2015 NJ Marine Digest - Division of Fish and Wildlife

Comments

Transcription

2015 NJ Marine Digest - Division of Fish and Wildlife
2015 Marine Fishing Season Dates and Limits • FREE
New Jersey
May 2015
Size and
Possession
Limits
page 17
A Clear
Revival
for New Jersey’s
Artificial Reef Program
page 6
A Summary of Recreational Regulations and
Marine Fish and Shellfish Management Information
NJFishandWildlife.com
YOUR FISHING SEASON
STARTS HERE
VA L I D 4 / 2 5 / 1 5 T H R O U G H 1 0 / 2 4 / 1 5
10 OFF
TAKE
$
YOUR NEXT FISHING, HUNTING AND
CAMPING PURCHASE OF $50 OR MORE
Limit one coupon per customer. Minimum purchase of $50 before
sales tax. Total amount of coupon must be redeemed at one time.
Cannot be combined with any other offers, coupons, team discounts
or Guaranteed In-Stock markdowns, or used for licenses or previously
purchased merchandise. Coupon valid in-store only. Not redeemable
for cash, gift cards or store credit. No reproductions or rain checks
accepted. Returns or exchanges where a ScoreCard Reward or
other discount was applied may result in an adjusted refund amount.
Excludes purchases of gift cards, firearms, ammunition, Shimano, St. Croix,
G. Loomis, Eureka!, Leupold, Gregory, Hurley, O’Neill, Diamondback,
Under Armour, The North Face, Patagonia, Burton, Marmot, Columbia,
Volcom, FoxPro, Simms, Thule, Van Staal, Yakima, Megabass, GoPro, Garmin,
Fuji, Mongoose, Rollerblade, Descente, Prana, Benchmade, Camelback,
Kelty, Merrell, Yeti, Liquid Force, Kwik Tek, Teeter, Yvolution, Wenonah,
Weber, Thermos, RAVE Sports, Hurricane Kayaks, Sportube,
Henderson Wetsuits, FLOW, Arena, Advanced Elements, Swarovski Optik,
Zeiss, K2 Snowboards, Atlas Snowshoes,
Tubbs Snowshoes, MSR, Therm-A-Rest,
Seal Line, Platypus, Ecase, PackTowl,
Humminbird, Excludes clearance items.
Clearance items have .93 or .97 endings.
Some additional exclusions may apply.
See store or visit Dicks.com for details.
P00021680
SHOP DICKS.COM/FISHING
Contents
9 Governor’s Surf Fishing Tournament
10 Marine Fish Regulations — Finfish
14 Marine Species Identification
16 Marine Regulations — Mollusks and Crustaceans
17 State Seasons, Minimum Size and Possession Limits Chart
18 Federal Recreational Fishing Regulations
19 Shellfish and Non-Commercial Crab Pot License Information
22 Skillful Angler Recognition Program
24 New Jersey State Record Marine Sport Fish
6
26 Health Advisories
hotlines
New Jersey Fish and Wildlife
A Clear Revival for
New Jersey’s Artificial Reef Program
Report Marine, Shellfish and Finfish Violations
(609) 748-2050 or call the 24-hour DEP Hotline: 877-WARNDEP
Violators of the Marine Fisheries laws are subject to a $30 per fish or $300 to $3,000 fine.
Federal Marine Fisheries Contacts
NOAA Fisheries
Enforcement Hotline
24-hour non-emergency tipline
(800) 853-1964
NOAA Fisheries Office of Law
Enforcement — Northeast
Enforcement Division HQ
(978) 281-9213
Federal Fisheries Law
Enforcement Field Offices
Wall: (732) 280-6490
Marmora: (609) 390-8303
This DIGEST is available photocopied in an
enlarged format for the visually impaired.
Write to: New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, Large Format Marine Digest, ­
MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420
Scan this QR code with your
mobile device for instant
access to New Jersey Division
of Fish and Wildlife's website:
NJFishandWildlife.com.
This is not the full law. Consult the Division of Fish and Wildlife for further details. All persons are reminded
that the statutes, code and regulations are the legal authorities. New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife
receives federal assistance from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and thus prohibits discrimination on the
basis of race, color, national origin, disability, age and sex pursuant to Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, the Age
Discrimination Act of 1975 and Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972. If you believe that you have
been discriminated against in any program, activity or service, contact New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife,
MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08626-0420. The telephone number is (609) 292-9410. You may also
write to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, Civil Rights Coordinator for Public Access, 4401 N. Fairfax Drive,
Mail Stop: WSFR-4020, Arlington, VA, 22203.
20
27
Whoosh!
A Spearfishing
Primer
5
Profile:
Summer
Flounder
Unique Fishing Regs at
Island Beach State Park
Director's Message
DAV E C H A N DA
Since its inception in 1984, Fish and Wildlife’s Reef Program has been very
proactive in reef construction efforts. As New Jersey’s artificial reef network
grew and the volume of materials deployed to create them increased, reefs
quickly became popular locations for recreational anglers and commercial
fishermen utilizing potting gear. However, as early as 1989, charter and
individual boat owners indicated that the presence of fish pots and lobster
pots on reefs was beginning to preclude access.
As reef building efforts continued into the 2000s, conflicts between recreational and commercial users continued to rise. Federal officials representing the Sport Fish Restoration Program stated that this situation must be
resolved because anglers had paid for these reefs through excise taxes on marine gas and fishing
tackle; one user group should not be allowed to dominate access. Following this admonishment, on
April 11th, 2011, more than $250,000 in Sport Fish Restoration funding for New Jersey’s Program
was discontinued for use in reef construction and monitoring activities. These funds were not lost,
just redistributed to other Fish and Wildlife projects. It was further explained that once access to
reefs was restored to recreational users, funding could once again be utilized for the Reef Program.
To alleviate these conflicts and ultimately restore access to recreational anglers, in March 2013,
New Jersey DEP Commissioner Bob Martin worked with representatives from the recreational and
commercial fishing sectors to develop a plan for balancing access on reefs located in state waters.
Since that time, Fish and Wildlife staff has been working diligently towards implementing this
plan. A component of the plan also includes the construction of a new reef where potting gear
will be prohibited. In essence, the plan sets the stage for the future and will translate into more
benefits for all reef users.
This edition of the Marine Digest has an article (see page 6) focusing on the specifics of Commissioner Martin’s compromise as well as other beneficial proposed changes to the Reef Program.
Also directly related to our Reef Program and artificial reefs, readers will find an informative “how to”
article on spearfishing in New Jersey. (See page 20.) Spearfishing is growing in popularity; we
offer insights and techniques for this exciting form of recreation. Recently, Fish and Wildlife added
a new category to our Record Fish Program for “speargun hunters” to recognize their outstanding
achievements.
New Jersey’s Reef Program is recognized as being the best in the nation; our reefs are second to
none for spearfishing, scuba diving and fishing. In the Program’s 31 year history, more than 7 million cubic yards of materials have been deployed to create artificial reefs. These materials consist
primarily of rock, vessels, designed habitats (reef balls) and other materials of opportunity.
In a study conducted by the DEP, it was determined that reefs accounted for 18 percent of all of
the fish caught in marine waters. In other words, roughly two out of every 11 fish caught along the
Jersey shore were caught on a reef — an amazing statistic! The future of Fish and Wildlife’s Reef
Program is bright. We will continue to be dynamic in adjusting our goals and objectives to meet
the needs of resource users wisely.
2015 Marine Fishing Season
Dates and Limits • FREE
New Jersey
May 2015
Size and
Possession
Limits
page 17
A Clear
Revival
for New Jersey’s
Artificial Reef Program
page 6
A Summary of Recreatio
Marine Fish and Shellfish nal Regulations and
Management Information
NJFishandWildlife.com
About this Guide
This high-quality regulation guide is offered
to you by the New Jersey Division of Fish and
Wildlife through its unique partnership with
J.F. Griffin Publishing, LLC.
J.F. Griffin is an award-winning publishing house
that specializes in producing state fish and
wildlife regulation guides. J.F. Griffin supports
the Fish and Wildlife staff in the design, layout
and editing of the New Jersey Marine Digest. We
also manage the marketing and sales of Digest
advertising to appropriate businesses.
The revenue generated through ad sales significantly lowers production costs and generates
savings. These savings translate into additional funds for other important fisheries-related
programs.
To explore advertising opportunities, please
contact us at 413.884.1001 or online at
www.JFGriffin.com
Graphic Design:
Jon Gulley, Dane Fay,
Evelyn Haddad, Chris Sobolowski
430 Main St. Suite 5 | Williamstown, MA 01267
Dave Chanda is the Director ­­of the Division of Fish and Wildlife.
available online
in a new Digital Edition!
Fully searchable
Email pages
Live hyperlinks to
One-click printing
expanded content
We’re Here to
Save Your Day
Although our Captains don’t really dress like super heroes, if your day on the water
goes south, they can help you turn it around. Our captains are confident, qualified,
licensed and ready to assist at a moment’s notice. Before you start your engine, make
sure you’ve got Unlimited Towing and the aid of over 600 towboats at the ready.
Call or go online now to join!
Take Us With You On the Water
1-800-888-4869 BoatUS.com/towing
Unlimited towing details and exclusions can be found online at BoatUS.com/towing or by calling.
Take a
friend
New Jersey
fishing!
The memories will last a lifetime.
State of New Jersey
Chris Christie, Governor
Kim Guadagno, Lieutenant Governor
Department of Environmental Protection
Bob Martin, Commissioner
Office of Natural and Historic Resources
Rich Boornazian, Assistant Commissioner
Division of Fish and Wildlife
David Chanda, Director
Larry Herrighty, Assistant Director
Paulette Nelson, Assistant Director
Brandon Muffley, Administrator, Marine Fisheries
Russ Allen, Chief, Marine Fisheries
Russell Babb, Acting Chief, Shellfisheries
Mark Chicketano, Chief, Law Enforcement
Lisa Barno, Chief, Freshwater Fisheries
Dave Golden, Acting Chief, Land Management
Carole Stanko, Acting Chief, Wildlife Management
David Jenkins, Chief, Endangered and Nongame Species
Cindy Kuenstner, Editor
FREE Freshwater Fishing Days
— June 13 and Oct. 17, 2015 —
On these two days, residents and non-residents may fish New Jersey’s
public fresh waters without a license or trout stamp. All other
regulations, including size and daily catch limits, remain in effect.
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife is a professional, environmental organization dedicated
to the protection, management and wise use of the state’s fish and wildlife resources.
The Digest is available at coastal license agents, bait and tackle shops and Fish and Wildlife
offices. Information may be reprinted with permission. Subscriptions are not available.
This Digest is designed and produced by J.F. Griffin Publishing, LLC; www.jfgriffin.com.
Partial funding for the Digest is provided by the Federal Aid in Sport Fish Restoration Program.
Cover photo: Black sea bass courtesy of Joe Quinn | Dreamstime.com
New Jersey Fish and Wildlife Councils
Authorized Hobie
Kayak Dealer
1325 West Avenue
Ocean City, NJ
FREE Sales Tax!
Enter the code NJDGST2015 at checkout and receive
7% off any purchase from our online store!
(Discount does not apply to Hobie products)
Shop Online: www.fin-atics.com
Call Us: 609-398-BAIT (2248)
Stop by FIN-ATICS ....We’ll Hook You Up!
Expert Service & Friendly Advice
4
Marine Fisheries Council
Richard N. Herb, Acting Chair
James Alexis
Scott Bailey
Erling Berg
Dr. Eleanor Ann Bochenek
Walter L. Johnson, III
Frances Puskas
Sergio Radossi
Joe Rizzo
Robert R. Rush, Jr.
Joseph A. Zaborowski
Fish and Game Council
Dave Burke, Acting Chair
Cathy Blumig
Phillip Brodhecker
Dr. Barbara Brummer
Agust Gudmundsson
Joe DeMartino
Jeffrey A. Link
Robert Puskas
Dan VanMater
Atlantic Coast Shellfish Council
Walter L. Johnson, III, Chair
John J. Maxwell, Vice Chair
Walter Hughes
Delaware Bay Shellfish Council
Scott Bailey, Chair
Barney Hollinger, Vice Chair
Richard Malinowski
Stephen J. Fleetwood
Endangered and Nongame
Species Advisory Committee
Dr. Barbara Brummer, Chair
Dr. James Applegate
Dr. Joanna Burger
Dr. Emile DeVito
Howard Geduldig
Dr. Rick Lathrop
Dr. Erica Miller
Dr. David Mizrahi
Jane Morton-Galetto
Dr. Howard Reinert
James Shissias
Waterfowl Stamp
Advisory Committee
Robert VonSuskil, Chair
Robert Allen
Peter Bacinski
Carl W. Blank
Dave Burke
Joseph DeMartino
George Howard
Mike Kantor
Scott Paterson
Jim A. Shissias
Dr. Lenore Tedesco
Wildlife Rehabilitators
Advisory Committee
Kelly Simonetti, Chair
Donald Bonica
Phillip Brodhecker
Giselle Chazotte-Smisko
Lisa DeLambert
Tracy Leaver
Dr. Erica Miller
Diane Nickerson
Dr. Jennifer Norton
Where to Write Us
New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection, Division of Fish and Wildlife
MC 501-03 • P.O. Box 420 • Trenton, NJ 08625-0420 • NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife
Our Mission
To protect and manage the state’s fish and wildlife to maximize their long-term b­ iological,
recreational and economic value for all New Jerseyans.
Our Goals
•To maintain New Jersey’s rich variety of fish and wildlife species at stable, healthy levels
and to protect and enhance the many habitats on which they depend.
•To educate New Jerseyans on the values and needs of our fish and wildlife and to foster a
positive human/wildlife co-existence.
•To maximize the recreational and commercial use of New Jersey’s fish and wildlife for both
present and future generations.
Summer Flounder
A PROFILE
By Maryellen Gordon, Senior Fisheries Biologist | Lauren “Maggie” Sager, Seasonal Fisheries Technician | Bryan Carter, Seasonal Fisheries Technician
Jonathan Klotz, Seasonal Fisheries Technician | Erin Mulvenna, Seasonal Fisheries Technician
Common Names: summer flounder, fluke
Scientific Name: Paralichthys dentatus
Range: Nova Scotia south to eastern Florida, but
most common in the Mid-Atlantic region.
Size: Males can grow to over 2 feet, with larger
females reaching lengths up to 3 feet.
Biological Characteristics: Like all flounder, adult
summer flounder are flat-bodied. They are white
below and range from shades of brown to grey drab
above, with a scattering of distinct, dark identifying
spots. Summer flounder have the ability to change
their coloring in order to blend with their environment. Summer flounder are considered “left-eyed;”
when viewed from above, both eyes are typically on
the left side of the body, although rarely a right-eyed
variation may occur.
Habitat: Hard, sandy bottoms and salt marsh creeks
or seagrass beds with muddy or silty substrate.
