art basel miami beach 2012, issue 1

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art basel miami beach 2012, issue 1
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UMBERTO ALLEMANDI & CO. PUBLISHING
LONDON NEW YORK TURIN MOSCOW PARIS ATHENS
A RT BA S E L M I A M I BEAC H DAILY ED ITION 5 DECEMBER 2012
Who’s afraid of
contemporary art?
A High Line
for Miami?
But group needs $37m
to restore stadium
As Art Basel Miami Beach opens today to VIPs, critics say the art world is facing a crisis of values
ANALYSIS
Miami. Exactly one year ago, the
collector, dealer and sometime
columnist Adam Lindemann was
roundly criticised for an article he
wrote in the New York Observer, in
which he announced: “I’m not going
to Art Basel Miami Beach this year.
I’m through with it. It’s become a
bit embarrassing, because why
should I be seen rubbing elbows
with all those scenesters, people
who don’t even pretend they are
remotely interested in art?”
“Art and money have
slept together since
the beginning of time”
RALEIGH: © VANESSA RUIZ. STADIUM: ARSENI VARABYEU
In what he now says was a satire
(he did indeed come to the fair),
Lindemann exhorted those who
care about contemporary art to “Occupy Art Basel Miami Beach” to
“correct the ills of global art fairdom
once and for all, and to send the
dealers, the artists and especially
the art-fair companies our message
of protest”.
In the months since, however,
others have started to express doubts
about the state of the contemporary
art world. Recently, a number of
art-world figures have broken ranks,
claiming that the high prices being
spent on art invite trophy-hunters
and oligarch investors, not serious
appreciation.
Although there have always been
complaints about the pernicious influence of the market on art, and
the ease with which rich patrons
sway taste, this was counterbalanced
by the critical discourse about the
VIPs, exhibitors and members of the press get the party started at the Raleigh
Hotel, which hosted the Art Basel Miami Beach welcome reception last night
cultural value and meaning of art.
Today, the noise around the market
has amplified, while independent
critical debate is diminishing. “Art
and money have slept together since
the beginning of time. It’s the same
as it ever was, only more so—there
are more people with more money,
spending more money more publicly,” says the critic Jerry Saltz.
Some argue that the lines are
blurred by the fact that museums,
curators and critics are more enmeshed in the market than before.
It is not uncommon for curators at
public institutions to work for private
foundations: for example, Massimiliano Gioni, the associate director
of New York’s New Museum, is also
the artistic director of the Fondazione
Nicola Trussardi. Eric Shiner, the director of the Andy Warhol Museum,
is organising an American focus for
the next edition of the Armory Show
(7-10 March 2013).
Some have defected altogether—
John Elderfield, formerly the chief
curator in the painting and sculpture
department at New York’s Museum
of Modern Art (MoMA), joined
Gagosian Gallery earlier this year.
“Many curatorial colleagues are now
working both sides of the street:
with private clients—and, worse, as
curators with galleries—and with
public institutions. That is a line I
will not cross,” says Robert Storr,
the dean of the Yale University
School of Art. “One cannot serve
two masters.”
Others say that institutions are
interacting with greater alacrity with
the market as well. MoMA opened
an exhibition (until 29 April 2013)
of Munch’s The Scream, 1895, in October, mere months after it became
the world’s most expensive work of
art to sell at auction; the New Yorkbased financier Leon Black, a trustee
of the museum, paid $119.9m for
the piece in May. Eyebrows were
raised when the New Museum decided to show the collection of the
Greek billionaire and trustee Dakis
Joannou in 2010. In Europe, once
heavily reliant on state funding, museums increasingly depend on additional money from private donors.
CONTINUED ON PAGE 2
Rubells team up with Beijing’s Ullens Center
Alligators go wild at Miami’s Freedom Tower
Miami. The Rubell Family Collection
in Miami is planning to stage an exhibition of Chinese contemporary
art next year in collaboration with
the Ullens Center for Contemporary
Art in Beijing. The show, which will
include the work of around 25 artists
aged under 35, is due to open in December 2013, to coincide with Art
Basel Miami Beach. The collector
Mera Rubell tells The Art Newspaper
that she and her husband, Don, recently travelled to China, where
Miami. The Everglades is creeping
back into Miami: a pack of alligators
is clambering up the Freedom Tower
for a show highlighting the importance of environmental protection
in Florida. “Foreverglades: Here Today, Hopeful for Tomorrow” (until
26 January 2013), by the Belgian
artist William Sweetlove and fellow
members of the Cracking Art Group,
is organised by the Galleria Ca’ d’Oro
(Rome and Miami) in co-operation
with Miami Dade College’s Museum
they visited art fairs in Shanghai as
well as the studios of several artists.
