructional design staff member within the College of Allied
Health. Additionally, students have electronic access 24 hour per day, 7 days per week to the
OUHSC’s Robert M. Bird Library.
Financing. Since the proposed program will use existing resources and internally reallocated
funds, no additional costs are expected.
Electronic delivery authorization. As outlined in the Electronic Media Policy, OUHSC will
undergo a rigorous “best practice” review during the first two years of the program’s online
offering. Continuation of the electronic delivery beyond spring 2005 will depend on the results
of the review.
Attachment
7
ATTACHMENT A
UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA HEALTH SCIENCES CENTER
CERTIFICATE IN PUBLIC HEALTH
Course Requirements
BSE 5103 Introduction to Biostatistics
BSE 5113 Principles of Epidemiology
HPS 5213 Social and Behavioral Sciences in Public Health
OEH 5013 Environmental Health
HAP 5453 U.S. Health Care System
CHP 7003 Integrated Public Health Practice
18 Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
CERTIFICATE PROGRAM TOTAL
18 Credit Hours
Admission Requirements for the Program:
Students who meet the following criteria will be eligible for admission to the program:
ƒ Hold a baccalaureate degree or equivalent from an accredited institution of higher education
with a grade point average of 3.00 or greater in the last 60 hours of course work applied to
the undergraduate degree OR
ƒ Completion of an entry level professional degree from an accredited institution with a
cumulative grade point average of 3.00 or greater;
ƒ Admission standards for the Master of Public Health degree program will apply to students
in the certificate program.
8
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #5-b:
Programs
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City (OSU-OKC). Approval of
request to offer the Associate in Applied Science in Health Technology.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OSU-OKC’s request to
offer the Associate in Applied Science in Health Technology with the
stipulation that continuation of the program beyond fall 2006 will depend
upon meeting the criteria established by the institution and approved by
the State Regents, specifically, the program will enroll a minimum of 18
majors in fall 2006 and will graduate a minimum of 8 students in 2006-07.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
OSU-OKC’s Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
improving quality of the teaching/learning process;
continuing improvement of instructional assessment;
continuing efforts to improve faculty diversity and full-time/adjunct ratio;
being identified as THE learning centered institution;
providing resources necessary for effective distance learning programs;
enhancing articulation/cooperative agreements with area Career Technology
Centers and developing new areas of collaboration with area businesses; and
developing strong linkages and partnerships.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, OSU-OKC has deleted 28 degree programs.
Program Review
OSU-OKC offers 49 degree and certificate programs (7 associate, 27 associate in applied
science, and 15 certificates), all of which were reviewed in the past five years with the
exception of those programs receiving specialty accreditation. For programs receiving specialty
accreditation, OSU-OKC aligns its program review schedule with the accreditation cycles, so
that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an accreditation visit. Thus, if a
9
professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be reviewed for ten years,
which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
OSU-OKC faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional
officials and OSU-OKC’s governing board.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval” and
“Standards of Education Relating to Credit for Extrainstitutional Learning.”
ANALYSIS:
Associate in Applied Science in Health Technology
Program purpose. The proposed program will provide an opportunity for individuals who
have attained national certification in various allied health technology fields, such as respiratory
therapy, radiologic technology, etc., to complete an associate in applied science degree. The
proposed program will enable students to enhance their management skills, increase their
understanding of workforce and accreditation/approval issues, and strengthen their potential
value to employers.
Program rationale/background. The proposed degree program is designed primarily to
address the needs of working adult students by articulating educational experience, as verified
by national certification examinations, into an associate in applied science degree.
Employment opportunities. The proposed program targets working adults who are interested
in furthering their careers through additional education. Opportunities for healthcare workers to
move into management and supervisory positions are enhanced by holding an academic degree
in addition to a national certification or license.
Student demand. The proposed program is expected to enroll a minimum of 18 majors in fall
2006 and graduate a minimum of 8 students in 2006-07.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. Currently, no State System institution offers a
degree in general health technology.
Curriculum. The proposed degree program consists of 60 total credit hours, including 18
credit hours of general education, 30 credit hours in the major core, and 12 credit hours of
guided electives. Attachment A details the proposed curriculum, including nine new courses
(asterisked) for which up to 30 credit hours may be awarded for national certifications in
accordance with the State Regents’ Extrainstitutional Learning Policy.
Faculty and staff. No additional faculty will be required.
Support services. The libraries, facilities, and equipment are adequate.
10
Financing. No additional funds are required; existing state resources and reallocation of
internal funds will finance the program.
Attachment
11
ATTACHMENT A
OKLAHOMA STATE UNIVERSITY – OKLAHOMA CITY
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE IN HEALTH TECHNOLOGY
General Education Requirements
ENGL 1113
Freshman Composition I
POLS 1113
American Government
HIST 1483
U.S. History up to 1865
or
HIST 1493
U.S. History since 1865
ENGL 1213
Freshman Composition II
or
SPCH 1113
Introduction to Speech Communication
or
ENGL 2333
Technical Report Writing
PSYC 1113
Introductory Psychology
SOC 1113
Introductory Sociology
18 Credit Hours
3
3
Technical-Occupational Specialty – Major Core
(Up to 30 credit hours may be awarded for National Certification)
*HTEC 1002 Fundamentals of Health Care Technology
*HTEC 1013 Legal Issues Related to Health Care Technology
*HTEC 1023 Ethical Issues Related to Health Care Technology
*HTEC 1102 Health Care Equipment Safety
*HTEC 1112 Health Care Provider Safety
*HTEC 1320 Health Care Applications
*HTEC 2150 Clinical Laboratory
*HTEC 2122 Professional Issues Related to Health Care Technology
*HTEC 2350 Health Care Internship
30 Credit Hours
Technical-Occupational Support - Guided Electives
These courses must to the specialty courses above and must be selected with the
approval of the department head. The following courses are suggested:
BIOL 1012
Medical Terminology
BIOL 1515
Human Anatomy and Physiology
CIS 1113
Computer Concepts with Application
QA 1833
Introduction to Total Quality
QM 1113
Team Building and Continuous Process Improvement
HCM 1143
Health Care Systems/Operations
HCM 1153
Medicolegal Principles and Ethical Issues
HCM 2163
Health Care Management
HCM 2173
Health Care Human Resources Management
12 Credit Hours
Total to Graduate
60 Credit Hours
* New Courses
12
3
3
3
3
2
3
3
2
2
1-6
1-6
2
1-6
2
5
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #5-c:
Programs
SUBJECT:
Eastern Oklahoma State College (EOSC). Approval of request to offer the
Certificate in Surgical Technology.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve EOSC’s request to offer
the Certificate in Surgical Technology with the stipulation that
continuation of the program beyond fall 2006 will depend upon meeting
the criteria established by the institution and approved by the State
Regents. Specifically, the program will enroll a minimum of 10 majors in
fall 2005 and will graduate a minimum of 5 students in 2005-06.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
EOSC’s 2002-03 Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
•
•
•
•
improving retention rates;
increasing enrollment in associate in applied science programs;
utilizing assessment data effectively;
enhancing the developmental studies program to improve skill levels of incoming freshmen;
and
developing two to six new programs, including Allied Health.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, EOSC has deleted 25 degree programs.
Program Review
EOSC offers 32 degree programs (9 associate in applied science and 23 associate in
arts/science) and 2 certificate programs, all of which were reviewed in the past five years with
the exception of those programs receiving specialty accreditation. For programs receiving
specialty accreditation, EOSC aligns its program review schedule with the accreditation cycles,
so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an accreditation visit. Thus, if a
professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be reviewed for ten years,
which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
13
Program Development Process
EOSC faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional
officials, including members of the Curriculum Committee, and EOSC’s governing board.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
Certificate in Surgical Technology
Program purpose. The program will prepare students to take the Liaison Council on
Certification for the Surgical Technologist’s (LCC-ST) examination, a national certification
examination, and for immediate employment as surgical technologists.
Program rationale/background. In May 2003, a needs assessment was conducted by EOSC
indicating a demand for qualified surgical technologists in southeastern Oklahoma. EOSC
surveyed 15 area hospitals in eight southeastern Oklahoma counties (Pittsburg, McCurtain,
Latimer, Le Flore, Choctaw, Pushmataha, Haskell, and McIntosh). Thirteen of the 15 hospitals
responded to the survey, and eight of the respondents indicated they had unfilled surgical
technologist positions. All 13 hospitals indicated support of establishing a surgical technology
program at EOSC.
Currently, area students who desire surgical technology training must travel to Wes Watkins
Technology Center in Wetumka, which is more than 75 miles from Wilburton and
approximately 45 miles northwest of EOSC’s branch campus in McAlester. The proposed
program, with classes to be held at EOSC’s McAlester branch campus and laboratory/clinical
work offered at the Choctaw Nation Indian Health Center (CNIHC) in Talihina, will provide
increased opportunity for students and meet the needs of hospitals in southeastern Oklahoma.
Realizing the shortage of certified surgical technologists in southeastern Oklahoma, McAlester
Regional Health Center and CNIHC have each pledged $40,000 annually to support this
program.
Employment opportunities. Graduates will be prepared for employment as surgical
technologists in labor and delivery, emergency departments, inpatient/outpatient surgical
centers, dialysis units, physicians’ offices, and central supply processing units. The needs
assessment indicated a lack of qualified employees for unfilled surgical technologist positions.
Hospitals in the eight counties surveyed will provide many employment opportunities for
graduates of the program.
Student demand. The minimum productivity criteria for program continuation are: 1) enroll
10 majors by fall 2005 and 2) graduate 5 students by 2005-06. At program maturity, EOSC
expects to enroll over 50 majors and graduate over 20 students each year.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. There are no other certificate programs in surgical
technology offered in the State System, and the three existing associate in applied science
14
programs are offered in other areas of the state at Northern Oklahoma College, Tulsa
Community College, and Oklahoma City Community College. Therefore, approval of this
program will not constitute unnecessary duplication.
Curriculum. The proposed program consists of 42 credit hours. Attachment A details the
proposed curriculum, including 10 new courses (asterisked). Because program accreditation is
required for students to sit for the LCC-ST examination, the Commission on Accreditation of
Allied Health Education Programs will conduct its accreditation evaluation prior to graduation
of the first group of program completers.
Faculty and staff. A full-time coordinator will be hired with responsibilities in teaching,
maintaining clinical sites, recruitment, curriculum development, and accreditation activities.
Support services. Existing facilities at the McAlester branch campus will accommodate
classroom activities, with laboratory experience planned at the CNIHC in Talihina. A new
facility under construction at the McAlester campus will provide additional classrooms and
laboratory space for allied health programs. Additional resources for clinical and laboratory
experiences exist at the McAlester Regional Health Center. Library and equipment resources to
be purchased will adequately support the program.
Financing. The proposed program will require $91,000 annually, including $5,000 for
equipment in the first year. McAlester Regional Health Center and CNIHC will provide
$80,000 annually, with the remainder to be financed through student tuition.
Attachment
15
ATTACHMENT A
EASTERN OKLAHOMA STATE COLLEGE
CERTIFICATE IN SURGICAL TECHNOLOGY
Fall Semester
Hours
CIS
*ST
ST
ST
*ST
ST
*ST
1113
1011
1114
1122
1212
1123
1223
Credit
Computer Applications
Orientation to Surgical Technology
Basic Anatomy & Physiology
Medical Terminology
Surgical Pharmacology
Introduction to Microbiology
Introduction to Surgical Tech
TOTAL
Spring Semester
Hours
*ST
*ST
*ST
*ST
*ST
1343
1323
1334
1613
1623
Aseptic Technique & Skills
Surgical Patient Care & Skills
Supplies, Equipment & Skills
Surgical Procedure I
Surgical Tech Clinical Practicum I
Summer
Hours
1644
1634
18 hours
Credit
TOTAL
*ST
*ST
3 hours
1 hour
4 hours
2 hours
2 hours
3 hours
3 hours
3 hours
3 hours
4 hours
3 hours
3 hours
16 hours
Credit
Surgical Tech Clinical Practicum II
Surgical Procedures II
TOTAL
* Denotes new courses added specific to the program
16
4 hours
4 hours
8 hours
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2002
AGENDA ITEM #5-d:
Programs
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC). Approval of request to offer the
Certificate in Cyber/Information Security, Associate in Applied Science in
Cyber/Information Security, and Associate in Science in Cyber/Information
Security.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve OCCC’s request to offer
the Certificate in Cyber/Information Security, Associate in Applied
Science in Cyber/Information Security, and Associate in Science in
Cyber/Information Security with the stipulation that continuation of the
programs beyond fall 2007 will depend upon meeting the criteria
established by the institution and approved by the State Regents, as
detailed below.
•
Certificate in Cyber/Information Security. Continuation beyond fall
2007 will depend upon:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 10 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 10 students in 2006-07
•
Associate in Applied Science in Cyber/Information
Continuation beyond fall 2007 will depend upon:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 18 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 5 students in 2006-07
•
Associate in Science in Cyber/Information Security.
beyond fall 2007 will depend upon:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 25 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 5 students in 2006-07
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
OCCC’s 2002-03 Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
implementing the Integris Health LPN to RN track;
17
Security.
Continuation
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
implementing the ACDelco Knowledge Center;
expanding high-tech student services using Web Advisor;
increasing credit enrollments by 7 percent;
increasing student retention rates to above the national average for peer institutions;
increasing the number of graduates by 10 percent;
demonstrating student competencies of remedial, general education, and transfer
students;
attaining or exceeding national average pass rates for students taking national licensure
exams;
increasing the number of programs with global awareness components; and
earning student satisfaction ratings above the national average for peer institutions.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, OCCC has deleted 32 degree programs.
Program Review
OCCC offers 43 degree programs (22 associate in applied science and 21 associate in
arts/science) and 23 certificate programs, all of which were reviewed in the past five years with
the exception of those programs receiving specialty accreditation. For programs receiving
specialty accreditation, OCCC aligns its program review schedule with the accreditation cycles,
so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing for an accreditation visit. Thus, if a
professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not be reviewed for ten years,
which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
OCCC faculty developed the proposals, which were reviewed and approved by institutional
officials and OCCC’s governing board.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
Certificate in Cyber/Information Security
Associate in Applied Science in Cyber/Information Security
Associate in Science in Cyber/Information Security
Program purpose. The programs will prepare students for employment in a variety of
information technology related fields including telecommunications, networking, programming,
and operations. Students will be prepared in general security concepts, communications
security, infrastructure security, basics of cryptography, and operational/organizational security.
Program rationale/background. OCCC was asked by the University of Tulsa to become
partners in the Oklahoma Cyber Security Education Consortium, which includes the University
of Tulsa, Tulsa Community College, Rose State College, and the Oklahoma Career Technology
18
Centers. OCCC and the consortium are working to increase cyber/information security
education opportunities in the Oklahoma City metropolitan area.
Employment opportunities. Daily, there are news reports of cyber threats, denial of service,
viruses/worms, hacking, electronic fraud, and other cyber/information security issues. The
University of Tulsa estimates a shortage of 37,000 qualified workers to combat these major
problems in an information society. Oklahoma businesses/agencies in need of a qualified
cyber/information security workforce include state and local government agencies, federal and
military agencies, as well as private and corporate businesses. In the Oklahoma City area, the
Federal Aviation Administration and Tinker Air Force Base are prime examples of agencies that
would have interest in graduates of these programs.
Student demand. The minimum productivity criteria for program continuation beyond fall
2007 are:
• Certificate in Cyber/Information Security:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 10 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 10 students in 2006-07
•
Associate in Applied Science in Cyber/Information Security:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 18 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 5 students in 2006-07
•
Associate in Science in Cyber/Information Security:
Majors enrolled: a minimum of 25 students in fall 2006
Graduates: a minimum of 5 students in 2006-07
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. Tulsa Community College offers a certificate and
associate in applied science in information security, however, due to the distance between
institutions, approval of these programs will not constitute unnecessary duplication. In addition,
OCCC was invited to become involved in this emerging field to meet the increasing demand for
programs in the Oklahoma City area.
Curriculum. The proposed programs will be structured as follows:
• Certificate in Cyber/Information Security. 15 credit hours in cyber/information
security core and 27 credit hours in computer science for a total of 42 credit hours.
Attachment A details the proposed curriculum including five new courses (asterisked).
• Associate in Applied Science in Cyber/Information Security. 15 credit hours in
cyber/information security core, 27 credit hours in computer science, and 19 credit
hours in general education courses for a total of 61 credit hours. Attachment B details
the proposed curriculum including five new courses (asterisked) (same courses as for
the certificate).
• Associate in Science in Cyber/Information Security. 15 credit hours in computer
science, 3 hours in cyber/information security, and 43-44 hours in general education
courses for a total of 61-62 credit hours. Attachment C details the proposed curriculum
including one additional new course (asterisked).
Faculty and staff. A program director/faculty member will be hired for the program. This
staff member will have a master’s degree with 18 graduate hours in computer science or
19
telecommunications or a directly related field; two years of professional work experience in the
computer or telecommunications or information security industry; and possess one or more of
the following certifications: A+, Network+, Security + or other security certification, Cisco
CCNA, and/or CCNP certification. She/he will have experience in teaching computer science,
telecommunications or a directly related subject at the secondary level or higher. Other staff
support is sufficient.
Support services. Existing facilities and library materials are adequate to support the program
initially. Additional funds will be allocated to increase the printed and electronic resource
material related to information technology. OCCC will use reallocated internal funds to
purchase new equipment, software and supplies to support the new program.
Financing. OCCC expects the first year costs of the program to total $211,000, which will
come from reallocation of internal funds. OCCC is committed to internal evaluation of
programs and directing resources to new programs or successful current programs. No new
funds are requested with the new program proposal.
Attachments
20
ATTACHMENT A
OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CERTIFICATE IN CYBER/INFORMATION SECURITY
Semester hours General Education: 0
Semester Hours in Major: 42
Semester Hours Support: 0
Semester Hours Electives: 0
Semester Hours – Total: 42
c
CS 1103
c
CS 1143
c
CS 1153
c
CS 1353
c
CS 1413
c
CS 2153
c
CS 2163
c
CS 2503
c
CS 2303
* cISEC 2513
* cISEC 2523
* cISEC 2543
* cISEC 2563
* cISEC 2583
CURRICULUM LISTING
Major Courses
Introduction to Computers and Applications1
Beginning Programming
Introduction to Computing Technologies
Microcomputer Operating Systems2
Microcomputer Technology2
Windows Support3
Java
Network Administration3
Local Area Networking4
Principles of Information Assurance
Secure Electronic Commerce
Network and Operating Systems Security
Enterprise Security Management
Cyber Forensics
Total Credit Hours:
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
42
* Denotes new courses added.
1
2
3
4
c
Advanced Standing is available
A+ Certification courses
Preparatory course for MCP certification through Microsoft that can apply toward MCSA and/or MCSE
Network+ Certification courses
A grade of “C” or higher must be achieved
21
ATTACHMENT B
OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ASSOCIATE IN APPLIED SCIENCE IN CYBER/INFORMATION SECURITY
c
CS 1103
CS 1143
c
CS 1153
c
CS 1353
c
CS 1413
c
CS 2153
c
CS 2163
c
CS 2503
c
CS 2303
* cISEC 2513
* cISEC 2523
* cISEC 2543
* cISEC 2563
* cISEC 2583
c
Semester hours General Education: 19
Semester Hours in Major: 42
Semester Hours Support: 0
Semester Hours Electives: 0
Semester Hours – Total: 61
CURRICULUM LISTING
Major Courses
Introduction to Computers and Applications1
Beginning Programming
Introduction to Computing Technologies
Microcomputer Operating Systems2
Microcomputer Technology2
Windows Support3
Java
Network Administration3
Local Area Networking4
Principles of Information Assurance
Secure Electronic Commerce
Network and Operating Systems Security
Enterprise Security Management
Cyber Forensics
Sub-total:
General Education Courses
ENGL 1113
English Composition
HIST 1483
U.S. History to the Civil War
or
HIST 1493
U.S. History since the Civil War
MATH 1503 Contemporary Mathematics
PHYS 1014
Physical Science
POLSC 1113 American Federal Government
† Any OSRHE approved General Education communication course
Sub-total:
Total Credit Hours:
1
2
3
4
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
3
42
Credit Hours
3
3
3
4
3
3
19
61
Advanced Standing is available
A+ Certification courses
Preparatory course for MCP certification through Microsoft that can apply toward MCSA and/or MCSE
Network+ Certification courses
c
A grade of “C” or higher must be achieved
† OSRHE approved General Education communications courses: ENGL 1213, ENGL 1233, COM 1123, COM
2213
* Denotes new courses added.
22
ATTACHMENT C
OKLAHOMA CITY COMMUNITY COLLEGE
ASSOCIATE IN SCIENCE IN CYBER/INFORMATION SECURITY
c
CS 1143
c
CS 2163
c
CS 2363
c
CS 2453
c
CS 2463
* cISEC 1103
Semester hours General Education: 43-44
Semester Hours in Major: 18
Semester Hours Support: 0
Semester Hours Electives: 0
Semester Hours – Total: 61-62
CURRICULUM LISTING
Major Courses
Beginning Programming
Java
C++
Visual Basic
Advanced Java
Introduction Cyber/Information Security
Sub-total:
General Education Courses
COM 1123
Interpersonal Communications
or
COM 2213
Public Address
ENGL 1113
English Composition
ENGL 1213
Composition and Literature
HIST 1483
U.S. History to the Civil War
or
HIST 1493
U.S. History since the Civil War
Humanities Electives
MATH 1513 College Algebra
MATH 1613 Trigonometry
MATH 2103 Calculus and Analytical Geometry I
MATH 2203 Calculus and Analytical Geometry II
POLSC 1113 American Federal Government
PSY 1113
Introduction to Psychology
or
SOC 1113
Introduction to Sociology
†
Any Physical Science chosen from ASTR, PHS, CHEM, or GEOL prefixes
†
Any of the following Biological Science courses:
BIO 1113, BIO 1114, BIO 2114, BIO 2125, BIO 2215, BIO 2343, or BIO
2404
Sub-total:
Total Credit Hours:
* Denotes new courses added.
†
At least one science course must include a laboratory component
23
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
3
3
18
Credit Hours
3
3
3
3
6
3
3
3
3
3
3
3-4
3-4
43-44
61-62
24
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #5-e:
Programs
SUBJECT:
Tulsa Community College (TCC).
Management Leadership.
Approval of request to offer the Certificate in
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve TCC’s request to offer the
Certificate in Management Leadership with the stipulation that continuation of the
program will depend upon meeting the criteria established by the institution and
approved by the State Regents. Specifically, the program will enroll a minimum of
12 majors in fall 2004 and will graduate a minimum of 8 students in 2004-05.
BACKGROUND:
Academic Plan
TCC’s Academic Plan lists the following institutional priorities:
•
•
•
•
•
developing and assessing courses/programs for workforce development;
providing a state-of-the-art learning environment;
assessing student learning;
designing and implementing professional development to increase student learning; and
meeting student learning needs in a variety of settings.
APRA Implementation
Since 1991-92, TCC has deleted 58 degree and/or certificate programs.
Program Review
TCC offers 106 degree and certificate programs (24 associate, 47 associate in applied science, and 35
certificates), all of which were reviewed in the past five years with the exception of those programs
receiving specialty accreditation. For programs receiving specialty accreditation, TCC aligns its program
review schedule with the accreditation cycles, so that programs are reviewed when faculty are preparing
for an accreditation visit. Thus, if a professional program received a ten-year accreditation, it would not
be reviewed for ten years, which is an approved exception to State Regents’ policy.
Program Development Process
TCC faculty developed the proposal, which was reviewed and approved by institutional officials and
TCC’s governing board.
25
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
Certificate in Management Leadership
Program purpose. The proposed program will provide students the skills for successful careers in
management with abilities in communicating, decision making, organizing, motivating, leadership,
human relations, and group processes. The program will provide practical experience through an
internship assignment, and an understanding of the human factors of management including recruitment,
interviewing, testing, training, and performance appraisal. TCC will meet the needs of local business and
industry by offering the program in an accelerated format.
Program rationale/background. This program is in response to requests from local business and
industry leaders for a concentrated, accelerated certificate in management.
Employment opportunities. Local business and industry leaders requested an accelerated program for
current employees to gain management skills.
Student demand. The proposed program is expected to enroll 12 majors in fall 2004 and graduate 8
students in 2004-05.
Duplication/Impact on existing programs. TCC currently offers the Certificate in Management (193),
consisting of 24 credit hours, which incorporates accounting, computer science, and English in the
curriculum, contrary to the proposed certificate, which will focus solely on management leadership.
Oklahoma City Community College offers a certificate in a mid-management field; however, OCCC has
requested deletion of this program (see Program Deletion agenda item). Due to the differences in the foci
of the current certificates and OCCC’s request to delete its certificate, approval will not constitute
unnecessary duplication.
Curriculum. The proposed certificate program consists of 18 credit hours in management utilizing
courses from the existing Certificate in Management (193), and no new courses will be added.
The
program will be offered at the Northeast and Southeast Campuses, and on-site at corporations and
organization in the greater Tulsa area. The core management courses are delivered in a five-week
accelerated seminar format, and the internship course is completed simultaneously within the traditional
sixteen-week semester.
Faculty and staff. Existing full-time and adjunct TCC faculty will teach the courses in this program.
Support services. The library, facilities, and equipment are adequate.
Financing. No new funds are required.
Attachment
26
ATTACHMENT A
TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
CERTIFICATE IN MANAGEMENT LEADERSHIP
Certificate Requirements
Module 1
MGT 1353
MGT 1343
MGT 1373
Module 2
MGT 2323
MGT 2303
MGT 2353
MGT 2123
Credit Hours
Management Essentials
Management Internship I
Human Resources Management
3
3
3
Organizational Behavior
Management Internship II
Business Policy OR
Leadership Development
3
3
3
Total:
18 Credit Hours
Note: There are no new courses required for this program.
27
28
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #6:
Program Deletions
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve institutional requests for
program deletions, as listed below.
BACKGROUND:
Southeastern Oklahoma State University (SEOSU) requests authorization to delete the Bachelor
of Arts in Speech Education (050).
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College (NEOAMC) requests authorization to delete the
Associate in Applied Science in Golf Course Management (118).
Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) requests authorization to delete the Certificate in
Manufacturing Technology (085) and Certificate in Mid-Management (063).
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City (OSU-OKC) requests authorization to delete the
Certificate in Freelance Writing (078), the Certificate in Systems Maintenance Administration
(051), and the Certificate in Land Surveying (024).
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval”
and “Policy Statement on Program Review.”
ANALYSIS:
SEOSU requests to delete the Bachelor of Arts in Speech Education (050). The program was
suspended in August 2000 due to low enrollment. The department no longer has faculty with
sufficient background in the field to offer this degree. No students remain in the program. One
course will be deleted, and no funds are available for reallocation.
NEOAMC requests to delete the Associate in Applied Science in Golf Course Management
(118) due to low enrollment and difficulty in securing faculty to teach the curriculum. No
students remain in this program. No courses were offered in the past year, and only one was
offered in 2001-02. There are no funds available for reallocation.
29
OCCC requests to delete the Certificate in Manufacturing Technology (085) and Certificate in
Mid-Management (063) due to low enrollment. There are no students in either program; no
courses will be deleted; and no funds are available for reallocation.
OSU-OKC requests to delete the Certificate in Freelance Writing (078), the Certificate in
Systems Maintenance Administration (051), and the Certificate in Land Surveying (024) due to
low productivity in each certificate program. No students are enrolled in any of the programs,
no course will be deleted, and no funds are available for reallocation.