Food and Feeding: Larval summer flounder feed
primarily on zooplankton, juveniles mainly on
crustaceans and adults are opportunistic predators. Their ability to camouflage themselves with the
substrate where they spend most of their lives makes
them highly efficient ambush predators. Numerous,
well-developed teeth allow adult summer flounder
to feed on a range of prey, including crustaceans,
small fish, squid and sea worms. Summer flounder
most actively feed during daylight hours.
Commercial/Recreational Importance: Summer
flounder are considered one of the most important
and sought-after fish in New Jersey, primarily for
their great tasting meat. Restaurants, bait and tackle
shops, charter and head boats plus beach townships
all benefit economically from the influx of both local
and visiting anglers that target summer flounder
along the New Jersey coastline each summer. The
New Jersey commercial summer flounder fishery
accounts for a large portion of the summer flounder
sold in restaurants and super markets. However, the
recreational fishery is equally important in New Jersey. Recreational anglers support the local businesses,
enjoy the activity of fishing for summer flounder and
can then take part in a fresh, home-cooked meal.
Fishing Methods: Summer flounder can be caught
using a variety of methods, one of which is by using
a bucktail teaser rig. The bucktail acts as the weight
on the bottom of a leader, and a second hook is
placed 12–24 inches above on a dropper loop. Both
hooks can be tipped with an artificially scented soft
plastic lure that summer flounder can’t resist. Using
light tackle such as 5- to 7-foot medium-action rods
and 10 lb. mono/20 lb. braided line is necessary to
feel the sensitive bite of a summer flounder.
Applying a small, but rapid vertical jigging action
to the rod will present the bucktail and lure like an
Steve Evert
Spawning: Summer flounder typically begin spawning around age two to three, with males averaging 10
inches and females averaging 12.5 inches in length.
Spawning occurs in the fall and winter (peaking in
October and November) when summer flounder
migrate from coastal to offshore waters to depths
between 120 and 600 feet. Spawning is directly
linked to sexual maturity, with older, larger fish
migrating first. Since flounder spawn several times
per season, a large female may release up to 4
million eggs in a single year. Larval flounder, or
fry, begin life in the water column and migrate
inshore to shallow coastal nurseries. Here
they settle into the sediment and develop
their adult form, with the body flattening and the right eye migrating over
the top of the head to the left side.
Sources:
Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission (2014)
NOAA Fish Watch (2014)
K. Hill, Smithsonian Marine Station at Fort Pierce (2014)
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife, Bureau of Marine Fisheries
Surf Fishing at
Long Beach Island
— Shane Evert
and his dad Steve
share in the delight
of catching this
summer flounder.
Migration: Their migration patterns are strongly tied to water
temperature, with adults spending
the warm summer months on the sea
floor in shallow coastal waters before migrating to the outer edge of the continental shelf
as fall temperatures drop.
2015 Marine Issue
injured baitfish, often resulting in a strike from a
summer flounder. Since these fish are visual predators, the presented bait should be moving constantly
to attract their attention. This usually requires
shore-based anglers to continually cast and retrieve;
boat anglers drift rather than anchor in one spot.
Summer flounder do not produce drag-ripping
fights such as bluefish and striped bass, but can
still be sporty on light tackle, especially from boats
where their flat profile creates a lot of water resistance. Making up for their lack of fighting skills,
summer flounder can often be caught in large quantities in one fishing trip.
If a summer flounder is caught along a certain
stretch of beach or near a certain underwater feature, continue fishing that same area and you will
often catch more fish. When fishing from shore, it
is important to work the bucktail right up to the
beach. Summer flounder often settle close against
the beach lip, feeding on baitfish and crabs washed
seaward off the beach face. Typically, most summer
flounder caught from the surf are hooked less than
20 yards from shore.
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
5
A Clear Revival for
New Jersey’s
Artificial Reef Program
By Hugh Carberry, Reef Coordinator
The federal Sport Fish Restoration Program funding for New Jersey’s Artificial Reef Program was
discontinued on April 12, 2011 by federal officials
due to spatial conflicts between anglers and recreational plus commercial fishers using potting
gear. Federal officials stated that the Sport Fish
Restoration funding source is a “user pays—user
benefits” program and that the presence of potting
gear precludes access to reefs for which anglers have
paid for through excise taxes. These officials further
explained that funding would be restored when
appropriate action was taken.
Since that time, the New Jersey Department
of Environmental Protection (DEP) has worked
diligently with representatives from the recreational
and commercial sectors in developing a fair plan
to balance access on reefs located in marine state
waters. The plan includes designating specific locations within these reefs where potting gear can be set
and the creation of a new reef in marine state waters
where potting gear will be prohibited. The DEP also
vowed to petition the Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council for Special Management Zone
regulations for the 13 reefs located in Exclusive Economic Zone once regulations are in place for reefs
in marine state waters. It is anticipated that these
changes will satisfy federal officials and that Sport
Fish Restoration funding will then be restored.
These changes, as well as a separate proposal to
potentially construct a new reef in Delaware Bay—
and a legal agreement to work jointly with nonprofit
organizations (501C3s) for future reef construction
6
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
efforts—have set the stage for New Jersey’s Artificial Reef Program to make an epic comeback.
Fish and Wildlife’s Artificial Reef Program has
been inactive for more than three years but these
proposals will breathe new life into a Program that
has been recognized as being the best in the nation.
Ultimately, it will be recreational users who will
benefit from all of these changes.
Under the DEP’s plan to balance access, regulations will set aside a portion of the Sandy Hook
Reef and two sections of the Axel Carlson Reef to
be designated as Full Access Zones. These will be
areas where potting gear can be set. Anglers will
not be prohibited from utilizing the Full Access
Zones but run the risk of losing terminal fishing
tackle on submerged potting gear and the associated ground lines between pots. All other forms of
commercial fishing will be allowed on these reefs
in their entirety, including the Full Access Zones.
Once the Full Access Zone regulations are in
place, the DEP has vowed to petition the MidAtlantic Fisheries Management Council for Special
Management Zone regulations for the 13 reefs
located in the Exclusive Economic Zone. The purpose of the Special Management Zone designation
is to establish management authority that would
allow for options that prohibit or restrain the use of
specific types of fishing gear that are not compatible
with the intent of the artificial reef.
The Mid-Atlantic Fisheries Management Council’s Special Management Zone Monitoring Team
will evaluate New Jersey’s request and prepare a
written report for the Council’s chairman. The Monitoring Team bases recommendations on fairness
and equity; promotion of conservation; avoidance of
excessive shares; consistency with the summer flounder, scup and black sea bass Fisheries Management
Plan; the natural bottom within the reef and surrounding it; and impacts to historical uses. Following
a full review by the Council a recommendation will
be made to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric
Administration’s (NOAA) Regional Administrator.
Ultimately it is the NOAA’s Regional Administrator that makes the final decision on the Monitoring
Team’s recommendations.
Another component of the DEP’s plan to balance
access includes the creation of a new reef north
of Barnegat Inlet where potting gear will be prohibited. The reef will be located in marine state
waters and its size will equate to the total area of
the three Full Access Zones contained within the
Sandy Hook and Axel Carlson Reefs (0.95 mi2 ).
Through exclusionary mapping, Fish and Wildlife’s marine biologists will select a location having
adequate depth and substrate that will not adversely
impact commercial fishing operations and will not
be near productive areas such as rock outcroppings
and other live bottom, shipping lanes, anchorages
and telecommunication cables. If all the components of the DEP’s proposals to balance access reach
fruition, the new reef will be ready for construction
during the spring of 2016.
A separate DEP proposal outside the plan to balance
access is the creation of a new reef in Delaware Bay.
For the past ten years Fish and Wildlife has received
hundreds of requests from anglers from the ports of
Fortescue, Cape May, Matt’s Landing, Bidwell Creek and
Dennis Creek to construct reefs in the bay. Anglers from
these ports contended that the State of Delaware’s reefs
within the bay are extremely productive and that New
Jersey’s Reef Program should move forward with reefs
in Delaware Bay to increase recreational opportunities.
After much consideration, Fish and Wildlife
elected to move forward with obtaining necessary
approvals to construct a new reef in Delaware Bay.
Our main concern with reef construction in this
area is that juvenile game fishes such as weakfish,
striped bass, black sea bass and tautog use the upper
Delaware Bay estuary as a nursery area. Reefs will
concentrate juvenile and sublegal fishes making
them vulnerable to catch by hook and line, potentially resulting in hooking mortality.
To avoid this possible outcome, the DEP chose to
consider only one location in the lower Bay where
the likelihood of hooking juveniles and sublegal
fishes would be significantly reduced. For the past
two years, Fish and Wildlife, has been working
diligently towards this goal. The first hurdle was
proposing a change in the Coastal Zone Management rules.
Working with DEP officials from Coastal Management, a change in the Coastal Zone Management rules was proposed which would allow for
the construction of an artificial reef in lower Delaware Bay. Since the inception of New Jersey’s Reef
Program in 1984, the Coastal Zone Management
rules stated unequivocally that reefs were only to be
constructed in the ocean. The proposed rule change
appeared in the June 2014 New Jersey Register for
a 30 day public comment period. Although the
proposed rule change has not yet been officially
adopted, it is anticipated that this change will be
in effect by June 2, 2015.
This change is the first initial step towards constructing a reef in the lower Delaware Bay. However, other crucial steps include meeting with representatives from the commercial fishing industries
from the Delaware Bay area to receive their input.
Our main focus on selecting a potential location
will be to choose an area that is equidistant from
all ports that has adequate depth and substrate
composition that will not interfere with established
shipping lanes.
Sandy Hook Reef
Location of “Full Access Zone” highlighted in red.
(Charts not for navigational use.)
2015 Marine Issue
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
7
Axel Carlson Reef
Locations of “Full Access Zones” highlighted in red.
(Charts not for navigational use.)
NJ Div. Fish and Wildl ife
If our efforts are successful, the proposed reef will
be one mile in area and be comprised of low profile
structures such as reef balls, dredge rock and demolition concrete and low vertical relief deck barges.
The final outcome will be an outstanding location
for anglers to catch tautog, summer flounder, black
sea bass, striped bass and transient species such as
sheepshead, spadefish and cobia. Similar to the
new reef being proposed further north as part of
the DEP’s plan to balance access, potting type gear
will be prohibited at the proposed lower Delaware
Bay reef.
The last exciting change regarding the Reef Program is a Memorandum of Understanding that was
In the shadow of Old Barney—Captured from
atop the lighthouse as it passed by, landing craft
Benjamin Maybe transports 50 reef balls to the
Barnegat Light Reef.
8
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
developed by the DEP for any interested nonprofit
organizations and reef material providers that want
to participate with New Jersey’s Artificial Reef
Program in building reefs. This agreement, when
finalized, will serve as a catalyst for reefing more
vessels and other acceptable materials within New
Jersey’s Reef Network in a quick and timely manner.
The agreement is very specific in that it identifies
responsibilities of the DEP, nonprofit organizations, reef material providers and contractors for
preparing and towing of vessels to reefs for deployment. Perhaps the greatest benefit though will be
a system set in place that will allow interested
nonprofit organizations to serve as a repository
for donations from fishing clubs, scuba clubs and
the Reef Program’s very popular adopt-a-reef and
memorial reef programs.
New Jersey’s Reef Program is recognized nationally as being the most progressive and served as the
model for other states now active in constructing
artificial reefs. Our Program has reefed more vessels
and deployed a greater volume of materials than
any other state in the nation, an amazing statistic
given the size of New Jersey compared with other
states having an active reef program such as Florida,
California and North Carolina.
Although the conflicts that arose between recreational and
commercial fishers using potting gear were an unfortunate
outcome, the measures proposed by the DEP to ameliorate
access issues should satisfy federal officials from the
Sport Fish Restoration Program. It is anticipated that our
federal funding will be restored by the spring of 2016 and
that New Jersey’s Reef Program will once again set the
gold standard for other states to follow.
NJFishandWildlife.com
2015 Marine Issue
Governor's Surf Fishing Tournament
GET OUTSIDE & ENJOY A DAY OF FISHING WITH FAMILY AND FRIENDS
By Karen Byrne, Senior Biologist
Thank you!
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife,
along with our co-sponsors—the NJ State Park
Service, NJ State Federation of Sportsmen’s
Clubs, Jersey Coast Anglers Association and NJ
Beach Buggy Association—would like to thank
the following organizations for contributing to
the success of the 23rd Annual Governor’s Surf
Fishing Tournament in 2014:
• Sportsman’s Center
• Silver Horde
• Chestnut Neck Boat Yard • Skunkbunker
• Eagle Claw Fishing Tackle • Stanley Jigs
• L&H Wood and Water
• Canyon Gear
• Legal Limits Company
• Tica USA
• Manns Bait Company
In memoriam: We remember and thank
Ken Jelnicki, Jr. who, for the past five years,
donated a Surf Rocket, one of his customdesigned surf casters, as an early registration
prize. Mr. Jelnicki passed away in January
2014 but will be remembered as being
passionate about surf fishing and as someone
always willing to help other anglers.
Jon Carlucci/NJ D FW
instruction programs and equipment and the purchase of the first mobile automatic heart defibrilMark your calendar for May 17, 2015 when Island
lator for use at Island Beach State Park. In 2014,
Beach State Park will host the 24th annual Govfunds from the tournament and partnering orgaernor’s Surf Fishing Tournament! Hundreds of
nizations provided Island Beach State Park with
anglers from New Jersey and neighboring states
more than eight new specialized wheelchairs that
are expected to hit the beach that day in hopes of
provide beach access for the disabled and elderly.
catching the longest fish and to enjoy a great day of
Last year was the first time in tournament history
fishing with family and friends at the Jersey Shore.
that the event was not held in the fall. The change to
The tournament aims to encourage youngsters
May was beneficial with a significant increase in the
and adults to learn more about surf fishing while
number of participants over recent years. More than
taking advantage of a great family activity. Since its
600 anglers participated this year. A bluefish blitz
inception in 1991, the tournament has generated
kept tournament judges on the move with nearly 200
more than $130,000 for various marine educafish being measured. However, it was Chris Follmer
tion and restoration efforts, construction of access
of Hasbrouck Heights, NJ, who took the grand
ramps for disabled saltwater anglers, surf fishing
prize and New Jersey Governor's Cup with a 36-inch
bluefish. Follmer received two rod-and-reel combinations plus a plaque; his name will be engraved on the
Governor's Cup on permanent display at the park.
New Jersey Lieutenant Governor Kim Guadagno
was on hand to greet tournament participants and
help present the awards after spending a day on the
beach fishing with family and friends.
In addition to the Governor’s Cup winner, twenty
anglers received rod and reel combinations for their
Tournament winner Chris Follmer of Hasbrouck
prize-winning fish in the striped bass and bluefish
Heights landed the top position with a 36-inch bluefish. categories. Overall fish length determined the grand
L–R: John Toth (Jersey Coast Angler Assoc.), Chris
prize winner, as well as first, second or third place in
Follmer (Governor’s Cup winner), John Rogalo (NJ
each of the species categories. There were categories
State Federation of Sportsmen’s Clubs), Lt. Governor
for children, teen and adult anglers, including subGuadagno, Tim Burden (NJ Beach Buggy Assoc.) and
categories for male and female anglers.