“There’s so much going on there.
It’s a very exciting time for the
arts,” she says, adding that the exhibition will have different presentations in Miami and Beijing. “It
will be the same show with two different perspectives. The Ullens Center is going to have more than 60
artists; we’re going to present a
number of the same ones in Miami,”
she says. C.R.
of Art and Design and the Swiss
watchmaker Girard-Perregaux. The
tower is owned by the college. The
sculptures are joined by other native
fauna—including sea turtles and
frogs—made of recycled plastic, resin
and aluminium. The show launches
a year-long cultural exchange between the US and Italy, supported
by the Consulate General of Italy in
Miami and the European Union. A
symposium on environmental issues
took place on 30 November. H.S.
Miami. There are hopes that a neglected 6,566-seater Modernist stadium on Virginia Key could become
Miami’s rival to New York’s High
Line park. The huge structure, which
was built in 1963 and measures 326ft
by 100ft, overlooks the water and
used to host powerboat races as
well as rock concerts on a floating
stage. It was closed down and threatened with demolition when it was
declared unsafe in the wake of Hurricane Andrew in 1992, although a
subsequent engineering study found
that the structure was sound.
The Friends of Miami Marine
Stadium (FMMS), a group that was
set up in 2008 to restore the structure
and has more than 2,000 volunteers,
needs to raise $37m by March 2014.
There have been difficulties—securing naming rights with the City of
Miami has been “complicated”, says
Donald Worth, the co-chairman of
the FMMS—but $10m has already
been committed, including support
from the National Trust for Historic
Preservation and the John S. and
James L. Knight Foundation.
Worth compares the project with
New York’s High Line, an elevated
park that was previously a disused
rail line. “It’s a similar initiative to
ours,” he says. “Both were started by
a grassroots organisation that took
The Virginia Key stadium by the sea
on a complex project that people
didn’t think had a chance.” Robert
Hammond and Philip Aarons, the
High Line’s co-founder and founding
chair respectively, made a presentation to the FMMS earlier this year.
The stadium has been popular
with graffiti artists since it closed,
and preserving of some of its disused
look is core to the FMMS’s plans.
“We could reserve one of the walls
for a graffiti competition,” Worth
says. Other ideas for art include a
floating sculpture garden and even
an art fair. The original architect of
the building, Hilario Candela, now
the co-chairman of the FMMS, has
more sporting plans. “If we put
three barges together, we could
host a soccer match on the water,”
he says. M.G.
• For more information, visit
www.marinestadium.org
DESIGN MASTERS
AUCTION
11 DECEMBER 2012
PHILLIPSDEPURY.COM
NEW YORK
2
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
NEW
NEWS
Lawyer builds arts idyll in Tuscany
Director of Glasgow festival will oversee collection, residencies and shows
Great views and a vibrant art scene
displayed in the hotel and villas
owned by Cioffi as well as in public
places. This week, she is visiting Art
Basel Miami Beach, where she intends
to start buying. The collection she
puts together over the next few years
will rotate between Tuscany and Cioffi’s homes in Cincinnati and Miami.
The idea is to have art “everywhere” in Monteverdi, McCrory
says. “We might also commission
works [for display] around the area,”
Who’s afraid of
contemporary art?
CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1
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The Whitechapel Gallery in London
has an ongoing exhibition programme dedicated to displays of
works from private collections; the
next, featuring the Collection Sandretto Re Rebaudengo, opens on 15
“Criticism is not as
sexy; it doesn’t get
as many page hits”
December (until 10 March 2013). The
Whitechapel is also organising
shows, for a consultancy fee, with
the Gallery at Windsor, Florida,
which is owned by the billionaire
collectors Galen and Hilary Weston.
The role of the art critic, meanwhile, has been diminishing for
years. In the era of blogging, critics
have fewer privileges and less power.
Newspaper budgets for arts coverage
have shrunk and the audience has
changed, too. “We’re not getting
sustained critical views about works
of art,” Storr says. “But a great deal
of the writing done before this explosion happened was so arcane—
and for another market, the academic market—that it was already
in terrible straits before money took
everything out.” Saltz argues that
“criticism hasn’t gone down—there
is just more of the other writing.
Criticism is not as sexy; it doesn’t
get as many page hits. It’s out there
but it’s not as widely read.”
As the art world has grown to
become more international, “the
bohemian environment has all gone,
and with it the quiet, serious conversations. It’s a different world,”
says Peter Goulds, a co-director of
the LA Louver gallery.
Charlotte Burns
she says. “Over time, we’d like to
collaborate with Italian galleries
such as Galleria Continua in nearby
San Gimignano.”