30
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #7:
Intensive English Program Review
SUBJECT:
Accreditation - English Language Center.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents provisionally accredit the
Intensive English Program at Educational and Cultural Interactions, Inc.
in Oklahoma City for one year, with stipulations as described below.
BACKGROUND:
Approving English language centers has been part of the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on
Admissions of Students for Whom English is a Second Language” since 1980. Beginning with
the 1995 review, out-of-state evaluators with expertise in directing English as a Second
Language (ESL) programs have been hired to conduct the reviews.
In fall 1996, an English Language Institute committee was convened to work with State
Regents’ staff to revise the policy to include standards for the centers and an approval process.
This committee consisted of representatives from proprietary and institutionally-based English
language centers. The State Regents approved this policy in April 1997.
The approval process includes a self-study report and an external evaluation team visit. The
evaluation team prepares a report of findings on each standard and recommends one of the
following: (1) approval without qualification with reexamination in five years; (2) provisional
approval with reexamination in one, two, or three years; or (3) deny approval. The evaluators
compare the self-study to the standards outlined in the policy and verify the information in the
self-study with observations from the on-site visit, providing a written report with
recommendations. The center’s staff has the opportunity to provide a written response to the
evaluators’ report.
POLICY ISSUES:
According to the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Admission to, Retention in, and Transfer
Among Colleges and Universities of the State System,” students for whom English is a second
language must demonstrate English proficiency following standards described in the “Policy
Statement on Admission of Students for Whom English is a Second Language.” Students
without the minimal Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) score (500 for
undergraduate and 550 for graduate students) who have earned a TOEFL score of at least 460
for undergraduate or 500 for graduate students, or students without the minimal International
English Language Testing System (IELTS) score (6.0 for undergraduate and 6.5 for graduate
31
students) who have earned an IELTS score of at least 5.0 for undergraduate or 5.5 for graduate
students, must complete an intensive English program (IEP) approved by the State Regents
prior to admission.
IEPs are evaluated on criteria for the language program, administration, faculty, student
services, finances, and physical facilities. Embedded in these broad categories are standards for
the curriculum, recruitment, assessment and contact hours of the program, standards for the
faculty and administrators of the program, and standards for advising and orientation services
offered to students in the program.
ANALYSIS:
As required by policy, a team of out-of-state evaluators reviewed the IEP at Educational and
Cultural Interactions, Inc. (ECI) in Oklahoma City June 18-19, 2003. A summary of the twoperson evaluation team’s credentials is provided, and an outline of the recommendations for the
IEP follows.
¾ Dr. Susan Carkin (Team Chair), Associate Professor in the Intensive English Language
Institute in the English Department at Utah State University in Logan, Utah.
Credentials: Doctoral degree in Applied Linguistics (Northern Arizona University),
Master of Arts in English with English as a Second Language emphasis (Utah State
University), Master of Arts in English (University of Oregon), Bachelor of Arts in English
(Southern Illinois University), and Bachelor of Arts in Spanish (Southern Illinois
University).
¾ Ms. Sarah M. Kim, Interim Director, Center for English as a Second Language at the
University of Arizona in Tucson, Arizona.
Credentials: Master of Arts in Teaching English as a Second Language (University of
Arizona), and Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing (University of Arizona).
Educational and Cultural Interactions, Inc., Oklahoma City, OK
Date of Visit:
Evaluators’
Recommendation:
June 18-19, 2003
Provisional approval with reexamination in one year and four stipulations
detailed in the final report:
1. ECI will submit an implementation plan within two months of the State
Regents’ acceptance of the report [plan due November 12, 2003].
2. ECI should hire a consultant with expertise in English for academic
purposes (EAP) to help guide the program in its curricular development
at the Advanced Level (1,2,3) focusing on college-bound graduate and
undergraduate students.
3. ECI should send a report to the State Regents by January 15, 2004
detailing the progress made in the development of an EAP curriculum far
beyond its current structural syllabus, and include a time frame for
completion and implementation.
4. ECI should examine other self-study documents to understand the kind
of information and evidence that is provided to evaluators, especially
with regard to curricular goals and assessment.
32
Summary of
Evaluators’ Report:
Program strengths include:
• Communication among faculty, staff, and administration is distinguished by
respect, openness, and a shared commitment to students and a quality
program;
• Diverse and beneficial relationships exist with overseas agencies, state and
private universities, and high schools;
• Assessment measures are used for program improvement; and
• Faculty, staff, and administrators support and are sensitive to individual
student needs and varying academic objectives and cultural backgrounds.
In addition to the four stipulations above, team recommendations include the
following:
• ECI’s brochure needs to reflect actual proficiency levels offered and include a
statement of admission requirements;
• The team suggests ECI produce a separate brochure, aimed at college-bound
students, which includes the EAP curriculum and assessment measures for
advanced levels and articulation information/admission requirements for
Oklahoma colleges and universities;
• ECI staff should attend a NAFSA: Association of International Educators’
(NAFSA) professional practice workshop regarding visa procedures and
consult the latest Bureau of Citizenship and Immigration Services updates
through the NAFSA website;
• Curriculum should include integration of basic computer literacy skills, and
the computer lab should be upgraded, as the budget allows, to facilitate that
goal;
• Alternative curricular approaches, e.g., task-based, content-based, genrebased, etc., should be considered to assist EAP students. If the current
grammar-based emphasis is continued, the grammar of academic language
(textbooks, lectures, popular media) should be stressed;
• A syllabus template should be developed to address topics and sequences,
course objectives, classroom activities, assessment, and course policies;
• Administrators should be evaluated by faculty and possibly students;
• ELI should consult with test developers regarding the practice of using the
Michigan Test, a placement test, as a proficiency measure to advance students
from one level to another; should consider developing in-house criterionreferenced tests to assess classroom learning; and should determine an
appropriate testing frequency for use of the Michigan Test;
• Advanced students, in particular, should be given speaking and writing tests
as part of the assessment process;
• The grievance procedure should be more accessible and student-friendly, with
the written grievance being the last step in a series of more easily negotiated
interactions;
• ECI is encouraged to move toward full-time faculty contracts and, in the
interim, should compare its hourly and annual salary ranges to others in the
region;
• ECI should consider faculty contracts which compensate extracurricular
activities or provide a reduced teaching load;
• Staff with curricular responsibility should attend Teachers of English to
33
Center’s Staff
Objection:
Speakers of Other Languages conferences annually and be involved in EAP
literature;
• ECI should consider designated advisors, who could assist students in
expressing concerns with homestay families and understanding financial
arrangements and protocols.
None.
State Regents’ staff concurs with the team’s recommendation.
The team’s full report is available upon request.
34
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #8:
Student Preparation
SUBJECT:
ACT, SAT, and AP Annual Reports
RECOMMENDATION:
Annual Reports on ACT and SAT scores and Advanced Placement
participation are presented for State Regents’ information only.
BACKGROUND:
Staff annually present to the State Regents the performance of Oklahoma students on the ACT
and SAT assessments, two assessments used in conjunction with other indicators for college
admission. Further, data are presented on Advanced Placement (AP) participation among
Oklahoma high school students as well.
ACT scores are of particular importance to higher education in Oklahoma because such a
substantial proportion of the state’s high school graduates take the ACT assessment for the
purposes of college admission. A smaller proportion of students take the SAT exam.
ACT scores are of importance additionally because, while they serve as a predictive measure of
success in college in the first year, they also serve as outcome indicators of preparation for
college. For a decade, State Regents have been involved with ACT as partners in the
Educational Planning and Assessment System (EPAS) with promising results that grow more
substantial each year of the program.
This year, ACT granted the State Regents some national exposure for their commitment to
EPAS. The first attachment to this item is a document issued by ACT, Inc. that tells the story of
the State Regents’ decade-long investment in student success through EPAS. ACT distributed
this report to all K-12 and higher education agencies in all 50 states this August in conjunction
with their states’ respective data releases.
Further, within Oklahoma, ACT scores are used in consideration in the K-12 accountability
system. Because of the inclusion of ACT scores and participation in this system, more school
districts are availing themselves of the technical assistance in guidance, professional
development and curriculum improvement afforded to them through EPAS, GEAR UP and the
State Regents’ Student Preparation team.
35
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents annually review these indicators as a means to gauge student preparation and to
examine State System needs to improve student preparation in Oklahoma. Improving student
preparation for college is a high priority on the State Regents’ Work Plan and also forms the
basis of Strategy 1 Brain Gain 2010 goals and objectives.
ANALYSIS:
ACT Results for the High School Graduating Class of 2003
The second attachment to this item is a summary page for this year’s ACT scores. Broadly, the
results show the following:
•
Oklahoma’s composite score remained unchanged at 20.5 from last year even though
nearly 700 more students took the ACT assessment this year. This year’s national
composite score also remained unchanged at 20.8.
•
Oklahoma students outscored the nation on the English subtest, scoring a 20.4. The
national average was 20.3. This is the second year in a row that Oklahoma students
outscored the national average in English.
•
Oklahoma reported a substantial increase in the number of students reporting taking
core coursework. This year, 59 percent of the ACT test-taking students reported taking
core coursework compared with 53 percent last year. Ten years ago, only 46 percent of
the ACT test takers reported taking core coursework.
•
When breaking down the core course taking data by demographic subgroup, the data
reveal that:
o African American students increased their core course participation rate by four
percentage points;
o White students increased by seven percentage points; and
o Native American students increased their core participation rate by six
percentage points.
•
Oklahoma showed an increase in the percentage of high school graduates who took the
ACT over last year. Based on State Regents’ estimates of the 2002-2003 high school
graduates, 73.0 percent of the graduating class took the ACT. Ten years ago, only 65.5
percent of the high school graduating class took the ACT. This increase also reflects an
increase in the actual number of students who took the ACT.
•
Oklahoma saw a full eight percent growth in the percentage of African American
participation on the ACT assessment over last year. Native American students
increased participation by one percent. There was no change in the percentage
participation of students in all other demographic subgroups.
36
•
Though Oklahoma did not narrow the gap in reading scores as compared to the national
average overall, African American students increased their reading scores by .3 of a
scale score point.
Mathematics Issues:
Mathematics remains Oklahoma’s primary need for increased attention to student preparation.
This is not just an Oklahoma issue, however. Nationally, most states see a gap between their
students’ performances and that of the nation as a whole. This year, ACT staff presented
special information on readiness for college courses by core content area. Overall, only half of
the ACT test takers (students who are self-selecting to take the ACT because of their intention
to attend college) scored a 19 or above in mathematics in Oklahoma.
Rigorous preparation in mathematics matters. For example, when students only take Algebra I,
Algebra II, and Geometry, 2003 data show that, among these students:
• African American students scored an 15.4 on the math subtest
• White students scored a 17.3; and
• Native American students scored a 16.6
• Overall, the average of students who take these courses only (representing 24 percent of
the graduating class) the average was 16.9
These students are not meeting the required level of readiness for entry into college level
courses in Oklahoma or outside of the state.
However, more rigorous mathematics coursework in high school makes a difference. For the
2002-2003 high school graduates, when students take four or more years of advanced math (and
these students represent 26% of the ACT test takers):
• Native American students score a 21.3 on average
• White students score 22.9
• But African American students score 18.4 on average – still not indicative of readiness
for entry level college mathematics courses and indicative of inequities in preparation at
some level
• Overall, however, students who take four or more years of advanced math score 22.6 on
average.
As important as the course sequence is to mathematic achievement, it is equally important that
the expected content be taught in each mathematics course and that there is the substantially
rigorous content expected in Algebra I, Algebra II, and Geometry. As more schools understand
the competencies in the Standards for Transition and integrate those skills into their classrooms,
improved scores are likely.
Additionally, the graduating class of 2003 is the first graduating class to exit high school having
taken the higher number of core courses required for high school graduation. Even with this
increased core, ACT scores remained the same as last year. The 13 units now required for high
school graduation, while the same number of units required by ACT to be considered “core,”
nonetheless does not reflect the same sequence of actual courses. ACT’s core course sequence
is defined more narrowly than Oklahoma’s at the present time. Gains in core participation this
year among all Oklahoma students as reflected by the ACT results are likely due to the
increased requirements. However, though self-reported, there still remain gaps in Oklahoma in
the quality of courses the students choose to take that count toward the high school graduation
37
core courses. Work remains to be done in Oklahoma middle and high schools to prepare all
students for successful postsecondary education and work.
Full analyses of ACT scores, as well as a decade-long analysis of core course-taking reported
through the ACT annual data is covered in the attached summaries.
SAT and Advanced Placement Results for 2003
SAT: In Oklahoma, only eight percent of the high school graduates took the SAT; the same
percentage as last year. Oklahoma students outscored the national average on the mathematics
and verbal portion of the SAT this year; however. this is because such a smaller percentage of
students took the test and there is less variability among the students in terms of academic
readiness for college. For the class of 2003, Oklahoma’s mean verbal score was 569, up four
scale points from last year’s score of 565. For the mean math score, Oklahoma graduates
scored 562, which is unchanged from last year.
Over the past five years, Oklahoma’s net change in mean verbal scores is +1; the net change in
math scores is -2.
Advanced Placement (AP): Annually, more students are taking AP courses and more students
are taking AP examinations for the purposes of gaining college credit in advance of attending
college. For the class of 2003, 16,725 exams were taken by 10,442 students to try and gain
college course credit while still in high school. Of those exams taken, 49.9 percent, or 8,340
were scores of three, four, or five. A score of three is the minimal score through which students
can gain college credit via AP exams.
However, an additional 5,024 exams yielded a score of two on their AP exams. While these
students who score a two on their exams do not gain course credit, these are indicative of
students who were close and are likely to enter entry-level college courses ready to successfully
complete them.
The totals above include public and private schools.
For public schools only, 46.5 percent of students taking the AP examinations scored a three,
four, or five.
Minority student participation in the AP program has increased over the past five years.
• African American participation has increased from 221 in 1998 to 479 students in 2003.
• Native American participation has increased from 242 in 1998 to 785 students in 2003.
• Native American participation in Oklahoma is 7.5 percent; nationally, Native American
AP participation is 4.5 percent.
Statewide, the number of schools offering AP programs has grown substantially over the past
five years. In 1998, 124 schools offered AP programs. In 2003, 335 schools are offering AP
programs.
AP has grown in Oklahoma because of the AP Incentive program, administered by the State
Department of Education and funded at $3.9 million in 2002-2003.
38
These funds provide for teacher training grants, equipment and material grants for AP classes,
and exam fee subsidies of $50 for students with economic need and an exam fee subsidy of $25
per AP exam for any student taking more than one AP exam.
AP indicators are also considered in the state’s accountability system for K-12. Just as we saw
for 2003, we continue expect to see a greater number of AP courses, a greater number of
students taking those courses, and a greater number of students who take the exams and score a
3 or above as this accountability system takes root in Oklahoma schools.
Attachment
39
40
A Decade of Progress in Student Academic Achievement and College Readiness:
Oklahoma’s Educational Planning and Assessment System (EPAS) Story
by
Dolores A. Mize, Associate Vice Chancellor and Special Assistant to the Chancellor,
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education provide a compelling example of higher
education’s responsibility and leadership for (1) narrowing achievement gaps in K-12 schools;
(2) helping students in K-12 prepare for college and work; (3) maintaining a long-term
commitment to systemic actions required to generate positive achievement outcomes in a state;
and (4) helping ACT Inc.’s EPAS system mature into the comprehensive student and school
improvement system it is today.
The History
A decade ago – well before the term “K-16” was on the public policy radar in education,
Oklahoma’s State Regents took action to help Oklahoma’s middle school and high school
students better prepare for college. There was good reason to do so. College remediation rates
exceeded 60 percent in some areas and the majority of the state’s high school graduates were
unprepared for the rigor of entry-level college courses. Something had to change.
State Regents stimulated that needed change, raising admission standards from 11 to 15
required units of core coursework in high school. State Regents believed that this stronger core
would better enable Oklahoma students to be ready for life after high school.
However, beyond the mere policy change, State Regents also understood the impact that raising
admission standards might have on student access to college. An Oklahoma impact study
showed that raising standards might leave some students behind; in particular, low income and
minority students who might not have an equitable opportunity to prepare for the more rigorous
requirements. All students, the study revealed, would individually benefit from extra
preparation in high school and better information on being academically ready for college.
Consequently, the State Regents decided to help all students in Oklahoma succeed through
EPAS. With ACT, Inc. as partners, the State Regents implemented EPAS as a voluntary
program with four pilot school districts in 1993.
Why EPAS?
School districts volunteer to participate in EPAS over and above the state’s mandated testing
requirements for K-12. Districts participate in part because the three assessments in the EPAS
system – EXPLORE (8th grade); PLAN (10th grade); and the ACT Assessment (11th or 12th
grades) – comprise the only assessment system in the state that measures student readiness
along a continuum of college readiness benchmarks.
41
Additionally, Oklahoma school districts voluntarily participate in the EPAS system because the
data, guidance, and feedback are useful. For example, EPAS feedback is useful for helping an
individual student work on math skills or for helping a teacher revise how a particular concept is
taught. EPAS feedback can also help a student choose a career as well as the right academic
courses needed to achieve that career goal.
EPAS also aids the Oklahoma State Regents in making policy decisions and in communicating
to the public what higher education expects in the way of college readiness skills through the
ACT Standards for Transition.
EPAS Today:
In 2003 Oklahoma EPAS served 489 school districts, of which 42 are private school districts
and two are Bureau of Indian Affairs Schools. Nearly 85,000 8th and 10th grade students in
Oklahoma took the EPAS assessments and benefited from the system’s early interventions.
EPAS, which remains voluntary for all Oklahoma school districts, now serves over 95 percent
of the state’s 8th and 10th grade public school students.
For Oklahoma, EPAS is more than an assessment system. It is a comprehensive early
intervention system aimed at helping students, teachers, parents, guidance counselors, and
school administrators make data-driven decisions that impact teaching and learning every day.
Outcomes tell the Oklahoma EPAS story best:
Some of Oklahoma’s EPAS Outcomes
¾ Though more students are taking the ACT Assessment in Oklahoma, scores have
continued to rise.
o For 1992 high school graduates, 21,294 students took the ACT Assessment,
representing 65.3 percent of the high school graduating class.
o For 2002 high school graduates, 26,717 students took the ACT Assessment,
representing 72.3 percent of the high school graduating class.
o ACT Assessment scores rose over the past 10 years from 20.0 in 1992 to 20.5 in 2002.
The national average during that same time period rose more slowly -- from 20.6 in
1992 to 20.8 in 2002.
¾ Over the past decade, only three states in the Southern Regional Education Board
(SREB) have made gains on the national ACT Average.
Oklahoma is one of the three narrowing the gap between the state and national average.
West Virginia joins Oklahoma in making the greatest gains on the national average –
both states have statewide EPAS systems in place.
¾ More students of all demographic subgroups are taking rigorous core courses in high
school than a decade ago.
African American students taking core course work rose from 38 percent to 51 percent
since EPAS was implemented.
42
Native American student core course taking rose from 39 percent to 46 percent during
the same time period.
¾ EPAS students’ educational aspirations rise between the 8th and 10th grades, as well as
between the 10th grade and their taking of the ACT Assessment.
Most students upgrade their educational aspirations to the level of a two or four-year
college degree.
¾ Oklahoma’s college-going rate has increased since EPAS implementation reached a
critical mass number of school districts.
o For the 1996-97 high school graduating class, 51.3 percent of Oklahoma’s high school
graduates attended college directly after high school.
o In 2001-2002, the college-going rate had increased to 57.7 percent.
¾ College remediation rates have dropped in all content areas over the past decade of
EPAS, with mathematics remaining the area in most need of improvement.
o EPAS linkage reports show that the drop-off in performance in mathematics occurs
primarily between the 10th and 12th grades, indicative of lower added educational value
during the final two years of high school.
o By policy, Oklahoma higher education’s core competencies for collegiate readiness and
success are clearly defined and communicated to students and schools through ACT’s
Standards for Transition.
¾ EPAS has narrowed gaps between and among demographic subgroups.
African American, Native American, and Hispanic students now outscore their national
peers on the ACT Assessment.
While all demographic subgroups have seen improvements in ACT Assessment scores,
the most significant contribution to those gains comes from increases in minority
student scores.
For more information or assistance, please contact you ACT Regional Office.
43
44
45
46
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #9:
E & G Budgets
SUBJECT:
Approval of additional FY04 allocations
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents (1) approve FY04 one-time
allocations to the institutions and selected programs in the state system in
the amount of $8,697,683 in one-time FY 2003 unexpended General
Revenue funds received from the Office of State Finance; and (2) allocate
$310,000 to Northeastern State University for the Center for Rural
Development.
BACKGROUND:
During the first three quarters of FY2003, the Office of State Finance declared revenue
shortfalls reducing General Revenue appropriations to higher education by 7.85 percent.
However, in June 2003 revenue collections for the state exceeded projections and resulted in an
additional $8,697,683 one-time allocation of the unexpended carryover funds from the Office of
State Finance in July 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
The recommendation is consistent with Regents’ policy and actions.
ANALYSIS:
Allocation of One-time Funds:
The Regents at the meeting of May 30, 2003, approved the FY2004 state appropriation
allocation of $767,880,403 for colleges, universities, constituent agencies, centers, Regents’
operations and other special programs. This base allocation level represented a 9.8 percent
decrease from the beginning allocation of FY2003, and resulted in severe budget cuts.
The additional allocation of $8,697,683 for FY2004 will lessen the impact of the reductions
resulting from the initial allocation. However, this allocation is considered “one-time,” i.e., not
part of the allocation base for FY2005.
The recommendation for allocation of the additional state appropriations for FY2004 is
highlighted below and detailed on the attached schedule. The budget allocation presented in
this item deals only with the allocation of state appropriated funds.
47
Institutional Budgets. The proposed allocation for institutions is $5,735,727, lowering the
overall reduction for FY2004 to 9.2 percent, rather than the original 9.99 percent. Concerns
remain due to the higher costs of health insurance, risk management increases and other items
expected to total approximately $25 million for FY2004. Increased tuition revenue is not
expected to substantially offset the higher mandatory costs. Substantial enrollment increases
will compound the funding challenges.
Teacher Residency Program. The Teacher Residency Program proposed allocation is
$1,356,956. Program support had been suspended for one year in the original May allocation.
At the proposed level, although the program will be funded at 69 percent of the total FY 2003
allocation, the recommended allocation reimburses fully both public and private institutions’
travel costs and provides 90 percent of the previous year’s funding support for each committee.
Committee funding levels will be $650 for public institutions and $380 for private institutions.
The public institutions’ number of committees served is 1,634, 19.8 percent fewer than the
2,038 served in the previous year. Private institutions have served 35 percent fewer
committees, 252 down from 388.
Fire Service Training Program. The proposed allocation includes $465,000 for the Fire
Service Training Program, which will result in a 13.3 percent reduction from FY2003. The
original reduction for this program was 55 percent. This one-time allocation will allow time
for program administrators to put plans in place to enhance revenue through fees and other
federal sources, and to examine efficiencies of delivery.
Grants. The proposed allocation includes $150,000 for the State Regents’ grants programs
(Economic Development, Research Match, Quality Initiative Grants), which will result in a 16.6
percent reduction from FY2003, rather than the original reduction of 21.3%. The proposed
allocation will provide resources for systemwide studies, such as the needs assessment studies,
and other new initiatives envisioned by Chancellor Risser.
Oklahoma Museum of Natural History. The proposed allocation includes $200,000 for the
Oklahoma Museum of Natural History, which like the Fire Service Training, is a statewide
program. The allocation would bring the effective reduction to 13.8 percent, rather than
original 19.4 percent.
OU Family Medicine. The proposed allocation for OU Family Medicine is $200,000. The
allocation would bring the effective reduction to 21 percent, rather than the original 55 percent.
Funding will be contingent upon assurances that the quality concerns associated with program
and local commitments are met.
Pollard Theater. The proposed one-time allocation of $130,000 will support the theater
operation as management seeks other sources of funding. Funding for the Performing Arts
Program through the Pollard Theater at Langston had been eliminated and the program support
suspended for one year in the original May allocation. The proposed $130,000 allocation is
55.7 percent less than the FY2003 allocation.
Quartz Mountain. The proposed allocation of $110,000 for Quartz Mountain makes the
overall FY2004 reduction 2.3 percent, rather than the original 8.5 percent. The allocation would
allow for funding of lodge operations and major maintenance in FY 2004. This one-time
48
funding will be used to reduce accounts payable for the management company, in consideration
of a reduction in the lodge management fee. The reduction in the management fee would be an
on-going savings, which could be used to fund major maintenance in subsequent years.
Summer Academies Program. Funding for the Summer Academies Program had been
eliminated and the program suspended for one year in the original May allocation. A minimal
allocation of $300,000, which is only 20.4 percent of the FY2003 allocation is proposed to
assure continuity, even at a reduced level. A matching commitment from institutions will be
required.
State Regents’ Office. The proposed allocation for the State Regents’ Office is $50,000, to
address increases in mandatory costs and to pay for space reconfigurations in RPIII. The
allocation would bring the effective reduction to 9.2 percent, rather than the original 10.1
percent.
Allocation for Center for Rural Development at NSU.
The 2003 Legislature transferred base support funding for the Center for Rural Development
(CRD) from the Department of Commerce to Higher Education. Created in the 2001
Legislature in House Bill No. 1503, the center’s mission is “to improve the effectiveness of
citizens, enterprises, and communities in rural Oklahoma to better meet the quality of life
challenges…” State support is $310,000; federal support approximately $250,000.
49
49-a
49-b
49-c
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #10-a:
Endowment
SUBJECT:
Approval of new accounts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve new endowment
accounts and increases to accounts at the University of Oklahoma, OU
Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma State University, OSU-Okmulgee,
Cameron University, East Central University, Rogers State University,
Southwestern Oklahoma State University, Langston University, Carl
Albert State College, and Rose State College.
BACKGROUND:
State Regents have allocated $7.5 million from appropriations made by the 2003 Oklahoma
Legislatures for the endowed chair program. A portion of that allocation is recommended as
matching funds at this time; future recommendations will be brought to the Regents as revenues
are received.
POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents' Policy for Administering the Regents' Endowment Fund Program provides
that:
Endowed chairs and distinguished professorships should be established in
academic areas that will contribute to the enhancement of the overall cultural,
business, scientific or economic development of Oklahoma.
Endowed chairs and professorships must be established in areas for which the
institution has ongoing, approved academic programs.
An institution may apply for an endowed chair, professorship or other related
project upon meeting the requirements for establishing an account (an
institution must have on deposit at least 50% of the private funds minimum
required match as set forth in the policy, with a written commitment that the
balance will be on deposit within a 36-month period). Matching funds must
originate from monies contributed to the institution from sources specifically
designated by the donor for the purpose specified in the endowment fund
policy.
ANALYSIS:
To date, institutions have requested a total of $50 million for which state matching funds have
not been available.
51
Sufficient funds from the appropriation of the 2003 legislature are available to match 24 new
accounts and increases to ten accounts, for a total endowment approval of $7.8 million for 34
accounts.
The accounts requested for approval at this time include 15 accounts at OU, nine accounts at
OUHSC, and one each at OSU, OSU-Okmulgee, Cameron University, Carl Albert State
College, East Central University, Langston University, Rogers State University, Northwestern
Oklahoma State University, Southeastern Oklahoma State University, Southwestern Oklahoma
State University, and Rose State College.
The entire match is on hand for these increases and includes $350,964 from the FY03 carryover.
The donors have given the entire amount, the accounts are eligible to accrue earnings on the
public matching funds, and if approved, academic departments could begin recruiting efforts to
appoint a faculty member as holder of the chair or professorship.