Dave Chanda (Director, NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife).
The Governor’s Surf Fishing Tournament is a great
way for anglers of all ages and experience to enjoy a
great day of fishing, and help kick off the start of the
summer season at the Jersey shore. For more information about the Tournament, or to receive a registration form, visit NJFishandWildlife.com/gsft.htm
or call (609) 748-4347.
Serving New Jersey
for over 100 years!
LIVE BAIT
Shiners • Fatheads • Worms
Plus Frozen Bait
FULL SERVICE FLY SHOP
One of the Largest Fly Tying
Selections in the State
NJ & PA
Hunting and Fishing Licenses
STATE & FEDERAL DUCK STAMPS
• EXPERT REEL REPAIR
• SPECIAL ORDERS
• LARGE SELECTION OF
CUSTOM SURF PLUGS
Enter our FREE Fluke Contest
SIGN UP for our Rewards Program
YOUR FISHING TACKLE DESTINATION
Fresh & Saltwater Tackle – Friendly & Knowledgeable Staff!
513 West Union Ave. Bound Brook, NJ · (732) 356-0604
HUNTING · FISHING · CAMPING · ATHLETIC EQUIPMENT · ARCHERY · KAYAKS · BICYCLES · OUTDOOR &
ATHLETIC CLOTHING · FOOTWEAR · TEAM, SCHOOL & CORPORATE SALES · BOY SCOUT UNIFORMS
www.efingersports.com
Take $10 off
your Fishing Purchase
of $50 or more.
Cannot be combined with any other coupon offers or
sales, or discounts. Not valid on prior purchases or
licenses. Limit one coupon per person. Valid for in-store
purchases only. Minimum purchase of $50 before sales
tax. No reproductions accepted. Other exclusions may
apply. Coupon valid 5/1/15 – 10/31/15.
Hours: Monday–Friday 9:30–8:00, Saturday 9:00–5:30, Sunday 10:00–5:00 � AMEX VISA M/C DEBIT
Directions: 2 blocks east of I-287, exit 13A from I-287N, exit 13 from I-287S. 3 Blocks So. of Rt. 22 at the Thompson Ave. exit.
1/4 Mile east of the Bridgewater Promenade on Rt. 28.
ORVIS • PENN • POWER PRO • BOMBER • SCI ANGLER • HOPKINS • VAN STAAL
SUPER STRIKE • BERKLEY GULP • GRUNDENS • AQUASKINS • GAMAKATSU
DAIWA • ST. CROIX • ABU GARCIA • QUANTUM • COSTA DEL MAR • SALT LIFE • SPRO BUCKTAILS • MOMOI • SHIMANO
TRILENE • TSUNAMI • LAMIGLAS • MAUI JIM • LEATHERMAN• OCEANMAX • AVET • G. LOOMIS • GIBBS • RUN OFF LURES • STORM
9
Finfish
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
Regulations in red are new this year.
Regulations remain in effect until changed.
For the most current regulations, go to
NJFishandWildlife.com/njregs.htm#marine
or call the marine fish "listen-only" information
line at (609) 292-2083. The Department of Environmental Protection’s Division of Fish and Wildlife informs anglers that rules for the recreational
harvest of summer flounder (fluke), black sea bass,
striped bass and lobster have changed.
• The recreational summer flounder open season
has been modified to include May 22 to September 26.
• The black sea bass recreational minimum size
remains at 12.5 inches. However, the recreational
seasons and possession limits have changed. There
is a 15 fish possession limit for May 27 to June 30,
a two fish possession limit for July 1 to July 31, and
a 15 fish possession limit for Oct. 22 to Dec. 31.
• The recreational striped bass size limit has changed
to one fish at 28 inches to less than 43 inches and
one fish at greater than or equal to 43 inches. The
Striped Bass Bonus Program has been modified
to one fish at 24 inches to less than 28 inches with
a season of September 1 to December 31. See page
12 for additional program information.
• The lobster season has changed; there is no harvest
or possession allowed from April 30 to May 31.
• Notice: New Federal regulations for the taking
of blueline tilefish will likely be implemented
in 2015. Visit our website at NJFishandWildlife.com or call the 24-hour marine fish “listen-only” information line at (609) 292-2083
for the latest regulation updates.
These changes were implemented for New Jersey
to remain in compliance with the Atlantic States
Marine Fisheries Commission’s management plans
for summer flounder, black sea bass, striped bass
and coastal sharks. The new rules are aimed at
providing adequate protection to these fish stocks
while allowing New Jersey’s saltwater recreational
anglers to participate to the fullest extent possible
in these various fisheries.
New Jersey recreational marine regulations apply
to all fish species when they are possessed in state
waters or landed in New Jersey regardless of where
they are caught. Saltwater anglers must comply
with the requirements of the New Jersey Saltwater
Recreational Registry Program. See page 13.
Resource Information
Anyone who takes fisheries resources may be
required to provide information on the species,
number, weight or other information pertinent to
management of resources. Anglers are encouraged
to report all fishing activity after each trip. Visit
Fish and Wildlife's Volunteer Angler Survey at
NJFishandWildlife.com/marinesurvey.htm.
Methods of Recreational Fishing
No person shall take, catch, kill or attempt to take,
catch or kill any fish within the marine waters of the
state by any means except in the manner commonly
known as angling with hand line or rod and line unless
specifically provided for by statute or regulation.
A Delaware fishing license is required for all nonresident anglers aged 16 and over fishing either fresh
or tidal waters. Delaware fishing license information can be found at http://www.fw.delaware.gov/
Fisheries/Pages/NewFishingLicense.aspx.
New York Fishing Registry Requirement
New York offers a free registry to all marine anglers.
Visit http://www.dec.ny.gov/permits/54950.html.
Bait Fish
­ o license is required for the taking of baitfish for
N
personal use with the following gear:
1. Dip nets 24 inches diameter or less for the taking of Atlantic herring only (does not include
river herring — alewife and blueback herring)
for live bait. The taking or possession of river
herring is prohibited.
2. Bait seines 50 feet long or less.
3. Cast nets 20 feet in diameter or less.
4. Lift or umbrella nets four feet square or less.
5. Not more than five killipots.
6. Not more than two miniature fykes or pots for
the taking of eels for bait.
Fish taken in this manner may not be sold or used
for barter unless a commercial bait net license is
in possession.
No person shall take or attempt to take fish by any
means from the Deal Lake flume, Lake Takanasse
spillway or Wreck Pond spillway on any Monday,
Wednesday or Friday during the months of April
and May.
Wanton Waste Prohibited
Fish of any species which are purposely killed shall
become part of the angler’s daily possession limit
and shall not be returned to the water from which
they were taken. This does not apply to fish which
are released alive and subsequently die, but does
apply even to species without size/possession limits.
Spearfishing
Spearfishing may be conducted by means of a
spear, harpoon or other missile while completely
1. L ay fish flat on top of, or alongside a
measuring rule, not measured over the body.
2. F ish are measured from the tip of the snout
(mouth closed) to the longest part of the tail.
Prohibited Species
It is illegal to take, possess, land, purchase, or sell
any of the following species:
• Atlantic sturgeon
• basking shark
• big eye sand tiger shark
• sand tiger shark
• sandbar shark
• shortnose sturgeon
• whale shark
• white shark
• river herring (alewife and blueback herring; see
herring illustrations, page 14)
• See Sharks (page 11) for the full list of prohibited shark species
Sea Turtles &
Marine Mammals
It is illegal to intentionally molest, kill or possess
sea turtles or marine mammals, or to possess any
part thereof.
Finfish
How to Release Hooked Fish
For people with disabilities, visit:
www.NJFishandWildlife.com/sites.htm
An Accessible Fishing Sites list is available to assist anglers whose mobility
is impaired. All sites are wheelchair-accessible except for the Musconetcong
River in Morris County, where vehicle access is to the shoreline.
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
Fish Measurement
Delaware Fishing License Requirement
Accessible Fishing Sites
10
submerged in the marine waters of the state for
any species, except lobster.
Persons who fish with a spear for species with
size limits are reminded that it is their responsibility to ensure the fish meets the minimum size
limits before being killed or injured. (See article,
A Spearfishing Primer, on page 20.)
NJFishandWildlife.com
Proper handling and releasing techniques reduce
fish mortality.
• Land fish as quickly as possible, except not when
retrieving from depths of 40-feet or more. Fighting a fish to exhaustion increases mortality as
does rapidly bringing up a fish through the changing water pressure and temperature gradients.
2015 Marine Issue
6 Hour Fishing
FISH MORE, RIDE LESS!
Closest Boat to
Ocean or Bay.
ONLY 6 Hour Boat
in Cape May County!
SUPER CLEAN,
AFFORDABLE,
FAMILY-FRIENDLY!
www.seastarfleet.com
www.seastarfleet.com
609-884-3421
• Keep fish to be released in the water as much
as possible. Plan ahead with tools and camera.
• Minimize physical injury. Do not touch gills or
allow fish to flop around on deck.
• Carefully remove hooks using a dehooker or
needle-nose pliers.
• Use plain hooks, not stainless, to rust away
quickly if one must be left in a gut-hooked fish.
Be prepared with long-handled dykes. Cut this
line close to the hook’s eyelet.
• To bring a fish out of the water momentarily, use
a neoprene net or one of knotless nylon. Handle
the fish carefully using wet hands, wet cotton
gloves or similar material to minimize loss of
the fish’s protective slime layer.
• To revive lethargic fish, hold in a normal, upright
position. Move the fish forward in an “S” or
figure-8 pattern so that water flows over the
gills only from front to back.
• Use circle hooks (not offset) for species that bite
and flee, such as striped bass, weakfish or sea
bass. Consider pinching hook barbs.
Filleting
The filleting at sea of all fish with a size limit, or any
species of flatfish, is prohibited except for summer
flounder; see Summer Flounder, page 12. No parts
of any fish caught on a previous fishing trip shall
be in possession. Party boats may fillet fish at sea
2015 Marine Issue
if they obtain a Special Fillet Permit. Applications
may be obtained from Fish and Wildlife’s Bureau
of Marine Fisheries.
River Herring
Black Drum
The minimum size limit for black drum is 16 inches
in total length and the daily possession limit is
three fish. There is no closed season for black drum.
The taking or possession of any river herring
(alewife and blueback herring) in New Jersey’s
marine, tidal and freshwaters is prohibited. This
prohibition does not include Atlantic herring
which may be retained and used as bait. See the
fish ID illustrations on page 14 for herring species identification.
Black Sea Bass­­
Sharks
Black sea bass are measured along the midline
from the snout to the end of the central portion
of the tail, not to include the tail filaments. (See
fish measuring example on page 10.) The black
sea bass recreational minimum size remains at
12.5 inches. The 2015 recreational seasons and
possession limits have changed. See details on the
Marine Regulations chart, page 17. Visit our
Web site at NJFishandWildlife.com or call the
24-hour marine fish “listen-only” information line
at (609) 292-2083 for the latest regulation updates.
The hammerhead shark recreational size limit is
78 inches fork length (FL). The minimum size limit
for authorized shark species of the Aggregate Large
Coastal and Pelagic groups remains at 54 inches
fork length while all others do not have a size limit.
See dogfish Note and measuring illustration for
fork length.
Shark
Bluefish
The possession limit for bluefish is 15 fish.
Fork Length
Red Drum
The red drum possession and size limits are one
fish no less than 18 inches and not greater than
27 inches.
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
11
Finfish
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
Regulations in red are new this year.
The 2015 shark regulations complement existing
federal shark regulations (see 2015 Federal Recreational Regulations table, page 18). However,
the following additional measures are required
for state waters:
• In state waters, there is no minimum size limit
for non-blacknose small coastal sharks and blacknose sharks* in the recreational fishery, but
federal regulations include a 54-inch minimum
size limit for blacknose and finetooth small
coastal sharks.
• All sharks within the Aggregate Large Coastal
and Hammerhead groups* will have a closed
season within state waters from May 15 through
July 15 to protect spawning female sharks during
the pupping season.
* See page 18 footnote for species list defining
shark groupings.
All sharks harvested by recreational fishermen must
have heads, tails and fins attached naturally to the
carcass until landed. Anglers may still gut and bleed
the carcass as long as the tail is not removed. Filleting sharks at sea is prohibited.
Recreational anglers should access the following
National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
website, http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/stories/2012/08/
docs/rec_shark_id_placard_2010.pdf to view the
Be the First to Know!
Get on the List
The Marine Fisheries and Shellfish
e-mail list, that is. This free service
provides the latest information about
Fish and Wildlife events, public hearings and
other matters related to marine resources.
And there are six other lists to help you get
the most out of New Jersey’s fish and wildlife
resources. Sign up today.
Visit Fish and Wildlife’s Web site:
NJFishandWildlife.com/lstsub.htm
Saltwater or fresh
Sales, outfitting,
repairs, trips....
The most complete kayak
shops in New Jersey.
We’ve got you covered!
Voted #1 kayak rentals
in Cape May County, NJ.
Kayak storage and launch
at our N. Wildwood location.
www.TheKayakFishingStore.com
Let our experts set you up right.
Fairfield, NJ. 973.227.3251
N. Wildwood, NJ. 609.522.5969
12
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
publication Sharks That Can Be Legally Retained By
Recreational Anglers In The Atlantic Ocean, Caribbean Sea And Gulf Of Mexico, an excellent pictorial
guide to identifying sharks that are legal to harvest.
These shark species are prohibited from possession: Atlantic angel, basking, bigeye sixgill, bigeye
thresher, bigeye tiger, bignose, Caribbean reef,
Caribbean sharpnose, dusky, Galapagos, longfin
mako, narrowtooth, night, sandbar, sandtiger,
sevengill, silky, sixgill, smalltail, whale and white
sharks.
Note: To differentiate sharks from dogfish—
the smooth dogfish has flat, tiny teeth; the spiny
dogfish has strong, dorsal spines, shorter than,
and in front of, the dorsal fins. Neither are present in sharks.
Striped Bass (includes
Hybrid Striped Bass)
The possession limit for striped bass/hybrid
striped bass is two fish. The size limits are one
fish at 28 inches to less than 43 inches and one
fish equal to or greater than 43 inches. Anglers
participating in the Striped Bass Bonus Program
may possess a striped bass at 24 inches to less than
28 inches in length.
It is illegal to take, catch or kill any striped
bass from or in any marine waters of this state,
by means of a net of any description, or by any
methods other than angling with a hook and line
or by spear fishing.
It is illegal to possess any striped bass which
is less than the legal minimum size of 28 inches
unless in possession of a Striped Bass Bonus Permit which allows the possession of one fish at 24
inches to less than 28 inches.
Harvest and possession of striped bass from
federal waters (outside three miles) is prohibited.
Sale of striped bass in New Jersey is prohibited.
Striped Bass Closed Seasons
No person may take, attempt to take, or have in
possession any striped bass from the following
closed waters:
Jan. 1–Feb. 28: All waters closed except the
Atlantic Ocean from zero to three miles offshore.