The key to the art project is to
“reconnect the village with its past”,
Cioffi says. “There are Neolithic cave
drawings on Mount Cetona [near
Castiglioncello], so you have this
human presence going back 20,000
years,” he says. The mountain will
be visible from the gallery.
“I can’t draw a line to save my
life… but one thing I can do is use
the means I have to support the
arts,” Cioffi says. “We want to have
the best contemporary artists from
Asia, South America, Australia, England and America come and visit
us.” They will join writers and musicians who are already travelling to
Monteverdi as part of a residency
programme for creative individuals;
the film-maker Wes Anderson wrote
part of his 2012 film “Moonrise Kingdom” there, and other visitors include
the Italian soprano Roberta Mameli.
The arts programming aims to
attract more locals than tourists,
says Cioffi, whose intention is that
the village, which has fewer than
ten permanent inhabitants, should
be visited primarily by people from
the surrounding areas.
So far, Cioffi’s strategy seems to
be working. “Last time I went to
Monteverdi, there was a small jazz
festival. There must have been 200
people in the main square who had
come from villages nearby. The
place was heaving,” McCrory says.
Cristina Ruiz
• For more information, visit
www.monteverdituscany.com
Lining up with Lindemann?
• The writer Sarah Thornton (right)
penned her “top ten reasons NOT to
write about the art market” in
October. Examples included
the fact that “oligarchs and
dictators are not cool”.
• The Las Vegas writer Dave
Hickey told the UK’s Observer
newspaper that “art editors and critics—people like me—have become a
courtier class. All we do is wander
around the palace and advise very rich
people. It’s not worth my time.”
• The BBC’s arts editor, Will Gompertz,
penned an article in the Times, quoting
anonymous curators who told him
that “very shiny, very expensive
art is normally very bad”, and
admitting that they had to
defend the reputations of big
brand-name artists because
“everybody is too implicated”.
• The director of London’s
National Gallery, Nicholas Penny, called
video art “an incompetent form of
film”, and added that he was not “very
impressed by conceptual art, nor very
often by performance art”.
• Felix Salmon of Reuters wrote that
“the art market has stopped
being a source of fascination…
and started to be a source of
sheer disgust.”
• The artist and critic Jacob
Willer denounced contemporary
art as “uncool… because of money”.
• The New York Magazine critic Jerry
Saltz (below) has generated hundreds
of comments on Facebook after calling
for the removal of “the reckless superhuman sellers flipping paintings and
turning profits in public. Keep the
astronomical numbers private. Do
this, and this cult of personalities
and penis-waving power-men
would fade away and go
flaccid.” C.B.
Adam Lindemann then leapt to
the market’s defence. Writing
about trophy-hunters, he said: “I really
like them—especially if they are buying
what I’m selling… I still have hope that
one day these collectors will develop
their tastes.”
TUSCANY: © BERNARD TOUILLON, 2012
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Tuscany. Michael Cioffi, an American lawyer and professor, started
buying dilapidated buildings in Castiglioncello del Trinoro, 45 miles
south-east of Siena, eight years ago.
He has spent around $15m slowly
restoring them, and has opened
three rental villas, a boutique hotel
and a cafe in the tiny hamlet—properties he collectively calls Monteverdi.
He has also restored the crumbling
medieval church in Castiglioncello,
which is now used for concerts and
music festivals, and plans to open a
restaurant as well as an archaeological park on the site of excavations
he has funded near the hamlet.
Cioffi’s latest project is to open
a contemporary art gallery in a 13thcentury building. Sarah McCrory,
the recently appointed director of
the Glasgow International Festival
of Visual Art and the former curator
of Frieze Projects, will organise two
shows a year in the space, which is
due to open next summer. She will
also invite artists to take part in a
visual arts residency programme in
Monteverdi, which starts next year.
McCrory has been tasked with
assembling a contemporary art collection for the Tuscan town, to be
Ged Quinn / Bass Museum
Ged Quinn, On Behalf of the Pharmakon, 2011
The Endless Renaissance
featuring a solo project by Ged Quinn
Bass Museum
December 6, 2012 – March 17, 2013
Bass Museum
2100 Collins Avenue
Miami Beach, FL 33139
www.bassmuseum.org
Ged Quinn is represented by Stephen Friedman Gallery, London and Haunch of Venison, New York
4
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
NEWS ANALYSIS
The more fairs,
the merrier
First Istanbul art week
heralds explosion in fairs
will include classical Turkish and
Islamic art. Meanwhile, Sandy Angus, a co-founder of the ArtHK fair
(now Art Basel Hong Kong), has
teamed up with the Turkish firm
Interteks to launch a fair in Istanbul
next September.