Assuming approval of this item, still unmatched are 84 fully funded accounts and increases to
58 previously approved accounts at ten institutions. The total of these unmatched accounts is
$43 million.
Status Report on the Program - With the appropriation from the 2003 session, the Oklahoma
State Regents have allocated a total of $147.7 million since inception of the endowment
program in 1988. Including the accounts presented in this item for approval, State Regents will
have approved a total of 451 accounts at 23 institutions, as shown below:
52
Approved Accounts, pending action of September 12, 2003:
Institution
Chairs
Professorships
OU
54
63
117
OU-HSC
60
19
79
OSU
40
51
91
2
2
OSU-CHS
Lectureships
Total
OSU Tech Okmulgee
29
29
OSU Oklahoma City
2
2
UCO
3
4
7
ECU
4
3
7
NSU
3
2
5
NWOSU
13
SEOSU
6
8
14
SWOSU
1
4
5
Cameron
6
1
20
27
Langston
1
2
3
6
USAO
1
3
1
5
CASC
18
18
EOSC
1
1
OCCC
1
1
NEOA&M
1
1
2
4
4
2
6
1
2
5
4
2
6
150
106
451
Rogers State
13
2
Rose
TCC
2
WOSC
TOTAL
195
53
54
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #10-b:
Endowment
SUBJECT:
Endowment Trust Fund Annual Distribution
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve a distribution in the
amount of $9,530,127.49 for fiscal year 2003 and $11,134,536 for prior
years’ carryover-- totaling approximately $20.7 million-- for institutional
expenditure from eligible Endowment Trust Fund accounts.
BACKGROUND:
With the allocation at the May 30, 2003, meeting, the State Regents have allocated a total of
$147.7 million to the Endowment Trust Fund for chairs, professorships and lectureships and
$11.58 million for the Langston University Endowment from state appropriations since
inception of the program in 1988. These allocations are to support the establishment of faculty
chairs and professorships and for related activities to improve the quality of instruction and
research at colleges and universities in the State System. In addition to state funding, the fund
contains private matching funds and unrestricted gifts.
In October 1992, the State Regents authorized the investment of trust fund monies in asset
classes other than fixed income. Staff continues to invest on-hand cash through the State
Treasurer’s Office. Also, included for the fifth year is the available distribution for the
Langston University Endowment.
POLICY ISSUES:
Investments for the Endowment Trust Fund have been made in compliance with the State
Regents’ investment policy and relevant State Statutes.
STAFF ANALYSIS:
The State Regents’ current investment policy provides that “the investment committee shall
determine the distribution...The distribution will not necessarily be equivalent to actual earnings
during the year, but to maintain a distribution rate from year to year that, as a goal, will
approximate 5 percent of the asset values for the endowment trust fund.” Elsewhere in this
agenda is a recommendation to amend this policy, effective with the FY04 distribution.
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the attached distribution schedule for eligible
Endowment Trust Fund accounts.
55
56
57
58
59
60
61
62
63
64
65
66
67
68
69
70
71
72
73
74
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #10-c:
Endowment
SUBJECT:
Approval of distribution for filled chairs and professorships that are unmatched
by State Regents
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve a distribution of
operating funds to institutions that have appointed faculty to hold chairs
and professorships that have received the full amount of private
endowment but still unmatched with public funds.
BACKGROUND:
To date, institutions have requested a total of $50 million for which state matching funds have
not been available. Still unmatched are 84 fully funded accounts and increases to 58 previously
approved accounts at ten institutions. The total of these unmatched accounts is $43 million.
State Regents allocated $9.5 million in FY03 for the endowed chair program. Because the state
revenue picture was uncertain early in the last fiscal year, Regents approved only $7.4 million
in matching money for endowed chairs, professorships and lectureships. Of the $2.1 million,
approximately $1.4 million remains after the revenue shortfall.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with Regents’ allocation policies and actions.
ANALYSIS:
Institutions with unmatched accounts in the queue responded to a survey on the number of
faculty appointments to unmatched chairs and professorships that are fully funded on the private
side. Three institutions, OU, OSU and ECU, had made such appointments before the start of
the fall semester.
An amount equivalent to the usual 5 percent distribution for each of the filled chairs and
professorships is $831,846, as shown on the attached schedule. It is recommended that Regents
make a one-time allocation of this amount from the unobligated FY03 funding.
FY03 unobligated funds
$1,421,507
One-time Allocation
831,846
Remaining for matching funds
$ 589,661
75
Item 10-a of this agenda recommends use of $425,964, combined with $7.5 million in FY04
funding to match accounts at twelve campuses. A recommendation concerning allocation of the
remaining $163,697 will come to Regents at a later date.
76
.
77
78
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #11:
Investment Policy
SUBJECT:
Posting of amendment to policy on earnings distribution
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve an amendment to the
policy on earnings distribution, to be effective for the distribution of FY04
earnings.
BACKGROUND:
At the September 2002 meeting, State Regents approved a contract with Hammond Associates
of St. Louis to serve as investment consultants for management of the State Regents’
Endowment Fund. The firm has undertaken a thorough review of the Regents’ policies on asset
allocation, spending, and portfolio evaluation. The private equity class was added at the
meeting of April 3, 2003.
POLICY ISSUES: This action will amend the policy on Earnings Distribution (II-4-74).
ANALYSIS:
Hammond Associates recommends consideration of amendments that would more closely
conform to practices by other endowments of comparable size and cushion endowment
distributions to institutions from dramatic swings in market performance. Regents’ longtime
policy has been a distribution of five percent of the end-of-fiscal-year market value. Proposed
for posting and approval in September is a distribution of four and one-half percent of the threeyear average of market value at June 30.
Earnings Distribution
The investment committee shall recommend to the board the distribution at the end of
each fiscal year. The distribution will not necessarily be equivalent to actual earnings
during the year, but to maintain a distribution rate from year to year that, as a goal, will
approximate 5% four and one-half percent of the asset values based on an average of
the past three years for the endowment trust fund.
79
80
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #12-a:
EPSCoR
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve for payment the annual
EPSCoR Coalition dues in the amount of $25,000 for the fiscal year 2003.
BACKGROUND:
The Oklahoma EPSCoR program helps build the research competitiveness of Oklahoma’s
universities through strategic support of research instruments and facilities, research
collaborations, integrated education and research programs, and high-performance computer
networks. The success of the NSF program has led to EPSCoR programs in six other federal
agencies (DOD, DOE, EPA, NASA, NIH, USDA). Coalition activities include congressional
and public outreach on the need for broadly based research support.
POLICY ISSUES:
The recommendation is consistent with State Regents’ policy.
ANALYSIS:
Each of the 20 participating states is a member of the EPSCoR Coalition. They include
Alabama, Alaska, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Kentucky, Louisiana, Maine, Mississippi, Montana,
Nebraska, Nevada, North Dakota, Oklahoma, South Carolina, South Dakota, Vermont, West
Virginia, Wyoming and Puerto Rico. The work of the coalition is evident in the growth of
federal funding awarded to the participant states. Funds are available in the EPSCoR budget
allocation for this annual expense.
81
82
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #12-b:
EPSCoR
SUBJECT:
Appointment of members to the Oklahoma EPSCoR Advisory Committee
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the appointment of
individuals to the EPSCoR Committee, effective November 1, 2003, with
additional members to be recommended.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents have currently eight standing advisory committees to the Chancellor, of
which two are created by statute and the others established by State Regents’ action. 70 O.S.
2001, §3230.1 et seq. establishes the EPSCoR Committee as an advisory committee to the State
Regents. The Student Advisory Board is the other statutory committee.
The purpose of the EPSCoR committee is to promote cooperative research efforts among public
and private universities in Oklahoma; promote private sector involvement in university research
and encourage technology transfer; promote human resource development in science and
engineering within the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education; recommend research
projects when only a limited number may be submitted by the State of Oklahoma; and appoint
the EPSCoR director.
The statutes provide that the Regents shall appoint members of the EPSCoR Advisory
Committee to include: 1) representatives of the state’s universities and colleges; 2)
representatives of private research entities located in Oklahoma; 3) representatives of private
businesses; 4) residents of Oklahoma whose contribution will enhance the goals of the
Committee; and 5) a representative of the Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science
and Technology. Additional committee members are to be appointed by the Governor, the
President Pro Tempore of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives.
Eight federal agencies have EPSCoR or similar programs to encourage the development of
competitive sponsored research in states that have historically had little federally sponsored
research. The federal agencies are the National Science Foundation, the National Institutes of
Health, the Environmental Protection Agency, the Department of Energy, the Department of
Defense, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, the United States Department of
Agriculture and the Department of Commerce. Oklahoma is one of 23 states that participate in
a program at one or more federal agency.
83
POLICY ISSUES:
Development of State Regents’ policy on EPSCoR and research match is a current staff project.
Appointment of the additional committee members will facilitate policy development.
Advisory Committee Bylaws have been posted at the State Regents’ meeting of February 21,
2003.
ANALYSIS:
Chancellor Risser recommends that members be appointed to the EPSCoR Advisory Committee
for the terms indicated below. Current membership includes members of the private sector, a
member of the House of Representatives, the President of the Oklahoma Center for the
Advancement of Science and Technology, the Vice Presidents for Research of The University
of Oklahoma Norman and Health Sciences Center campuses, and the Oklahoma Medical
Research Foundation, the President of the University of Oklahoma – Tulsa, the Dean of the
College of Agriculture for Oklahoma State University, the Dean of the College of Engineering
and Natural Sciences from the University of Tulsa, the Biological Sciences Department Chair
for the University of Tulsa, the President of Cameron University, the Associate Provost of
Southwestern Oklahoma State University and an Associate Professor from Langston University.
The proposed additional membership includes a new member representative of Oklahoma State
University.
Name
Dr. Stephen McKeever
Affiliation
Vice President for Research and
Technology Transfer, Oklahoma
State University
Term Exp (yr)
2006
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the appointment of Dr. McKeever.
It is further recommended that the State Regents acknowledge Governor Brad Henry’s
appointment of Mary Kay Audd to the EPSCoR Committee.
84
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #13:
Master Lease Purchase Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents authorize submission to the Council for
Bond Oversight for the 2003C Master Lease Series. The total projects from seven
entities amount to approximately $16.8 million.
BACKGROUND:
The Oklahoma State Legislature approved in May 1999, Senate Bill 151, which authorized the State
Regents to establish a master lease program. State System entities may enter into lease agreements for
projects having a project value of at $50,000 up to a maximum of $10 million. The terms of the lease
agreements will vary by the useful life of the equipment purchases.
The State Regents’ office works in conjunction with the Oklahoma Development Finance Authority
(ODFA) to administer this program with each institutional lease purchase agreement submitted to the
State Council for Bond Oversight for approval. The institutional governing boards have given prior
approval of all equipment purchases submitted under this program.
POLICY ISSUES:
Recommendation is consistent with current State Regents’ policy.
ANALYSIS:
The Master Lease Purchase Program provides the State System entities a method of financing major
personal property acquisitions at significant efficiencies from both financing aspects and administration.
This program is designed to provide flexibility in acquiring new capital equipment by allowing lease
purchase payments or debt service payments to be made on a monthly basis from current capital and
operating funds. Individual sub-lease agreements will be entered into with each participating institution
and the State Regents, under the terms of the Master Lease Purchase Agreement. The institution’s fee
structure shall be based on the individualized purchase package and interest rates available on the day of
bond pricing.
The third series for FY2003 includes seven system institutions with an estimated total of approximately
$16.8 million of equipment purchases. The following table summarizes this series of project totals by
institution.
85
Institution
Total Amount to be Financed in
December Issue
$496,247
$2,504,837
$450,000
$990,000
$3,089,600
$8,700,000
$575,000
Oklahoma City Community College
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College
OU Health Sciences Center
Oklahoma State University
Northeastern State University
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
Total for December Issue
$16,805,684
86
Oklahoma City Community College
87
88
89
90
91
92
93
94
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #14-a:
University of Oklahoma
Multiple Facility Revenue Bond
SUBJECT:
Review of Statement of Essential Facts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents certify to the Attorney General
of Oklahoma that the Statements of Essential Facts for the University of
Oklahoma, Series 2003, in the amount of $36,000,000 is substantially
accurate.
BACKGROUND:
For revenue bonds issued pursuant to Title 70, Oklahoma Statutes, Section 4001 through 4014,
a Statement of Essential Facts shall be prepared by the issuing Board of Regents for the use of
and information of prospective bond purchasers. Section 4014 of this statute requires that the
State Regents examine the Statement of Essential Facts and, if found to be substantially
accurate, certify such to the Attorney General of Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
None
ANALYSIS:
The proceeds received from the sale of the Series 2003 bonds will be used for the following six
projects: (1) Student Housing Residence Hall Improvements, (2) Holmberg Hall Renovation
and Addition, (3.) Department of Public Safety Headquarters, (4.) Fred Jones Jr., Museum of
Art Addition, (5.) Price College of Business Expansion, and (6.) the Gaylord Hall – College of
Journalism. The bond proceeds will be used (a.) to construct, acquire, furnish and to equip the
listed projects, (b) to fund the required Reserve Fund, and (c) to pay the costs of issuance.
The bonds to be issued as fully registered bonds will be payable on October 1 each of the years
2003 through 2028 with interest payments commencing on April 1, 2004, and semiannually
each year thereafter. The bonds are special obligations of the Board of Regents of the University
of Oklahoma. The University has pledged, as security for the bonds the gross receipts of $9.00
per credit hour Academic Facilities and Life Safety Fee, and the earnings from the Reserve
Fund. The University has also pledged as security a Debt Service Reserve Fund in the form of a
Debt Service Reserve Fund Surety Policy. The pledged revenues as anticipated by the
University’s Board, will provide sufficient revenue to: (1.) pay principal of and interest on the
Bonds; and, (2.) maintain the reserve required in the Reserve Account for securing any bonds
payable. The pledged fee will be charged incoming Freshman for the Fall 2003 term and each
95
entering class thereafter, thus gross revenue is projected to increase over four consecutive terms
before leveling to increases based on increases in student-credit hour production.
The Statement of Essential Facts as reflected in the Preliminary Official Statement for the
multiple facilities projects has been reviewed and found to be substantially accurate. Projected
revenue, as described in the Statement, will assure that revenues will be adequate to cover debt
service requirements at a minimum coverage ratio of 1.73.
A concurrent resolution authorizing issuance of the bonds has been approved by the legislature.
A copy of the Preliminary Official Statement is available for review.
A summary of the proposed projects is included as follows:
(1.) Student Housing Residence Halls: This project includes roofing, general
renovation and replacement of HVAC systems, fire suppression and
detection system improvements. $21,917,000
(2.) Holmberg Hall Renovation: This project provides space for lectures,
presentations and performances, classroom improvements, studios,
technology and equipment. This project creates the Donald W. Reynolds
Performing Arts Center, and includes the complete renovation of the
existing auditorium as an opera performance hall, the creation of improved
patron amenities, and associated life improvements. $4,475,000
(3.) Department of Public Safety Headquarters: This project will provide a new
headquarters facility for the University of Oklahoma Department of Public
Safety. The new facility will provide critically needed space for
administration and personnel offices, meetings, training, and support,
evidence processing and storage, and records processing and storage.
$4,000,000
(4.) Fred Jones Jr. Museum of Art Addition: This project expands current
gallery space in the museum to create the Howard and Mary Lester Wing
that will house the Weitzenhoffer Collection. New educational and support
space will also be provided. $2,000,000
(5.) Price College of Business Expansion: This project provides space for
selected programs of the Michael F. Price College of Business to
accommodate increasing enrollments and new programs. The addition will
house classrooms, undergraduate and graduate advising and admissions
areas, the Business Communications Center, and a new commons area for
both student and college functions. $2,000,000
(6.) Gaylord Hall – College of Journalism: This new facility will house the
Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communications, The Oklahoma
Daily (student newspaper), and the Sooner Yearbook. The facility will
include a broadcasting studio, technical core area, converged media lab,
classrooms, computer labs, resource areas and offices. $1,000,000
96
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #14-b:
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Student Union
SUBJECT:
Review of Statement of Essential Facts
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents certify to the Attorney General
of Oklahoma that the Statements of Essential Facts for Southeastern
Oklahoma State University, Series 2003, in the amount of $8,000,000 is
substantially accurate.
BACKGROUND:
For revenue bonds issued pursuant to Title 70, Oklahoma Statutes, Section 4001 through 4014,
a Statement of Essential Facts shall be prepared by the issuing Board of Regents for the use of
and information of prospective bond purchasers. Section 4014 of this statute requires that the
State Regents examine the Statement of Essential Facts and, if found to be substantially
accurate, certify such to the Attorney General of Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
None
ANALYSIS:
The proceeds received from the sale of the Series 2003 bonds will be used (a) to construct,
furnish and to equip a Student Union, (b) to fund the required Reserve Fund, and (c) to pay the
costs of issuance.
The bonds to be issued as fully registered bonds will be payable on November 1 each of the
years 2003 through 2028 with interest payments commencing on May 1, 2004, and
semiannually each year thereafter. The bonds are special obligations of the Board of Regents for
Oklahoma Colleges. The University has pledged, as security for the bonds the gross receipts of
$7.30 per credit hour Student Facility Fee, and the earnings from the Reserve Fund. The
University has also pledged as security a Debt Service Reserve Fund in the form of a Debt
Service Reserve Fund Surety Policy. The pledged revenues as anticipated by the University’s
Board, will provide sufficient revenue to: (1.) pay principal of and interest on the Bonds; and,
(2.) maintain the reserve required in the Reserve Account for securing any bonds payable. The
Board will covenant to maintain that pledged revenues in each fiscal year would be sufficient to
generate at least 1.20 times the maximum annual debt service requirements.
97
The Statement of Essential Facts as reflected in the Preliminary Official Statement for the
Student Union has been reviewed and found to be substantially accurate. Projected revenue, as
described in the Statement, will assure that revenues will be adequate to cover debt service
requirements at a minimum coverage ratio of 1.23.
A concurrent resolution authorizing issuance of the bonds has been approved by the legislature.
A copy of the Preliminary Official Statement is available for review.
98
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #15:
Tuition
SUBJECT:
Requesting approval of institutional requests for minor revisions to Tuition and
Mandatory Fees and Academic Services Fees for Fiscal Year 2004.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve institutional requests for
minor revisions to Tuition and Mandatory Fees and Academic Services
Fees for Fiscal Year 2004 as reported on the attached schedules.
BACKGROUND:
Constitutional and Statutory Provisions for the Coordination of Higher Education Tuition
and Fees
Article XIII-A of the Constitution of the State of Oklahoma establishes the Oklahoma State
Regents for Higher Education as the coordinating board of control for all public institutions in
The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education. Among others, specific powers enumerated
include the power to prescribe and coordinate student fees and tuition within limits prescribed
by the Legislature. The 2003 Legislature has enacted, and Governor Brad Henry signed, House
Bill No. 1748, which modifies the statutory limits and emphasizes the role of institutional
governing boards in the establishment of tuition. This legislation authorizes the State Regents
to establish resident Tuition and Mandatory Fees at levels less than the average rate charged at
public institutions in the Big Twelve Conference for comprehensive universities, and less than
the average rate charged at peer institutions for regional and two-year institutions. Further, the
legislation deletes the enumeration of specific fees and authorizes the State Regents to establish
Academic Services Fees, not to exceed the cost of the actual services provided. Special fees for
instruction and academic services are assessed students as a condition of enrollment and as a
condition of academic recognition for completion of prescribed courses. Said fees are required
for all students receiving certain courses of instruction or academic services as designated by
the institution. The legislation also details annual reporting requirements and stipulates that the
State Regents will make a reasonable effort to increase need-based financial aid available to
students proportionate to any increase in tuition.
State Regents’ policy lists November 1 of each year as the deadline for submission of requests
for changes in fees to be charged the following academic year. This year an exception to this
policy was requested for all institutions, due to passage of new statutory provisions in House
Bill No. 1748 noted above and approved May 30, 2003.
99
State Regents’ staff has reviewed institutions’ published tuition and fee schedules for
compliance with State Regents’ June 30, 2003 action and several minor inconsistencies were
reported. Attached is a listing of the requested institutional revisions along with the
corresponding rates approved for those institutions on June 30, 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
This item is consistent with the Policy and Procedures Relating to Tuition and Student Fees.
ANALYSIS:
The attached schedules list several institutional requests for minor changes to Tuition and
Mandatory Fees and Academic Services Fees for Fiscal Year 2004. Generally, all requests are
changes to mandatory fees, not tuition, except for the request from OU Health Sciences Center
as explained below.
Tuition and Mandatory Fees
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
East Central University—inadvertently calculated only one semester, instead of two, for
the Student Health Fee, Academic Records Fee, and the Student ID Fee and omitted the
Parking Fee on the June 30, 2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fee Request for both
undergraduate and graduate students. The graduate Student Activity Fee was also listed
as $7.00 per credit hour but should have been $7.15 per credit hour.
Oklahoma Panhandle State University—inadvertently omitted the Student ID Fee on
the June 30, 2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fee Request for both lower and upper
division undergraduate students.
Carl Albert State College—inadvertently omitted the Assessment Fee on the June 30,
2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fee Request for undergraduate students.
Northeastern Oklahoma A&M College—inadvertently omitted the Academic Records
Fee on the June 30, 2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fee Request for undergraduate
students.
OU Health Science Center—The June 30, 2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fee Request
contained a typographical error in the amount of graduate resident tuition for FY04.
The amount was submitted as $115.20 per credit hour but should have been $115.60 per
credit hour.
OSU Center for Health Sciences—requested a decrease in the Student Technology Fee
for graduate students. An increase in this fee from $3.00 to $9.00 per credit hour was
approved June 30, 2003 but OSU-CHS has decided not to implement the increase until
Fall 2004. They also requested clarification on the Library Automation and Materials
Fee for first, second, and third year professional students and for fourth year
professional students. The rates approved June 30, 2003 are those charged to fourth
year professional students. First, second, and third year professional students are
charged a lower rate of $108, instead of $120, for the mandatory Library Automation
and Materials Fee.
OSU Veterinary Medicine—inadvertently submitted three Academic Services Fees as
Mandatory Fees and calculated Mandatory Fees for only one semester, instead of two,
on the June 30, 2003 Tuition and Mandatory Fees Request.
100
The Tuition and Mandatory Fees will be effective this academic year beginning with the Fall
2003 semester. Also included is a revised schedule of graduate tuition and mandatory fee rates,
showing the peer cost for a full-time student computed on the basis of 24 credit hours, rather
than 30.
All changes approved for tuition and mandatory fees will result in student charges that are
within the mandatory limits.
Academic Services Fees—Spring Semester Only
•
•
•
•
Oklahoma Panhandle State University—requesting 48 new course fees and one increase
to an existing distance learning fee.
Connors State College—requesting a change to an existing computer lab fee from $5.00
per credit hour to $15 per course.
Northern Oklahoma College—requesting an increase to two existing course fees at their
Stillwater site which were approved June 30, 2003.
Oklahoma State University—requesting a decrease to the Student Technology Services
Fee for upper division Architecture students from $20 to $12 per credit hour.
These Academic Services Fees will be effective this academic year beginning with the Spring
2004 semester.
It is requested that the State Regents approve these institutional requests for revisions to Tuition
and Mandatory Fees and Academic Services Fees for Fiscal Year 2004.
101
102
103
104
105
106
107
108
109
110
111
112
113
114
115
116
117
118
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
June 30, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #16-a:
Allocation
SUBJECT:
Approval of allocation to Oklahoma State University and the University of
Oklahoma from the Higher Education Facilities Fund.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the allocation of
$647,163.96 to Oklahoma State University and $893,791.32 to the
University of Oklahoma from revenue collected through the Higher
Education Facilities Revolving Fund.
BACKGROUND:
The Oklahoma Legislature passed House Bill No. 2598 in May 2002 designating $38 million
from an assessment on motor fuel, diesel fuel and blending materials used or consumed in the
state for certain research purposes at OU and OSU. This revenue will be deposited into a new
fund called the “Higher Education Facilities Fund.” The bill further states that these funds shall
be evenly deposited to an account at the University of Oklahoma for funding construction of the
weather center and to an account at Oklahoma State University for purchase of equipment and
renovation of facilities for work on the application of advanced sensor technology for the
detection of chemical and biological threats to homeland security. The State Regents, at their
October, 2002 meeting, approved strategic plans submitted by each university outlining the
related expenditures of the funds received through this source.
POLICY ISSUES:
The recommendation is consistent with Regents’ policy and approved budget principles.
ANALYSIS:
House Bill No. 2598 appropriated $38,000,000 to the State Regents over a period of years for
transfer to the Higher Education Facilities Fund and further transfer to the accounts of the
University of Oklahoma and Oklahoma State University. The fund currently has on deposit
$1,787,582.64, sufficient for a transfer of $893,791.32 to each university. To date the
institutions have each received an allocation of $5,352,836.04. With the approval of this
allocation, The University of Oklahoma will have received an accumulated total of
$6,246,627.36. The authorized approval for Oklahoma State University was capped at $6
million until receipt of an expanded strategic plan; therefore, OSU will receive an allotment of
$647,163.96, bringing the total received to the authorized $6 million. President Schmidly has
indicated that the expanded plan will be submitted this fall. The OSU Board has recently
119
appointed physicist Dr. Steven McKeever as Vice President for Research who will lead up
preparation of the plan.
It is recommended that the allocation of the Higher Education Facilities Fund be approved at
this time with subsequent allocations and allotments to be made on a quarterly basis, as the
revenue stream to this fund is not certified.
120
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
RESOLUTION NO. 4394
Pursuant to the authority granted under the Constitution of Oklahoma by Articles XIII-A adopted March 11, 1941, which
vests in the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education the allocation of funds appropriated by the Legislature for use in The
Oklahoma State System of Higher Education and pursuant to 70 O.S. 1991, Sections 3210, 3903,4401 and 4408 and pursuant to the
provisions of House Bill No. 2598, of the Forty-Eighth Oklahoma Legislature,
The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education hereby ALLOCATE the sums set out below for the respective special
programs of the specified institutions for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2003, and ending June 30, 2004, said funds to be subsequently
allotted for encumbrance and expenditure during said fiscal year, as provided by law.
Higher Education Facilities Revolving Fund Allocation
University of Oklahoma – Weather Center
Oklahoma State University – Biosensor Laboratory
From: 299-03-605-000000
$1,540,955.28
To: 295-760
295-010
$893,791.32
$647,163,96
Total
$1,540,955.28
Adopted by the State Regents in the meeting of September 12, 2003.
SEAL:
ATTEST:
Joe Cappy, Secretary
Chairman
Marlin “Ike” Glass,
I, Paul G. Risser, do hereby certify that the above is a correct statement of the action authorized by the Oklahoma State Regents for
Higher Education as set forth in the minutes of the regular meeting on September 12, 2003.
Paul G. Risser, Chancellor
Duly subscribed and sworn to before me this 12th day of September 2003.
______________________
Notary Public
____________________________________
My commission expires _____________________
121
122
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #16-b:
Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Professional Development Program
SUBJECT:
Allocation of Funds for FY 2004.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the reimbursement of
$1,356,956 as shown on Resolution No. 4393 and authorize the Chancellor
to approve revised budgets for State System institutions to incorporate the
reimbursement.
BACKGROUND:
The provisions of House Bill 1549, creating the Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Act, authorize
the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education to provide funding to upgrade the quality of
teacher preparation in Oklahoma. The purpose of the Act is to improve the caliber of
elementary and secondary school teachers certified to teach in Oklahoma public school systems.
The Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Act provides for a three-member Residency Committee for
each first-year teacher licensed by the State Board of Education. A Residency Committee
consists of 1) a mentor teacher; 2) a principal or assistant principal designated by the local
board; and 3) a teacher educator from a college or university in Oklahoma.