All inlets and bays are delineated from ocean
waters by a Colregs Demarcation line.
April 1–May 31: Delaware River and Bay and
their tributaries closed from the upstream side of
the Calhoun St. bridge downstream to and including the Salem River and its tributaries.
Note: Non-offset circle hooks are required to
reduce striped bass bycatch mortality while
fishing with natural bait during the striped
bass springtime spawning area closure within
the Delaware River and its tributaries. This
restriction does not apply to hook sizes smaller
than size 2.
Striped Bass Bonus Program
The Striped Bass Bonus Program will continue
this year, where anglers possessing a bonus permit
may keep a striper at 24 inches to less than 28
inches. For 2015, the open season for this program
will be September 1 through December 31.
NJFishandWildlife.com
The current allocation from the Atlantic States
Marine Fisheries Commission is 215,912 pounds.
Should New Jersey exceed this quota, any overage
would be subtracted from the following year’s quota.
Application Process: Striped Bass Bonus Program permits are only available online. Go to
www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com to complete the
application and immediately print one Bonus Permit
(application fee, $2). The permit is non-transferable
and valid for the current calendar year. Only one
permit can be used per day. Harvest reporting also
must be online. Note that the Striped Bass Bonus
Program application process may change later in
2015. For regulation or program updates, visit us
at www.NJFishandWildlife.com/bonusbas.htm
or check the marine fish "listen only" information
line (609) 292-2083.
Striped Bass Bonus Permit Harvest Reporting:
All information on the Bonus Permit must be
completed immediately after harvest and prior to
transportation. After reporting harvest information at www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com, anglers are
then eligible to receive another bonus permit for
the $2 application fee. Note: Harvest information
must be reported online.
Summer Flounder (Fluke)
The summer flounder recreational minimum size
limit remains at 18 inches and the possession
limit remains five fish. The 2015 summer flounder
recreational season will be open from May 22 to
September 26.
Anglers may fillet one legal-sized summer flounder
from their daily possession limit catch for use as bait.
This carcass, commonly known as the rack, shall be
kept intact so it can be measured for compliance with
the minimum size limit. No parts of any summer
flounder caught on a previous fishing trip shall be
in possession; only fish just caught on this outing.
Shore-based anglers fishing at Island Beach State
Park (IBSP) may retain 2 fish greater than or equal
to 16 inches (total length) only at IBSP during the
current open summer flounder fishing season. Shorebased fishing is defined as fishing from a pier, jetty,
beach, bank, or marsh. See the article on page 27.
Tautog (Blackfish)
The minimum size limit for tautog is 15 inches.
There is a four fish possession limit from Jan. 1–
Feb. 28, a closed season from March 1–March 31,
a four fish possession limit from April 1–April 30,
a closed season from May 1–July 16, a one fish possession limit from July 17–Nov. 15 and a six fish
possession limit from Nov. 16–Dec. 31.
Weakfish (Gray & Spotted Seatrout)
The current possession and minimum size limit
for weakfish is one fish at least 13 inches in length.
Winter Flounder
The possession minimum and size limit for winter
flounder is two fish at 12 inches. For winter flounder
the open season is March 1–Dec 31.
Additional Marine Fishing Regulations
See pages 14–15 for the fish ID pages and
pages 17–18 for the regulation charts.
2015 Marine Issue
New Jersey Saltwater Recreational Registry Program (NJSRRP)
ATTENTION: New Jersey Saltwater Anglers
REGISTER. You make a difference! It’s free, easy and required.
Intercept Surveys (APAIS) are conducted at public marine fishing access points (boat ramps, piers,
beaches, jetties, bridges, marinas and more) to collect individual angler catch data, including species
identification, total number of each species, length and weight measurements of individual fishes as
well as some angler-specific information about the fishing trip and the angler’s fishing behavior.
These angler surveys will be conducted by individual states beginning next year. To date, New Jersey’s
APAIS has been conducted by a contractor of the National Marine Fisheries Service. The interviews are
conducted in person by trained field staff. The sites and dates are selected by a proportional random
selection process. From these angler interviews a catch-per-unit- effort trip estimate can be made for
each type of fish encountered, either observed or reported.
These estimates are combined with the effort estimates—
such as those collected through telephone interviews—
to produce the catch and harvest estimates.
Each state’s saltwater registry serves as the contact list for
these telephone interviews. Complete participation in the
New Jersey Saltwater Recreational Registry Program is
crucial to achieve accurate recreational fishing estimates
which help to ensure healthy fisheries for the future.
Before you head out to catch your favorite saltwater fish this year, be sure
to join the hundreds of thousands of anglers who have already registered
with the New Jersey Saltwater Recreational Registry Program (NJSRRP).
Register at the NJ Saltwater Recreational Registry Program site:
www.saltwaterregistry.nj.gov
For more information on the APAIS, visit www.st.nmfs.noaa.gov/
recreational-fisheries/in-depth/our-surveys-counting-catchand-effort/survey-materials/access-point-angler-intercept-survey
Motor Boat Registration & Title Requirements
NJ Motor Vehicle Commission (MVC)
Registration
Title
Most boats must be registered to operate on New Jersey waterways.
For use on New Jersey waterways, all boats more than 12 feet in length
must be titled, with the exception of ship’s lifeboat, canoe, kayak,
inflatable, surfboard, rowing scull, racing shell, tender/dinghy used for
direct transportation between a vessel and shore for no other purposes.
• All titled boats must be registered also.
• A
ny boat (including jet skis and non-titled watercraft),
mechanically propelled (incl. electric motors), regardless of
length, must be registered.
• B
oats greater than 12 feet in length, regardless of propulsion means,
must be titled and registered at an MVC office.
Boats and marine equipment which need not be registered:
• T hose not based in New Jersey or operating here less than 180
consecutive days that are operating under a federally approved
numbering system from another state
• Ship’s lifeboats
• N
on-motorized vessels used exclusively on small lakes and ponds on
private property
• Racing vessels with New Jersey State Marine Police permit
• N
on-motorized inflatable device, surfboard, racing shell, dinghy, canoe
or kayak
• Non-motorized vessel less than 12 feet in length
2015 Marine Issue
Boat Operator License (MVC)
An operator license is required to operate power vessels on fresh,
non-tidal waters such as lakes, creeks and rivers. (Minimum age
16 years; with certain exceptions.)
For More Information:
New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission
(888) 486-3339 toll free in NJ or (609) 292-6500 from out-of-state
www.nj.gov/mvc/
Boat Safety Certificate (NJSP)
A boat safety certificate (from an approved boat safety course; see
NJSP Web site, below) is required to operate a personal watercraft or
power vessel, including electric motors, in NJ waters (tidal and non-tidal).
New Jersey State Police (NJSP)
(609) 882-2000
www.njsp.org/maritime
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
13
Marine Species Identification
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
Herring
Dorsal fin forward of midlength
Teeth on roof
of mouth
Eye diameter greater
than snout length
Round snout
overhangs
closed mouth
Dorsal fin at midlength
Deep
body
Long, filamentous projection
from last ray of dorsal fin
Narrow
body
No teeth on
roof of mouth
Alewife (a river herring)
Large mouth
Upper jaw
close to rear
edge of eye
May have a line
of spots
Largest in the
herring family
American Shad
Atlantic Herring
Eye diameter less
than snout length
Gizzard Shad
Dorsal fin forward of midlength
No teeth on
roof of mouth
Blueback Herring (a river herring)
Lower jaw projects
well beyond upper jaw
when mouth closed
Hickory Shad
Alewife, American Shad, Blueback Herring and Hickory Shad illustrations ©Duane Raver; Atlantic Herring illustration ©Victor Young/NH. Fish and Game Department;
Gizzard Shad illustration courtesy of Texas Parks and Wildlife Department ©2012.
Striped Bass
Black Sea Bass
Tautog
(Blackfish)
Red Drum
14
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
Weakfish
Bluefish
(Snapper)
Atlantic Croaker
Winter Flounder
Black Drum
Blue Crab
NJFishandWildlife.com
Summer Flounder
(Fluke)
Hard Clam
2015 Marine Issue
Scup
(Porgy)
Spot
Northern Searobin
Northern Kingfish
Northern Puffer
Atlantic Bonito
Oyster Toadfish
Spanish
Mackerel
Atlantic Cod
Atlantic Mackerel
Spiny Dogfish
Smooth Dogfish
Sandbar Shark
Sand Tiger Shark
2015 Marine Issue
White Perch
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
15
Mollusks & Crustaceans
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
Regulations in red are new this year.
Crustaceans
American Lobster
The legal possession size limit of whole lobsters,
measured from the rear of the eye socket along a line
parallel to the center line of the body shell to the rear
of the body shell, shall be not less than 3⅜ inches
nor greater than 5¼ inches. Lobster parts may not
be possessed at sea or landed. There is no harvest or
possession of lobster from April 30–May 31.
Lobster
V notch
The possession limit is six lobsters per person. No
person shall possess any lobster with eggs attached
or from which eggs have been removed or any female
lobster with a v-notched tail, as illustrated above.
The use of spears, gigs, gaffs or other penetrating
devices as a method of capture for lobsters is prohibited. A recreational lobster pot license is required
to use pots or traps to capture lobsters. For details
call (609) 748-2020. Lobsters taken recreationally
may not be sold or offered for sale.
Crabs
1. Crabs may be taken recreationally with hand
lines, manually operated collapsible traps or
scoop nets without a license. A non-commercial
crab pot license is required for the use of not
more than two non-collapsible Chesapeake-style
crab pots (see illustration on page 19) or two
trot lines to harvest crabs. See page 19 for the
non-commercial crab pot license information.
2. It is illegal to harvest or possess more than one
bushel of crabs per day per person or offer for
sale any crabs without having in your possession
a valid commercial crabbing license.
3. Minimum size for crabs that may be harvested
(measured from point to point of shell) are as
follows:
a) Peeler or shedder crab: 3 inches
b) Soft crab: 3½ inches
c) Hard crab: 4½ inches
Measure crabs point to point.
4. All female crabs with eggs attached and all
undersized crabs shall be returned to the water
immediately.
16
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
5. Recreational trot lines shall not exceed 150 feet
in length with a maximum of 25 baits.
6. All pots and trot lines shall be marked with the
identification number of the owner.
7. All crab pots must be tended at least once every
72 hours.
8. No floating line may be used on any crab pot
or crab pot buoy.
9. No crab pot shall be placed in any area that
would obstruct or impede navigation or in any
creek less than 50 feet wide.
10.Only the owner, his agent or a law enforcement
officer may raise or remove contents of a legally
set fishing device.
11.Crabs taken with a bait seine may be retained
for personal use only if the fisherman possesses
a bait net license, and may not be bartered or
sold unless the fisherman possesses a commercial crab license.
12.No crabs may be harvested from the Newark
Bay Complex. For more information, see Health
Advisory on page 26.
13.Crab Pot/Trot Line seasons: Delaware Bay and
tributaries: April 6–Dec. 4. All other waters:
March 15–Nov. 30. The following waters, and
their tributaries, are closed to the use of crab
pots and trot lines: Cumberland Co.: Cohansey
River and creeks named Back, Cedar, Nantuxent,
Fortescue, Oranoken and Dividing; Cape May
Co.: West and Bidwell Creeks and the Cape May
Canal; Atlantic Co.: Hammock Cove (Dry Bay);
Ocean Co.: on east shore of Barnegat Bay, that
area of Sedge Islands Wildlife Management Area
enclosed by a line drawn from the northern bank
of Fishing Creek on Island Beach State Park to
the northern tip of the Sedge Islands (Hensler
Island), then south from point to point along the
western side of the Sedge Islands WMA and
terminating on the most southwestern point of
Island Beach State Park.
14.Crab Dredge Seasons: Delaware Bay and
tributaries: Jan. 1 through April 15 and Nov. 15
through Dec. 31. All other waters: Jan. 1 through
March 31, Dec. 1 through Dec. 31. Fish and
Wildlife will issue a non-commercial crab dredge
license for the harvest of not more that one bushel
of crabs per day during
­­­
the crab dredge season.
Crabs so taken may not be sold or offered for barter. There is a fee of $15 for this non-commercial
crab dredge license. See page 19 for details on
purchasing a non-commercial crab dredge license.
Notice: All non-collapsible Chesapeake-style crab
pots (see illustration on page 19) must be constructed to include a biodegradable panel designed
to create an opening to allow crabs and other organisms to escape if the pot is lost or abandoned. All
non-collapsible Chesapeake-style crab pots set in
any manmade lagoon or any water body less than
150 feet wide must also include a turtle excluder
device inside all pot entrance funnels.
NJFishandWildlife.com
Horseshoe Crabs
The harvest of horseshoe crabs is prohibited. Possession of horseshoe crabs is also prohibited except
for those individuals holding a scientific collecting
permit for research and education and those fishermen that can provide suitable documentation
that the horseshoe crabs in their possession were
harvested outside of New Jersey.
Mollusks
1. All persons must be licensed to harvest any
shellfish. See license information, page 19.
Shellfish means any species of benthic mollusks
(except conch) including hard and soft clams,
oysters, surf clams, bay scallops and mussels.
2. It is illegal to harvest shellfish from condemned
waters, even for bait purposes. It is also illegal
to harvest shellfish including surf clams from
beaches adjacent to water classified as condemned. Shellfish water classification charts are
available from license agents or any state shellfish office. See page 19 for shellfish license
information. Charts are updated annually.
3. Shellfish harvesting is prohibited before sunrise and after sunset. Shellfish harvest is also
prohibited on Sundays except in the seasonally
approved areas of the Navesink and Shrewsbury
rivers, when harvesting is permitted between
Nov. 1 and April 30.
4. Harvesting shellfish on public grounds is
restricted to the use of hand implements.
5. It is illegal to harvest shellfish from leased
grounds. These grounds are delineated by stakes
or buoys set by the lease holder. Charts of the
leases may be examined at Fish and Wildlife’s
Nacote Creek or Delaware Bay shellfish offices
during regular business hours. Invasion onto
leased grounds is punishable by penalties up
to $3,000 and loss of all equipment.
Recreational Shellfishing
1. No holder of any recreational shellfish license
may take more than a total of 150 shellfish (in
aggregate) per day. See Shellfish License Information, page 19.
2. It is illegal to dredge shellfish on public grounds.
Use of hand implements are the only legal harvest methods.
3. The minimum size of hard clams that may be
harvested is 1½ inches in length. Clams less
than 1½ inches in
length must immediately be returned
to the bottom from
which they were
taken. Specific seasons, regulations
and size limits exist
1½"
2015 Marine Issue
State Size and Possession Limits
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
for oyster beds in Great Bay, Delaware Bay, plus
the Mullica, Great Egg Harbor and Tuckahoe
rivers. Check with the nearest shellfish office
(Nacote Creek or Delaware Bay) for these
detailed regulations.
4. Shells taken in the process of harvesting oysters must be culled from the live oysters and
returned immediately to the area from where
they were taken.