Ali Güreli, the chairman of Contemporary Istanbul, says: “Istanbul
is a rising star. It will become a
collectors’ paradise in the
near future.” International aspirations
were no doubt encouraged by the
addition to this
year’s exhibitor
list of Haunch of
Venison and Marlborough Gallery
(the latter is showing at Art Basel Miami Beach; stand F5).
Elsewhere in Istanbul, the
New York gallerist Regis
Krampf has opened a permanent
space, Phillips de Pury is looking to
open an office and Lehmann Maupin
(K15) has held pop-up exhibitions
featuring artists such as Angel Otero.
“There’s more of a dialogue happening here between the Turkish
and the international art scenes,
but there’s still a long way to go,”
says Isabella Icoz, an art adviser
specialising in Turkish and international contemporary art. “Collectors
are becoming better informed… but
it’s not without its challenges, and
I think labels such as boom or
bubble are premature.”
Most of the current investment
in Turkey’s art is domestic. Key players include the Koç and Sabanci families (two of Turkey’s richest), Suna
and Inan Kiraç and the Eczacibaşi
group. Akbank Private Banking, Yapi
)VV[O*/HSS+LJLTILY¶ The state, meanwhile, provides
little financial support. Güreli said:
“It’s important for the government
to play a role. We are pushing for
tax changes as there are currently
no exemptions for investing in art
and the VAT rate is very high.” Two
dealers at the fair reported works
of art being held or “misplaced” at
Customs.
The lack of art expertise within
the country is a concern, said Hasan
Bülent Kahraman, the fair’s general
co-ordinator. “We are talking to a
“Istanbul is a rising star. It will become a
collectors’ paradise in the near future”
Kredi Bank and Garanti Bank are
also investing heavily; Garanti’s notfor-profit institution Salt hosted a
strong show of works by the Egyptian
artist Hassan Khan during the week.
Collectors at the fair, including Güler
Sabanci and Daghan Ozil, were predominantly Turkish. “There’s not a
huge number of ex-pats; this isn’t
one of the emirates or Singapore,”
said Mandana Pages of the Germanbased Galerie Frank Pages.
Sol LeWitt, Open Cube Structure - Black, 2001, © 2012 The LeWitt Estate / Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
Istanbul. If the buzz in Istanbul ten
days ago is anything to go by, the
city’s contemporary art scene is continuing its rapid expansion.
Until recently, the city’s art
scene was rooted primarily in its
respected biennial, which was
founded in 1987. The Contemporary
Istanbul fair (22-25 November) entered its seventh year with a
strong foundation of local
support but is still striving to reach out to a
foreign audience.
This year, the organisers launched
Art Istanbul, a
week-long initiative that ran
alongside the fair
and involved the
city’s museums, art
foundations and galleries. They also plan to
hold exhibitions in Dubai, Korea and São Paulo next year, in addition to launching three new fairs.
These include Step Istanbul, which
will focus on emerging galleries,
an as-yet-unnamed fair featuring
photography, and All Arts, which
is due to take place next April and
new cluster of people who want to
invest and they have limited knowledge, so we’re working with our
sponsors [Akbank], in conjunction
with experts, to advise clients.”
Educating the international market about Turkish art is a priority
for local galleries. Turkish artists
such as Taner Ceylan, who recently
signed up with New York’s Paul Kasmin Gallery (A7), are establishing
stronger international reputations,
and the Istanbul-based Rampa
Gallery (N16) and Riff Art Projects
are promoting Turkish work on the
international stage. At the fair, Rampa sold works including Abstraction,
2012, by Leyla Gediz, for €22,000. At
Riff, a 2011 photograph of Hagia
Sophia by Ahmet Ertug sold for
€50,000. Halil Altindere, one of only
five Turkish artists to have been invited to Documenta, sold a work to
the collector Mustafa Taviloglu.
Small local galleries sold moderately at the fair, while big international galleries did well with famous
names. Marlborough showed works
by Picasso and Fernando Botero,
and the Opera Gallery sold “numerous pieces” at its stand, which included works by Keith Haring,
Basquiat and Robert Indiana. But
the majority of the work on display
sat in lower price brackets. “We
were warned not to bring really expensive works if the artists were
lesser-known,” said a spokeswoman
for the Netherlands-based Grimm
Gallery, which showed works ranging in price from €12,000 to more
than €80,000.