POLICY ISSUES:
The above recommendation is consistent with State Regents' policy.
ANALYSIS:
The Residency Committee reimbursement to each institution is based on the workload of the
previous year in terms of both the number of committees served and miles traveled. Effective
January 1, 2003, the mileage reimbursement rate decreased from 36.5 to 36.0 cents per mile
traveled; this reduction is reflected in the reimbursement calculations. The 2003-04 allocations
total $1,238,627 to 12 State System institutions and $118,329 to eight independent institutions.
The combined total of $1,356,956 is the amount allocated by the State Regents from lump-sum
appropriations and represents a reduction of $528,171 from the previous year, reflecting the
standard 10 percent reduction in funding per committee from FY02. The allocation summary
table and Resolution No. 4393 are attached.
Attachments
123
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
Oklahoma Teacher Preparation Professional Development Residency Program
2003-2004 Institutional Allocations
INSTITUTION
FY02
Average
Number of
Committees
Served
Reduction in
2002-03
Average
FY03 Average Percent of
Number of
Total
Miles
Number of
Committees
Committees Committees Traveled
Served,
Served
Served
FY02 to FY03
2003-04
Mileage
2001-02
Reimburse- Reimbursement
ment
2002-03
Proposed
Reimbursement
Difference in
Funding from
FY03
University of Oklahoma
159
-29
130
7.94%
30,278
$10,981
$124,567
$95,481
($29,086)
Oklahoma State University
304
-56
248
15.14%
66,679
$24,175
$262,483
$185,375
($77,108)
University of Central Oklahoma
295
-43
252
15.38%
39,235
$14,260
$229,380
$178,060
($51,320)
East Central University
138
-6
132
8.06%
52,331
$18,996
$121,484
$104,796
($16,688)
Northeastern State University
586
-108
478
29.18%
153,284
$55,454
$497,606
$366,154
($131,452)
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
63
-14
49
2.99%
22,428
$8,146
$54,643
$39,996
($14,647)
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
133
-27
106
6.47%
33,212
$12,029
$110,779
$80,929
($29,850)
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
121
-25
96
5.86%
47,884
$17,395
$105,915
$79,795
($26,120)
Cameron University
109
-47
62
3.79%
14,871
$5,398
$84,983
$45,698
($39,285)
Langston University
36
-19
17
1.04%
2,114
$767
$28,233
$11,817
($16,416)
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
33
-7
26
1.59%
6,902
$2,506
$28,728
$19,406
($9,322)
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
61
-19
42
2.56%
10,525
$3,820
$48,750
$31,120
($17,630)
2,038
-400
1,638
100.00%
479,743
$173,927
$1,697,550
$1,238,627
($458,924)
Oklahoma Baptist University
43
-24
19
7.17%
5,163
$1,873
$22,854
$9,093
($13,761)
Oklahoma Christian University
22
-11
11
4.15%
2,680
$975
$10,495
$5,155
($5,340)
Oklahoma City University
40
-13
27
10.19%
4,117
$1,495
$19,175
$11,755
($7,420)
Total State System Institutions
Oklahoma Wesleyan University
29
3
32
12.08%
4,771
$1,732
$14,338
$13,892
($446)
Oral Roberts University
152
-59
93
35.09%
10,447
$3,788
$70,220
$39,128
($31,092)
Southern Nazarene University
27
6
33
12.45%
9,188
$3,335
$12,794
$15,875
$3,081
University of Tulsa
63
-20
43
16.23%
7,885
$2,857
$30,752
$19,197
($11,555)
Mid-America Christian University
12
-5
7
2.64%
4,348
$1,574
$6,950
$4,234
($2,716)
Total Independent Institutions
388
-123
265
100.00%
48,599
$17,629
$187,577
$118,329
($69,249)
124
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
RESOLUTION NO. 4393
Pursuant to the authority granted under the Constitution of Oklahoma by Articles XIII-A adopted March 11, 1941, which
vests in the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education the allocation of funds appropriated by the Legislature for use in The
Oklahoma State System of Higher Education.
The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education hereby ALLOCATE the sums set out below for the respective
institutions of the Oklahoma State System of Higher Education, for the fiscal year beginning July 1, 2003, and ending June 30, 2004,
said funds to be subsequently allotted for encumbrance and expenditure during said fiscal year, as provided by law.
Professional Development Program
From: 210-605
To: 290-000000 As Listed
Institution
Agency No.
University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma State University
University of Central Oklahoma
East Central University
Northeastern State University
Northwestern Oklahoma State University
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
Cameron University
Langston University
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma
760
010
120
230
485
505
660
665
100
420
531
150
Total Public Institutions
Amount of
Allocation
$95,481
$185,375
$178,060
$104,796
$366,154
$39,996
$80,929
$79,795
$45,698
$11,817
$19,406
$31,120
$1,238,627
Private Institutions
$118,329
Adopted by the State Regents in the meeting of September 12, 2003.
SEAL:
ATTEST:
Joe Cappy, Secretary
Marlin “Ike” Glass, Chairman
I, Paul G. Risser, do hereby certify that the above is a correct statement of the action authorized by the Oklahoma State Regents for
Higher Education as set forth in the minutes of the regular meeting on September 12, 2003.
Paul G.Risser, Chancellor
Duly subscribed and sworn to before me this 12th day of September, 2003.
____________________________________
_____________________________________________________
Notary Public
My commission expires _______________________________________________.
125
126
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #17:
Economic Development Generating Excellence (EDGE)
SUBJECT:
Economic Development Generating Excellence
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept the progress report on the
“Economic Development Generating Excellent” initiative and authorize
distribution of funds for the regional forums as indicated.
BACKGROUND:
In the February 3 State of the State Address, Governor Brad Henry charged the Chancellor and
Oklahoma higher education to take the lead in developing a comprehensive and integrated
economic development plan for the State of Oklahoma. Drafts prepared by the Chancellor and
presented and discussed with the State Regents earlier this year were further developed in work
involving Secretary of Commerce Kathy Taylor, the Governor’s office, and a vision committee
of leading Oklahomans assembled in June by the Governor. On August 21, Governor Henry
formally announced the Economic Development Generating Excellence (EDGE) project and
named a 19-member steering committee as well as hundreds of leading Oklahomans to serve on
23 expert panels. A copy of the EDGE brochure and a list of the steering committee and expert
panel memberships are provided.
POLICY ISSUES:
Numerous state agencies and civic organizations have some responsibility for Oklahoma’s
economy. However, because of its key responsibilities and ability to focus objective analyses,
The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education can provide the needed leadership in
developing a comprehensive, integrated economic development plan for the State of Oklahoma.
The System can provide this leadership because it 1) produces graduates with skills to drive the
economy, 2) transfers ideas from the research lab to existing and new businesses, and 3) creates
a high quality environment for retaining college graduates and retaining/attracting business to
Oklahoma. The State System is uniquely positioned to address the drivers of the Oklahoma
economy which are ideas and innovation, skilled workers and talented leaders, enabling
business environment, and capital.
The State Regents 2003-2004 workplan calls for the completion of the EDGE project by fall
2003 and presentation of an agenda for actions to be taken by the Governor, Legislature, higher
education, and the private sector (Quality #2)
127
ANALYSIS:
Building on past research and work, the 23 expert panels will form and submit a small number
of priority recommendations for actions relevant to their areas that can be taken by state
government, higher education, and the private sector to advance the state’s economy. Panel
chairmen will present the recommendations to the Steering Committee on October 7-8.
Regional summits will be held on November 4 to solicit public input on the recommendations
which will then be synthesized by the Steering Committee and presented to Governor Henry.
A total of 22 college and university campuses will host the regional summits on November 4.
Because the summit activity is being held in conjunction with a statewide economic
development conference sponsored by the Oklahoma Associations Supporting International
Studies (OASIS), OASIS is providing $500 each for 14 institutions (ECU, NSU, NWOSU,
SEOSU, SWOSU, OPSU, RSU, UCO, LU, USAO, OSU, OSU-T, OU, and CU) to host
simultaneous events. The OASIS-supported conference is one of the activities covered in the
April 2002 grant received by the State Regents from the Longview Foundation. It is
recommended that the State Regents provide $500 each to the remaining institutions (RCC,
MSC, OCCC, Rose, TCC, NOC, EOSC, WOSC, NEOAMC, and CASC) for the hosting
activity.
Governor Henry will announce the EDGE recommendations on December 3.
128
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #18:
Public Higher Education Needs Assessment
SUBJECT:
Approval of plan
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve plans for proceeding
with components of an Oklahoma higher education needs assessment.
BACKGROUND/POLICY ISSUES:
In carrying out their constitutional and statutory assignments, the State Regents have
historically assessed and gathered data and other input which then shapes public policy
development and guides Regents’ actions.
The State Regents’ workplan calls for the Regents to 1) conduct research on existing public
perception of higher education in Oklahoma with a survey using the 1993 public opinion survey
as a baseline and 2) create and implement a statewide marketing plan in cooperation with the
Communicators Council and based on the research findings. Recent Regents’ research of this
nature includes:
•
Statewide higher education needs assessment conducted by the National Center
for Higher Education Management Systems (1998)
•
Tulsa higher education needs assessment conducted by the National Center for
Higher Education Management Systems (1998)
•
Survey of business and industry needs conducted by the Council on Adult and
Experiential Learning (2000)
Tulsa higher education institutions have recently requested assistance from the State Regents in
conducting a study in the Tulsa area to determine how programs and services delivered by
higher education institutions in Tulsa can best meet area needs.
ANALYSIS:
It is recommended that the State Regents proceed with research and planning that will help the
State System determine and meet public needs for higher education programs and services.
Specifically:
129
1.
TULSA ASSESSMENT. It is recommended that the State Regents provide $15,000 in
Quality Initiative Grant funds to conduct a study of Tulsa area residents to determine
how education programs delivered by Langston University-Tulsa, Northeastern State
University-Broken Arrow, Oklahoma State University-Tulsa, the University of
Oklahoma operations in Tulsa, and Tulsa Community College can best serve students in
the Tulsa area. The study was originally requested by Langston University-Tulsa and
Oklahoma State University-Tulsa.
The Tulsa study will also assist the State Regents in determining the functions of branch
campuses operating in Tulsa.
The study will survey students attending area high schools as well as students attending
TCC, LU-Tulsa, OSU-Tulsa, NSU-Broken Arrow, and OU Tulsa operations to
determine demand for and satisfaction with higher education services. Requests for
proposals will also ask vendors to separately price services that would determine
educational demands of adult students. The project will be complete by December 15,
2003.
2.
STATEWIDE ASSESSMENT. The statewide needs assessment would build on recent
needs assessments noted above as well as those conducted by chambers of commerce,
institutions, and others. A two-part proposal to be implemented fall 2003 is
recommended as follows:
Prospective and Potential Students. It is recommended that the State Regents provide
up to $40,000 in Quality Initiative Grant funds to conduct a statewide assessment to
determine perceived needs, desires, and expectations of prospective and potential
students and to identify any barriers to college participation. The OSU Oklahoma
Social Indicator Survey (OSIS) conducts an annual telephone survey, and the
organization is widely recognized and respected. Adding statewide higher education
needs assessment questions to this survey would be cost feasible and timely and is the
recommended action. The cost of adding questions is dependent upon the number of
questions to be added and estimated to be between $10,000 and $40,000. Funding
would come from the Quality Initiative Grant fund.
Employers and Opinion Leaders. It is recommended that the State Regents approve
plans to proceed with a survey of employers and opinion leaders to determine
satisfaction with Oklahoma college graduates and courses offered. The survey
instrument would be prepared by the State Regents’ office with the counsel of various
advisory councils, and it would build on previous employer surveys. The estimated inhouse costs of $700 would cover postage and printing. Funding would come from the
operating budget of the State Regents.
3.
PUBLIC COMMUNICATIONS.
Assessment results will shape the public
communications efforts of the State Regents. To ensure that a mechanism is in place to
begin communications in a timely way, Regents’ authorization is requested to issue an
RFP and to accept the best proposal. Specifically, the proposal involves the production
and distribution of a short-run radio program to inform the public and advance
objectives such as those relating to higher education and economic development,
enhanced enrollment of traditional and nontraditional students, and enhanced student
130
preparation. It is estimated that the cost of such a communications effort would not
exceed $30,000 to be funded with federal funds from the operating budget. The value
of the effort would be reassessed at the close of FY 03.
131
132
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #19:
State Regents Work Plan
SUBJECT:
Addition to Workplan
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents add an item on capital funding to
the 2003-2004 workplan.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents’ 2003-2004 workplan was approved in April 2003. It is organized around
four central themes or strategic goals which drive both the workplan and the day-to-day work of
the State Regents’ office:
1.
2.
3.
4.
High Quality
Differentiation
Efficiency
Seamless Education
The 2003-2004 workplan is designed to inform the public as to the focus of the State Regents’
work as well as the philosophy underlying the board’s actions. However, the workplan does not
include myriad on-going activities involved in supporting the state’s higher education system.
Because the Regents’ work is constantly responding to the needs of the state, some items in the
workplan may evolve as new opportunities and responsibilities arise.
POLICY ISSUES:
The mission adopted by the State Regents in 1990 continues to drive workplan priorities:
Building a “nationally competitive system of higher education that will provide educational
programs and services universally recognized for excellence, expand frontiers of knowledge,
and enhance quality of life.”
Among State Regents’ duties, is the responsibility for long-range higher education planning.
Adoption and announcement of a two-year workplan signal the direction of Regents’ work and
provide an opportunity for the public and all higher education constituencies to be involved in
the development of specific plans, practices, and policy.
133
ANALYSIS:
It is recommended that the State Regents add the following item to the State Regents 2003-2004
workplan and as Quality Item 15 on the “Key Outcome Indicators of Progress” for the
workplan:
Capital Needs of the State System:
a.
Recommend and secure ongoing revenue to maintain and enhance the
Oklahoma higher education physical plant.
b.
Identify and prioritize capital projects consistent with state needs/goals.
c.
Secure capital bond funding.
In June, the State Regents identified capital funding needs for the State System in the amount of
$3,034,090,995. Some $1.2 billion of this amount will need state funding support.
Existing capital support comes from amounts carved from the higher education operating
budget (Section 13 Offset Funds), G.O. bond funds, federal funds, revolving funds, gifts and
grants funds, revenue bond funds, Section 13 Funds, and other miscellaneous funds. These
funds have restricted usages for the most part, and represent amounts insufficient to maintain or
improve higher education’s aging infrastructure.
A focused effort on meeting the capital needs of the system and securing an ongoing revenue
stream for this purpose is an item that merits addition to the Regents’ workplan.
Attachment
134
135
136
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #20:
State Regents’ Meetings
RECOMMENDATIONS:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the 2004 schedule of
regular meetings for filing with the Office of Secretary of State according
to law.
STAFF ANALYSIS:
The following times and dates for State Regents' regular meetings in 2004 are proposed.
DATE
TIME
LOCATION
Friday, February 13, 2004
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, April 1, 2004
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Friday, May 28, 2004
1 p.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Wednesday, June 30, 2004
1 p.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, September 9, 2004
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, October 28, 2004
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
Thursday, December 9, 2004
9 a.m.
655 Research Parkway, Ste. 200
Oklahoma City, OK
137
138
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #21:
Grants
SUBJECT:
Acceptance of Grants
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept the grants as detailed
below:
BACKGROUND/POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents are authorized (70:3206) to “accept Federal grants and use the same in
accordance with Federal requirements; and accept and disburse grants, gifts, devises, bequests
and other monies and property from foundations, corporations and individuals. . .”
ANALYSIS:
The following grants have been received by the State Regents. It is recommended that the State
Regents receive the funds and authorize their disbursement consistent with applicable grant
requirements.
Grantor
Project
Amount
U. S. Department of Education
Improving Teacher Quality Grant (Mize)
$ 530,396.00
American Forum for Global Raising Awareness and Spreading Best
Education and Asia Society
Practices in International Education Throughout
Oklahoma (Dahlem)
U. S. Department of Education
Gaining Early Awareness and Readiness for
Undergraduate Programs, GEAR UP (Mize)
139
2,900.00
4,450,236.00
140
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #22:
Commendations and Agency Sponsored Events
SUBJECT:
Recognitions
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents accept this report and issue
commendations to staff for state and national recognitions.
COMMENDATIONS:
State Regents’ staff has received the following state and national recognitions:
•
KERMIT McMURRY, Vice Chancellor for Student Services, has been
accepted into the 2003 Lakin Institute.
•
GINA WEKKE, Senior Coordinator for Academic Affairs and Director of
Oklahoma Campus Compact, was elected by the Oklahoma Board of Private
Vocational Schools as Vice Chair for 2003-04.
•
NED BASTOW, General Counsel, was invited to serve on the National
Association of College and University Attorneys’ Committee on Honors and
Awards.
•
KYLE DAHLEM, Director of Teacher Education, presented on the need for
preparing a workforce prepared for global competition at the Administrators’
and School Board Association conference in August and will present on a
similar topic at EncycloMedia in September and at the Oklahoma Education
Association Conference in October.
•
KYLE DAHLEM has been selected by the United States Department of
Education to serve on the Teacher Assistance Corps and provide assistance to
other states on meeting provisions of the No Child Left Behind Act. Ms.
Dahlem will contribute her honoraria to the Chancellor’s Scholarship Fund.
•
PHIL MOSS, Interim Vice Chancellor for Academic Affairs, made
presentations on academic efficiencies and K-12 collaborations at the 2003
MERLOT International Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia.
•
MARY MOWDY, RICK EDINGTON, GARY GAROFFOLO, RICKY
McCULLOUGH, WAYNE SPARKS, JEFF ANDERSON, ERICK OKEKE,
141
LAURA WEISS, LINDA COCKLIN, and KIM ELSTON from the
Guaranteed Student Loan Program staff presented at the Annual School and
Lender Conference in Norman in June. The highly rated conference, hosted
by OGSLP, was attended by 150 representatives from Oklahoma
postsecondary and lending institutions.
•
DOLORES MIZE, Special Assistant to the Chancellor and Associate Vice
Chancellor, has been selected by ACT to serve on a new Task Force on the
ACT State Organizations: Building for the Future. Dr. Mize will also be
authoring a case study project on the State Regents’ student preparation
initiatives for ACT. She has declined the honorarium for both assignments,
and ACT will make contributions to the Chancellor’s Scholars Fund.
•
DOLORES MIZE will be a speaker for the U. S. Department of Education
regional GEAR UP conference to be held in Baton Rouge, Louisiana in
November. She has been asked to discuss the State Regents’ student
preparation initiatives.
•
CHANCELLOR PAUL RISSER has been asked by the national Center for
Higher Education Management Systems to serve as an external evaluator for a
Fund for the Improvement of Postsecondary Education (FIPSE) Learning
Anytime Anyplace Partnership (LAAP) grant. The Chancellor will contribute
his honoria to the Chancellor’s Scholarship Fund.
•
DEBRA STUART, Executive Director of State System Research, has been
invited to participate in a meeting on student tracking technical issues related
to the National Center for Higher Education Managements Systems’
(NCHEMS) project to develop a comprehensive approach to tracking student
progression on a national basis. The work is funded by the Lumina
Foundation.
•
COMMUNICATIONS STAFF brought home awards from the 2003
Oklahoma College Public Relations Association conference as follows: 1)
DAYNA ROWE – 2nd place in four-color poster design for “Student Loan
Default Prevention Poster,” 2) DAYNA ROWE and REBECCA STOKES –
3rd place in brochure/flyer/booklet (4-color) for “What’s Your Plan for Life?
Your Guide to Preparing for College 2002-2003,” and 3) TERI SIMONTON –
2nd place in web design for “Student Center Web Site.”
•
The State Regents’ Student Civic Engagement Initiative was highlighted in
Peer Review, spring 2003 edition in an article on The Faculty Role in Civic
Engagement.
AGENCY SPONSORSHIPS:
Many of the programs administered by the State Regents call for the convening of individuals
and organizations to advance work objectives. Various grants administered by the board
specifically provide for the sponsorship of conferences, and many of the items on the State
142
Regents’ workplan call for the conduct of conferences to assist Oklahoma colleges and
universities in various areas. The following activities have been planned:
EVENT
DATE
LOCATION
COST
Course Equivalency Conference
sponsored by the State Regents
September 25,
2003
University of Central
Oklahoma, Edmond
Cost of
refreshments
Congressional Staff Reception
sponsored NCHELP
September 24,
2003
Hotel Washington
NCHELP will
cover expenses
Oklahoma Student Leadership
Retreat and Council on Student
Affairs Retreat
September 26-27,
2003
Westin Hotel,
Oklahoma City
Oklahoma Student Leadership
Retreat and Council on Student
Affairs Retreat
sponsored by Oklahoma Campus
Compact
October 1-2, 2003
College and university
campuses
October 3, 2003
Double Tree Hotel,
Tulsa
4th Annual GEAR UP State
Conference
Research Workshop
EDGE Regional Forum
October 14, 2003
November 4, 2003
Regents’ Conference
Room
OneNet and College
and University
Campuses
Cash for College, OSRHE and
GSLP sponsorship with other
organizations
January 27 or 29,
2004
OETA Broadcast
College Goal Sunday
February 1, 2004
College and university
campuses
143
Cost to be covered
by registration
Nominal costs to be
covered by VOICE
grant
GEAR UP grant
will cover cost as
will generous
sponsorships from
ACT, The College
Board, and
Innovative
Learning
$7,500 plus out-ofpocket travel for
consultants
Hosted by
campuses
With $500 support
per campus from
OSRHE to defray
expenses
$5,000 Quality
Initiative Grant
Lumina Grant will
support
144
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-a (1):
Programs
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve modifications to existing
programs, as described below.
BACKGROUND:
Oklahoma State University – Oklahoma City (OSU-OKC)
4 degree program requirement changes
1 option name change
Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC)
1 option addition
Seminole State College (SSC)
3 option additions
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Electronics Engineering Technology (006)
Degree program requirement change:
• change degree program requirements to include 6 hours of communications and
delete other general education course options;
• change will meet State Regents’ minimum degree program requirements;
• no courses will be deleted or added; and
• no new funds required and no funds available for reallocation.
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Construction Technology (065)
Degree program requirement change:
• change degree program requirements to include 6 hours of communications and
delete other general education course options;
• change will meet State Regents’ minimum degree program requirements;
• no courses will be deleted or added; and
• no new funds required and no funds available for reallocation.
145
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Civil/Surveying Technology (018)
Degree program requirement change:
• change degree program requirements to include 6 hours of communications and
delete other general education course options;
• change will meet State Regents’ minimum degree program requirements;
• no courses will be deleted or added; and
• no new funds required and no funds available for reallocation.
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in General Engineering Technology (010)
Degree program requirement change:
• change degree program requirements to include 6 hours of communications and
delete other general education course options;
• change will meet State Regents’ minimum degree program requirements;
• no courses will be deleted or added; and
• no new funds required and no funds available for reallocation.
OSU-OKC – Associate in Applied Science in Technical Communications (064)
Option name change:
• change “illustration emphasis” option name to “illustration/multimedia
emphasis;”
• change more appropriately represents the content of the option to students and
employers;
• no courses will be deleted or added; and
• no new funds required and no funds available for reallocation.
OCCC – Associate in Applied Science in Computer Science (052)
Option addition:
• add option in “web design and development;”
• option addition is designed to meet student and employer demand;
• no courses will be added; and
• no new funds required.
SSC – Associate in Applied Science in Applied Technology (120)
Option additions:
• add options in “emergency medical technician – paramedic” and “aviation
maintenance technology” to be offered through amended cooperative
agreements with Gordon Cooper Technology Center;
• add “medical office technology” option to be offered through an amended
cooperative agreement with Wes Watkins Technology Center;
• no courses will be added; and
• no new funds required.
146
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-a (2):
Program Modification
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional request.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approved modification
to an existing program, as described below.
BACKGROUND:
Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC)
1 program admission requirement change
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
OCCC – Associate in Applied Science in Physical Therapist Assistant (055)
Program admission requirement change:
• increase high school GPA from 2.75 to 3.00;
• increase minimum GED score from 53 to 55;
• add provision that the college retention GPA will be considered if the student
has 12 or more college credits in 1000-level science, math, social science or
English courses; and
• increased admission requirements will help ensure adequate student preparation
and are expected to reduce the program attrition rate.
147
148
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-a (3):
Program Suspensions
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional requests to suspend degree programs.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approved institutional
requests to suspend an existing academic program, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
Southeastern Oklahoma State University (SEOSU) requests authorization to suspend the
Bachelor of Arts in Social Gerontology (055).
Connors State College (CSC) requests authorization to suspend the Associate in Science in
Business Accounting (004).
Oklahoma City Community College (OCCC) requests authorization to suspend the Certificate
in Financial Services (118).
POLICY ISSUES:
Suspending programs is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program
Review,” which was revised at the January 29, 1999 meeting to include a “suspend” category
for academic programs. Students may not be recruited or admitted into suspended programs.
Additionally, suspended programs may not be listed in institutional catalogs and will be
reinstated or deleted within three years.
ANALYSIS:
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
SEOSU requests suspension of the Bachelor of Arts in Social Gerontology (055). The program
is low performing, and the SEOSU administration would like to conduct a thorough self-study
and program review to determine the program’s future. Eight students remain in the program
and will be accommodated. It is understood that in accordance with the Program Review
Policy, no students will be recruited or admitted to this program, and the program will not be
listed in the college catalog. It is further understood that SEOSU will reinstate or delete the
suspended program by July 15, 2006.
149
Connors State College
CSC requests suspension of the Associate in Science in Business Accounting (004). The
Business Division indicates that the program is almost identical in content and requirements to
the Associate in Science in Business Administration. CSC will thoroughly review the program
to determine its viability and future. Twenty-six students remain in the program and will be
accommodated through the business administration program. It is understood that in
accordance with the Program Review Policy, no students will be recruited or admitted to this
program, and the program will not be listed in the college catalog. It is further understood that
CSC will reinstate or delete the suspended program by June 1, 2006.
Oklahoma City Community College
OCCC requests suspension of the Certificate in Financial Services (118) due to low enrollment.
The program was originally developed with a corporate partner to provide training primarily for
their employees. Due to reorganization and revised priorities within the firm, this program was
not marketed to their employees. Attempts at recruiting students from other businesses did not
meet with success. One student remains in the program and will be accommodated. It is
understood that in accordance with the Program Review Policy, no students will be recruited or
admitted to this program, and the program will not be listed in the college catalog. It is further
understood that OCCC will reinstate or delete the suspended program by September 1, 2006.
Authorization was granted by the Chancellor for the above requests. State Regents’ ratification
is
requested.
150
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-a (4):
Degree Program Inventory Reconciliation
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional request for degree program inventory reconciliation.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the institutional request
for a degree program inventory reconciliation, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
Tulsa Community College (TCC) requests authorization for option additions, deletions, and
name changes; one program addition; and additional program name changes or deletions to
reconcile institutional practice with the State Regents’ degree program inventory.
POLICY ISSUES:
These actions are consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
TCC has historically offered options under both degree and certificate programs. Over the
years, varying interpretations regarding State Regents’ definitions of different programmatic
levels (option vs. degree program levels) have led to a situation in which institutional practices
and intent are inconsistent with the State Regents’ degree program inventory. TCC requests
authorization to make revisions to the official inventory as detailed in the following table. In
summary, TCC requests to delete 47 options, add 29 options, and rename 12 options.
Additionally, TCC requests authorization to add one currently existing program, the Associate
in Science in Quality Control Technology, NSU transfer option, delete 7 programs, and rename
7 programs.