2015 New Jersey Recreational Fishing Seasons,
Minimum Size and Possession Limits
Commercial Shellfishing
Black Sea Bass
1. Shellfish may be sold only to certified dealers.
All persons selling shellfish commercially must
tag each container listing date of harvest, name
and address of the harvester and the waters
from which the shellfish were harvested.
2. It is illegal to dredge shellfish on public grounds.
All harvesting on public grounds is restricted
to the use of hand implements.
3. Shells taken in the process of harvesting oysters must be culled from the live oysters and
immediately returned to the area from where
they were taken.
4. The minimum size of hard clams that may be
harvested is 1½ inches in length. Clams less
than 1½ inches must immediately be returned
to the bottom from which they were taken.
Specific seasons, regulations and size limits
exist for oyster beds in Great Bay, Delaware
Bay, plus the Mullica, Great Egg Harbor, and
Tuckahoe rivers. Check with the nearest shellfish office (Nacote Creek or Delaware Bay) for
these detailed regulations.
5. It is illegal to harvest shellfish on Sunday
except in the seasonal waters of the Navesink
and Shrewsbury rivers between Nov. 1 and
April 30.
Law Enforcement
and Regulation
Information
Contact a New Jersey
Division of Fish & Wildlife Law
Enforcement office that serves
the county where you hunt or fish.
• N
orthern Region — (908) 735-8240
(Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon,
Morris, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union
and Warren counties)
• C
entral Region — (609) 259-2120
(Burlington, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth
and Ocean counties)
• S
outhern Region — (856) 629-0555
(Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland,
Gloucester and Salem counties)
• M
arine Region — (609) 748-2050
(coastal and bay areas)
• T o report violations anonymously call
Operation Game Thief — (855) OGT-TIPS
2015 Marine Issue
Regulations remain in effect until changed. For the most current regulations, go to NJFishandWildlife.com
or call the marine fish “listen-only” information line at (609) 292-2083. Regulations in red are new this year.
See page 10 for how to measure fish.
Species
American Eel a
Black Drum
Bluefish (Snapper)
Cod
Haddock
Pollock
Red Drum
River Herring
Scup (Porgy)
Shad
Delaware River & tributaries
All Other Marine Waters
Shark b, c, †
Aggregate large coastal group †
Hammerhead group †
Non-blacknose small coastal group†
Blacknose group †
Pelagic group†
Smooth Dogfish
Spanish Mackerel
Striped Bass or Hybrid Striped Bass
Delaware River & tributaries**
(Calhoun St. bridge to Salem River &
tributaries)
Delaware River & tributaries**
(upstream of Calhoun St. bridge)
Atlantic Oceand
(0–3 nautical miles from shore­)
Rivers, bay and estuaries
3–200 nautical miles (federal waters)
Summer Flounder (Fluke)
Minimum
Length
Harvest & Possession Limit
(per person unless noted)
No Closed Season
No Closed Season
May 27–June 30
July 1–July 31
Oct. 22–Dec. 31
No Closed Season
No Closed Season
No Closed Season
No Closed Season
No Closed Season
No Open Season
Jan. 1– Feb. 28
July 1– Dec. 31
9"
16"
12.5"
12.5"
12.5"
None
21"
21"
19"
18"
None
25
3
15
2
15
15
No Limit
No Limit
No Limit
1 not greater than 27"
0
9"
50
No Closed Season
None
No Closed Season
None
6 (maximum of 3 American shad)
6 (no American shad may be
harvested or possessed)
Open Season
Jan.1–May 14 and 54" fork length One Shark (of any species, except
July 16–Dec. 31 78" fork length prohibited species) per vessel per trip;
plus one Atlantic sharpnose shark per
person per trip (no minimum size);
No Closed Season
None
plus one bonnethead shark per perNo Closed Season 54" fork length
son per trip (no minimum size).
No Closed Season
None
No Limit
No Closed Season
14"
10
March 1–March 31
and
June 1–Dec. 31
one @ 28" to
March 1–Dec. 31 < 43" and one
≥ 43"
No Closed Season
2
March 1–Dec. 31
Prohibited
­–
0
May 22–Sept.26
18"
5
Jan. 1–Feb. 28
15"
4
April 1–April 30
15"
4
Tautog (Blackfish)
July 17–Nov. 15
15"
1
Nov. 16–Dec. 31
15"
6
Weakfish
No Closed Season
13"
1
Winter Flounder
March 1–Dec. 31
12"
2
Note: No species of fish with a minimum size limit listed above may be filleted or cleaned at sea. Party boats licensed
to carry 15 or more passengers may apply for a permit to fillet the above species. See Summer Flounder, page 12.
Blue Crab
3"
peeler or shedder
No Closed Seasone
3½"
soft
No Closed Seasone
1 bushel
4½"
hard
No Closed Seasone
Jan. 1–April 29;
3 3⁄8"
Lobster (carapace length)
6
June 1–Dec 31
‡
Hard Clam (license required)
No Closed Season
1½"
150 clams
­­a Except 50 fish harvest/possession limit for party/charter boat employees.
b Not including dogfish; see description on page 11 under Sharks.
c See page 10 for a list of Prohibited Species.
d Atlantic Ocean greater than three miles from shore: harvest and possession prohibited.
e Unless using non-collapsible, Chesapeake-style crab pots, trot lines or crab dredges. See pages 16 and 19.
* Excluding tail filaments. (See illustration, page 10.)
**See Closed Seasons (page 12) for specifics of springtime non-offset circle hook requirements.
† See page 18 for Federal Recreational Regulations.
‡ See water classification chart information on page 19.
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
17
Federal Limits
M A R I N E R EG U L AT I O N S
Regulations in red are new this year.
2015 Federal Recreational Fishing Regulations for Minimum Size, Possession Limits and Seasons
See page 10 for how to measure fish. See Recreational Minimum Size, Possession Limits and Seasons (page 17) for state waters listings of species not included in these
federal waters regulations (from 3–200nm). For federal regulation questions, please contact the National Marine Fisheries Service at (978) 281-9260, or go to www.nmfs.noaa.gov.
Season
Minimum Size
Possession Limit
(number per angler per day
unless otherwise specified)
Year round
22"
10 per person per day
Striped Bass
NA
NA
No possession allowed in EEZ
Dolphin
(Mahi mahi)
Year round
None
Marlin, White
Year round
66" lower jaw–
fork length
Marlin, Blue
Year round
99" lower jaw–
fork length
Roundscale
Spearfish
Year round
66" lower jaw–
fork length
None
Sailfish
Year round
63" lower jaw–
fork length
None
None
None
Prohibited
Tilefish, Blueline
Year round
None
7 per angler per trip
Tilefish, Golden
Year round
None
8 per angler per trip
Species
Cod
Spearfish, Longbill
Swordfish
Year round
Tuna, Albacore (Longfin)
Year round
Tuna, Bigeye
Year round
Tuna, Bluefin†
Tuna, Skipjack
Tuna, Yellowfin
27" curved fork length
27" to <73"
Jan. 1–Dec. 31 curved fork length and
or until season is one trophy fish ≥ 73"
curved fork length per
closed.
vessel per year
Year round
None
Year round
27" curved fork length
Possession prohibited in federal waters (3–200 nm). See
pages 12 and 17 for NJ waters.
10 per day, not to exceed 60 per vessel,
For current federal waters regulations (3–200nm), refer to
which ever is less — except on a charter or
www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/ or call (727) 824-5326.
headboat, then 10 per paying passenger.
Billfish require Highly Migratory Species (HMS) permit when
None
fishing in federal waters (3–200 nm). For permits refer to
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or call (888) 872-8862.
None
During any sanctioned billfish tournaments offering prize
For anglers: 1 per person, no more than
47" lower jaw–
4 per vessel per trip.
fork length if the head
is naturally attached For charter vessels: 1 per paying passenger, no more than 6 per vessel per trip.
or 25" cleithrum to
caudal keel if the head For headboat vessels: 1 per paying pashas been removed. senger, no more than 15 per vessel per trip.
None
Notes
None
None
Limits can change during the season.
Prior to departure, check
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or
888-USA-TUNA for up-to-date limits.
None
3 per person per trip
money, non-offset circle hooks are required for lures with
natural bait or natural/artificial bait combos.
All non-tournament billfish landings must be
reported to NMFS within 24 hours, either online at
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or by calling (800) 894-5528.
For current regulations refer to
www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/ or call (727) 824-5399.
In effect from the Virginia/North Carolina border north.
Swordfish, tuna and sharks require an HMS permit when
fishing in federal waters (3–200 nm). For permits, refer to
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or call (888) 872-8862.
All non-tournament swordfish landings must be
reported to NMFS within 24 hours either online at
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or by calling (800) 894-5528.
† Bluefin
tuna are managed in two regions; Northern,
extending north from the Great Egg Inlet and Southern
extending south from Great Egg Inlet. Bluefin tuna
retention limits may change throughout the season. Visit
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or call (888) 872-8862 or
(978) 281-9260 for current information.
All recreational bluefin tuna landings must be
reported to NMFS within 24 hours either online at
https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or by calling (888) 872-8862.
For current federal waters regulations (3–200nm), refer to
www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/ or call (301) 713-2347 for
swordfish/sharks or (978) 281-9260 for tunas.
Sharks*
Aggregate Large
Coastal Group
Hammerhead Group
Non-blacknose
Small Coastal Group
Blacknose Group
The Aggregate
Aggregate Large
Large Coastal
Coastal and Pelagic:
and Hammerhead
54" fork length
group seasons
Hammerheads:
are July 1 to
78" fork length
Dec. 31.
Other listed sharks:
All others are
None
year round.
For non prohibited species:
1 authorized* shark/vessel/trip
plus 1 Atlantic sharpnose and
1 bonnethead shark/person/trip
See below for list of shark groups which MAY be kept or
MUST be released. Swordfish, tuna and sharks require an
HMS permit when fishing in federal waters (3–200 nm).
For permits, refer to https://hmspermits.noaa.gov or call
(888) 872-8862. Recreational fishermen (those that do not
have a limited access commercial shark permit) can not sell,
barter or trade any Atlantic shark or shark pieces.
Pelagic Group
Wahoo
Year round
None
2 per person per day
For more information, contact the South Atlantic Fisheries
Management Council at (727) 824-5326.
Wreckfish
None
None
Prohibited
*Shark Species That May Be Kept (Authorized Species): Aggregate Large Coastal Shark—blacktip, bull, lemon, nurse, tiger, spinner; Hammerhead Shark—scalloped
hammerhead, smooth hammerhead, great hammerhead; Non-Blacknose Small Coastal Shark—Atlantic sharpnose, bonnethead, finetooth; Blacknose Shark—blacknose;
Pelagic Shark—Shortfin mako, blue, porbeagle, oceanic whitetip and common thresher. Shark Species That MUST Be Released (Prohibited Species): Atlantic angel, basking, bigeye sand tiger, bigeye sixgill, bigeye thresher, bignose, Caribbean reef, Caribbean sharpnose, dusky, Galapagos, longfin mako, narrowtooth, night, sandbar, sand tiger,
sevengill, silky, sixgill, smalltail, whale and white.
Regulations concerning highly migratory species (HMS) such as tuna, swordfish, shark and billfish, are subject to change. Refer to www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/ for a list of complete federal regulations for highly migratory species. For questions/clarification of the federal highly migratory species regulations, contact the National Marine Fisheries Service
at (301) 713-2347 or go to www.nmfs.noaa.gov.
18
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
NJFishandWildlife.com
2015 Marine Issue
Shellfish & Crab Information
L I C E N S E A N D AG E N T S
Shellfish License Information
A shellfish license (formerly called clamming)
is required for harvesting all species of benthic
mollusks (except conchs, addressed in the commercial marine fisheries regulations), including,
but not limited to, hard and soft clams, surf clams,
oysters, bay scallops and mussels. Other specific
commercial shellfish licenses exist such as surf clam
dredge, Delaware Bay oyster dredge boat and Delaware Bay licenses to harvest in Areas 1, 2 and 3.
Anyone engaged in any shellfish harvesting activity with someone holding a commercial shellfish
license must also possess their own commercial
shellfish license.
The resident senior citizen shellfish license is a
lifetime license.
For shellfishing regulations, see pages 16–17.
Prior to harvesting any shellfish, you must consult
the Shellfish Growing Water Classification Charts
published by DEP’s Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring, available at shellfish license agents, state shellfish
offices, online at http://www.nj.gov/dep/bmw/waterclass.htm or call the Bureau of Marine Water Monitoring at (609) 748-2000. Shellfish licenses are available
for purchase online at www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com.
Chesapeake-Style Crab Pot
Shellfish License Fees
• Resident recreational shellfish: $10
Harvest limit of 150 shellfish (in aggregate)
per day. Sale of catch prohibited.
• Non-resident recreational shellfish: $20
Harvest limit of 150 shellfish (in aggregate)
per day. Sale of catch prohibited. License valid
only during the months of June, July, August
and September.
• Juvenile recreational shellfish: $2
For persons under 14 years of age. Subject to
same restrictions as resident or nonresident
adult recreational license holders.
• Resident commercial shellfish: $50
Unlimited harvest. Shellfish may be sold only
to certified dealers.
• Non-resident Commercial Shellfish: $250
Unlimited harvest. Shellfish may be sold to
certified dealers only.
• Resident senior citizen recreational shellfish
license: FREE ($2 application fee). NJ residents
age 62 years or older. Harvest limit, 150 shellfish
(in aggregate) per day. Sale of shellfish prohibited.
• Disabled veterans: Fish and Wildlife-certified
disabled veterans are eligible for free shellfish
license at any shellfish license agent location. To
become certified, call (609) 984-6213.
Crab Pot License Information
Crab Pot licenses are available at all agent
locations: Recreational Crab Pot/Trot Line
Licenses and Non-Commercial Crab Dredge
Licenses are available for purchase online at:
www.NJ.WildlifeLicense.com or at any Fish and
Wildlife-certified license agent including those
license agents listed below. For the most current
list of Fish and Wildlife-certified license agents, go
to NJFishandWildlife.com/agentlst.htm.
• Recreational crab pot/trot line license: $2
Harvest limit of one bushel per day. Refer to
the shellfish regulations on page 16 for all
recreational crabbing regulations.
• Non-commercial crab dredge license: $15
Harvest limit of one bushel per day during the
crab dredge season. See page 16 for all recreational crab regulations.
Terrapin Excluders and Biodegradable Panels
Are Required on Chesapeake-Style Crab Pots
Users of non-collapsible, Chesapeake-style crab
pots should know that all pots set in any body of
water less than 150-feet wide at mean low tide or
in any manmade lagoon MUST include diamondback terrapin excluder devices. In addition, all noncollapsible, Chesapeake-style crab pots set in any
body of water MUST include biodegradable panels.
