Creating a larger kitchen in a small house makes a big difference for

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Creating a larger kitchen in a small house makes a big difference for
opposite: When this
galley kitchen grew by
claiming space from
other rooms, the range
was moved from a
corner to the opposite
end of an extended
run of countertop.
left: A high-arc
bridge-style faucet in
brushed nickel mixes
traditional style with
the undermount sink
and the sleek black
granite countertop.
maine
interest
Creating a larger kitchen in a small
house makes a big difference for
this Atlantic Coast couple.
writer jacqueline devine
82
•
photographer james salomon
k it chen + b at h m a k eov er s | spr ing 2 013
•
before
field editor susan salomon
this photo:
Homeowners David
Allen and Kati Gaulkin
debated buying a readymade sideboard and
hutch, but opted for the
narrower silhouette of a
built-in custom cabinet.
opposite: Pottery,
pussy willows, and one
of David’s paintings
add individuality to the
expanded space.
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k it chen + b at h m a k eov er s | spr ing 2 013
room to roam or to sit
down to a delicious meal gives the kitchen
star billing in David Allen and Kati Gaulkin’s
Cape Cod-style home in Kennebunk, Maine.
By removing two walls that squeezed their galley kitchen, the
creative couple turned three small rooms into one great space
measuring 18×13 feet. For a house that is 20×40 feet, that’s a lot
of kitchen! A week after finishing the remodel, Kati and David
seated a dozen guests in their room-to-live-in kitchen, where
previously there was barely space for their yellow Lab, Tillie, to
wag her tail.
To minimize costly changes during construction, David and
Kati invested 18 months in research and design. David, an artist,
sketched and resketched ideas, while Kati compiled magazine
clippings and ideas from the Internet.
The centerpiece of the kitchen began as a budget
compromise. To afford an upgrade of appliances, the couple
decided to skip purchasing a custom island. Instead, David
converted Kati’s vintage cherry-top desk into a counter-height
table by adding longer legs. Giving a new purpose to the piece
produced savings that covered the cost of a dual-fuel range.
Kati is a by-the-book cook known for her crispy and chewy
chocolate chip cookies. David is more of a produce and protein
improviser. The couple’s decorating styles differ, too. She is a
traditionalist, and he is a modernist. Interior designer Krista
Stokes helped marry their styles. The pleasing result is a blend
of traditional cabinets painted a modern gray taupe, stainlesssteel appliances resting on oak floors, and classic mullioned
glass doors complementing contemporary open shelves. This
clean, casual, and comfortable blend of styles serves as a
showcase for David’s paintings and Kati’s pottery collection.
Homeowners often wish they had done things differently after
a remodel. Not this couple. “We wouldn’t change a doorknob,”
Kati says. And Tillie has room to wag her tail in agreement.
Resources begin on page 108.
bhg .com/k it chen b at h
85
about this makeover
budget
Appliances
Dishwasher912
Range2,198
Refrigerator1,690
585
Vent hood
Cabinetry
Cabinets9,950
Hardware208
Island690
Plumbing
Faucet1,002
Sink845
Surfaces
Countertops3,850
Flooring1,500
900
Paint for cabinets, includes labor
Pantry doors
560
Miscellaneous
Crown molding
385
Lights (recessed, fixture over island) 500
Window530
Total$26,305
Costs do not include labor unless noted.
OPPOSITE: Beaded board
backs open shelving,
which balances the range
hood on the opposite side
of the window (shown on
page 83). above: Glasspanel French doors on the
pantry further expand the
kitchen visually. right:
Purchased on the Internet,
white turned legs and ball
feet add classic beauty to
the island worktable David
fashioned from an old
cherry desktop.
DW
R/F
18x13
P
Small rooms were the signature style of this
1980s house, but removing walls and eliminating
a bathroom, hallway, and separate dining room
netted a smarter-working kitchen.
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bhg .com/k it chen b at h
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