Approval of the requested revisions to the official degree program and option inventory will
have no impact on current academic practice or offerings. Since the AS in Quality Control
Technology, NSU transfer option is currently operating at maturity, no new courses or costs are
added with this reconciliation. It is understood that this program will be subject to the regular
five-year program review schedule.
151
TULSA COMMUNITY COLLEGE
DEGREE PROGRAM INVENTORY RECONCILIATION
SEPTEMBER 2003
OPTION-LEVEL CHANGES
Degree Program
Certificate in Computer
Information Systems (133)
Certificate in Numerical
Control/Machine Technology
(180)
Certificate in Management
(193)
Option Additions
Add four options:
• “Oracle database
administrator,”
• “CNE,”
• “MCSE,” and
• “Windows 2000 (MSCE
preparation).”
Certificate in Marketing (207)
Delete “NT systems”
Option Name Changes
•
•
•
Change “web graphics” to
“web design cert.”
Change “computer desktop
video production” to “digital
video certificate.”
Change “Microsoft certified
software developer” to
“Microsoft certified solutions
developer.”
• Delete “Craftsmanship 2000.”
Add two options:
• “call center management
certificate” and
• “food manufacturing technology,
2d certificate”
Certificate in Human Services
(205)
Certificate in Child
Development (206)
Option Deletions
•
Add one option:
• “parateacher certificate.”
• Delete “internship” (code 075). [This is
a duplicate code; there is only one
internship option.]
Delete all five options:
• “child and family services,”
• community services management,”
• corrections, “
• “developmental disabilities,” and
• “gerontology.”
Delete three options:
• “center director,”
• “early childhood,” and
• middle childhood.
• Delete “e-business technical”
152
• Change “school age
child/youth worker” to “school
age certificate.”
Degree Program
Option Additions
Certificate in Health
Information Technology (237)
[See also program name change
below.]
Certificate in Business (241)
Associate in Arts in Liberal
Arts (009)
Associate in Arts in Social
Sciences (015)
Associate in Arts in
International Studies (213)
Associate in Science in
Business Administration (003)
Option Deletions
Option Name Changes
• Delete “applied horticulture options”
(option code 046).
Delete two options:
• “biomedical equipment technology,”
and
• “automation technology.”
Delete all three options:
• “coding & reimbursement specialist –
hospital & physician,”
• “coding and reimbursement specialist –
hospital,” and
• “coding & reimbursement specialist –
physician
Certificate in Horticulture
Technology (209)
Certificate in Electronics
Technology (223)
• Change “accreditation legal
secretary” to “accredited legal
secretary.”
Add two options:
• “customer account rep 1 (city of
Tulsa),” and
• “customer account rep 2 (city of
Tulsa).”
Add four options:
• “film emphasis,”
• “international emphasis,”
• “telecourse,” and
• “American studies.”
• Add “psychology” option.
• Add “Africa” option.
Add two options:
• “business education,” and
• “management.”
153
Degree Program
Option Additions
Associate in Science in
Engineering-Pre (007)
[See also program name change
below.]
Add three options:
• “electrical and computer
engineering, OSU transfer,”
• “mechanical engineering, OSU
transfer,” and
• “electronics technology, NSU
transfer.”
Add two options:
• “biology,” and
• “chemistry.”
Add two options:
• “marketing apparel & design
merchandising,” and
• marketing, NSU option”
• Add “individual, family &
community services” [See also
deletion of Associate in Science
in Individual, Family, and
Community Services (220)
program below.]
Associate in Science in Physical
Science (014) [See also
program name change below.]
Associate in Science in
Marketing (222)
Associate in Science in Human
Services (228)
Option Deletions
• Change “family relations and
child development” to “child
development, NSU transfer
option.”
• Change “child & family” to
“child & family, OSU transfer
option.”
Associate in Science in Child
Development (246)
Associate in Applied Science in
Electronics Technology (031)
Associate in Applied Science in
Numerical Control/Machine
Technology (045)
Associate in Applied Science in
Marketing (046)
Option Name Changes
• Change “electronics
engineering technology” to
“electronics engineering
technology, OSU transfer.”
• Add “wireless option” option.
Delete two options:
• “first class stationery engineer” and
• “electromechanical support tech.”
Delete two options:
• “computer aided manufacturing” and
• “machine operator option.”
• Delete “transfer” option.
154
Degree Program
Option Additions
Associate in Applied Science in
Medical Assistant (048)
Associate in Applied Science in
Computer Information Systems
(098)
• Add “Novell Netware (CNE)”
option.
Option Deletions
Delete two options:
• “medical transcription” and
• “medical insurance and physician
reimbursement.”
Delete three options:
• “computer systems technician option,”
• “computer user,” and
• Microsoft certified software developer.”
Associate in Applied Science in
Manufacturing Engineering
Technology (151)
Associate in Applied Science in
Business (153)
Associate in Applied Science in
Health Information Technology
(159) [See also program name
change below.]
Associate in Applied Science in
Child Development and Family
Relations (200)
Associate in Applied Science in
Desktop Publishing (216)
• Add “customer account
representative 2” option.
Delete four options:
• “insurance customer service
representative,”
• “certified professional secretary,”
• “accredited legal secretary,” and
• “receptionist.”
Delete two options:
• “medical records” and
• “coding & reimbursement specialist.”
Delete four options:
• “parateacher,”
• “child development credential
preparation,”
• “professional nanny,” and
• “residential child care.”
Delete both options:
• “professional option” and
• “specialist.”
155
Option Name Changes
• Change “computer desktop
video production” to “digital
video.”
• Change “PC help desk” to
“certified systems support
technician.”
• Change “CNE Oracle
database” to “Oracle database
administrator.”
• Change “instrument and
control specialist” to
“instrumentation & controls
specialist (Kwikset).”
Degree Program
Option Additions
Associate in Applied Science in
Telecommunications (230)
Option Deletions
Option Name Changes
• Delete “drafting and computer aided
design” option.
Associate in Applied Science in
Design Engineering
Technology (029)
Associate in Applied Science in
Stage Production Technology
(238)
Delete all six options:
• “lighting,”
• “costume,”
• “entertainment construction,”
• “rigging,”
• “sound,” and
• “stage management.”
• Add “telecommunications
management” option.
PROGRAM-LEVEL CHANGES
Program Addition
Program Deletions
Program Name Changes
Add Associate in Science in Quality Control
Technology, NSU transfer option. [This is a mature
degree program that has been offered for some time,
and if approved by the State Regents, will be subject
to the regular five-year review cycle.]
Certificate in Medical Office Administration
(183)
Change Certificate in Desktop Publishing
(217) to Certificate in Desktop Publishing,
Specialist.
Change Certificate in Health Information
Technology (237) to Certificate in Health
Information Technology, Coding &
Reimbursement Specialist. [See also option
revisions above.]
156
Program Addition
Program Deletions
Program Name Changes
Associate in Science in Individual, Family, and
Community Service (220) [Curriculum will
remain as an option under the Associate in
Science in Human Services (228).]
Associate in Science in Biology (002)
[Curriculum will remain as an option under
the Associate in Science in Physical Science
(014).]
Change Associate in Science in Physical
Science (014) to Associate in Science in
Science Related Fields of Concentration. [See
also option revision above.]
Change Associate in Science in EngineeringPre (007) to Associate in Science in
Engineering [See also option revisions above.]
Change Associate in Science in Health
Professions (010) to Associate in Science in
Pre-Professional Science Related Fields of
Concentration.
Associate in Applied Science in Electronics
Engineering Technology (116). [Curriculum
currently exists as an option under the
Associate in Science in Engineering-Pre
(007).]
Change Associate in Applied Science in Health
Information Technology (159) to Associate in
Applied Science in Health Information
Technology (Medical Records).
[See also option deletions above.]
Change Associate in Applied Science in Child
Development and Family Relations (200) to
Associate in Applied Science in Child
Development
157
Program Addition
Program Deletions
Associate in Applied Science in
Telecommunications Management (248)
[Curriculum currently exists as an option
under the Associate in Applied Science in
Telecommunications.]
Certificate in CIS-Digital Video (250)
[Curriculum currently exists as an option
under the Certificate in Computer Information
Systems.]
Certificate in CIS-Web Design (251)
[Curriculum currently exists as an option
under the Certificate in Computer Information
Systems.]
158
Program Name Changes
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-b (1):
Electronic Delivery of Degree Program
SUBJECT:
Redlands Community College (RCC). Approval of request to offer an existing
degree program via electronic media.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve RCC’s request to offer
the Associate in Applied Science in Criminal Justice (045) via electronic
media with the stipulation that continuation of the electronic offering
beyond spring 2005 will depend upon the successful completion of a “best
practice” review prior to January 1, 2005.
BACKGROUND:
RCC’s distance education offerings have grown over the last decade to include ITV courses,
telecourses, and computer-based curricula. In 2000-01, RCC offered over 130 courses
comprising 3,165 credit hours via electronic delivery and reported 1,068 enrollments in
electronically delivered courses. RCC requests authorization to offer the existing Associate in
Applied Science in Criminal Justice (045) via electronic media.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policies and Procedures Pertaining to the
Delivery of Electronically Delivered and Traditional Off-Campus Courses and Programs.”
The Electronic Media Policy calls for a two-step approval process. Evidence of specified
quality criteria must be provided at the time of the initial request, with provisional approval
granted if the criteria are addressed satisfactorily. Following provisional approval, the
institution must conduct a “best practice” review that provides quantitative and qualitative
analysis of the electronic media offerings through a rigorous review of exemplary programs
from other institutions. Final approval will depend on the results of this review.
Consistent with revisions to the Electronic Media Policy approved at the State Regents’ May
30, 2003 meeting, once an institution has successfully completed a best practice review process
and received final approval of an electronic delivery program, separate reviews will not be
required to offer additional existing programs via electronic media.
ANALYSIS:
RCC has requested approval to offer the Associate in Applied Science in Criminal Justice (045)
electronically. No new courses will be added. RCC’s request addresses satisfactorily the
criteria listed in the Electronic Media Policy. These criteria include faculty qualifications and
159
training, student demand, adequacy of resources, and funding.
summarized below.
RCC’s responses are
•
Faculty. Faculty teaching online courses hold the same academic credentials as faculty
teaching traditional courses. The Instructional Technology and Media Services
Department provides technology support and faculty development through workshops
and individual instruction specifically related to electronic course delivery. Technicians
are also available to faculty during the course development process.
•
Demand. RCC has been asked to participate in a pilot program with the Oklahoma
Department of Corrections (ODOC), whereby RCC will provide its Correctional
Officer Cadet option under the Associate in Applied Science in Criminal Justice to
ODOC employees. The pilot will include eight correctional facilities. Offering the
degree program electronically will provide the flexibility required for time- and placebound officers to participate. Preliminary discussions with ODOC employees indicate
significant interest in pursuing the program via distance education.
•
Student Support Services. ODOC facilities house educational centers, through which
RCC will offer access to online library resources and help-desk services. A variety of
student services, including admission, enrollment, and academic advising, will be
provided by RCC personnel during on-site sessions, as well as online and by telephone.
Financial aid information is available online, and questions can be answered by email.
Student-faculty interaction will be facilitated through email and telephone. Online
courses are delivered on the WebCT platform, and telecourses are available in three
different formats: OETA programming; streaming video on the RCC website; and
videotape.
•
Funding. No new funding will be required to deliver this program electronically.
Existing allocations in the institutional budget fund faculty, student support services,
and the Instructional Technology/Media Services Department.
As indicated above, RCC will undergo a rigorous “best practice” review during the first two
years of the programs’ online offerings. Continuation of the electronic delivery beyond spring
2005 will depend on the results of the review.
160
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-b (2):
Electronic Delivery of Degree Programs
SUBJECT:
Tulsa Community College (TCC). Approval of request to offer existing degree
programs via electronic media.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve TCC’s request to offer
the Associate in Applied Science in Business (153) and Certificate in
Business (241) via electronic media with the stipulation that continuation
of the electronic offerings beyond spring 2005 will depend upon the
successful completion of a “best practice” review prior to January 1, 2005.
BACKGROUND:
TCC has been a leader in distance education, offering telecourses beginning in 1979 and webbased curricula beginning spring 1998. In 2000-01, TCC offered over 200 courses via
electronic delivery and led the State System with 7,122 enrollments in electronically delivered
courses. TCC requests authorization to offer the existing Associate in Applied Science in
Business (153) and Certificate in Business (241) via electronic media.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policies and Procedures Pertaining to the
Delivery of Electronically Delivered and Traditional Off-Campus Courses and Programs.”
The Electronic Media Policy calls for a two-step approval process. Evidence of specified
quality criteria must be provided at the time of the initial request, with provisional approval
granted if the criteria are addressed satisfactorily. Following provisional approval, the
institution must conduct a “best practice” review that provides quantitative and qualitative
analysis of the electronic media offerings through a rigorous review of exemplary programs
from other institutions. Final approval will depend on the results of this review.
Consistent with revisions to the Electronic Media Policy approved at the State Regents’ May
30, 2003 meeting, once an institution has successfully completed a best practice review process
and received final approval of an electronic delivery program, separate reviews will not be
required to offer additional existing programs via electronic media.
ANALYSIS:
TCC has requested approval to offer the Associate in Applied Science in Business and
Certificate in Business via a variety of methods, including traditional classroom, online webbased, and telecourse instruction. No new courses will be added.
161
TCC’s request addresses satisfactorily the criteria listed in the Electronic Media Policy. These
criteria include faculty qualifications and training, student services, adequacy of resources, and
funding. TCC’s responses are summarized below:
•
Faculty. Faculty teaching online courses hold the same academic credentials as faculty
teaching traditional courses. The Office of Distance Learning provides faculty support
services and training specifically related to electronic delivery through several venues,
including lead teacher training, which is offered collaboratively with Tulsa Technology
Center staff; a variety of workshops; courses in technology and/or pedagogy of
electronic course delivery; and mentoring by TCC faculty with experience and expertise
in Internet delivery.
•
Student Support Services. Access to student services is available through the TCC
website and via telephone. Online services include library resources and admission
information, with an application for admission that may be completed and submitted
online. Students are able to enroll, drop and add classes, view grades and transcripts,
and pay tuition online or by telephone. Financial aid, grant and scholarship, and loan
information is available online, and questions can be answered by email. Academic
advising and career placement services may also be accessed by phone or email.
Student-faculty interaction in the telecourses will be facilitated through email and
telephone. Electronic delivery via the Internet utilizes Blackboard, a course
management system, which allows interaction through online threaded discussion
forums; electronic chat rooms; electronic posting of course syllabi, assignments,
instructions, lecture notes, and other documents; short video clips; streaming video; and
email. Many telecourse instructors use Blackboard in addition to television delivery.
•
Demand. TCC continues to address the need for anytime, anywhere education by
providing flexibility through electronic offerings to students who would otherwise be
unable to pursue academic degrees. The significant growth in courses offered online
and enrollments demonstrates student demand. TCC works closely with the business
community to provide educational opportunities for employees; electronic delivery
provides the greatest flexibility for these students.
•
Funding. No new funding will be required to deliver these programs electronically.
Existing funding within the institutional budget provides for faculty, support services,
and the Office of Distance Learning. Much of the enrollment growth in online courses
represents a shift from traditional on-campus offerings, and TCC has reallocated funds
accordingly. Distance learning students pay the same tuition and fees as on-campus
students.
As indicated above, TCC will undergo a rigorous “best practice” review during the first two
years of the programs’ online offerings. Continuation of the electronic delivery beyond spring
2005 will depend on the results of the review.
162
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-b (3):
Electronic Delivery of Existing Programs
SUBJECT:
Approval of institutional request for “best practices” review schedule extension.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve an institutional request
to extend the “best practices” review schedule for existing degree
programs, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
At the State Regents’ June 29, 2001 meeting, Cameron University (CU) was authorized to offer
the Associate in Science in Interdisciplinary Studies (365) and Associate in Applied Science in
Applied Technology (595) via electronic media with the stipulation that continuation of the
electronic offerings beyond fall 2003 would depend upon the successful completion of a “best
practices” review prior to August 1, 2003. CU requests authorization to extend the best practice
review schedule for these programs to December 1, 2003.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policies and Procedures Pertaining to the
Delivery of Electronically Delivered and Traditional Off-Campus Courses and Programs.”
ANALYSIS:
CU requests extension of the review schedule to allow adequate time to conduct the “best
practices” review. Due to key personnel changes in the administrative structure for distance
learning programs and in campus leadership, the review process was not completed within the
timeline prescribed by the State Regents in June 2001. Institutional officials estimate that the
best practice review will be completed by December 1.
163
164
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-b (4):
Electronic Media
SUBJECT:
Ratification of the approval of courses for the Southern Regional Education
Board (SREB) Electronic Campus.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the approval of courses for
inclusion in the SREB Electronic Campus.
BACKGROUND:
The SREB Electronic Campus was created in 1997 as an “electronic marketplace” for courses,
programs and services offered electronically by accredited colleges and universities in the
SREB member states. At the September 5, 1997 meeting, the State Regents approved the
inclusion of three courses from Oklahoma institutions in the Electronic Campus pilot offerings
for spring 1998. Over time, participation in the program has expanded, and the State Regents
have periodically approved inclusion of programs and courses from Oklahoma institutions.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Policy and Procedures Pertaining to the
Delivery of Electronically Delivered and Traditional Off-Campus Courses and Programs.”
While the comprehensive universities are functioned to offer courses and programs out of state,
this policy allows for other institutions to offer courses out of state with State Regents’
approval.
ANALYSIS:
In 1996, the SREB began plans to develop the Electronic Campus (originally called the
Electronic Common Market), a distance education consortium. The Electronic Campus serves
as a centralized listing of approved distance education courses and programs from participating
SREB states; thus, it does not grant credit or degrees. Institutions provide the education and
services, and as such determine tuition and fees, set enrollment procedures, and provide related
student services. The Electronic Campus has continued to expand and now lists over 7,065
courses and 250 degree programs from more than 250 colleges and universities in the south.
A proposal for new Electronic Campus offerings has been received from the University of
Central Oklahoma (UCO) comprising 28 individual courses. Offerings from Oklahoma
institutions listed within the Electronic Campus now total 398 courses and 12 programs.
165
UCO has provided information concerning the quality of the courses to be offered and has
affirmed that the submission complies fully with the Electronic Campus Principles of Good
Practice.
Authorization was granted by the Chancellor for the above request. State Regents’ ratification
is requested.
Attachment
166
Courses for the
Southern Regional Education Board - Electronic Campus
COURSES
Institution
University of Central Oklahoma
Course Listing
ART 4223
ART 4343
ART 4363
ART 4383
ART 5223
ART 5343
ART 5363
ART 5383
IME 5013
IME 5023
FACS 3633
FACS 4453
FACS 4572
FACS 5572
FACS 5910
SPED 4123
SPED 5123
ENG 1113
ENG 1213
ENG 4723
ENG 4910
ENG 4910
ENG 5413
ENG 5723
ENG 5910
ENG 5910
SOC 2103
FNRL 4483
167
Title
West African Art
Multicultural Art
Art by Women
Methods for Teacher Art History
West African Art
Multicultural Art
Art by Women
Methods for Teaching Art History
Library Materials for Secondary Schooling
Materials Selection
Problems of Today’s Consumer
Consumer Management
Career Education
Career Education
Consumer Management
Theories And Tech Except In
Theories And Tech Except In
English Grammar & Composition
English Composition
Composition Pedagogies
18th Century British Fiction
Greek Tragedy
Tesl Grammar
Composition Pedagogies
18th Century British Fiction
Greek Tragedy
Sociology
Psychology of Grief
168
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-c:
Cooperative Agreements
SUBJECT:
Ratification of approved institutional request for cooperative agreements.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify Oklahoma State University
Technical Branch – Okmulgee’s (OSUTB-OKM) request for cooperative
agreements, as detailed below.
BACKGROUND:
In 1988, the State Regents approved the “Guidelines for Approval of Cooperative Agreements
Between Technology Centers and Colleges.” The policy was designed to expand Oklahomans’
educational opportunities and to encourage colleges and technology centers to develop
resource-sharing partnerships. The policy guides the creation of cooperative agreements
between Oklahoma’s colleges and technology centers. Currently, 308 cooperative agreements
(involving 117 associate in applied science programs) are offered through 18 colleges and 29
career technology centers (CTC) and 2 out-of-state CTCs.
At the January 24, 1997 meeting, the State Regents approved revisions to the Cooperative
Agreement Policy that allow high school students meeting specified requirements to enroll in
cooperative agreements.
OSUTB-OKM requests authorization for cooperative agreements with High Plains Technology
Center (HPTC), Northwest Technology Center (NWTC), and Pioneer Technology Center
(PTC). These cooperative agreements will allow students to receive college credit for
coursework completed at the technology centers toward associate in applied science degrees as
detailed below.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is consistent with the State Regents’ “Guidelines for Approval of Cooperative
Agreements.”
ANALYSIS:
OSUTB-OKM requests authorization to establish cooperative agreements with the following
technology centers whereby students may earn up to 30 credit hours toward the following
associate in applied science degree programs:
169
At High Plains Technology Center:
• Automotive Service Technology (004)
• Diesel and Heavy Equipment Technology (018)
• Business Systems Technology (027)
• Office Information Systems Technology (039)
• Construction Technology (011)
• Information Technology (012)
At Northwest Technology Center (both in Alva and Fairview):
• Automotive Collision Repair Technology (003)
• Automotive Service Technology (004)
• Business Systems Technology (027)
• Office Information Systems Technology (039)
• Information Technology (012)
At Pioneer Technology Center:
• Automotive Service Technology (004)
• Construction Technology (011)
• Food Service Management (046)
It is understood that general education courses required for these degree programs will not be
offered as part of these agreements, and high school students will be permitted to enroll in
accordance with State Regents’ policy.
Institutional and CTC faculty and staff will serve on oversight and evaluation committees for
the cooperative agreements. The committees will meet at least annually to review course
content, relevance, and instructional methods as related to the established course and program
competencies.
Approval was granted by the Chancellor. State Regents’ ratification.
170
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-d (1):
Administrative Procedures Act
SUBJECT:
Minority Teacher Recruitment Center (MTRC)
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents adopt this amendment to the
rules of administrative operations, which amendment shall add a new
subchapter, Minority Teacher Recruitment Center, and further, continue
with the rule amendment process pursuant to the Oklahoma
Administrative Procedures Act.
BACKGROUND:
This agenda item was originally presented to the State Regents at their May 30, 2003.
Following the required APA public comment period, the item is now presented for final action
on the adoption of the program rule amendment.
70 O.S. § 6-130 gave the OSHRE the authority to establish and administer the MTRC.
Pursuant to a directive by the state legislature, a compliance review was conducted of the
OSRHE’s Administrative Code Rules. This review identified the absence of administrative
rules related to the OSRHE MTRC.
POLICY ISSUES:
The proposed rules describe to interested parties the MTRC and the programs and services
offered by the center. In addition the rules explain the role and duties of the advisory
committee.
This action is necessary to comply with essential agency rules as defined by the Administrative
Procedures Act.
ANALYSIS:
The amended rules would clarify:
ƒ The role of the MTRC;
ƒ The duties of the MTRC Advisory Committee;
ƒ Programs and services provided by the MTRC.
.
171
CHAPTER 1. ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS
SUBCHAPTER 13. MINORITY TEACHER RECRUITMENT CENTER
610:1-13-1. Purpose
The purpose of this Subchapter is to describe the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center
(MTRC). The MTRC is designed for the recruiting, retaining, and placing of minority teachers
in public schools of the State of Oklahoma [70 O.S. § 6-130]. The Act states that such efforts
shall include but not be limited to:
(1) The provision and coordination of support services to teacher training programs in
state institutions of higher education, including the funding of grants for campus-based
recruitment, retention and placement programs that assist minority students who intend
to become teachers;
(2) The establishment and development of recruiting programs for potential minority
teachers, including pre-collegiate curricular courses that emphasize school success and
the opportunity to investigate teaching as a career choice, future teacher clubs and
collegiate programs designed to recruit students making transitions form other careers
and other areas of study;
(3) The hosting of conferences dealing with issues that effect minority teacher
recruitment, retention, and placement;
(4) The creation of activities in the public and private schools of Oklahoma which
enhance the image of the teaching profession; and
(5) The creation and development of placement services providing assistance to both
minority educators and school districts seeking to hire qualified minority teachers. [70
O.S. § 6-130]
610:1-13-2 Minority Teacher Recruitment Advisory Committee
The MTRC has a 19-member Minority Teacher Recruitment Advisory Committee. The
advisory Committee has oversight of the implementation of MTRC and shall advise the
operation of the MTRC.
(1) Duties.
(A) Make recommendations on the annual operating budget of the Minority
Teacher Recruitment Center and verify that the funds allocated to the Center
through the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are utilized
exclusively by the Center by function;
(B) Advise the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education of unmet needs
within the state in the implementation of the Center's activities;
(C) Annually comment publicly on the progress of the Center;
(D) Assist the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education in developing and
reporting information about the Center when necessary;
(E) Meet as often as necessary to conduct business; and
(F) Keep official minutes of the Committee meetings which shall be made
available to the public upon request. [70 O.S. § 6-129.1 D]
610:1-13-3 Programs and Services.
To achieve its primary goal of recruiting, retaining, and placing minority teachers in the
public schools of the State of Oklahoma, the MTRC offers a variety of programs and services.
Parties interested in the programs and services can obtain additional information by contacting
the MTRC at the State Regents for Higher Education office.
(1) Teacher Cadet High School Program. The Teacher Cadet program serves as an
172
outreach effort creating an interest among high school students for teaching careers and
promoting an understanding of our nation’s education system. The Teacher Cadet
curriculum consists of a yearlong course taught at the high school site by teachers
selected by the high school principal. During the yearlong course, students examine
how children learn, study the educational system from a hands-on perspective, and gain
practical experience in elementary, middle school and high school classrooms.
(2) Pro Team Middle School Program. The goal of Pro Team program is to make
middle school and junior high school students aware of the skills needed to complete
college and consider education as a viable career option. During the semester-long
course, students actively participate in activities that focus on building self-esteem,
helping others, developing group skills and building a vision for a professional future.
(3) Collegiate Partnership Grant Program. The MTRC’s Collegiate Partnership
Grant Program provides grants to projects and activities that support the overall goals
and objectives of the MTRC. In this program, the MTRC provides funds to individual
public school sites for the Teacher Cadet and ProTeam programs, to school districts and
institutions of higher education that identify public school students interested in
becoming teachers and provide on-campus activities for them and their parents, as well
as, activities that promote teacher education to undergraduate students on the campus.
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174
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-d (2):
Revocation of Rules
SUBJECT:
Regents Education Program
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents give approval to the revised
administrative rules for the Regents Education Program, as submitted,
and continue the rule revocation process pursuant to the Oklahoma
Administrative Procedures Act.
BACKGROUND:
A review by OSRHE legal counsel of the current administrative rules relating to the Regents
Education Program concluded that the rules do not meet the APA definition of a rule. The
Regents Education Program rule is an internal policy statement; therefore it should remain as a
Regent’s policy, but be revoked as an administrative rule.
POLICY ISSUES:
This action is necessary to comply with the definition of rules as defined by the Administrative
Procedures Act.
ANALYSIS:
Approval by the State Regents would allow the process of revocation of the unnecessary
administrative rule to continue as defined by the Administrative Procedures Act.
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TITLE 610. STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
CHAPTER 1. ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS
SUBCHAPTER 9. REGENTS EDUCATION PROGRAM [REVOKED]
610:1-9-1. Purpose [REVOKED]
American higher education has thrived under the unique concept of lay governance. If that
tradition is to continue, qualified men and women must be selected to serve as regents, and they
must also be educated to govern in situations of increased complexity and accelerating change.