These crab pot modifications will help reduce the
unintentional drowning of terrapins and allow for
­escapement of these and other species in the event
that pots are lost or abandoned. Terrapin excluder
devices must be no larger than 2-inch high by
6-inch wide and securely ­fastened inside each funnel entrance. Biodegradable panels must measure
at least 6½-inch wide by 5-inch high and be located
in the upper section of the crab pot. The panel must
be constructed of, or fastened to the pot with wood
lath, c­ otton, hemp, sisal or jute twine not greater
than 3⁄16" diameter, or non-stainless steel, uncoated
ferrous metal not greater than 3⁄32" diameter. The
door or a side of the pot may serve as the biodegradable panel ONLY if it is fastened to the pot with any
of the material specified above. Crabbers should be
aware that ALL non-­collapsible, Chesapeake-style
crab pots MUST be licensed and marked with the
gear ­identification number of the owner. For crab pot
license information and r­ egulations, see the regulations on page 16 and license agents below.
Shellfish and Non-Commercial Crab Pot License Agents (For over-the-counter sales only.)
ATLANTIC COUNTY
Egg Harbor True Value, 208 N. Philadelphia Ave., Egg Harbor City........(609) 965-0815
Fish Finder Marina, 3645 Atlantic-Brigantine Blvd., Brigantine.............(609) 457-5384
NJ Div. Fish and Wildlife, 360 Rt. 9 N (milepost 51), Port Republic........(609) 748-2021
Zeus Sporting Goods, 6679 Black Horse Pike, Egg Harbor Twp............(609) 646-1668
CAMDEN COUNTY
Towne News, 81 So. Whitehorse Pike, Berlin.......................................(856) 768-9132
CAPE MAY COUNTY
Avalon Hodge Podge, 2389 Ocean Dr., Avalon.....................................(609) 967-3274
Belleplain Supply, 346 Handsmill Rd., Belleplain..................................(609) 861-2345
Budd’s Bait & Tackle, 109 Fulling Mill Rd., Villas...................................(609) 886-6935
City of Ocean City, 861 Asbury Ave., Ocean City..................................(609) 525-9328
Just Sports, 21 Mechanic St., Cape May Court House..........................(609) 465-6171
Sea Isle Bait & Tackle, 4200 Park Rd., Sea Isle City.............................(609) 263-6540
Smuggler’s Cove, 370 83rd St., Stone Harbor......................................(609) 368-1700
Sterling Harbor Bait & Tackle, 1020 W. Rio Grande Ave., Wildwood......(609) 729-1425
Two Chums Bait, Tackle and Boat, 375 – 43rd Pl., Sea Isle City...........(609) 263-2486
Upper Township, 2100 Tuckahoe Rd., Tuckahoe..................................(609) 628-2805
Wal*Mart, 3159 Rt. 9S, Rio Grande.....................................................(609) 465-7760
CUMBERLAND COUNTY
Beaver Dam Boat Rentals, 514 Old Beaver Dam Rd, Newport...............(856) 447-3633
NJ Div. Fish and Wildlife, 1672 E. Buckshutem Rd., Millville.................(856) 785-0730
Shire Products, 389 S. Lincoln Ave., Vineland .....................................(856) 692-3646
GLOUCESTER COUNTY
Sportsman’s Outpost, 2517 Fries Mill Rd., Williamstown......................(856) 881-3244
HUDSON COUNTY
Caso’s Gun-A-Rama, 176 Danforth Ave., Jersey City............................(201) 435-5099
MIDDLESEX COUNTY
Auto Parts of Woodbridge, 108 Main St., Woodbridge..........................(732) 634-6264
Sayreville Sportsman Shop, 52 Washington Ave., Sayreville..................(732) 238-2060
MONMOUTH COUNTY
Brielle Bait & Tackle, 800 Ashley Ave., Brielle.......................................(732) 528-5720
L & H Woods and Water, 2045 Rt. 35, Wall..........................................(732) 282-1812
The Bait Shop, 57 Main St., Bradley Beach..........................................(732) 361-8500
OCEAN COUNTY
American Sportsman, 857 Mill Creek Rd., Manahawkin.......................(609) 597-4104
Bob Kislin’s, 1214 Rt. 37 East, Toms River...........................................(732) 929-9300
Creekside Outfitters, 403 Rt. 9, Waretown...........................................(609) 242-1812
Downes Marina, 287 Brennan Concourse, Bayville...............................(732) 269-0137
Fish Bonz Bait & Tackle, 103 Lacey Rd., Forked River...........................(609) 971-2928
Grizz’s Forked River B & T, 232 N. Main St., Forked River.....................(609) 693-9298
Pell’s Fish & Sport Shop, 335 Mantoloking Rd., Bricktown....................(732) 477-2121
Pineland Sporting Goods, 959 W. Veterans Hwy., Jackson...................(732) 961-7248
Surf City Bait & Tackle, 317 Long Beach Blvd., Surf City.......................(609) 494-2333
Tip’s Hardware, 218 Main St., West Creek...........................................(609) 296-3192
West Creek Bait & Tackle, 387 Rt. 9, West Creek.................................(609) 857-3516
PASSAIC COUNTY
Fins & Furs Bait Shop, 2727 Rt. 23, Newfoundland..............................(973) 545-2336
SOMERSET COUNTY
Efinger Sporting Goods, 513 W. Union Ave., Bound Brook.....................(732) 356-0604
19
Whoosh!
A Spearfishing Primer
By Craig Tomlin, Fisheries Biologist
The weather is perfect for early June with a slight land breeze,
high 70s air temp, mid 60s water temp, rising tide and no swell.
You and your buddy double-check the gear while planning for the
day’s adventures. Your heart begins racing as time draws
near but you tell yourself to calm down, breath slow, relax.
The New Jersey coastline, along with its many wrecks and reefs, is a diver’s paradise.
Yes, New Jersey. While we do not have the tropical blue water of the Bahamas, the
Garden State offers many great opportunities in your back yard.
20
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
NJFishandWildlife.com
Craig Tomlin/NJ Div. Fish and Wildlife
When you gently slide into the water, your instincts and training take over. You have
entered the beautiful and alien ocean world. Your eyes take a moment to adjust as your
ears hear the rhythmic clicks and pops of sealife. Descending into the nutrient-rich green
abyss, you begin to see soft coral, sea stars, mussels and crabs. It’s hard to believe
there is so much life! Tautog, seabass and lobster come into view. Out of the corner of
your mask you catch movement, then a puff of mud and it’s gone! A huge flounder, the
biggest you have ever seen, has disappeared. That’s the way it goes when spearfishing
in New Jersey. You don’t always get dinner, but you always make a memory.
A nice stringer of flounder and
triggerfish were speared by Jason
Hearon on the Wildwood Reef.
2015 Marine Issue
N
ew Jersey’s vast artificial reef system (see
reef article, page 6), the many natural
undersea formations plus the large number of
shipwrecks all create terrific habitat for fish as
well as for diving. The best part: to access these
fish meccas there is no need to hop on a plane
bound for the tropics. Numerous exciting dive
spots are accessible either from shore, private
boat or by chartering a dive boat. In many cases
the dive opportunities are close enough to go
after work and be home in time for a late dinner.
Hopefully, dinner will include fresh seafood.
This spearfishing overview can put you well on
your way to bringing home great memories and
tasty table fare from New Jersey’s marine domain.
Training
There are two approaches for exploring the
underwater world: freediving and scuba diving.
Whichever you choose, training is paramount
and cultivates safe and responsible spearfishing
practices. Freediving classes are now readily available. These not only increase your level of safety,
they increase the amount of time you can safely
stay underwater. A freedive class is taught by a
certified instructor in a controlled environment.
Scuba classes are available at any local dive
shop. Also taught by certified instructors in a
controlled environment, a scuba course will teach
you how to safely use the equipment and certify
you to become a scuba diver. No matter which
path you choose make sure you get trained by a
reputable agency.
Basic Diving Gear
Acquiring equipment follows training. Diving
with a dive charter or through your dive shop
allows you to rent most of the equipment, a great
way to decide what equipment works best prior to
buying your own. Whether you decide to free dive
or scuba dive the first piece of essential equipment
is a well-fitted mask to keep out water so you can
see the underwater world. A snorkel (yes, it’s also
needed for scuba diving) and fins are additional
essential pieces of gear. A snorkel allows you to
breathe on the surface while the mask is still under
water. Fins are needed for mobility with their wide
surface area propelling a diver through the water.
Additional gear includes a wetsuit for warmth
and protection and either a dive knife or dive
scissors. Last but not least, get a “diver down”
flag. All dive vessels must fly a diver down flag
alpha when divers are in the water to alert other
boats to go slow and stay clear of the area. Even
when diving from shore you must use a dive flag.
For those wanting to start with a speargun, several companies make relatively inexpensive, higherquality models. The main advantage of a speargun
over a pole spear is the shooting distance. Remember this advantage is lost when the water gets cloudy
and when the gun is not agile enough to make the
quick shot on that huge flounder buried in the sand.
Once you’ve chosen your speargun you will
need a way to store your catch until you return
to the boat or shore. A hoop stringer works well
as would a catch bag or a line stringer. Again keep
it simple; whatever works for you is your best
choice. Also recommended is a spike or a pointed
dive knife to quickly dispatch the harvested fish.
Practice with your equipment and become proficient before you begin diving.
Know Before You Go
As with most sports there are regulations. Recreational fishing regulations and size limits always
apply but there are several special regulations that
relate only to spearfishing. These special regulations
preclude certain fish from harvest with a spear and
set forth the manner in which you may spearfish.
Alpha Flag
Spearfishing Gear
When it comes to spearfishing equipment, it’s
best to keep it simple. The less complicated your
equipment the less likely to fail and the easier to
use. A pole spear is a great way to start; they are
inexpensive and can last a long time. While not
as flashy-looking as a wood gun, the pole spear is
probably the ideal weapon for hunting summer
flounder and around rocks.
Surf & Stream Campground
Closest campground to
Seaside Heights and Island
Beach State Park!
732-349-8919
www.surfnstream.com
1801 Ridgeway Road
(Rte 571) Toms River, NJ
732-349-8919
Spearfishing Ethics
Even those new to the sport are responsible to maintain the standards practiced by spearfishing enthusiasts worldwide. Unlike anglers using rod and reel,
there is no catch and release. You must only shoot
what you can eat—no more. This allows our sport to
be one of the most environmentally friendly forms
of fishing by creating no bycatch. Take only clean
ethical shots and follow all season, size and limit
regulations. As visitors to the underwater world,
we must respect the habitat and the creatures that
live there by leaving behind only bubbles.
Safety! Safety! Safety!
Safety is everybody’s responsibility. Whether on
—or in—the water, be cautious of people around
you. Diver down and alpha flags must be respected
by everyone.
Remember to check your gear—and your
buddy’s gear—thoroughly. When scuba diving,
always monitor your air and bottom time as well
as that of your dive buddy. When free diving,
strictly adhere to the one diver up-one diver down
approach. Remember all safety tips from your
diver training and always dive within your limits.
Remember, a dive buddy is essential for safety
and can add to the fun. By working together, both
will be safer, more efficient hunters and have someone with whom to share stories at the day's end.
Be Aware: Spearfishing Requires
Extra Precautions!
Diver Down Flag
Best Location at the
New Jersey Shore!
• Never load a speargun out of the water.
• Never point a spear at anything unless you
intend to harvest it.
• Treat every gun as if it were loaded
• Know your target and what’s beyond.
Being a safe and responsible spearfisher can bring
years of enjoyment. New Jersey offers many opportunities for spearfishing along our coast. Get out
and enjoy this great marine resource close to home.
Be sure to check out Fish and Wildlife’s Record
Fish Program (http://NJFishandWildlife.com/
recfish-salt.htm) with a new spearfishing category which includes many species that frequent
New Jersey wrecks and reefs!
Bows, Crossbows,
Knives, Target Range,
Bait and Tackle
-Full Service Shop-
318 Route 9 - Bayville, NJ • 732-998-8795
bullseyearcheryandsporting.com
Make Hunting & Fishing
Dreams Come True!
Hunt of a Lifetime is a
nonprofit organization
that grants hunting and
fishing dreams to children,
age 21 and under, who
have been diagnosed with
life threatening illnesses.
If you are interested in helping a child live their
dream, please contact us for more information.
Toll Free 866.345.4455 HuntofaLifetime.org
The Soap that Lathers
in Saltwater!
Boaters • Fishermen • Divers
Windsurfers • Kayakers • Campers
Homes with Hard Water
Lakeville, MA
www.TackleBuddySoap.com
21
Skillful Angler Recognition Program
20 15 R EG U L AT I O N S
The Skillful Angler Program is designed both to
supplement the New Jersey Record Fish Program
and to acknowledge that many anglers catch freshwater and marine fish that are not record size but
are still worthy of recognition because the size and
weight of the fish sufficiently tested the angler’s skill.
Open to resident and non-resident anglers. All fish
must be caught in New Jersey waters using a hook
and line during legally open seasons.
Saltwater species taken from a boat must have
been caught from a boat that left from, and returned
to, a New Jersey port during the same trip.
The Program has three main divisions: Adult (for
anglers age 16 and older), Junior (under age 16)
and Catch and Release (based on length). A clear,
side-view photo that allows accurate species identification must be included with each application.
Anglers qualifying for a Skillful Angler award
receive a certificate with an artistic rendering of
the fish species they caught as a testament to their
achievement.
The new Skillful Angler Program now recognizes
different levels of fishing expertise. An angler who
submits five applications of qualifying size for the
same species will receive a Specialist Certificate. An
angler who submits five applications of qualifying
fish of different species will receive a Master Certificate. Catch 10 or more qualifying species of fish
within the year, and the angler will earn an Elite
Angler Certificate. The Program also now recognizes
the first fish caught no matter the age of the angler.
Qualified anglers will receive a First Fish certificate.
Also new this year, the program is introducing four marine “Slam” categories — an Inshore
Slam 1, Inshore Slam 2, Offshore Pelagics Slam
and Marlin Slam. For the Inshore Slam 1, an angler
must submit qualifying applications for a Striped
Cody Griglak, 10, of Great Meadows, caught this nice Bass, Bluefish and Fluke. For the Inshore Slam 2,
fluke from the Mi-Jo party boat during a fundraising
an angler must submit qualifying applications for
trip with the Warren County Federation of Sportsmen. Black Sea Bass, Tautog, and Weakfish. The OffThe boat had launched from the Atlantic Highlands.
shore Pelagics Slam will be obtained if an angler
Ocean Fun Day
submits qualifying applications for Bluefin Tuna,
Bigeye Tuna, Yellowfin Tuna and Dolphin. For the
Marlin Slam, an angler must submit qualifying
applications for a White Marlin and a Blue Marlin.
Each month, the leaders of each category and
species will be posted on our Skillful Angler Leader
Board web page. At the end of the year, special
recognition is given to anglers who catch the largest
fish in each species category. The winner of each
category is sent a special certificate recognizing
his/her accomplishment as the best of New Jersey’s
Skillful Anglers.
Fish must be measured from the tip of the nose
(with mouth closed) to the tip of the tail. For catch
and release categories, the fish must be measured
and photographed alongside a ruler. For Adult/
Junior division, fish must be weighed and measured
by fishing license agents, tackle shops or authorized
Fish and Wildlife fisheries biologists.