Riah Pryor
IMAGES: © CONTEMPORARY ISTANBUL
Contemporary fair creates a buzz, with four events due to launch next year
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INTERNATIONAL CONTEMPORARY + MODERN ART FAIR
INTERNATIONAL EMERGING + CUTTING EDGE ART FAIR
ART MIAMI PARTICIPATING GALLERIES:
101 / Exhibit | Miami Abby M. Taylor Fine Art | Greenwich Adrian Sassoon | London Alan Cristea Gallery | London Aldo de Sousa Gallery | Buenos Aires Alfredo Ginocchio | Mexico Allan
Stone Gallery | New York Alpha Gallery | Boston Antoine Helwaser | New York Arcature Fine Art | Palm Beach Armand Bartos Fine Art | New York Art Forum Ute Barth | Zurich Art Nouveau
Gallery | Miami Arthur Roger Gallery | New Orleans Ascaso Gallery | Miami Barry Friedman | New York Blue Leaf Gallery | Dublin Bolsa De Arte | Porto Alegre Bridgette Mayer Gallery |
Philadelphia C. Grimaldis Gallery | Baltimore Catherine Edelman | Chicago Cernuda Arte | Coral Gables Christopher Cutts Gallery | Toronto Claire Oliver Gallery | New York CONNERSMITH. |
Washington, DC Contessa Gallery | Cleveland Cynthia Corbett Gallery | London Cynthia-Reeves | New York Dai Ichi Arts, Ltd. | New York David Klein Gallery | Birmingham David Lusk Gallery
| Memphis David Richard Gallery | Santa Fe De Buck Gallery | New York Dean Project | New York Denise Bibro Fine Art | New York DeVera.Iglesias | Miami Dillon Gallery | New York Dot
Fiftyone Gallery | Miami Douglas Dawson | Chicago Durban Segnini Gallery | Miami Durham Press | Durham Eckert Fine Art | Millerton Eli Klein Fine Art | New York Evelyn Aimis Fine Art
| Miami Fama Gallery | Verona Ferrin Gallery | Pittsfield Galería Patricia Ready | Santiago Galerie Forsblom | Helsinki Galerie Kleindienst | Leipzig Galerie Olivier Waltman | Paris Galerie
Peter Zimmermann | Mannhein Galerie Renate Bender | Munich Galerie Terminus | Munich Galerie Von Braunbehrens | Munich Galleri Andersson/Sandstrom | Stockholm Galleria Bianconi |
Milan Galleria D’Arte Contini | Venice Goya Contemporary | Baltimore Hackelbury Fine Art | London Haunch of Venison | New York Heller Gallery | New York Hollis Taggart Galleries | New
York Jackson Fine Art | Atlanta James Barron Art | South Kent Jenkins Johnson Gallery | New York Jerald Melberg Gallery | Charlotte JGM. Galerie | Paris Jim Kempner Fine Art | New
York Joel Soroka Gallery | Aspen Juan Ruiz Gallery | Miami June Kelly Gallery | New York KM Fine Arts | Chicago Kreisler Art Gallery | Madrid Lausberg Contemporary | Düsseldorf Leila
Heller Gallery | New York Leon Tovar Gallery | New York Leslie Sacks Contemporary | Santa Monica Leslie Smith Gallery | Amsterdam Lisa Sette Gallery | Scottsdale Lyons Wier Gallery |
New York Magnan Metz Gallery | New York Mark Borghi Fine Art Inc | New York Mayoral Galeria D’Art | Barcelona McCormick Gallery | Chicago Michael Goedhuis | London Michael Schultz
Gallery | Berlin Mike Weiss Gallery | New York Mindy Solomon Gallery | St. Petersburg Modernbook Gallery | San Francisco Modernism Inc. | San Francisco Nancy Hoffman Gallery | New
York Nicholas Metivier Gallery | Toronto Nikola Rukaj Gallery | Toronto Nohra Haime Gallery | New York Now Contemporary | Miami Olyvia Fine Art | London Osborne Samuel | London Pace
Prints | New York Pan American Art Projects | Miami Paul Thiebaud Gallery | San Francisco Peter Fetterman Gallery | Santa Monica Piece Unique | Paris Priveekollektie Contemporary Art &
Design | Heusden Rosenbaum Contemporary | Boca Raton Rudolf Budja Gallery LLC | Miami Santa Giustina | Lucca Schantz Galleries | Stockbridge Schuebbe Projects | Düsseldorf Scott
White Contemporary Art | La Jolla Shaheen Modern and Contemporary Art | Cleveland Simon Capstick-Dale Fine Art | New York Sundaram Tagore | New York Talento / Guijarro de Pablo
| Mexico City Tresart | Coral Gables Unix Contemporary | London Vincent Vallarino Fine Art | New York Waterhouse & Dodd | London Westwood Gallery | New York Wetterling Gallery |