A series of legislation was passed in Oklahoma during the late 1980s to improve Oklahoma
higher education and increase its accountability [74 O.S.§ 3101]. That activity was capped by
the passage of bills in 1990 calling for a regents' education program [70 O.S.§ 3228]. The
purpose of the program is to educate Oklahoma regents and trustees about the nature of their
responsibilities and the seriousness with which they should be undertaken. More specifically,
the program is to provide information and understandings that will allow regents and trustees to
perform their public responsibilities and to govern successfully in the face of greater calls for
wider programs and services, mandates for greater accountability, changing clientele and
demands, and resource scarcity.
610:1-9-2. Definitions [REVOKED]
The following words or terms, when used in this Subchapter, shall have the following
meaning, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise:
"Course bulletin" means the schedule of Regents Education Courses which is distributed
periodically and +ed with updates.
"Credit" means clock-hour credit earned to satisfy requirements of this program only. It
does not refer to "collegiate" credit which can be applied to college/university transcripts.
"Date of taking office" means the date on which a qualified person (one who meets the
age requirements and other qualifications set out in 70 O.S. § 3202[b]) "takes office" thus
triggering the continuing education requirements. It is the first date on which one of the
following sets of criteria is satisfied:
(A) The appointment has been confirmed by the Senate, the appointee has taken the
oath provided by law, and the predecessor's term has expired, or
(B) The individual's nomination has been submitted to the Senate (but has not yet been
confirmed), the current Regent has resigned (or otherwise vacated the office as
provided in 51 O.S. § 8), the Governor has appointed the individual to hold the office
on an interim basis pending Senate confirmation (74 O.S. § 2.2) and the appointee has
taken the oath provided by law.
"Hour" means the unit of credit assigned by the State Regents to Regents Education
Courses. The unit of credit will indicate the relative importance and value of the offering but
will not exceed the actual hours and minutes of course duration.
"Regents education courses" means courses, seminars, lectures, videotapes, audiotapes,
and satellite downlinks approved by the State Regents as part of the Regents Education Program
and offered for credit.
610:1-9-3. Administration of program [REVOKED]
(a) The Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education are charged with responsibility for
developing and operating the Regents Education Program in consultation with the State
Attorney General's office.
(b) A Regents Education Program Advisory Committee shall be formed to assist, advise,
develop, and react to proposals.
(1) Duties. The advisory committee will provide counsel to the Chancellor as follows:
(A) designing, implementing, and refining the program, and
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(B) developing an annual curriculum.
(2) Membership/terms. The provisions for membership and terms of the advisory
committee are as follows:
(A) The advisory committee will be comprised of 8-10 individuals representing the
faculty, administration, and board staff of two-year, four-year, and comprehensive
institutions.
(B) A former regent or regents with service experience preferably on two of the three
types of higher education boards (coordinating, governing, administrative) may also be
selected to serve on the committee.
(C) Members of the committee will be appointed by the Chancellor.
(D) Ex officio members of the committee will include the Assistant Attorney General
serving as the higher education liaison, the Executive Assistant to the Chancellor for
Board Relations, and the Executive Secretaries of the three multi-institution governing
boards.
610:1-9-4. Participants in program [REVOKED]
(a) All regents and trustees for Oklahoma's 18 higher education boards appointed or reappointed
after January 1, 1991, will complete the Regents Education Program as required by law.
(b) All regents and trustees for Oklahoma's 18 higher education boards appointed prior to
January 1,1991, will be given the opportunity to participate in the Regents Education Program.
(c) All regents and trustees will be notified and given the opportunity to participate in the
Regents Education Program even after the 15-hour requirement is satisfied.
(d) Opportunity to participate in portions of the program may be made available and announced
to others in the higher education community, common and vocational-technical education, other
sectors of state government, the public at large, and regional/national education organizations.
610:1-9-5. Delivery of courses [REVOKED]
(a) Regents education courses will be offered at various locations within the state with at least
one-half of the offerings to be offered outside the major population centers.
(b) Courses will be offered through the following sources:
(1) classroom settings on campuses
(2) seminar settings in various locations
(3) electronic media including audio tapes, satellite, compressed video, OneNet, videotapes,
etc.
(c) The State Regents will host seminars/lectureships on an annual basis, each containing
portions of program components as set forth in 610:1-9-6. Generally, it is expected that each
annual seminar/lectureships series would offer 4-8 hours of credit.
(d) Courses may be hosted and offered by the following: The State Regents, colleges/
universities, other government agencies, civic groups, national education or other professional
organizations, and others. All such courses and their credit must be approved in advance by the
State Regents' office. The State Regents will maintain an official Regents Education Course
Inventory and will provide official notice of credit opportunities to the state's regents and
trustees and college/university presidents.
(e) Education sessions offered by institutions and board offices for their respective boards of
regents may qualify for credit with advance approval.
610:1-9-6. Program curriculum [REVOKED]
Each Regent/Trustee appointed or reappointed after January 1, 1991, must complete 15
hours of continuing education within two years of the date on which the Regent/Trustee takes
office. Individuals appointed to a board for a term of less than two years are expected to
participate in the Regents Education Program. For purposes of the Regents Education Program,
177
an initial term of less than two years and a successive appointment to the same or another board
in The Oklahoma State System of Higher Education will be treated as a single term and the
Regent/Trustee will have two years from the date he/she takes office for the initial appointment
in which to complete the continuing education requirement. Two of the 15 hours must be in
ethics as required by law [70 O.S. § 3228(A)]. The Regents Education Program will be
comprised of three general areas of education as follows:
(1) Orientation is required as a prerequisite for the Regents Education Program for all
Regents/Trustees appointed or reappointed after January 1, 1991.
(A) All boards are currently required to brief new members on the duties of their office
within two weeks of appointment. [74 O.S. § 3101]
(B) Orientations are offered at the campus or system board site and conducted by the
board secretary, president, and/or other executive officer familiar with the
responsibilities of the board. (C) Board orientation sessions may qualify for up to four
hours of Regents Education Program with advance approval.
(2) A minimum of eight hours is required to be spent on core programs. There is a standard,
base-line knowledge necessary for the successful service of Regents/Trustees. Many
members are successful business people and many have considerable experience in serving
on boards of some type. While bringing these valuable perspectives to higher education lay
governance, a familiarity with specific responsibilities of regents will be beneficial to
understand and provide effective leadership for the higher education operation. Courses for
the core programs would include:
(A) History and traditions of higher education and lay governance in America, such as:
(i) academic freedom and tenure,
(ii) institutional autonomy/central control, State System policies, State Regents/
governing board regents' responsibilities,
(iii) development of the three-tiered system of two-year colleges, regional
universities, and research universities,
(iv) governance systems in higher education and the role of lay governance,
(v) the distinction between policy development and day-to-day management,
(vi) faculty and student roles in the governance process,
(vii) politics and higher education,
(viii) higher education finance (sources of support, as well as accounting practices
and principles),
(ix) legal aspects of higher education and legal responsibilities of regents, and
(x) ethics issues facing individual regents, boards, and institutions (two hours
required by law).
(B) Methods for delivery of this coursework include:
(i) The key method of delivery will be an annual one-to-two-day seminar. Core
courses may also be taken through the year by one of the methods described below.
(ii) Multimedia package on Trustee Responsibilities (Kellogg Foundation/
Association of Governing Boards) to be shown at campus or board office locations.
(iii) Seminars conducted by well-known speakers, national education organizations,
government agencies, etc., as approved by the State Regents.
(iv) Campus-based lectures by Oklahoma higher education faculty on specified
topics.
(v) Videotapes on higher education leadership to be used in campus classroom
settings with faculty-conducted question-and-answer sessions following.
(3) A minimum of three hours of higher education issues is required. Courses in this part of
the curriculum will be designed to keep Oklahoma Regents and Trustees apprised of state
and national issues that impact the operation of their colleges/universities and higher
education generally. This curriculum will acquaint board members with the issues and
178
provide information that will allow better planning for the future. Some of the issues may
be a take-off or expansion of issues more generally addressed in the core Regents'
Responsibilities section, 610:1-9-6(2). Courses may be unrelated to institutional type or
institutional-type specific, such as:
(A) A workshop on Students– Yesterday, Today, and Tomorrow, which could include:
(i) changing American college student body and the effects of those changes on the
nature of the institution, student support services, and long-range planning;
(ii) student retention and graduation;
(iii) advising and counseling, the multicultural, multiethnic campus; and
(iv) the non-traditional student, the differing roles of the different types of
institutions.
(B) A workshop on higher education finance including presentations on:
(i) capital projects,
(ii) foundations,
(iii) state laws governing different kinds of money, and
(iv) different kinds of funding methods used in different states.
(C) Assessment and accountability in higher education, one of the hottest national
issues today, concerning:
(i) the assessment of student learning,
(ii) evaluation of programs,
(iii) faculty evaluation and merit pay, and
(iv) strategic planning as a way of focusing resources and maximizing
opportunities.
(D) Fundraising, including presentations on alternate sources and methods of funding.
(E) Other current issues such as:
(i) the role of athletics,
(ii) fraternities and sororities,
(iii) racism on campus, and
(iv) general education versus professional education.
(4) Methods for delivery of issues coursework are listed in (2)(B) of this Section.
610:1-9-7. Class schedule [REVOKED]
(a) The class schedule for the Regents Education Program will be announced via "Regents
Education Program Bulletin". Updates may also be made using postcard alerts.
(b) The master annual schedule will be developed in consultation with the committees, councils,
and offices as set forth in of 610:1-9-3(b) and submitted by the Chancellor for State Regents'
approval. Updates in the annual schedule will be approved by the Chancellor in accordance with
policy guidelines.
610:1-9-8. Notification; certification [REVOKED]
(a) Class schedules for the Regents Education Program will be circulated to all regents and
trustees at the beginning of the fiscal year and to all new regents and trustees upon their initial
appointment.
(b) Regents and trustees will be expected to register for the courses at least two weeks prior to
their offering.
(c) Class instructors will certify course completion to the State Regents' office on forms
provided by the Chancellor's office.
(d) The State Regents will issue Certificates of Achievement following completion of 15 hours
of credit that includes a minimum of eight hours of core credit (with two hours in ethics), and
three hours of issues credit.
179
(e) The State Regents will provide notification and alerts for Regents and Trustees regarding
final opportunities to satisfy education requirements.
610:1-9-9. Cost of program [REVOKED]
(a) Insofar as state-appropriated funds or external private funds are available, the State Regents
will incur costs of speakers, materials, printing, postage, copying, and meeting room charges for
the Regents Education Program.
(b) Regents and Trustees will incur the cost of meals, lodging, and travel and will be reimbursed
in the usual manner according to the State Travel Law [74 O.S. § 500.1 et seq.].
(c) Seminar attendees who are not Regents and Trustees will be charged an announced nominal
fee to cover costs of postage, copying, meeting materials, and seminar refreshments.
610:1-9-10. Contracting for assistance [REVOKED]
The State Regents will be responsible for arrangements for the offering of course work for
the Regents Education Program and may contract or coordinate for assistance in one or more of
the following:
(1) mailing of class schedules,
(2) printing of class schedules and bulletins,
(3) registration/certification activities,
(4) development of courses,
(5) utilization of faculty expertise,
(6) securing of meeting sites,
(7) meal arrangements,
(8) purchase and shipping of course materials.
610:1-9-11. Effective date [REVOKED]
The Regents Education Program shall become effective with the first full-year class
schedule to commence July 1, 1991.
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Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-e:
Capital
SUBJECT:
Ratification of Capital Allotments for FY2004.
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the capital allotments
made during the period of June 10, 2003, through August 25, 2003.
BACKGROUND:
The Chancellor has been authorized by the State Regents to approve routine changes and allot
funds for capital projects subject to ratification at the next scheduled meeting. A listing
summarizing allotments for the period June 10, 2003, through August 25, 2003, is attached.
This listing is provided to the Regents for ratification.
POLICY ISSUES:
State Regents’ Delegation of Authority Policy (II-1-25.1) authorizes the Chancellor to approve
routine changes to capital projects and to allot funds for capital projects.
ANALYSIS:
The attached listing includes allotments made from State Funds, Section 13/New College Funds
and Section 13 Offset Funds. The total amount of capital allotments made for this period is
$8,348,673. This total is represented $3,325,363 in Section13/New College allotments and
$5,023,310 in State Fund allotments.
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182
183
184
185
186
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-f (1):
Agency Operations
Not Available Electronically.
187
Not Available Electronically.
188
Not Available Electronically.
189
Not Available Electronically.
190
Not Available Electronically.
191
Not Available Electronically.
192
Not Available Electronically.
193
Not Available Electronically.
194
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-f (2):
Agency Operations
SUBJECT:
Purchasing Policy
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents’ Purchasing Policy be modified
with respect to the renewal of the contract with the Guaranteed Student
Loan Program’s current student loan system service provider.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents’ Purchasing Policy generally requires competitive bidding. The present
policy exceptions to this general rule are: (1) Emergency Purchases, (2) Memberships and
Subscriptions, (3) Services of Licensed Professionals, (4) Sole Source Purchases and (5)
Training. “Sole source” is limited to “services or goods that, by the contract specifications
needed by the agency, restricts the contract to one vendor or to one brand name.”
POLICY ISSUES:
The staff proposal would modify the Purchasing Policy by adding a new, limited category, (6)
“Contract Renewals for Student Loan System Service Provider.”
ANALYSIS:
Although the student loan system service provider contracts have historically been characterized
as sole source contracts, Legal has recommended that, because of the unique circumstances
surrounding this contractual relationship policy, a special policy category be created. The
recommended addition is entitled “Student Loan System Service Provider,” and reads as
follows:
For so long as the incumbent student loan system service provider or its successor entity
continues as the student loan system service provider for OGSLP, the Chancellor may
waive the bidding requirements of the State Regents purchasing policy with regard to
renewals and renegotiations of the contract. Such waiver authority is conditioned upon
the Chancellor's assessment that 1) the continuance of the existing business relationship
remains advantageous to the State Regents and to the state system institutions in terms
of the continuity of seamless loan processing and uninterrupted delivery of Title IV
student aid dollars, economies of scale and enhanced customer service and 2) that a
conversion to a competing vendor would be financially impracticable both in terms of
the prohibitive cost of the conversion and the marketplace vulnerability that would
likely result.
195
The unique considerations involving this contract, as reflected in the proposed modification,
speak for themselves. The new exemption is recommended for approval.
.
196
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-f (3):
State Regents’ Personnel Policies
Not Available Electronically.
197
Not Available Electronically.
198
Not Available Electronically.
199
Not Available Electronically.
200
Not Available Electronically.
201
Not Available Electronically.
202
Not Available Electronically.
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204
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-f (4):
Agency Operations
Not Available Electronically.
205
206
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-f (5):
Agency Operations
SUBJECT:
Data Access and Management Policy
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the Data Access and
Management policy.
BACKGROUND:
The State Regents’ Unitized Data System (UDS) is a comprehensive Oklahoma higher
education database of students, courses, and staff. It has been operational for more than 20
years and contains more than 15 million active records. UDS has statewide and national
benefits:
¾ analyze State Regents’ policies;
¾ standardize data to meet state and federal government reporting requirements;
¾ provide quantitative information for grant applications (e.g. GEAR-UP, Teacher
Preparation);
¾ generate accountability and student success measures;
¾ collaborate with ACT (e.g. EPAS, Collegiate Success Profile); and
¾ combine with employment data.
The strength of UDS is that it provides useful standard reports used to establish trends and to
answer ad hoc requests. Since its inception in 1977, UDS has set national standards for the
breadth of data elements collected from both public and private institutions and for procedures
to add new elements.
In order to regain its former status as a premier state database and to stem the decline of its
capabilities, work is underway to upgrade UDS to a web-based, data warehouse. When the
upgrade is completed, the State Regents’ unitary data system will be called the Oklahoma
Education Information System (OEIS). Users will customize standard reports and be provided
access to ad hoc reports as needed while ensuring the security of the database. Institutions may
use all or part of OEIS in lieu of maintaining a separate system at each campus. Also, State
Regents’ staff and others will have access to an executive information system to answer
inquiries more easily.
POLICY ISSUES:
The State Regents’ Workplan contains numerous projects that require information generated
from the unitary data system, UDS.
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ANALYSIS:
As the State Regents’ upgrade UDS to a web-based, data warehouse, the primary benefit is to
improve the access and usefulness of the data. The Data Access and Management Policy will
facilitate this effort while continuing to insure the protection and privacy of individuals. This
policy describes how individual records may be used to fulfill information needs. Requests for
data will be screened as set forth in this policy to protect the confidentiality of all records. The
policy incorporates the federal Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA).
State Regents’ staff has always protected the confidentiality of the UDS data. The purpose of
this policy is to formalize review procedures and make them more explicit to OEIS users. Since
FERPA and other protection practices have evolved since UDS was developed, it is appropriate
at this time to have a written policy that corresponds to the new OEIS.
It is recommended that the State Regents adopted the Data Access and Management Policy.
Attachment
208
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
Data Access and Management Policy
Purpose
This policy establishes the principles governing access to and the dissemination of information
gathered and maintained through the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (State
Regents) unitary data system.
Scope and Applicability
This policy shall apply to all data and information products created, collected and maintained by
or for the State Regents data system, whether in electronic, paper or other format. When access
to information, as it is collected or maintained, is restricted by federal or state laws for
confidentiality, privacy, or other authorized purpose, the information shall be processed (e.g.,
aggregated, summarized or characterized) as appropriate to provide access while meeting the
requirements for restriction. This policy will adhere to restrictions on the releases of
confidential information identified in the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA),
20 U.S.C. 1232g and its implementing regulations found in Title 34 C.F.R. Part 99, which
established restrictions and penalties for the improper release of information contained within a
student record.
Background
The State Regents manage a unit record database containing public and private higher education
institutional data submissions which are used by the State Regents for state and federal
reporting, policy analysis, and decision-making.
The unitary data system contains four files:
(1) Student Enrollment File,
(2) Student Course Enrollment File,
(3) Class File, and
(4) Professional Staff File.
While each of the four files are collected and stored separately, the usefulness of the entire
unitary data system is in the ability to connect data across files to generate complex data sets.
These files also can be integrated with other data sets, such as K-12 and employment
information.
The System Research Division of the State Regents protects the unitary data system in
accordance with FERPA. Because the data system contains individual data on students and
staff, this policy is subject to both privacy and confidentiality procedures.
Definitions
Confidentiality consists of how personally identifiable information collected by an authorized
agency is protected and when consent by the individual is required. FERPA guards the
confidentiality and access to certain educational records, but not to personnel data. To protect
confidentiality and privacy of individual records, the individual record is subject to restricted
access defined in this policy and to summative reports.
Privacy is the right of individuals to have the information about themselves adequately
protected to avoid the potential for substantial harm, embarrassment, inconvenience, or
unfairness.
209
Education records means those records directly related to a student and maintained by an
educational agency or institution.
Personally identifiable information consists of information contained in an education record
such as a personal identifier, characteristic, or other information that would make the students
identity easily traceable.
Directory information consists of information contained in an education record which would not
generally be considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if disclosed. It includes, but is not
limited to the students date and place of birth, field of study, dates of attendance, degrees and
awards received.
Research is a formal investigation designed to develop or contribute to generalized knowledge.
Legitimate educational interest, for purposes of this policy, is an endeavor meant to further the
understanding of educational practices, methods, and/or theory that is expected to be analyzed
through formal, accepted research practice and the results of which, consistent with FERPA,
will be disseminated in such a manner as to benefit the educational community and/or public in
general.
Policy
Data collected and maintained in the State Regents’ data system shall be managed in a manner
which will promote access to and dissemination of information that improves the educationrelated decisions of parents, teachers, administrators, policymakers, and educational
stakeholders as well as the general public.
This policy articulates three privacy and confidentiality protections:
(1) Security includes the measures in place to ensure that records are not lost, stolen,
vandalized, illegally accessed, or otherwise rendered useless. Since the data are stored on
computers, it is essential that there be a high level of protection that provides integrity and
availability commensurate with the level of risk and magnitude of harm.
(2) Access to the data is restricted by the State Regents and significantly limits who can view
the data and for what purposes. There are five access levels, each of which is consistent
with a specific educational purpose as defined in Section 99.2 of the FERPA regulations.
(3) Disclosure in summary reports is designed to protect individual data. In cases where
populations include only a few individuals, no group smaller than six individuals is
reported.
Access Level
Access levels are assigned to maximize public usage without risking disclosure of personally
identifiable information.
Level 1 allows authorized State Regents’ staff to read and write to all records and fields in the
database. This access level is only permitted to a minimum number of authorized staff members
who operate or manage the data system or are responsible for maintaining the accuracy and
security in the performance of their duties.
210
Level 2 allows researchers, education groups, and other parties who express legitimate
educational interests to read all records and fields in the database to further the understanding of
educational practices, methods, or theory that would be expected through acceptable research
practice.
Level 3 allows personally identifiable information plus those data that are considered directory
information only.
Level 4 allows individual records without personally identifiable information.
Level 5 allows summaries of data only. The State Regents will block any aggregate results when
fewer than six students or educational personnel might be disclosed.
Disclosure of Data
Private or confidential data on an individual shall not be created, collected, stored, used,
maintained, or disseminated by the State Regents in violation of federal or state law and shall
not be used for any purpose other than those stated. If the State Regents enter into a contract
with a private person or third party to perform any State Regents’ functions, that agreement
shall require that the data be protected in the same fashion.
Under this policy, no private or confidential data will be released except under the following
circumstances as stated in Section 99 of the FERPA regulations:
1. To staff of the higher education institutions who have released the data to State
Regents when the determination has been made that there are legitimate educational
interests, under Section 99.36(b)(2).
2. To comply with a subpoena or court order, under Section 99.31(a)(9)(A).
3. To honor a request from a judicial order, or an authorized law enforcement unit, or
lawfully issued subpoena, under Section 99.31(a)(9)(i). A law enforcement unit
refers to all state and local prosecution authorities, all state and local law
enforcement agencies, the Department of Corrections, and probation officers who
are part of the Judiciary.
4. To educational officials in connection with an audit or evaluation of a federal or
state supported education program, under Section 99.32(c)(3).
5. To appropriate parties in connection with an emergency if such knowledge is
necessary to protect the health and safety of the student or other individuals, under
Section 99.36(a). In cases of health or safety emergency, the request for release
must first be directed to the school district that owns the data. The Director, under
Section 99.36(a), may also convene a committee to evaluate the request to
determine whether or not the person who would receive the information is in a
position to deal with the emergency and the extent to which time is of the essence.
6. To research proposals approved by the Chancellor or designee, when a requestor
demonstrates a clear legitimate educational interest, provided that personally
identifiable information if discovered is not disclosed to anyone other than the
initiator of the request. At the discretion of the Chancellor or designee, any request
may be denied.
211
Data will be disclosed only on the conditions that (1) the party to whom the data are released
does not disclose the information to any third party, (2) the data are protected in a manner that
does not permit the personal identification of an individual, (3) the data are used solely for the
purpose requested, and (4) the data are destroyed when no longer needed for the purposes under
which the disclosure was granted.
If it is determined that personally identifiable information was disclosed in violation of this
policy, all parties will not have access to any State Regents’ data for five years. In addition, all
violations will be reported to the appropriate federal and state enforcement agencies. The
Privacy Act of 1974 states that disclosure of individually identifiable information in any manner
to any person or agency not entitled to it shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not more
than $5,000.
State Regents will account for all disclosures. This includes the date, nature, and purpose of the
disclosure, and to whom the disclosure was made. Data access provisions may change at the
discretion of the State Regents or if mandated by federal statue, state law, or administrative
rules.
Requirements for Security, Privacy, and Confidentiality
Commercial use of data obtained under such a request is prohibited. Recipients do not attain
ownership of the data. Such data may not be shared or distributed, and all copies must be
destroyed when the researcher completes the analysis or report. Data, copies of data, and all
reports must be maintained in a secure environment to prevent unauthorized access. A secure
environment includes any electronic media, personal computer, server, or network on which the
data reside. Compliance with these security requirements may be monitored by unannounced,
unscheduled inspections of the data user’s work site by State Regents’ staff or designated
representatives.
All users of the requested data must sign the Data Request Form that explains how the data are
to be stored, used, maintained, and disseminated. When the Chancellor or his designee approves
a research proposal request pursuant to this policy, requestor shall be required to forward a copy
of any analysis or reports created with the State Regents’ data system to the System Research
Division of the State Regents.
Requests for Data Access
Pursuant to the State Regents’ Data Access and Management Policy, researchers, education
groups, and other parties who express legitimate education interests in the data, as defined in
this policy and consistent with FERPA, may submit requests for access to State Regents’ data
system. In reviewing requests for data, consideration is given to access permitted by statute,
federal law, privacy concerns, security procedures, availability of staff to monitor the data
release, and the perceived benefits of the research. Entities seeking access to the State Regents’
data system are required to submit a Data Request Form stating how the data will be used, and a
description of the data needed. Release of data is subject to approval by and at the discretion of
the Chancellor or designee.
Upon request of individuals under Section 552a(f)(1) of the Privacy Act of 1974 or Section
99.20 of FERPA to gain access to their records contained in the State Regents’ data system,
State Regents will provide a copy of all or any portion in a comprehensible form and will
consider requests to amend the record.
212
Processing Request
Completed requests will be reviewed and a response provided in an appropriate manner. In the
event a request is rejected, specific reasons shall be given and if appropriate, may include
information concerning possible alternatives. Requests may be rejected if information on the
application form is incomplete.
213
214
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-g (1):
Contract/Agreement
SUBJECT:
FY 2004 agreement with the Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology
Education
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the agreement with the
Oklahoma Department of Career and Technology Education for FY 2004.
BACKGROUND:
For the past several years, the State Regents have entered into an annual agreement with the
State Board of Career and Technology Education whereby certain State System institutions
carry out programs and services of a technical education nature utilizing funds provided by the
Department of Career and Technology Education.
POLICY ISSUES:
State law (70 O.S. 1991, Section 2264) provides for the State Board of Career and Technology
Education (formerly Oklahoma Board of Vocational and Technical Education) to contract with
the State Regents for the administration of the amount of funds set aside for supplementing the
funding of postsecondary programs. The State Regents assume responsibility for allocation of
the funds.
ANALYSIS:
The attached contract provides for the transfer of approximately $2.2 million in state and federal
funding from the Oklahoma State Board of Career and Technology Education to the Oklahoma
State Regents for Higher Education in exchange for services. The services provided by
Oklahoma colleges and universities relate to the operation of Tech Prep programs, Carl D.
Perkins programs, and teacher inservice and professional development for new CareerTech
teachers. A new provision in the FY 04 contract provides $50,000 to the State Regents for data
services. The funding will support the addition of a research analyst.
Attachment
215
216
217
218
219
220
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-g (2):
Contract/Agreement
SUBJECT:
Agreement with Office of Accountability
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents ratify the agreement with the
Office of Accountability to be effective September 1, 2003.
BACKGROUND:
In the closing days of the 2003 legislative session, House Bill 1767 was amended to transfer the
responsibility for housing the Office of Accountability from the State Department of Education
to the State Regents. The particulars of the transfer were determined by the Legislature without
substantial input by the Chancellor and staff.
The Office of Accountability was created to assist the Education Oversight Board (EOB) and
the Secretary of Education in monitoring the implementation and effectiveness of common
education reforms created in 1989 by the historic House Bill 1017. The Secretary and the EOB
both have important roles in directing the staff and work of the Office of Accountability. There
are four employees of the Office of Accountability.