Anglers must submit two photographs of the fish
caught, one at the site of the catch and one with the
fish alongside a ruler for clear identification and measurement verification. Take time to compose good
quality (and high resolution) photos to submit with
your application. The best photo may be selected
for publication in this Digest next year! Include
your e-mail address on back of the photo so we may
contact you for a digital copy of your print.
Apply online at:
NJFishandWildlife.com/pdf/sklflang-appform.pdf
Minimum Entry Requirements:
Adult Weight (lbs., oz.)
Junior Weight (lbs., oz.)
Catch & Release (inches)
Black Sea Bass
4
3
20
Never surf fished before?
Striped Bass
40
36
42
Join New Jersey Division of
Fish and Wildlife educators at
Ocean Fun Days to learn how!
Black Drum
70
63
46
Bluefish
18
16
33
May 16, 2015 from 11:30 a.m.–1:30 p.m.
at Island Beach State Park.
• Learn proper surf • All equipment and
fishing techniques
supplies will be
and tricks.
provided. Ages 12
and up.
Participants may join in the Governor’s
Surf Fishing Tournament (see page 9
for Tournament details) the next day using
provided equipment. Tournament registration
fees will apply.
Species
Cod
30
27
42
Dolphin
30
27
n/a
Winter Flounder
2
1 lb., 8 oz.
16
Fluke
8
7
27
Kingfish
1
8 oz.
13
Mako Shark
250
225
n/a
Blue Marlin
400
360
n/a
White Marlin
60
54
n/a
Pollock
25
22 lbs., 8 oz.
41
Tautog
8
7
22
Albacore Tuna
50
45
n/a
Big Eye Tuna
200
180
n/a
Bluefin Tuna
500
450
n/a
Yellowfin Tuna
120
108
n/a
Tuna (other)
250
225
n/a
Weakfish
10
9
30
The New Jersey State Record Fish Program requires a separate application and is based on weight alone. Scale
certification d­ ocumentation and a weighmaster’s signature are necessary. Other rules apply. Visit Fish and Wildlife’s
Web site at NJFishandWildlife.com for a complete list of current state records. See also page 24.
22
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
NJFishandWildlife.com
2015 Marine Issue
New Jersey State Federation
of Sportsmen's Clubs
Get Hooked On...
Teal!
If you care about...
• Wise management of fish and
wildlife populations
• Protection and enhancement
of natural lands and waters
• Preservation of traditional
outdoor sports
Then get involved!
• Stay informed on issues affecting NJ sportsmen and sportswomen
• Make an impact on outdoor issues
• Meet others who share similar sporting interests
• Have fun and participate in Federation-sponsored activities:
jamborees, clay target shoots, tournaments, dinners, conventions,
and more!
Membership
___ $35 Includes monthly newspaper and $1 million excess liability
insurance covering your sporting activities throughout the
U.S. and Canada
___ $20 M
onthly newspaper only
Enjoy the South Jersey Shore!
Flounder • Sea Bass • Weakfish • Blues
Stripers • Ocean or Bay • 4, 6 & 8 hour trips
Deep Sea & Back Bay Fishing
Open Boat & Private Charters
Party Cruises, Bachelor Parties
Up to 110 Passengers
Docked at Captain Andy’s Marina • 9317 Amherst Ave. • Margate, NJ
908-601-7345
tealcruises.com • tealfishing.com
Name������������������������������������������������
County�����������������������������������������������
Phone������������������������������������������������
Address����������������������������������������������
City��������������������������������������������������
State_________________________________ Zip��������������
E-mail������������������������������������������������
Do you have homeowner's / renter's insurance? (circle one) Y / N
Insurance Company��������������������������������������
Policy #�����������������������������������������������
Send with your check
or money order to:
NJSFSC
PO Box 10173
Trenton, NJ 08650
Join online at
www.njsfsc.org
2015 Marine Issue
23
State Record Marine Sport Fish
20 15 R EG U L AT I O N S
New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Record
Fish Program honors anglers who catch the largest
of select species of freshwater and saltwater fish.
Record size is based on weight alone; there are no
line classes. Currently there are 76 marine species
eligible for entry into the program which includes
a new spearfishing category with 17 additional species. See A Spearfishing Primer, page 20.
Anglers are reminded that the objective of the
Record Fish Program is to increase awareness of
fishing opportunities for species that are regularly
sought and routinely found on or off the coast of
New Jersey. The original list of 72 species was pared
down with that objective in mind.
Twelve species are now retired from the list of
program-eligible fish, but remain on a separate list
posted on Fish and Wildlife’s Web site. One historical catch is also retired and posted on the list.
Anglers should be aware of the procedure in effect
for entering the Record Fish Program. First, separate applications are required for freshwater and
On an October fishing trip, this sheepshead
was caught by William Catino. The fish weighed
19 pounds, 3 ounces and measured 29 inches
long with a 27 inch girth. Catino caught this
monster while casting from a dock in Longport.
saltwater species. Second, for saltwater entries, it
is now mandatory that a marine biologist inspect
any potential record fish, as identification solely by
photo is not always accurate. Anglers must call Fish
and Wildlife’s Nacote Creek Research Station at
(609) 748-2020 to make arrangements for inspection. In most instances, the fish must be transported
to this office in Port Republic. However, in the case of
extremely large fish (i.e., shark and tuna), a biologist
should be available to travel for dockside inspection.
Note that all scale certification requirements still
apply, including a valid Certificate of Inspection/Test
Report and current Registration Certificate issued
by the County Office of Weights and Measures.
The entry deadline is now no later than one month
after the date of catch. Note that the triggerfish
category is now defined as gray triggerfish.
For a complete list of state record fish or to print
an application with complete program rules, visit
the Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Web site at
NJFishandWildlife.com/fishing.htm.
New Jersey State Record Marine Fish
Species­
Lbs.
Oz.
Year
Angler
Where Caught
Species­
Amberjack, greater
85
0
1993
Off Cape May
Shad, hickory
Off Cape May
Shark, blue
5 Fathom Bank
Bluefish
27
1
1997
Edwin Metzner
Andrew A.
Merendino
Roger Kastorsky
Bonito, Atlantic
13
8
1945
Frank Lykes, Jr.
Off Sandy Hook
Cobia
87
0
1999
John Shanchuk
Off Sea Bright
81
0
1967
Joseph Chesla
Off Brielle
8¾" pt. to pt. 2009
Raymond Ponik
Bayonne
1981
Frederick Brown
Delaware Bay
Raul de la Prida
Off Pt. Pleasant
Bass, black sea
Cod
Crab, blue
Croaker, Atlantic
24
8
5
4.5 2010
8
Lbs.
Oz.
Year
Angler
Where Caught
2
13
2011
Robert Macejka
Mantoloking
366
0
1996
William Young, Jr.
Mud Hole
Shark, bull
Shark, dusky
Vacant (Minimum Weight 150 lbs.)
530
0
1987
Brian Dunlevy
Off Great Egg Inlet
Shark, hammerhead 365
0
1985
Walter Thacara
Mud Hole
Shark, porbeagle
Shark, s-fin mako
Vacant (Minimum Weight 100 lbs.)
856
0
1994 Christopher Palmer Wilmington Canyon
Shark, thresher
683
0
2009 Bennett Fogelberg
Shark, tiger
880
0
1988
Billy DeJohn
Sheepshead
19
1
2014
William Catino
Longport
Spadefish
11
6
1998
Cliff Low
Delaware Bay
42
0
1989
George Algard
Poor Man’s Canyon
42
0
1997
Joseph Natoli
0
13
2003
Robert Belsky, Jr.
Fingers
Off Cape May
*Cunner
3
0.5 2012
Dogfish, smooth
19
11.2 2013 Michael J. LaTorre,Jr.
Dogfish, spiny
15
12
1990
Jeff Pennick
Off Cape May
Dolphin
63
3
1974
Scott Smith, Jr.
Baltimore Canyon
Drum, black
109
0
2008
Nick Henry
Delaware Bay
Drum, red
55
0
1985
Daniel Yanino
Great Bay
Eel, American
9
13
1988
Warren Campbell
Atlantic City
*Striped bass
78
8
1982
Al McReynolds
Hudson Canyon
Little Sheepshead
Creek
Atlantic City
Fluke
19
12
1953
Walter Lubin
Off Cape May
Swordfish
530
0
1964
Edmund Levitt
Wilmington Canyon
Flounder, winter
5
11
1993
Jimmy Swanson
Off Barnegat Light
*Tautog
25
0
1998
Anthony Monica
Off Ocean City
Hake, white
41
7
1989
Wayne Eble
Off Barnegat Light
Tilefish, golden
63
8
2009 Dennis Muhlenforth Linden Kohl Canyon
Kingfish, Northern
2
8
2004
Chester Urbanski
Barnegat Bay
Tilefish, gray
23
14
2013
Cheol Min Park
Ronald Pires
Sculls Bay
Spearfish, longbill
Spot
Wilmington Canyon
Ling (red hake)
12
13
2010
Billy Watson
Off Manasquan
Triggerfish, gray
5
12
2008
Mackerel, Atlantic
4
1
1983
Abe Elkin
Manasquan Ridge
Tuna, albacore
77
15
1984 Dr. S. Scannapiego
Mackerel, king
54
0
1998
Fernando Alfaiate
Off Cape May
Tuna, big-eye
364
14
1984
George Krenick
Hudson Canyon
*Mackerel, Spanish
9
12
1990
Donald Kohler
Off Cape May
Tuna, bluefin
1,030
6
1981
Royal Parsons
Off Pt. Pleasant
Craig Eberbach
Wilmington Canyon
High Bar Harbor
Spencer Canyon
Marlin, blue
1,046
0
1986
Phil Infantolino
Hudson Canyon
Tuna, skipjack
13
4
1999
Marlin, white
137
8
1980
Mike Marchell
Hudson Canyon
Tuna, yellowfin
290
0
1980 Wayne Brinkerhoff
Perch, white
2
12
1998
Michael King
Little Beach Creek
Tunny, little
24
15
1977
Mark Niemczyk
Off Sea Bright
*Pollock
46
7
1975
John Holton
Off Brielle
Wahoo
123
12
1992
Robert Carr
28-Mile Wreck
Weakfish
18
8
1986
Karl Jones
Delaware Bay
Porgy
5
14
1976
Victor Rone
Delaware Bay
Sailfish
43
4
2006
Dr. John Tallia
Linden Kohl Canyon
Seatrout, spotted
11
2
1974
Bert Harper
Holgate Surf
Shad, American
7
0
1967
Rodger West
Great Bay
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
Whiting (silver hake)
Hudson Canyon
Vacant (Minimum Weight 2.5 lbs.)
* Fish was previously certified by the IGFA as a world record.
For information concerning the New Jersey State Record Fish or Skillful Angler programs,
visit the New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife’s Web site at NJFishandWildlife.com.
NJFishandWildlife.com
2015 Marine Issue
Spearfishing Category
In 2014, the NJ Record Fish Program expanded with the addition of a Spearfishing category for saltwater. Seventeen (17) species commonly sought after by spearfishers are part
of the Program. Spearfishers now have a unique opportunity to be recognized in New Jersey's Record Fish Program. Anglers are reminded that the objective of the Record Fish
Program is to increase the awareness of fishing opportunities for species that are regularly sought after and routinely found in or off the coast of New Jersey.
Species
Amberjack, greater
Lbs.
Oz.
Year
Bass, black sea
Min. Wt. 5 pounds
VACANT
Bluefish
Min. Wt. 18 pounds
VACANT
VACANT
Cobia
Min. Wt. 60 pounds
Cod
Min. Wt. 50 pounds
VACANT
Dolphin
Min. Wt. 40 pounds
VACANT
*Fluke
15
Flounder, winter
5
2014
Min. Wt. 3 pounds
VACANT
Hake, red (ling)
Min. Wt. 9 pounds
VACANT
Pollock
Min. Wt. 30 pounds
VACANT
Porgy
Min. Wt. 4 pounds
VACANT
Sheepshead
Min. Wt. 12 pounds
VACANT
Spadefish
Min. Wt. 9 pounds
VACANT
Striped bass
Min. Wt. 55 pounds
*Tautog
Angler
Where Caught
Robert A. Davis
Off Barnegat Lighthouse
Luke Dylan Hickey
Off Cape May
VACANT
Min. Wt. 60 pounds
VACANT
23
14
2007
Triggerfish, gray
Min. Wt. 3.5 pounds
VACANT
Weakfish
Min. Wt. 14 pounds
VACANT
* Fish was recognized by the International Underwater Spearfishing Association as a world record.
TING FOR TING FOR
OUTFIT
ND
OUTF IT BEYO
& ter and Fly & BEYOND
SPRINGr, FreshwaSPRING
Saltwate
2015 Product
Saltwater, Freshwater and Fly
2
IV, Issue
Guide Volume
2015 Product Guide Volume IV, Issue 2
INSIDE
OUR ULTIMATE
INS IDESELECTION
OF LURES
ATE
26-27
See Pages
OUR ULTIM
OF LURES
SELEC TION
See Pages
26-27
requesT our currenT caTalog
aT TackleDirecT.com/caTalog
Name Brands
R AR
Da
vid
VE
the Top
CO
CO
From all
Du
VE See pg. nleavyTIST
Da
2
vid R
Se Du AR
e pg nle TI
. 2 avy ST
For Promotions & Deals Text “Tackle” to “33233”
ST
& GREATE
& GREATEST
THE LATEST
COMBOS, ACCESSORIES,THE LATEST
E
DESERV
DESERVE
YOU YOU
TACKLE
ORIES,
AND MORE
TOOLS
TACKLE
S, ACCESS
From all the Top Name Brands
COMBO
AND MORE
TOOLS
2/27/2015
3:09:09
PM
2/27/2015 3:09:09 PM
5032•TD_Spring2015_catalog.indd 1
_catalog.indd
Shop Over 45,000 In-Stock Items at: TackleDirect.com
1
5032•TD_Spring2015
ulTegra xsc surF
sPinning reel
Pricedat
20999
$
sTraDic 5000Fj
sPinning reels
WaTch
ViDeo
SHM-2817
•X-Ship:Efficientgearengagement
•AeroWrapII:providesoptimumoscillation
withspeciallydesignedpitch
•ShimanoInstantDrag
Pricedat
20999
$
Teramar inshore n.e.
sPinning roD 6’6” - 1Pc.