Stockholm William Shearburn Gallery | St. Louis Woolff Gallery | London Yares Art Projects | Santa Fe Zadok Gallery | Miami Zolla/Lieberman Gallery Inc. | Chicago
CONTEXT ART MIAMI PARTICIPATING GALLERIES:
AJLart | Berlin Asymmetrik | New York Atlas Gallery | London Aureus Contemporary | Providence Bankrobber | London Berlin Lounge by LVBG | Berlin Beth Urdang Gallery | Boston Black
Square Gallery | Miami Cancio Contemporary | Bal Harbour Centro De Edicion | San Martin ClampArt | New York CONNERSMITH. | Washington, DC Contemporary by Angela Li | Hong
Kong Curator’s Office | Washington, DC Da Xiang Art Space | Taiwan Dialogue Space Gallery | Beijing Dmitriy Semenov Gallery | Saint-Petersburg Fabien Castanier Gallery | Studio City Frederieke
Taylor Gallery | New York FREIGHT + VOLUME | New York Gaga Gallery | Seoul Galeria Enrique Guerrero | Mexico City Galeria Sicart | Barcelona Galerie cubus-m | Berlin Galerie Kornfeld
| Berlin Galerie Leroyer | Montreal Galerie Paris - Beijing | Paris Galerie Richard | Paris Gering & Lopéz Gallery | New York Glaz Gallery | Moscow J. Cacciola Gallery | New York Jennifer
Kostuik Gallery | Vancouver Kasia Kay Art Projects | Chicago Kavachnina Contemporary | Miami Kit Schulte Contemporary Art | Berlin Kunst Limited | San Jose Licht Feld | Basel Lyle
O. Reitzel Gallery | Santo Domingo Lyons Wier Gallery | New York Magnan Metz Gallery | New York Marcia Wood Gallery | Atlanta The McLoughlin Gallery | San Francisco Merry Karnowsky
Gallery | Los Angeles Morgen Contemporary | Berlin Nina Menocal Gallery | Mexico N O M A D Gallery | Brussels Packer Schopf Gallery | Chicago Patricia Conde Galería | Mexico City Praxis
International Art | New York Robert Klein Gallery | Boston Robert Mann Gallery | New York Swedish Photography | Berlin Traeger & Pinto Arte Contemporaneo | Mexico The Proposition | New
York Torbandena | Trieste Varnish Fine Art | San Francisco Villa del Arte galleries | Barcelona White Room Art System | Positano Witzenhausen Gallery | Amsterdam z2o Galleria | Sara Zanin
| Rome Zadok Gallery | Miami Zemack Contemporary Art Gallery | Tel Aviv zone B | Berlin 532 Gallery Thomas Jaeckel | New York
ART MIAMI + CONTEXT ART MIAMI 2012 | EVENT SCHEDULE
TUESDAY, DEC. 4 - SUNDAY, DEC. 9, 2012 - DURING FAIR HOURS
Art Video | New Media Lounge
Video Program: Girls or Boys? Who Cares?!
The Art Video | New Media Lounge, located in the CONTEXT Art Miami Pavilion,
will showcase a carefully selected group of works sourced from museums, private
collections and art institutions across Europe and the United States. The program is
curated by Julia Draganovic, and Claudia Loffelholz, fouders of LaRete Art Projects.
“Boys or girls? Who cares?!” presents a series of video art works approaching the
polemic gender issues in modern society, and questioning the ongoing debate about
the current roles of men and women.
Video art works include:
Said Atabekov’s Battle for the Square, courtesy of Videoinsight, Turin; Gerald Byrne’s
Homme à Femmes (Michel Debrane), courtesy of Mudam Musèe d’Art Moderne du
Grand-Duc Jean, Luxemburg; Eli Cortiñas’s Dial M for Mother, courtesy of Stiftung
Museum Kunstpalast, Düsseldorf; Oded Hirsch’s 50 Blue, courtesy of Collection
Robert Bielecki, New York; Janet Biggs’ Brightness All Around, courtesy of Tampa
Museum of Art, Tampa (FL), and Carlson/Strom’s Sloss, Kerr, Rosenberg & Moore,
courtesy of Contemporary Collection of Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, USA
BANKSY Out of CONTEXT
CONTEXT Art Miami and photo-sharing platform I PXL U have partnered to exhibit
five walls equaling six-and-a-half-tons in weight, each displaying an iconic stencil by
one of the world’s most prominent graffiti artists.
Sugar & Gomorrah
Peter Anton’s experiential “Sugar & Gomorrah” is the world’s first art installation in
which the viewer journeys in a reworked carnival ride through a modern interpretation
of the destruction of a Sodom and Gomorrah-like world. Attendees will be able to
enjoy the ride as part of the outdoor exhibition area.