POLICY ISSUES:
Although the Office of Accountability’s responsibilities are confined to the common education
arena, there are strong connections between its research mandate and many of the activities
included in the State Regents’ K-16 agenda. Although this transfer was not sought by the State
Regents, it reflects legislative confidence in the State Regents’ ability to coordinate its K-16
initiatives with the research and statistical agenda of the Office of Accountability.
Incorporating the Office of Accountability into the structure of the State Regents’ office will
present some challenges, and we expect ongoing dialogue with legislative leaders about the
future of the relationship.
ANALYSIS:
The Chancellor, members of the Education Oversight Board, and staffs of the State Regents and
Office of Accountability have had several productive meetings to identify mutual goals and
expectations for the housing and alliance of the Office of Accountability with the State Regents.
The attached agreement is reflective of those expectations and understandings, and it is
presented for State Regents’ ratification.
Attachment
221
Agreement Between the
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
and
Office of Accountability
This agreement is between the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education (OSRHE), the
party of the first part, and the Office of Accountability (O of A), the party of the second part,
executed this 30th day of August 2003.
WHEREAS, the 2003 Oklahoma Legislature amended 70 O.S. 2001, Section 3-117,
directing OSRHE to support the Office of Accountability from the budget of OSRHE
and transferring positions, furniture, supplies, and equipment for O of A from the State
Department of Education to OSRHE and whereas OSRHE desires to comply with the
legislative directive. Funding for O of A will also be transferred to OSRHE.
WHEREAS, The Education Oversight Board shall be solely responsible for
supervision, management, and control of the Office of Accountability’s personnel,
equipment, budget, and expenditure of funds. The OSRHE shall serve as fiscal agent.
O of A desires, and OSRHE concurs, that O of A will operate autonomously to the
maximum extent possible, maintaining its reporting responsibility to the Education
Oversight Board and the independence necessary to carry out its work in a credible
manner while also complying with state law and requirements to which the OSRHE are
subject and operating in a manner that will not diminish the operations of OSRHE. The
Education Oversight Board will have full control and responsibility for O of A
employees.
WHEREAS, OSRHE and O of A desire to increase efficiencies and effectiveness in the
respective work of the two agencies via their new relationship.
THEREFORE, the parties agree that:
1.
FISCAL AGENT. The OSRHE will act as fiscal agent for the O of A and carry out the
following responsibilities:
a.
Allocate all funds to the O of A from sums transferred from the Office of State
Finance pursuant to HB 1767 and/or appropriated for O of A to the OSRHE.
b.
Approve an annual budget for the O of A upon approval of the Education
Oversight Board.
c.
Approve an annual budget needs request upon approval by the Education
Oversight Board.
d.
Provide staff assistance and support to O of A for the functions of budget
development, accounting, purchasing, bidding, accounts payable, risk
management, asset inventory and management, auditing, human resources,
payroll, legal, legislative, communications, and information technology. O of
A will be responsible for any direct costs incurred by the OSRHE on behalf of
O of A. O of A will be responsible for direct costs such as external audits, risk
222
management insurance costs, copying, printing, binding, postage, consumable
supplies (e.g., toner cartridges, fusers, and other consumable office goods)
hardware, software, and other purchases. Unless otherwise identified in this
agreement, OSRHE will not be responsible for O of A costs.
Until such time as otherwise determined, warranted, and mutually agreed upon,
OSRHE will not assess indirect costs for the performance of the above
functions.
2.
SPACE. Effective September 1, 2003, the O of A will move its offices from 3033
North Walnut to 655 Research Parkway, Suite 301 (Post Office Box 108850).
a.
The O of A will occupy OSRHE leased space of 1,167 NUSF at a cost of $7.50
per NUSF payable to OSRHE. O of A annual lease costs will be $8,752.50
(7,293.75 for September 1 – June 30, 2004 occupancy). For FY 05, O of A will
pay an additional 21 cents per NUSF, the amount of OSRHE lease cost
increase.
b.
The O of A, with the assistance of OSRHE staff, will make arrangements with
the University of Oklahoma Transportation Authority for employee and visitor
parking.
c.
The O of A, with the assistance of OSRHE staff, will make arrangements for
the moving of O of A files, furnishings, and other assets.
d.
The OSRHE will provide at no charge the use of modular furnishings currently
located in space to be occupied by O of A and will coordinate and provide
existing product for nominal reconfiguration at no cost to O of A.
e.
The OSRHE will ensure cabling and power connectivity sufficient for the
operation of O of A. Any additional costs will be the responsibility of O of A.
f.
The OSRHE will provide O of A with access to OSRHE leased conference
rooms, break rooms, teleconferencing facilities, and other common areas.
g.
OSRHE, as lessee, will be responsible for all interactions with Presbyterian
Health Foundation (landlord) and will secure O of A signage on first and third
floor directories and on third floor hall door consistent with specifications of
landlord at no cost to O of A.
h.
O of A will comply with requirements and restrictions of landlord (Presbyterian
Health Foundation) as enumerated on Attachment “A.”
i.
OSRHE will, for a term of at least one year, provide storage space to the O of A
for office furniture taken out of serve as a result of modular furniture use after
office relocation. There will be no cost to the O of A associated with this
storage.
223
3. NETWORK CONNECTIVITY AND IT SUPPORT. OSRHE will provide network and
telecommunications support for O of A as reflected on Attachment “B.” O of A will
reimburse OSRHE annually in the amount of $6,298.75 for IT services and
connectivity.
OSRHE will provide IT support for O of A at no additional charge.
4. TERM. The parties agree that the initial period of this agreement shall run from the
date of execution through June 30, 2004, and that it shall be automatically renewed
thereafter, annually, on July 1 of each fiscal year. The parties further agree that the
agreement may be terminated at the end of any fiscal year, provided that 60 days notice
is given to the other party; and that the agreement may be renegotiated, provided that
sufficient notice is given to allow increases to be incorporated into the next fiscal year’s
budget work program. Finally, this agreement may be nullified by legislative action.
5. EACH PARTY RESPONSIBLE FOR ITS OWN ACTS. Each party hereby agrees to
be responsible for its own wrongful or negligent acts or omissions, or those of its
officers, employees or agents to the full extent permitted by law. Further, nothing
herein shall be construed to create any legal liability for the OSRHE with regard to any
personnel actions of the O of A. OSRHE and O of A are governed by the provisions of
the Oklahoma Tort Claims Act, Title 51 O.S. Section 151 et seq. Nothing herein shall
be construed as a waiver of immunity pursuant to such laws.
THE PARTIES HAVE READ THE TERMS AND PROVISIONS OF THIS AGREEMENT
AND HEREBY GIVE THEIR VOLUNTARY CONSENT TO THAT AGREEMENT.
Office of Accountability
Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education
By:_____________________________
Robert Buswell, Executive Director
By:__________________________________
Paul Risser, Chancellor
Date:_____________________________
Date:_________________________________
224
Attachment “A”
225
Attachment “A”
226
Attachment “B”
NETWORK CONNECTIVITY & PHONES
a.
Local Area Network. OSRHE will create for O of A personnel appropriate
LAN logins to promote connectivity to the OSRHE LAN, servers, and
facilities. O of A must abide by the OneNet Acceptable Use Policy and by the
Acceptable Use Policy for OneNetTM and the State Regents’ Computing System
and Equipment located in the State Regents’ Personnel Policies and Procedures.
b.
Shared file space and options. OSRHE will create a shared file space for O of
A within which each O of A employee will have his/her own directory.
c.
Printers/Copiers. O of A will provide its own printers and copiers. OSRHE
will provide network connections for networkable printers.
d.
Network. OSRHE will provide Ethernet (10Mbps) or Fast Ethernet (100Mbps)
network connections to OSRHE servers and staff.
e.
Electronic Mail. OSRHE will provide O of A with existing use of OneNet mail
server until such time as OSRHE migrates to OneNet’s new Exchange server.
Shared calendaring access will not be available until O of A migrates to the
new Exchange server. With the implementation of a hosted exchange server in
FY 04, O of A will be responsible for a hosted exchange cost of $5.00 per
month per educational user.
f.
Web Site. OSRHE will host the O of A website on the regents web server
(Dual 1.26 GHz processor system with redundant power supply, N+1 HVAC
with FM200 fire suppression, Fast Ethernet connections on the OneNet
backbone, 24x7 support, and nightly website backup to tape. O of A will be
responsible for website content and administration.)
g.
Telephone. OSRHE will assign O of A new phone numbers (225-9468 to 2259474 and voicemail. The main “O of A” number will be 225-9470 and the fax
number will be 225-9474. With the availability of Voice Over IP, O of A will
be responsible for the purchase of new phones (OSRHE are currently
negotiating system purchase and anticipate phone costs normally at
approximately $400 to be zero to minimal. Actual cost per phone, if any, will
be passed along to O of A).
h.
Databases. O of A may store its Access database on the OSRHE Access
database server. OSRHE datacenter will provide N+1 redundant UPS power
with a diesel power generator, N+1 HVAC with FM200 fire suppression, Fast
Ethernet connections on the OneNet backbone with 24x7 support. Data on the
server will be backed up nightly to tape.
227
228
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #23-h:
Grants
SUBJECT:
Allocation of Minority Teacher Recruitment Center funds
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve the proposed MTRC
Pre-collegiate and Collegiate Partnership Program budgets.
BACKGROUND:
Pre-Collegiate Programs: The Minority Teacher Recruitment Center supports the
implementation of two pre-collegiate teacher recruitment programs in Oklahoma schools.
Grants to each junior high and high school site in the amount of $300.00 to provide additional
resources for teachers furnish supplemental materials and enhance learning opportunities for
students.
Collegiate Partnership Grants: Since 1996, collaborative efforts by MTRC and teacher
education programs in the state have led to partnerships that help address teacher recruitment
from a campus-based perspective and take advantage of the unique strengths of each institution.
o
Cameron University - Cameron Secondary Teacher Education Program (CAMSTEP) is
an integrated post-baccalaureate teacher education program designed for individuals
who hold a bachelor’s degree with majors and/or subject specializations in certifiable
teaching areas.
o
Oklahoma City Community College - Program for Academic Achievement is designed
to recruit and provide support services for students interested in teaching while
improving retention, academic success, and transfer rates to teacher education
programs.
o
College Connection Grants: New this year, the College Connection grants will focus
higher education collaborations with K-12 schools on retention as well as recruitment.
These one year grants may be renewed if money is available and the assessments are positive.
Special Project Grants o University of Central Oklahoma – “Multicultural Institute” is cosponsored by several
Oklahoma education agencies and school districts. The conference brings teachers,
administrators and students together to explore critical issues and concerns related to
the challenges and rewards of living and teaching in a culturally diverse society.
228.1
o
Oklahoma State University – “Celebration of Teaching” promotes the teaching
profession to high school students. Outstanding Oklahoma educators are honored as the
conference seeks to encourage academically talented students to enter the teaching
profession, foster mentoring between students and teachers, and give high school
students the opportunity to experience university classes.
POLICY ISSUES:
The Minority Teacher Recruitment Center has a legislative directive (HB2557) to develop
recruiting programs for potential teachers, including pre-collegiate curricular courses that
emphasize school success and the opportunity to investigate teaching as a career choice as well
as collegiate activities which deal with issues such as retention and placement.
ANALYSIS:
Pre-Collegiate Programs:
As in previous years, the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center has provided grants to initiate
school projects and activities associated with the curriculum as well as collaborative activities
with college partners. Included this year will be eight high schools that are piloting a new
curriculum developed specifically for Oklahoma students called: Seminar in Education. The
grants provided to Teacher Cadet, Seminar in Education and ProTeam sites will be used to
purchase materials needed by students as required in the curriculums; provide student
transportation for field trips; and pay for substitute teachers when the teachers attend training
conferences or meetings sponsored by the Minority Teacher Recruitment Center. Schools must
use the grant funds on activities directly related to the MTRC curriculums and can not use the
funds to supplement teacher salaries or to purchase equipment normally furnished by the school
district. Each school is required to provide a report of expenditures at least once during the
academic year. MTRC staff anticipates 45 pre-collegiate programs for school year FY 03-04.
Collegiate Partnership Grants
Each year, teacher preparation programs at State System institutions provide both new and
recurring conferences and activities designed to enhance the image of teaching and to assist in
recruitment efforts. MTRC has supported the UCO Multicultural Institute and OSU Celebration
of Teaching conferences for the past eight years.
Since 1996, sixty-seven participants have completed the CAMSTEP program and requirements
for the teacher licensure in Oklahoma.
Since 1998, Oklahoma City Community College has provided assistance to over 90 preeducation undergraduate students, with approximately 21% currently enrolled in teacher
education programs at four-year institutions and another 57% enrolled at OCCC pursuing
education as a profession.
The College Connection will provide means to develop programs to improve the retention rate
of first through fifth year teachers and/or for partnerships between colleges of education and K12 urban or hard-to-staff schools. Using the Oklahoma State Regents Teacher Supply and
Demand Study (2002), applicants will develop scientifically based research projects which will
result in the development of teacher retention or recruitment strategies.
228.2
Special Project Grants
Each year, teacher preparation programs at State System institutions provide both new and
recurring conferences and activities designed to enhance the image of teaching and to assist in
recruitment efforts. MTRC has supported the UCO Multicultural Institute and OSU Celebration
of Teaching conferences for the past eight years.
The following projects are recommended for funding.
Pre-Collegiate Grants
•
$13,500
45 junior high and high school sites
$300
Collegiate Partnership Grants
$90,000
•
CAMSTEP
$15,000
•
OCCC
$25,000
•
College Connection
$50,000
Special Project Grants
$2,000
•
UCO
$1,000
•
OSU
$1,000
•
TOTAL
$105,500
228.3
228.4
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-a (1):
Reports
SUBJECT:
Annual Status Report on Program Requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
Oklahoma State System institutions submitted 142 program requests from July 1, 2002 to June
30, 2003. Five requests are carried over to 2003-04. The following schedules, which detail
requests on which the State Regents acted in 2002-03, are attached.
A.
B.
C.
D.
E.
F.
G.
H.
Approved New Program Requests
Approved Degree Program Deletions
Approved Degree Program Name Changes
Approved Degree Designation Changes
Completed Cooperative Agreements
Suspended Programs
Reinstated Programs
Approved Inventory Reconciliations
2002-03 submissions. In 2002-03, institutions requested 29 new programs, 50 program
deletions, 28 degree program name changes, 11 degree designation changes, 6 cooperative
agreements, 8 program suspensions, 1 program reinstatement, and 9 inventory reconciliations.
2002-03 actions. In 2002-03, the State Regents approved 143 program requests, including 6
requests carried over from 2001-02. The State Regents approved 28 requests for new programs,
51 requests to delete programs, 28 degree program name changes, 11 degree designation
changes, 6 cooperative agreements, 8 program suspensions, 2 program reinstatements, and 9
inventory reconciliations. The following tables detail the State Regents’ 2002-03 actions.
229
APPROVED NEW PROGRAM REQUESTS
Program Level
Number of New Programs
5
7
0
1
6
7
2
28
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM DELETIONS
Program Level
Number of Program Deletions
14
21
2
1
8
5
0
51
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM NAME CHANGES
Program Level
Number of Program Name Changes
3
10
3
4
6
2
0
28
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
230
APPROVED REQUESTS FOR DEGREE DESIGNATION CHANGES
Number of Existing Programs Taken
to New Locations
Program Level
0
2
0
0
6
2
1
11
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM SUSPENSIONS
Program Level
Number of Program Suspensions
0
4
1
0
1
0
2
8
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
APPROVED PROGRAM REINSTATEMENTS
Program Level
Number of Program Reinstatements
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
2
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
231
APPROVED INVENTORY RECONCILIATIONS
Program Level
Number of Program Reinstatements
0
0
5
2
0
2
0
9
Certificate
Associate in Applied Science
Associate in Arts
Associate in Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
TOTAL
232
A. Approved New Program Requests
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Institution
CSC
OSU-OKC
Degree Program
Associate in Science in Computer Information Systems
Date Rec'd
Date Approved
7/12/02
September 13, 2002
Certificate in Early Care Education Administration
8/5/02
September 13, 2002
OU
Master of Arts in Organizational Dynamics
6/26/02
September 13, 2002
RSU
Bachelor of Science in Business Administration
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Chemical Laboratory Technology
9/23/02
November 1, 2002
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Telecommunications Management
6/11/02
November 1, 2002
TCC
Certificate in Computer Information Systems - Digital Video
10/21/02
December 5, 2002
TCC
Certificate in Computer Information Systems - Web Design
10/21/02
December 5, 2002
OU
Master of Science in Knowledge Management
12/18/02
February 21, 2003
OSU
Bachelor of Fine Arts in Theatre
10/31/01
April 3, 2003
OU
Master of Science in Environmental Engineering
12/18/02
April 3, 2003
OU
Doctor of Philosophy in Environmental Engineering
12/18/02
April 3, 2003
CASC
Associate in Applied Science in Radiologic Technology
3/11/03
April 3, 2003
Bachelor of Applied Arts and Sciences in Technical Management
4/14/03
May 30, 2003
OU
Bachelor of Arts in Human Relations
4/2/03
May 30, 2003
OU
Master of Arts in Native American Studies
2/21/03
May 30, 2003
2/3/03
May 30, 2003
11/8/02
May 30, 2003
NSU
Associate in Applied Science in Applied Trades Technology
Associate in Applied Science in Emergency Medical Services Municipal Fire Protection
Bachelor of Business Administration in Entrepreneurship
4/29/03
June 30, 2003
OSU
(graduate) Certificate in Family Financial Planning
5/12/03
June 30, 2003
OSU
Master of Science in Agricultural Communications
5/12/03
June 30, 2003
Associate in Applied Science in Supply Chain Management
Associate in Applied Science in Power Transmission and
Distribution Technology
Doctor of Philosophy in Bioengineering
5/12/03
June 30, 2003
5/12/03
June 30, 2003
2/10/03
June 30, 2003
OU
Master of Science in Bioengineering
2/10/03
June 30, 2003
OU
Master of Professional Writing
5/16/03
June 30, 2003
OUHSC
Bachelor of Science in Radiation Sciences
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Certificate in Fire and Emergency Services
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
NWOSU
OSU-OKC
OSU-OKC
OSU-OKC
OSU-OKC
OU
233
B. Approved Degree Program Deletions
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Institution
Date Rec'd
Date Approved
Bachelor of Arts in Geography (017)
6/17/02
September 13, 2002
Certificate in Medical Office Administration (183)
7/18/02
September 13, 2002
Associate in Arts in Art (004)
7/22/02
September 13, 2002
NWOSU
Bachelor of Arts in Library Media Specialist (023)
8/6/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Certificate in Management/Marketing Skills (101)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Science in Education/Secondary (017)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Certificate in Surgical Technology (065)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Applied Science in Medical Assistant (116)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Certificate in Medical Assistant (115)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Arts in Journalism (028)
Associate in Applied Science in Semiconductor Manufacturing
Technology (229)
Certificate in Ranch Management (053)
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
8/28/02
November 1, 2002
NWOSU
TCC
EOSC
TCC
RCC
RCC
RSU
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
OSUTB-OKM
Degree Program (program code)
Certificate in Life Enrichment (051)
Associate in Applied Science in Social and Behavioral Studies
(095)
Associate in Applied Science in Electronic Engineering
Technology (021)
Associate in Applied Science in Medical Secretarial Technology
(028)
Associate in Applied Science in Machine Tool Technology (029)
Associate in Applied Science in Design Drafting Technology (040)
Associate in Applied Science in Food Service Management
(Baking) (045)
Associate in Applied Science in Industrial Electrical Technology
(052)
Associate in Applied Science in Digital Graphics Technology (083)
9/12/02
November 1, 2002
9/12/02
November 1, 2002
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
Associate in Applied Science in Ford ADEPT (084)
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
10/25/02
December 5, 2002
11/5/02
December 5, 2002
11/5/02
December 5, 2002
RCC
Associate in Applied Science in Behavioral Science (056)
Associate in Applied Science in Computer Science Technology
(046)
Associate in Applied Science in Administrative Management and
Technology (037)
Certificate in Administrative Management and Technology (060)
11/5/02
December 5, 2002
RSU
Certificate in Police Science (080)
12/20/02
February 21, 2003
MSC
RCC
RCC
NEOAMC
Certificate in Television (105)
2/7/03
April 3, 2003
NEOAMC
Certificate in Nursing (085)
2/7/03
April 3, 2003
NEOAMC
Certificate in Preoperative Nursing (104)
2/7/03
April 3, 2003
NEOAMC
Certificate in Medical Laboratory (083)
2/7/03
April 3, 2003
SWOSU
Master of Science in Psychology (076)
2/13/03
April 3, 2003
OUHSC
Master of Science in Medical Sciences (021)
3/3/03
May 30, 2003
SEOSU
Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering Technology (015)
3/13/03
May 30, 2003
234
OU
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics in Mathematics (301)
4/2/03
May 30, 2003
OU
Bachelor of Business Administration in Real Estate (236)
4/2/03
May 30, 2003
SWOSU
Bachelor of Arts in Physics (043)
4/11/03
May 30, 2003
SWOSU
Bachelor of Science in Physics (044)
4/11/03
May 30, 2003
SWOSU
Bachelor of Science in Biophysics (045)
4/11/03
May 30, 2003
OUHSC
Master of Public Health in Health Administration and Policy (017)
Master of Public Health in Occupational and Environmental Health
(019)
Master of Public Health in Health Promotion Sciences (045)
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
5/20/03
June 30, 2003
5/20/03
June 30, 2003
5/2/03
June 30, 2003
5/2/03
June 30, 2003
4/24/03
June 30, 2003
5/16/03
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
ROSE
Associate in Applied Science in Art (056)
Associate in Applied Science in Business Management and
Administration (006)
Associate in Applied Science in Computer Systems Information
Technology (011)
Certificate in Computer Systems Information Technology (079)
Associate in Applied Science in Alcohol and Substance Abuse
Counseling (069)
Associate in Applied Science in Telecommunications Technology
(088)
Associate in Applied Science in Administrative Office Technology
(046)
Certificate in Administrative Office Technology (100)
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
ROSE
Associate in Applied Science in E-Commerce (120)
6/4/03
June 30, 2003
OUHSC
OUHSC
OPSU
RSU
CSC
CSC
OSU-OKC
OSUTB-OKM
ROSE
C. Approved Degree Program Name Changes
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Institution
Current Program Name (program code)
Proposed Program Name
Date
Rec'd
Date Approved
OSU-OKC
Associate in Science in Fire Protection
Technology (067)
Associate in Science in Fire Protection and
Safety Technology
7/1/02
September 13, 2002
OSU-OKC
Associate in Applied Science in Interpreter
Training (063)
Associate in Applied Science in Sign Language
Interpretation
7/1/02
September 13, 2002
TCC
Associate in Science in Child Development and
Family Relations (246)
Associate in Science in Child Development
7/16/02
September 13, 2002
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Electrical
Engineering Technology (116)
Associate in Applied Science in Electronics
Technology
7/16/02
September 13, 2002
Bachelor of Science in Natural Science (018)
Bachelor of Science in Physical Science
7/31/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Arts in Television (053)
Associate in Arts in Mass Communications
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
NEOAMC
Associate in Arts in Social Science (044)
Associate in Arts in History
8/2/02
September 13, 2002
RSU
Associate in Arts in Elementary Education (011)
Associate in Arts in Early
Childhood/Elementary Education
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
UCO
Bachelor of Science in Medical Technology (123)
Bachelor of Science in Clinical Laboratory
Science/Medical - Technology
10/25/02
December 5, 2002
OPSU
235
Master of Science in Applied Behavioral Studies
(068)
Master of Science in Educational Psychology
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
OSUTBOKM
Associate in Applied Science in Automotive Body
Technology (003)
Associate in Applied Science in Automotive
Collision Repair Technology
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
OSUTBOKM
Associate in Applied Science in Watch and
Micro-Instrument Repair Technology (043)
Associate in Applied Science in Watchmaking
and Microtechnology
11/6/02
December 5, 2002
OU
Bachelor of Business Administration in
Management/Petroleum Land Management (168)
Bachelor of Business Administration in
Management and Human Resources
4/2/03
May 30, 2003
OU
Bachelor of Business Administration in
Marketing (152)
Bachelor of Business Administration in
Marketing/Supply Chain Management
4/2/03
May 30, 2003
Bachelor of Arts in Speech (041)
Bachelor of Arts in Speech and Theatre
4/14/03
May 30, 2003
CSC
Associate in Science in Pre-Chemistry (010)
Associate in Science in Chemistry
4/4/03
May 30, 2003
CSC
Associate in Science in Physical Science (042)
Associate in Science in Physical Science/
Physics/Pre-Engineering
4/4/03
May 30, 2003
OUHSC
Master of Public Health in Biostatistics and
Epidemiology (006)
Master of Public Health in Public Health
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
NWOSU
Bachelor of Science in Law Enforcement (022)
Bachelor of Science in Criminal Justice
5/28/03
June 30, 2003
Rose
Associate in Applied Science in Webmaster (121)
Associate in Applied Science in E-Commerce
and Webmaster
6/4/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Fire Protection
Technology (032)
Associate in Science in Fire and Emergency
Services (includes degree designation change
request)
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Safety and
Environmental Technology (161)
Associate in Applied Science in Public Safety
911
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Certificate in Safety and Environmental
Technology (160)
Certificate in Public Safety 911
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Design
Engineering Technology (029)
Associate in Applied Science in Drafting and
Design Engineering Technology
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in
Telecommunications Technology (230)
Associate in Applied Science in
Telecommunications
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Certificate in Telecommunications Technology
(232)
Certificate in Telecommunications
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Digital Video
(098)
Associate in Applied Science in Computer
Information Systems
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
TCC
Certificate in Drafting & CAD Technology (175)
Certificate in Drafting and Design Engineering
Technology
5/29/03
June 30, 2003
OSU
NWOSU
236
D. Approved Degree Designation Changes
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Date
Rec'd
Institution
12/18/02
NSU
Bachelor of Arts in Education in Music –
Combination Instrumental/Vocal (061)
Bachelor of Music Education
February 21, 2003
12/18/02
NSU
Bachelor of Arts in Education in Music –
Instrumental (062)
Bachelor of Music Education
February 21, 2003
12/18/02
NSU
Bachelor of Arts in Education in Music – Piano
or Vocal (063)
Bachelor of Music Education
February 21, 2003
4/2/03
OU
Bachelor of Arts in Mathematics in Mathematics
(300)
Bachelor of Science in Mathematics in
Mathematics
May 30, 2003
5/29/03
OUHSC
Master of Health Administration in Health
Administration (067) (academic degree "02")
Master of Health Administration in Health
Administration (first professional "05")
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
OUHSC
Master of Public Health in Biostatistics and
Epidemiology (006) (academic degree "02")
Master of Public Health in Biostatistics and
Epidemiology (first professional "05")
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
OUHSC
Doctor of Public Health in Public Health (007)
(academic degree "04")
Doctor of Public Health in Public Health (first
professional "05")
June 30, 2003
5/28/03
NWOSU
Bachelor of Arts in Mass Communications (052)
Bachelor of Science in Mass Communications
June 30, 2003
5/28/03
NWOSU
Bachelor of Arts in Social Work (036)
Bachelor of Science in Social Work
June 30, 2003
5/28/03
RCC
Associate in Applied Science in Fitness Trainer
(082)
Associate in Science in Fitness Trainer
June 30, 2003
5/29/03
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Fire Protection
Technology (032)
Associate in Science in Fire and Emergency
Services (includes name change request)
June 30, 2003
Current Degree Program
Proposed Degree Designation
Date Approved
E. Completed Cooperative Agreements
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Date
Rec'd
Institution
Area Career
Technology Center
Date
Approved
Date Ratified
8/27/02
WOSC
Great Plains Technology
Center
Associate in Applied Science in Radiology (045)
9/16/02
November 1, 2002
8/28/02
OCCC
Moore Norman
Technology Center
Associate in Applied Science in Medical
Assisting (120)
9/16/02
November 1, 2002
9/23/02
TCC
Tulsa Technology Center
Associate in Applied Science in Chemical
Laboratory Technology
11/1/02
N/A
11/27/02
RCC
Caddo Kiowa Technology
Center
Associate in Applied Science in Business
Administration (058)
1/17/03
February 21, 2003
11/27/02
RCC
Canadian Valley Technology
Center
Associate in Applied Science in Business
Administration (058)
1/17/03
February 21, 2003
2/19/03
RCC
Caddo Kiowa Technology
Center
Associate in Applied Science in Applied Technology
(081)
3/3/03
April 3, 2003
Degree Program (program code)
237
F. Suspended Programs
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Institution
Program (program code)
Date
Suspended
Date
Suspension
Ratified
Date by which
program must be
reinstated or
deleted
NOC
Associate in Arts in Native American Leadership (072)
8/15/02
9/13/02
September 1, 2005
NOC
Associate in Applied Science in Computer Information Systems
(075)
9/25/02
11/1/02
September 1, 2005
OSU-OKC
Associate in Applied Science in Heating, Ventilation and Air
Conditioning Technology (013)
10/31/02
11/1/02
November 1, 2004
RCC
Associate in Applied Science in Laboratory Animal Science
Technology (075)
11/4/02
12/5/02
December 1, 2005
NOC
Associate in Applied Science in Agribusiness (002)
4/10/03
5/30/03
April 1, 2006
Bachelor of Accountancy in Accounting (264)
4/7/03
5/30/03
April 2006
OUHSC
Doctor of Philosophy in Health Administration and Policy (063)
5/3/00
5/30/03
Extension
April 2004
OUHSC
Doctor of Philosophy in Health Promotion Science (064)
5/3/00
5/30/03
Extension
April 2004
Original
Suspension
Date
Date
Reinstatement
Ratified
OU
G. Reinstated Programs
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Date
Rec'd
Institution
1/22/03
OU
Master of Natural Sciences (181)
1/14/02
February 21, 2003
6/17/02
NWOSU
Bachelor of Arts in Spanish (038)
8/3/99
May 30, 2003
Program (program code)
238
H. Approved Inventory Reconciliations
July 1, 2002 to June 30, 2003
Institution
Date Rec'd
Date Approved
Master of Education in School Psychometrist (048)
9/24/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Science in Physics
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Arts in Sociology
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Arts in History
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Science in Chemistry (037)
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Arts in Psychology (042)
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Arts in Political Science (050)
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
Rose
Associate in Arts in Journalism (026)
9/5/02
November 1, 2002
NSU
Master of Science in Speech-Language Pathology
4/29/03
June 30, 2003
NWOSU
Program (program code)
239
240
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-a (2):
Reports
SUBJECT:
Status Report on Program Requests.