WaTch
ViDeo
SHM-2253
Read Reviews +
Product Q & A
•X-Shipgivesincreasedgearingefficiency
•Ultra-lighthandlerotation
•Smooth,effortlessretrieve
Pricedat
14999
$
WaTch
ViDeo
SHM-2927
•TC4blankconstruction
•Fujireelseatandaluminumoxideguides
•DesignedspecificallyforNortheastanglers,
butuniversallyversatile
Scan QR Code
or Visit tdire.co
Shop Online: TackleDirect.com
Order Toll-Free: 888.354.7335
Retail Location: 6825 Tilton Road, Bldg C, Egg Harbor Twp, NJ 08234-4426
25
Health Advisory
F I S H S M A R T, E AT S M A R T
Eating Fish And Crabs Caught In New Jersey Waters
Fishing provides enjoyable and relaxing recreation. Fish are an excellent source of protein
and other nutrients and
play a role in maintaining
a healthy, well-balanced
diet. Many anglers enjoy
cooking and eating their
own catch. However,
elevated levels of potentially harmful chemical
contaminants such as
dioxin, polychlorinated
biphenyls (PCBs), pesticides and mercury have
been found in certain fish and crabs in some New
Jersey waters. Fish consumption advisories have
been adopted to guide citizens on safe consumption practices.
To reduce exposure to harmful chemical contaminants when preparing and eating the fish species
taken from the identified waters, it is essential to follow the guidelines provided. The DEP encourages
you to consult the Fish Smart-Eat Smart Fish Advisory Guide or www.FishSmartEatSmartNJ.org
when making decisions about eating recreationally
caught fish and crabs.
The current list of fish consumption advisories
consists of statewide, regional and water bodyspecific warnings for a variety of fish species and
fish consumers. The New Jersey Department of
Environmental Protection (DEP) and the Department of Health and Senior Services have prepared
new "how to" electronic pamphlets on cleaning
and cooking your catch to reduce your exposure
to these harmful chemicals. These e-pamphlets
are downloadable in multiple languages.
For a complete list of state and federal
marine fish consumption advisories visit:
www.FishSmartEatSmartNJ.org.
The fish consumption advisories and Fish SmartEat Smart website are updated periodically and are
available online or from the Office of Science at
(609) 984-6070 and through the Division of Health
and Senior Services at (609) 826-4935.
Check online for fish consumption advisories
on the local water body in which you fish! Go to
www.FishSmartEatSmartNJ.org
NOW AVAILABLE
in Multiple Languages!
WARNING:
Wildlife Hazard
Please properly dispose of all fishing line.
Plastic debris can endanger aquatic life and
snare propellers.­­
Explore. Experience. Enjoy!
September 12 & 13, 2015
10 am – 5 pm daily
Colliers Mills Wildlife Management Area
Jackson Township, NJ
Fishing
Archery
Hiking
Kayaking
Hunting/Trapping Instruction
Geocaching
Birding
Fish and Wildlife Exhibits
Camping Skills
Rock Climbing
Outdoor Supply Flea Market
Trap Shooting
And much more FREE family fun!
For more information visit WildOutdoorExpo.com
26
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
NJFishandWildlife.com
Could this
be your line?
2015 Marine Issue
Shore-based Fishing Opportunity
at Island Beach State Park Boasted
Unique Regulations Last Year
By M
aryellen Gordon, Senior Fisheries Biologist | Lauren “Maggie” Sager, Seasonal Fisheries Technician
Bryan Carter, Seasonal Fisheries Technician | Jonathan Klotz, Seasonal Fisheries Technician
Erin Mulvenna, Seasonal Fisheries Technician
Program Overview
Marine Fisheries Angler Program: Shore-based Enhanced Fishing Opportunity Program
Species: Summer flounder
Where: Island Beach State Park
When: June 14, 2014 through September 27, 2014
Regulations: A two fish bag limit; ≥ 16 inches; shore fishing only
Goal: To estimate the additional landings of the reduced size limit to determine if it affects
NJ's overall recreational harvest target.
Last year's Shore-based Enhanced Fishing Opportunity Program at Island Beach State Park (IBSP)
allowed anglers to keep smaller fish while collecting recreational harvest data. The bag limit was
reduced to two fish from IBSP shorelines, but the
size limit was also reduced to a 16-inch minimum
total length. Summer flounder caught between
16 and less than 18 inches were required to be
brought to a check station to receive a tag, confirming that the fish was legally taken from IBSP
waters. Anglers that caught two 16-inch or greater
summer flounder at IBSP could still attempt to fill a
New Jersey daily bag limit of five fish, but the other
three summer flounder had to be taken outside of
IBSP at 18 inches or greater.
At the check station, fish were measured, weighed
then tagged to confirm legal harvest within the
park. A creel survey ran concurrently with the Program, with agency staff interviewing anglers providing valuable demographic information, catch and
effort data as well as biological data for all species
caught at the park during the Program season. Data
collection included species name, length, weight,
disposition and number of fish caught.
During this Program, 176 summer flounder
between 16 and less than 18 inches were tagged
and 271 creel surveys were conducted. A total of
337 fish were caught amongst those anglers, 155
of which were summer flounder; 48 were available
catch with the other 289 fish released.
Attention Boaters
Operation Game Thief
Keep Our Waters Clean—
Use Pumpouts
Report Abuse of our Outdoor Heritage!
Ready To Serve Boaters! Visit marina pumpout facilities
or contact one of the pumpout boats. A complete listing of
operational pumpout facilities at marinas and detailed information on
the pumpout boats can be found at NJBoating.org.
Proper maintenance and operation of your on-board toilet and
holding tank are critical to ensure they function properly.
1-855-OGT-TIPS
24 Hours a Day, Seven Days a Week
The person who poaches, pollutes habitat and abuses public land
tarnishes the image of sportsmen and robs us of our fish and wildlife
as well as tax and license dollars. You can make a difference.
Call OGT to report:
• Always use sufficient water when flushing
• Use toilet paper designed for use in marine/RV systems
• Have your marina inspect your onboard toilet system to make sure
it is operating properly
• Negligent use of firearms
• Over the limits for game and fish
• Commercial exploitation of fish and wildlife
• Pollution of habitat, dumping on state land
Download the Free
GPS MOBILE APP
Pocket Ranger!
• Destruction of signs and state property
• Illegal killing, taking or possession of any wildlife
It's Free. It's Confidential.
You May Be Eligible for a Reward.
Funded by the New Jersey State Federation of Sportsmen's Clubs.
Designed to encourage sportsmen to report poaching and wildlife crimes.
2015 Marine Issue
NJFishandWildlife.com
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
27
Angler's Showplace
A DV ER T I S E M E N T S
Full and Half Day Trips • Deep Sea & Back Bay
Day and Evening Charters available
Wreck fishing our speciality!
www.rainbowdeepseafishing.com
Sea Bass • Taug • Fluke • Croakers • Ling
Porgy • Triggersfish • Stripers
Offshore trips also availible for tuna
Dock: 609-391-6446 • Boat: 609-780-6362
Capt. Robbins ~ 228 Bay Ave. Ocean City, NJ
Join us aboard our
44’ Henriques.
1-6 pass.
Inshore,
offshore and
overnight trips.
Call Captain Nick:
732-851-5103 (Office) 732-547-5688 (Cell)
Located in Point Pleasant Beach, NJ
NewJerseySportfishing.com
WOOD CARVING
BAIT, TACKLE & GEAR
THANK YOU!
Customized hand carved,
air brushed & hand painted
saltwater species
Prices vary w/size
Includes postage & handling
DaveDeinh[email protected]
woodcarvingsforyou.com
BAIT & TACKLE
• Custom Rods
• Rod Building Supplies
• Rod & Reel Repairs
• Bay, Beach, Boat &
Jetty Supplies
RETAILERS
Frozen &
Live Bait
Lures, Rods
& Reels
732-830-1900
906 NE Central Ave.
Seaside Park, NJ 08752
www.GrumpysTackle.com
Cape Queen
Sportfishing
Capt. Mike Brocco
Capt. Andy Merendino
USCG Certified for 28 passengers
Charters to 100 miles offshore!
NJ State Record
Sea Bass: 8.26 lbs!
Utsch’s Marina
1121 New Jersey Rt. 109
Cape May, NJ
609-884-0001
capequeencharters.com
True World Tackle Charters
Captain Akira Hayashi
28' True World Marine
All bait and tackle included
Everything Fishing & Crabbing
201-339-2628 (store)
917-653-8068 (charter)
403 Route 9, Waretown, NJ
609-242-1812
www.creeksideoutfittersnj.com
True World
TACKLE
Feature Your Business in the
New Jersey Marine Digest!
For information, visit
www.JFGriffin.com
or call 413.884.1001
28
| New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
Bluefish • Weakfish • Flounder • Sunset Cruises • Memorials • Dolphin Cruises •Groups/Families
Real Fishing for Reel Fun!
Deep Drop • Sea Bass • Stripers • Tautog • Drum • Mahi • Tuna • Marlin • Shark • Bachelor Parties
NEW JERSEY GUIDES & CHARTERS
TrueWorldTackle.com
805 Broadway, Bayonne NJ 07002
2015 Marine Fishi
ng Season Date
s and Limits •
FREE
New Jersey
May 2015
Size and
Possession
Limits
page 17
A Clear
Revival
for New Jers
Artificial Reef Pro ey’s
gram
page 6
A Summary
Marine Fish andof Recreational Regulation
s and
Shellfish Mana
gement Inform
ation
NJFishandWildl
ife.com
NJFishandWildlife.com
2015 Marine Issue
2015 TELEPHONE DIRECTORY
New Jersey
Publications
Available
Internet Address..........................................................................................................www.NJFishandWildlife.com
General Information......................................................................................................... (609) 292-2965
Commercial Preserves & Semi-Wild Preserves...............................................................................(908) 735-7040
Deer & Turkey Permit Hotline..........................................................................................................(609) 292-9192
Automated Harvest Report System.......................................................... (855) 448-6865 — (855) IHUNTNJ
DEP ACTION LINE—24 HOURS........................................................................... (877) WARNDEP
Exotic & Nongame Captivity Permits...............................................................................................(908) 735-5450
Falconry Permit Information..............................................................................................................(908) 735-8793
Freshwater Fisheries (north/south)...................................................................................................(908) 236-2118
Horseback Riding Permits.................................................................................................................. (609) 259-2132
Hunter Education............................................................................................................................(877) 2HUNTNJ
Hunting, Fishing & Duplicate Licenses............................................................................................(609) 292-2965
Operation Game Thief.....................................................................................................................(855) OGT-TIPS
Outstanding Deer Program................................................................................................................ (609) 633-7598
Pheasant & Quail Stocking Information......................................................................................... (609) 984-0547
Trout Stocking Hotline.......................................................................................................................(609) 633-6765
Wildlife Conservation Corps Information......................................................................................(908) 735-7040
Wildlife Control....................................................................................................................................(908) 735-8793
Wildlife Education................................................................................................................................ (908) 637-4125
Wildlife Management Area Information........................................................................................ (609) 984-0547
Trenton Office
MC501-03, P.O. Box 420, Trenton, NJ 08625-0420
Endangered and Nongame Species............................................................................................. (609) 292-9400
Land Management.......................................................................................................................... (609) 984-0547
Marine Fisheries..............................................................................................................................(609) 292-7794
Shellfisheries................................................................................................................................... (609) 984-5546
Wildlife Management.................................................................................................................... (609) 292-6685
Nacote Creek Research Station
P.O. Box 418, 360 Rt. 9 N. (Milepost 51) Port Republic, NJ 08241
Marine Fisheries..............................................................................................................................(609) 748-2020
Marine Fisheries “Listen Only” regulation information line...................................................(609) 292-2083
Shellfisheries....................................................................................................................................(609) 748-2040
Marine Education............................................................................................................................ (609) 748-2031
Marine Law Enforcement.................................................................................................. (609) 748-2050
Delaware Bay Office
1672 E. Buckshutem Rd., Millville, NJ 08332...........................................................................(856) 785-0730
Certified Shellfish Dealer Information
NJ Consumer Health Service, Dept. of Health
P.O. Box 369, Trenton, NJ 08625................................................................................................(609) 588-3123
Shellfish Water Classification
DEP, Water Monitoring and Standards
P.O. Box 405, Stoney Hill Road, Leeds Point, NJ 08220........................................................(609) 748-2000
Lebanon Field Office
P.O. Box 394, 1255 County Rt. 629, Lebanon, NJ 08833.......................................................(908) 236-2118
Northern Region Office
26 Route 173 W., Hampton, NJ 08827
Wildlife Management.....................................................................................................................(908) 735-7040
Endangered and Nongame Species (1 Van Syckel’s Rd.).........................................................(908) 638-4127
Hunter Education......................................................................................................................(877) 2HUNTNJ
Wildlife Control..............................................................................................................................(908) 735-8793
Land Management...........................................................................................................................(973) 383-0918
Law Enforcement (Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Hunterdon,
Morris, Passaic, Somerset, Sussex, Union, and Warren counties)............................................(908) 735-8240
Pequest Trout Hatchery.....................................................................................................(908) 637-4173
Pequest Natural Resource Education Center
605 Pequest Rd., Oxford, NJ 07863............................................................................................ (908) 637-4125
Hackettstown Fish Hatchery
23 Reese Ave, Hackettstown, NJ 07840..................................................................................... (908) 852-3676
Central Region Office
1 Eldridge Rd., Robbinsville, NJ 08691
Land Management........................................................................................................................... (609) 259-2132
Hunter Education......................................................................................................................(877) 2HUNTNJ
Wildlife Control.............................................................................................................................. (609) 259-7955
Law Enforcement
(Burlington, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, and Ocean counties).........................................(609) 259-2120
Southern Region Office
220 Blue Anchor Rd., Sicklerville, NJ 08081
Information..................................................................................................................................... (856) 629-0090
Freshwater Fisheries.......................................................................................................................(856) 629-4950
Hunter Education......................................................................................................................(877) 2HUNTNJ
Land Management...........................................................................................................................(856) 629-5006
Wildlife Control..............................................................................................................................(856) 629-7224
Law Enforcement
(Atlantic, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester, and Salem counties)......................(856) 629-0555
2015 Marine Issue
NJFishandWildlife.com
The following
publications
are available by writing:
Nacote Creek Research Station Publications
P.O. Box 418
Port Republic, NJ 08241
Shellfish Growing Waters
Classification Charts
This publication is available free at any
shellfish license agent and online at
http://www.nj.gov/dep/bmw/waterclass.htm.
New Jersey Boaters Guide
Send a self-addressed stamped, #10 envelope
(2 oz. postage).
The following publications
are also available online at
NJ­­FishandW­­ildlife.com:
• G
uide to New Jersey Saltwater
Fishing (available online only)
• P
arty and Charter Boat Directory
(available online only)
Yo S
H!
OPENS
7 DAY K
AWEE
L&H Woods & Water, a family owned
and operated business, carries a full line
of products and clothing for the avid
outdoorsman. We carry an immense range
of tackle, clothing & hunting products as
well an assortment of varied firearms and
ammunition.
2045 Hwy. 35, Wall, NJ
732-282-1812
LHWOODSANDWATER.COM
New Jersey Fish & Wildlife Digest
|
29
GREAT GEAR, RIGHT HERE!
West Marine is the one-stop source
for all of the best brands in fishing!
PENN SHEILD LOGO
Expanded fishing
department at our
Brick Flagship store
PANTONE
186
PANTONE
186
PANTONE
186
Brick
Flagship
Visit our New Jersey stores! For the location nearest
you, or to shop 24/7, go to westmarine.com