Soul of Seoul
Curated by Bernice Steinbaum, this exhibition explores the essence of Korean
artistic sensibility - the commingling of daily life and nature. The exhibition features
an extraordinary range of works that include contemporary art, ceramics, traditional
silver services, hand carved chests and informal modeling of the traditional Korean
dress, the “Hanbok”. An intuitive and innate wisdom and serenity flows from the
natural world to the Korean people and this relationship is prominently seen in the
work of Korea’s most accomplished artists.
LOCATION:
Midtown Miami I Wynwood, 3101 NE 1st Avenue, Miami, FL 33137
PARKING:
Valet and general parking directly across the street from the fair.
DIRECTIONS FROM CONVENTION CENTER:
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6
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
FEATURE
What the...?! Does
Tom Wolfe mean us?
Five fair insiders give their verdict on the author’s satirical portrait of Art Basel Miami Beach. By Christian Viveros-Fauné
I
Eric Shiner,
director, the
Andy Warhol
Museum
“After reading
the Vanity Fair
excerpt, I don’t
want to read the
rest of the book. The writing is terrible and the characterisations are
ridiculously broad and negative.
The collectors aren’t just billionares, they’re dumpy, sweaty
billionaires. I don’t recognise
those stereotypes. Their descriptions, which are largely based on
how the characters look and dress,
strike me as tremendously shallow. Also, it’s not all about money
at Art Basel—there are all kinds of
business conducted there on many
fronts. Wolfe can write what he
wants, but you wish people would
do the due diligence. If he
researched the art world, it
doesn’t show. If I could steer him
right, I’d have him look at the art,
because it is a barometer of contemporary values. He might even
see art that critiques the very
of lookers, buyers, and artists into a
clichéd bacchanal. Speculative
impulses undergird some parts of
the market, but this exposé dangerously insinuates that connoisseurship, discretion, and any ‘real’ commitment to art are a thing of the
past. It also glosses over the fact
that fairs, for their part, are hybrid
businesses whose value to the
international art world is commercial but much more as well, serving
as relevant platforms for education
and networking, and as sites for
artists to present their work. While
superstar artists and the newly
wealthy global collectors that
bankroll their careers is a signal of
our time, commentators like Wolfe
would do well to look beyond this
veneer, as thinly veiled criticisms
like his risk falling victim to the
same superficiality that they are
ostensibly directed against.”
Accuracy: “I’ll respectfully
abstain from giving a grade.”
The man in white goes to town on Miami
system that promotes it, and how
the market responds to that. Being
the director of the Andy Warhol
Museum, I often think about what
Andy would say about today’s art
fairs, especially as he’s seen as an
artist who influenced art’s drift
towards commercialism. I think
Andy would absolutely love the
idea of seeing people from every
part of the world and every walk
of life at the art fair.”
Accuracy: “I’ll go with a three.”
Thea Westreich,
art adviser
“I think the
excerpt is typical
satire and that’s
the way Tom
Wolfe writes.
Wolfe only wrote
about one part of the art world.
That part of the art world happens
to be getting a lot of attention
lately, with record prices at auctions and people flipping work. All
kinds of people collect art: people
who build huge collections with a
lot of money and others who do so
with as little as $50,000. I did have
some collectors five or six years
ago who were like the people
Wolfe describes. I had to get rid of
them, because they were turning
stuff around left and right. It was
painful, but now I sleep better at
night. Ultimately, it’s very easy to
poke fun at the art world, because
anything that’s truly new and that
challenges people will be laughed
at. The typical response is ‘that’s
absurd’. But it’s when you dismiss
the unknown that you wind up
under a rock or sounding ignorant.
Does the novel describe the art
world well? No. Does it describe
part of the art world that we wish
wasn’t there? Yes, but also not
very well. The endgame for Wolfe
was to write an amusing novel,
even if his writing about the art
world is not very amusing at all.”
Accuracy: “I give it a zero, at
least as an accurate reflection
of the entire art world.”
Rick Hirsch,
managing
editor, the
Miami Herald
“I’ve been reading Tom Wolfe all
my life, from
Radical Chic &
Mau-Mauing the Flak Catchers to The
Bonfire of the Vanities. All his books,
both fiction and non-fiction, feature a classic clash between established power and rising social
forces. Tom Wolfe writes large,
whether he’s talking about Cuban
cops or Art Basel collectors. I can’t
really say how exaggerated his
characterisations of the collectors
are, but I can tell you that I enjoy
attending the fair. I’m not the clueless Wasp editor depicted in the
book. No one at the paper fits that
description, certainly not Mindy
Marques [the paper’s CubanAmerican female executive editor].
That character resembles people
who were here 15 years ago, when
the city was a cultural wasteland.