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
The Status Report on Program Requests tracks the status of all program requests received since
July 1, 2003, as well as requests pending from the previous year.
POLICY ISSUES:
This report lists pending requests regarding degree programs as required by the State Regents’
“Policy Statement on Program Approval.”
ANALYSIS:
The following pages contain the Current Degree Program Inventory and the following
schedules:
I.
II.
III.
IV.
V.
VI.
Letters of Intent
Degree Program Requests Under Review
Requested Degree Program Deletions
Completed Cooperative Agreements
Suspended Programs
Requested Inventory Reconciliations
241
CURRENT DEGREE PROGRAM INVENTORY
September 12, 2003
(Table reflects actions taken at the June 30, 2003 State Regents’ meeting)
No. of
Programs
Associate in
Arts/Associate
in Science
Associate
in
Applied
Science
Baccalaureate
Master's
Doctoral
First
Professional
Total
Certificates
236
0
0
104
79
49
0
232
4
OUHSC
56
0
0
7
23
15
9
54
2
OU-LAW
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
216
0
0
89
71
43
0
203
13
OSUTB-OKC
49
7
27
0
0
0
0
34
15
OSUTB-OKM
20
3
17
0
0
0
0
20
0
OSU Vet Med
1
0
0
0
0
0
1
1
0
OSU-COM
4
0
0
0
2
1
1
4
0
ECU
41
0
0
33
8
0
0
41
0
NSU
89
0
0
64
17
0
1
82
7
NWOSU
46
0
0
39
6
0
0
45
1
RSU
31
15
8
6
0
0
0
29
2
SEOSU
60
0
0
51
9
0
0
60
0
SWOSU
66
4
8
38
15
0
1
66
0
UCO
90
0
0
62
26
0
0
88
2
CU
43
2
9
28
4
0
0
43
0
LU
37
6
0
28
2
0
1
37
0
OPSU
32
4
3
25
0
0
0
32
0
USAO
25
0
0
25
0
0
0
25
0
CASC
37
24
8
0
0
0
0
32
5
CSC
35
26
6
0
0
0
0
32
3
EOSC
34
23
9
0
0
0
0
32
2
MSC
31
18
9
0
0
0
0
27
4
NEOAMC
59
22
12
0
0
0
0
34
25
NOC
39
21
18
0
0
0
0
39
0
OCCC
66
21
22
0
0
0
0
43
23
RCC
33
18
10
0
0
0
0
28
5
Rose
62
29
26
0
0
0
0
55
7
SSC
24
18
4
0
0
0
0
22
2
TCC
106
24
47
0
0
0
0
71
35
WOSC
15
2
12
0
0
0
0
14
1
1,684
287
255
599
262
108
15
1,526
158
Institution
OU
OSU
System Total
242
I. Letters of Intent
Institution
Degree Program
Date
Received
OSU-OKC
Associate in Applied Science in Hotel and Restaurant Administration
7/24/02
OSU-OKC
Certificate in Hotel and Restaurant Administration
7/24/02
OCCC
Associate in Applied Science in Database Management
10/25/02
OCCC
Associate in Applied Science in Network Technology
10/25/02
Certificate in Para-Education
11/5/02
Certificate in Supply Chain Management
12/12/02
RCC
OSU-OKC
OCCC
Associate in Arts in Film and Video Production
2/7/03
OCCC
Associate in Science in Biotechnology
2/7/03
Doctor of Philosophy in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
2/21/03
OSU
Certificate in Engineering and Technology Management
2/25/03
NSU
Master of Education in Science Education
7/29/03
NSU
Master of Education in Mathematics Education
7/29/03
WOSC
Certificate in Office Systems Technology
6/23/03
WOSC
Certificate in Aviation
6/23/03
OU
243
II. Degree Program Requests Under Review
July 1, 2003 to present
Date
Rec'd
Status
Associate in Science in General Studies
4/24/02
undergoing review
RCC
Certificate in Early Childhood Center Management
11/1/02
undergoing review
OSU
Bachelor of Arts in Liberal Studies
5/12/03
undergoing review
OSU
Bachelor of Science in Liberal Studies
5/12/03
undergoing review
Rose
Associate in Science in Geosciences
6/4/03
undergoing review
TCC
Associate in Science in Pre Computer Science
5/8/03
undergoing review
OCCC
Associate in Science in Cyber/Information Security
7/3/03
OCCC
Associate in Applied Science in Cyber/Information
Security
7/3/03
OCCC
Certificate in Cyber/Information Security
7/3/03
EOSC
Certificate in Surgical Technologist
7/25/03
Certificate in Management Leadership
8/1/03
Associate in Applied Science in Health Technology
8/11/03
Certificate in Public Health
8/27/03
Institution
OSU-OKC
TCC
OSU-OKC
OUHSC
Degree Program
244
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
III. Requested Degree Program Deletions
July 1, 2003 to present
Institution
SEOSU
NEOAMC
Date
Rec'd
Degree Program (program code)
Bachelor of Arts in Speech Education (050)
Associate in Applied
Management (118)
Science
in
Golf
7/14/03
Course
7/29/03
OCCC
Certificate in Manufacturing Technology (085)
8/4/03
OCCC
Certificate in Mid-Management (063)
8/4/03
OSU-OKC
Certificate in Freelance Writing (078)
8/11/03
OSU-OKC
Certificate in Systems Maintenance Administration
(051)
8/11/03
OSU-OKC
Certificate in Land Surveying (024)
8/11/03
245
Scheduled for
Action
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
September 12,
2003
IV. Completed Cooperative Agreements
July 1, 2003 to present
Date
Approv
ed
Date Ratified
Automotive Service Technology (004)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Diesel and Heavy Equipment Technology
(018)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Business Systems Technology (027)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Office Information Systems Technology
(039)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Construction Technology (011)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Information Technology (012)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Automotive Collision Repair Technology
(003)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Automotive Service Technology (004)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Business Systems Technology (027)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Office Information Systems Technology
(039)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Information Technology (012)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Pioneer Technology Center
Automotive Service Technology (004)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
OSUTBOKM
Pioneer Technology Center
Construction Technology (011)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
OSUTBOKM
Pioneer Technology Center
Food Service Management (046)
8/6/03
September 12,
2003
Date
Rec'd
Institutio
n
Area Career
Technology Center
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
High Plains
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
Northwest
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
Northwest
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
Northwest
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
Northwest
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
Northwest
Center
Technology
6/27/03
OSUTBOKM
6/27/03
6/27/03
Degree Program (program code)
V. Suspended Programs
July 1, 2003 to present
Institution
SEOSU
CSC
OCCC
Date
Suspended
Date
Suspension
Ratified
Date by
which
program
must be
reinstated or
deleted
Bachelor of Arts in Social Gerontology (055)
7/14/03
9/12/03
July 15, 2006
Associate in Science in Business Accounting (004)
6/16/03
9/12/03
June 1, 2006
Certificate in Financial Services (118)
8/21/03
9/12/03
September 1,
2006
Program (program code)
246
VI. Requested Inventory Reconciliations
July 1, 2003 to present
Institution
Program (program code)
Date
Rec'd
Status
TCC
Associate in Science in Quality Control Technology,
NSU transfer option [program addition]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Certificate in Medical Office Administration (183)
[program deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Associate in Science in Individual, Family, and
Community Service (220) [program deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Associate in Science in Biology (002)
deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Electronics Engineering
Technology (116) [program deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Associate in Applied Science in Telecommunications
Management (248) [program deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Certificate in CIS-Digital Video (250)
deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
Certificate in CIS-Web Design (251) [program deletion]
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
6/3/03
September 12,
2003
TCC
TCC
TCC
TCC
TCC
TCC
TCC
[program
[program
Change Certificate in Desktop Publishing (217) to
Certificate in Desktop Publishing, Specialist [program
name change]
Change Certificate in Health Information Technology
(237) to Certificate in Health Information Technology,
Coding & Reimbursement Specialist [program name
change]
Change Associate in Science in Physical Science (014)
to Associate in Science in Science Related Fields of
Concentration [program name change]
Change Associate in Science in Engineering-Pre (007)
to Associate in Science in Engineering [program name
change]
Change Associate in Science in Health Professions
(010) to Associate in Science in Pre-Professional
Science Related Fields of Concentration [program
name change]
Change Associate in Applied Science in Health
Information Technology (159) to Associate in Applied
Science in Health Information Technology (Medical
Records)
[program name change]
Change Associate in Applied Science in Child
Development and Family Relations (200) to Associate
in Applied Science in Child Development [program
name change]
247
248
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-b (1):
Heartland Scholarship
SUBJECT:
2002-03 Year-End Report
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item only.
BACKGROUND:
In April 1995, the State Regents established the Heartland Scholarship Program to provide
financial assistance to dependent children of individuals killed and dependent children who
survived in the Federal Building day care center in the April 19 Oklahoma City bombing.
Approximately 174 individuals have been identified as eligible recipients. The last eligible
child is projected to graduate from college in 2018. Over $920,000 has been raised for the
Heartland Scholarship Program, most of it through private donations and some from license
plate proceeds.
There are three major entities providing scholarship aid for children of bombing victims, and
the Heartland Scholarship Program efforts have been closely coordinated with those entities to
ensure that all needs will be met. The costs of enrollment are being covered by the Federal
Employee Education and Assistance Fund (FEEAF), the Survivors’ Education Fund (SEF)
administered by the Oklahoma City Community Foundation, and the Heartland Scholarship
Program.
POLICY ISSUES:
Operation of the Heartland Scholarship Program to date has been consistent with the Heartland
Scholarship Fund Program Policy.
ANALYSIS:
Beginning with the 1996 fall semester, the Heartland Scholarship Program became the first and
primary payer of financial aid for dependent children who lost a parent in the April 19 bombing.
For the 2002-03 academic year, disbursements from the Heartland Scholarship Program totaling
$126,640.00 were made to 18 institutions on behalf of 27 eligible individuals. In addition to
these disbursements, the Federal Employee Education Assistance Fund (FEEAF) distributed
$75,178.00 and the Survivors’ Education Fund (SEF) distributed $238,075.00 to eligible
students. The combined total from all three sources for 2002-03 was $439,893
The award amount distributed from the Heartland Scholarship Program to each institution for the
2002-03 academic year is indicated below.
249
Institution
Fall
Spring
Total
University of Oklahoma
Oklahoma State University
University of Central Oklahoma
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Oklahoma City Community College
Rose State College
Southern Nazarene University
Pitt Community College
Vanderbilt University
Murray State University
Florida International University
Gettysburg College
University of California-Santa Barbara
Savannah College of Art and Design
University of Arkansas-Fort Smith
University of Montana-Technology Center
Texas Wesleyan University
Texas A &M University
$8,250.00
$15,595.00
$9,850.00
$2,000.00
$1,750.00
$0.00
$0.00
$1,750.00
$2,750.00
$2,000.00
$4,000.00
$2,000.00
$2,750.00
$2,000.00
$1,750.00
$0.00
$2,000.00
$2,750.00
$11,000.00
$15,595.00
$5,850.00
$2,000.00
$1,750.00
$1,750.00
$2,000.00
$1,750.00
$2,750.00
$2,000.00
$4,000.00
$2,000.00
$2,750.00
$2,000.00
$1,750.00
$1,750.00
$2,000.00
$2,750.00
$19,250.00
$31,190.00
$15,700.00
$4,000.00
$3,500.00
$1,750.00
$2,000.00
$3,500.00
$5,500.00
$4,000.00
$8,000.00
$4,000.00
$5,500.00
$4,000.00
$3,500.00
$1,750.00
$4,000.00
$5,500.00
Total Disbursement
$61,195.00
$65,445.00
$126,640.00
Trust Fund Balances: There are two funds administered by the State Regents for the Heartland
Scholarship Program—(1) the Heartland Scholarship Fund which consists of private donations,
and (2) the Heart of the Heartland Scholarship Fund which consists of revenue from sales of
automobile license plates that benefit the program. Based on current annual expenditures, the
funds will be depleted in about 2.5 years. The Survivor’s Education Fund, with an estimated $2
million in assets, is expected to be sufficient to cover the remaining education costs of eligible
persons.
Heartland Scholarship Fund Summary
Contributions Since 1995
Investment Earnings
Scholarships Paid through 6/30/03
Fund Balance as of 6/30/03
$855,872
221,300
-812,718
$264,454
Heart of the Heartland Scholarship Fund Summary
Automobile Tag Sales Since 1995
Scholarships Paid through 6/30/03
Fund Balance as of 6/30/03
250
$71,800
-27,500
$44,300
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-b (2):
Deleted Item.
251
252
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-b (3):
Student Cost Survey
Not Available Electronically
253
254
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-b (4):
Tuition and Fees Book
Not Available Electronically
255
256
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-b (5):
Regents Education Program Annual Report
RECOMMENDATION:
It is recommended that the State Regents approve/ratify the Regents
Education Program 2002-2003 Annual Report.
BACKGROUND:
According to Regents’ policy, the State Regents will publish a Regents Education Program
Annual Report each fiscal year. The annual report for FY2002-2003 is attached for
approval/ratification.
POLICY ISSUES:
The Regents Education Program 2002-2003 Annual Report is a routine item for consideration
and no policy issues are in question.
ANALYSIS:
The Regents Education Program 2002-2003 Annual Report has been prepared in accordance
with State Regents’ policy and outlines the courses offered, notable speakers, offering locations,
regent/trustee participation, and a summary.
257
258
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-c:
Teacher Education
SUBJECT:
Oklahoma Teacher Enhancement Program (OTEP) Title II Grant Update
RECOMMENDATION:
This is an information item.
BACKGROUND:
Authorized in October 1998 under the Higher Education Act, the United State Department of
Education’s (USDE) Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant program is designed to improve
student achievement by implementing comprehensive approaches to improving teacher quality.
The State Grant program promotes innovative reforms that meet the mandates of “No Child Left
Behind,” which holds institutions of higher education (IHE) with teacher preparation programs
accountable for preparing teachers who are highly competent in the academic content area and
who have strong teaching skills that impact student learning. In August 2000, the USDE
awarded a higher education Title II grant in the amount of $787,073 for the State Regents’
OTEP proposal; funds were made available in January 2001. First year funding was $107,274.
Added to this amount was a supplemental fund award of $181,405. Second year funds were
awarded in the amount of $374,275. In the third and final year, grant funds awarded were
$371,461. Total funds awarded to the State Regents’ OTEP by the USDE are $1,034,415.
By way of reminder, the purpose of OTEP is to create and implement evaluation methods to
assess the impact of teacher preparation programs on K-12 student learning. Using data from
Resident Year Teachers (RYT) and their Resident Year Committees (RYC), a report is given to
the participating institutions’ teacher preparation programs to identify areas of needed
improvement in teacher preparation. Specifically, OTEP grant funds are used to create a
systematic method of monitoring classroom experiences of participating novice teachers. The
project includes the following initiatives.
•
•
•
Implementation of the Educational Testing Services’ “Pathwise Induction Program,” an
assessment system to evaluate the pedagogical impact of RYTs on K-12 student
progress. The RYC, which includes a school administrator, a higher education faculty
member, and a mentor teacher, use Pathwise to assess the effectiveness of the RYT.
Implementation of the Teacher Work Sample Methodology (TWSM), an in-class
assessment system, to be used by RYT’s to evaluate student learning on a unit-by-unit
basis.
Evaluation of the higher education teacher preparation program by RYT program
graduates.
Through the OTEP study, it has been determined that Oklahoma’s 15 teaching competencies,
which are required of all candidates in teacher preparation programs, and Effective Teaching
259
Criteria, which are used to evaluate experienced classroom teachers, are not aligned. Without
alignment, insufficient reliable data is available to implement the Teacher Education Warranty
approved by the State Regents in 2000. Therefore, the USDE has approved a no-cost extension
year, allowing OTEP to fund a state initiative to align P-16 standards and develop a P-16
teacher evaluation.
An advisory committee, representative of the many educational
stakeholders is aligning the Oklahoma Teaching Competencies and Effective Teaching Criteria
and developing a compatible P-16 teacher evaluation tool, which will be piloted in the 20032004 school year. This evaluation tool measures the qualities, competencies, and skills of
teachers from pre-service through residency and into career teaching while providing evidence
of student achievement in the classroom.
Year four grant activities are on schedule according to the grant action plan.
• A draft of the P-16 teacher evaluation tool has been developed and is ready for
piloting.
• The P-16 teacher evaluation training process has been completed.
• Thirty public school administrators and 20 higher education faculty have been recruited
for the P-16 teacher evaluation pilot.
• Administrator training for the P-16 teacher evaluation will take place in September.
POLICY ISSUES:
The activities of the Title II Teacher Quality Enhancement Grant are consistent with the State
Regents’ teacher education reform efforts.
ANALYSIS:
Activities in the third year were audited by an external reviewer, who noted the following key
findings in the evaluation report.
1. Teachers’ knowledge and skills in specific teaching competencies, including content
and pedagogy, assessment, instructional design, and the ability to reflect and grow as a
professional educator are key to impacting PK-12 student learning gains.
2. Teacher candidates scoring higher on the Pathwise and TWSM showed greater student
learning gains.
3. Teacher candidates demonstrate problems with modifying curriculum or assessment to
meet individual students’ needs. According to last year’s scores, teacher candidates
participating the previous year displayed the same problems.
4. The 15 competencies required for graduation from a teacher preparation program are
not closely aligned to the teacher effectiveness criteria on which experienced public
school teachers are evaluated. A new performance-based, state teacher evaluation
reflecting the 15 competencies has been developed.
Year-three OTEP teachers performed at a proficient level in the TWSM and Pathwise
observations. Overall, the TWSM score average this year, 74.75 percent, is higher than last
year’s score average of 70.39 percent. Reported student learning gain on this year’s work
samples is 65.66 percent, up 1 percent from last year. The average Pathwise score for the first
observation of 2002-2003 participating teachers was higher than the first Pathwise score for
2001-2002 teachers. Teachers in 2002-2003 show a measurement of .56 percent in professional
growth during the school year.
260
The following participating institutions of will receive an individual program report.
East Central University
Langston University
Oklahoma City University
Northeastern State University
Northwestern State University
Oklahoma Panhandle State University
Oklahoma State University
University of Oklahoma
Southeastern Oklahoma State University
Southern Nazarene University
University of Tulsa
University of Central Oklahoma
Southwestern Oklahoma State University
University of Arts and Sciences of
Oklahoma
261
262
263
264
265
266
267
268
Meeting of the
OKLAHOMA STATE REGENTS FOR HIGHER EDUCATION
September 12, 2003
AGENDA ITEM #24-e:
Brain Gain 2010
SUBJECT:
Preparing for College Mass Mailing
RECOMMENDATION:
This item is for information only.
BACKGROUND:
In January 1999 the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education announced an aggressive
plan to increase the proportion of Oklahomans holding a bachelor’s degree from 20 to 28
percent by 2010 and the proportion of associate degree holders from 5 to 10 percent. Called
Brain Gain 2010: Building Oklahoma Through Intellectual Power, the plan is designed to move
Oklahoma from the bottom to the top one-third of all states for its educational and economic
performance. Regents are seeking to add more college degree holders to the state’s population
by focusing on three areas – increasing the proportion of Oklahomans who earn a college
degree, keeping more Oklahoma graduates in the state and attracting college degree holders
from outside the state.
Additionally, in 1997 the Citizens’ Commission on the Future of Oklahoma Higher Education
recommended that the State Regents expand efforts to explain the services Oklahoma higher
education offers to Oklahoma and Oklahomans and the benefits the state and its citizens receive
from those services.
For the 11th consecutive year, the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, in a joint
effort with the Oklahoma Guaranteed Student Loan Program, undertook a mass mailing of
publications designed to help 8th-12th grade students better prepare for college. Many of the
materials include information that has been specifically requested by 8th-12th grade counselors
through annual surveys.
POLICY ISSUES:
This initiative is consistent with the Regents’ Brain Gain 2010 initiative and with
recommendations made by the Citizens' Commission on the Future of Oklahoma Higher
Education in October 1997 to better publicize higher education services and benefits.
ANALYSIS:
269
In past years, the mass mailing was outsourced to temporary workers or to a mailing service.
For the second consecutive year, in order to save agency funds, the mailing was handled inhouse by the following staff volunteers:
Patsy Alexander
Harve Allen
Jeff Anderson
Stacy Baker
Pam Boatright
Rachell Bowers
Amy Bruce
Barry Byrd
Chris Davis
Debbi McDaniel
Kermit McMurry
Debra Mann
DeAnn Marcum
Robert Norris
Jeannette Payne
Angela Peters
Colette Prigmore
Vernal Reese
Chad Fuston
Payton Hamlin
Ben Hardcastle
Margie Humdy
Janet Jackson
Ellen Jenkins
Anthony Jernigan
Zakia Jihad
Melissa Johnson
Linnie Reiter
Dayna Rowe
Laura Smith
Rebecca Stokes
Dwayne Webb
Ralph Williams
Due to the overwhelming response from staff to the call for volunteers, the mailing was
accomplished in 3 days, approximately half the time required by temps or a mailing service.
This distribution method not only saved the agency money but also insured that the schools
received materials in a more timely and accurate manner.
The following publications were distributed to head counselors at Oklahoma junior high and
high schools in August 2003.
College…It’s Closer Than You Think! Your Guide to Preparing for College, 8th-10th
Grade
Why Not College? Why Not You? Your Guide to Preparing for College, 11th-12th Grade
More than 227,000 brochures on preparing for college were distributed to head counselors at
Oklahoma public and State Department of Education-accredited private schools for distribution
to each 8th-12th grade student in their schools. This is the first year that separate, grade-specific
brochures were produced. More than 138,000 brochures focusing on early academic and
financial planning for college were distributed to 8th-10th grades, and nearly 89,000 brochures
focusing on academic, financial aid and career planning were sent to 11th-12th grades. The
brochures were also sent to home school organizations and to libraries statewide. The brochures
are designed to inform students of the courses they must take in high school to be admitted to an
Oklahoma state college or university. They also detail admission standards, placement score and
financial aid information. In addition, they encourage students to call the State Regents' toll-free
hotline number or visit the Student Center Web site for additional information. The brochures
also feature a map of Oklahoma public colleges and universities and include institution phone
numbers and Web site addresses. This is the 11th year these brochures have been produced.
Guide to Oklahoma Colleges and Universities
Approximately 480 guides were distributed to counselors at public and private high schools and
to home school organizations in Oklahoma. One guide was sent to each Oklahoma high school
with 12th-grade students. The guides are three-hole punched so that the information can be
easily duplicated. Due to continued budget concerns, the number of guides printed and
distributed this year was again lower than in past years, but students, counselors, parents and
others are encouraged to access the online version of the guide on the Student Center Web site.
The guide provides a short profile on each college and university in Oklahoma and includes
270
information on preparing for college, concurrent enrollment, transfer, college costs and financial
aid. In addition, it provides a glossary of college-related terms and a calendar of college
day/night programs offered by the Oklahoma College Day/Night Coordination Committee. It
also publicizes the State Regents' toll-free Student Information Hotline number and the Student
Center Web site. This year, in cooperation with the Oklahoma Department of Commerce, a new
section was added for international students that includes information on English language
requirements, costs, Oklahoma weather and culture, student populations and more. The ODOC
purchased 100 copies of the guide for use at their outreach offices in countries worldwide in an
effort to recruit international students to Oklahoma colleges and universities. The guide is
produced by the Communicators Council in coordination with the Council on Student Affairs
and the OCD/NCC. This is the eighth year that the guide has been produced.
Grant and Scholarship Programs
Approximately 480 booklets were distributed to counselors at public and private high schools
and to home school organizations in Oklahoma. One booklet was sent to each Oklahoma high
school with 12th-grade students. The booklets are three-hole punched so that the information can
be easily duplicated. The publication lists the financial aid programs that are primarily
administered by the State Regents and available to students attending colleges and universities
in Oklahoma. The publication provides information on state need-based financial aid, state
scholarship programs, specialized financial aid, U.S. Department of Education financial aid
programs, the Oklahoma 529 College Savings Plan and federal tuition tax credits. It also offers
information on tuition rates and college costs at Oklahoma public colleges and universities and
publicizes the State Regents’ toll-free Student Information Hotline and the Oklahoma higher
education Web site.
Are you looking for money?
Approximately 480 brochures were distributed to counselors at public and private high schools
and to home school organizations in Oklahoma. One brochure was sent to each Oklahoma high
school with 12th-grade students. The brochure provides information on Federal Stafford and
PLUS loans, including the application process, borrowing limits, interest rates and repayment.
271

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