Art Basel changed that: it’s propelled the city’s culture forward.
Anyone in South Florida who reads
Back to Blood will be reading it for
Wolfe’s take on Miami and the fair.
I say if you live here and you don’t
see Miami in this book, I don’t
think you’re looking hard enough.”
Accuracy: “I really hate the idea
of a numerical grade.”
Noah Horowitz,
executive
director, the
Armory Show
“Wolfe’s book
continues a long
line of recent criticism on the
excesses and
extremes of today’s art market.
Trading on a barrage of half-truths
and loaded hyperbole, the world it
captures isn’t pure fiction, though
it’s hardly indicative of the more
nuanced reality of the trade either.
If taken at face value, this portrayal
does a great disservice, gelling the
actions and intentions of thousands
THE INTERNATIONAL EXPOSITION OF CONTEMPORARY & MODERN ART
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Jerry Saltz, art
critic, New York
Magazine
“I started to read
the latest Wolfe
tomfoolery on Art
Basel Miami
Beach. I thought
it’d be great to
hear this master of the fast-action
social once-over work on this
crowd. I forgot, however, that
Wolfe often gets art wrong. He likes
to go preening, full Philistine on it.
Alas, this time around the Wolfe
ABMB piece is hackneyed, trivial,
inane. Worse, it’s fairly clueless. It’s
like he’s trying to retrofit his old
Bonfire of the Vanities formula to the
present situation. But as with the
clip of Karl Rove having his Fox
News nervous breakdown on camera, there’s no need to exaggerate
or embellish. The reality of the situation makes the epic bathos selfrevealing. Wolfe fails by simply
applying old chestnuts to new
cheese balls. But he doesn’t understand these cheese balls. The essay
feels very 80s. Which boomerangs
and turns his screed silly-stale and
a little cringe-making embarrassing. But what the heck! This is the
guy who wrote The Right Stuff and
The Bonfire of the Vanities. Wolfe is
allowed to write whatever the hell
he wants about whatever the hell
he wants to write about. Formulaic.
Clichéd. Whatever. The person I’d
really like to read on ABMB right
now is that raving freakazoid nut
sandwich, Glenn Beck.”
Accuracy: “If one is lowest,
then one.”
NAVY PIER
19—22
SEPTEMBER
2013
WOLFE: OSCAR CORRAL/AP; SHINER: COURTESY OF ERIC SHINER; WESTREICH: © PORTER HOVEY; HIRSCH: CHARLES TRAINOR JR; SALTZ: COURTESY OF PATRICK MCMULLAN COMPANY; HOROWITZ: © ALEXANDRA CORAZZA
s Tom Wolfe’s new novel
about Miami accurate?
That’s a question for
Miami residents and attendees of Art Basel Miami
Beach (ABMB) to ponder
this week, as the author’s Back to
Blood (Little, Brown, $30) heats up
the bookshelves. Like his previous
three bestselling novels, Wolfe’s
704-page doorstopper (excerpted
last year in Vanity Fair) has, according to reports, been researched to
within an inch of its glossy life.
The book is written about a
present-day city that resembles the
1980s TV series “Miami Vice”. Seen
through characters that include a
sexy Cuban-American vamp, a
milquetoast editor of the Miami
Herald, a venereal-disease ridden
local tycoon and a fat Russian oligarch collector, Wolfe’s characters
flail around during ABMB like
giant inflatables. One scribe suggested Wolfe’s novel was actually
penned by Donald Trump;
another, The New Yorker’s James
Wood, referred to the book’s
“yards of flapping exaggeration”.
To assess its accuracy, The Art
Newspaper canvassed five experts
on the real-life Miami arts scene
and asked them to give marks out
of ten for accuracy. (Marc
Spiegler, the director of ABMB,
declined to comment, saying: “It
is not the show’s role to critique
works of art—especially works of
literary fiction.”)
FOR
C U R –
I
–
O–
U
S
MINDS
The Global Forum for Design
5.–9. December 2012/
Meridian Avenue & 19th Street
Miami Beach/ USA
designmiami.com
Design Galleries
Caroline Van Hoek/ Brussels
Carpenters Workshop Gallery/ London & Paris
Cristina Grajales Gallery/ New York
Demisch Danant/ New York
Didier Ltd/ London
Gabrielle Ammann // Gallery/ Cologne
Galerie BSL/ Paris
Galerie Downtown - François Laffanour/ Paris
Galerie Jacques Lacoste/ Paris
Galerie kreo/ Paris
Galerie Maria Wettergren/ Paris
Galerie Patrick Seguin/ Paris
Galerie VIVID/ Rotterdam
Galleria Rossella Colombari/ Milan
Gallery SEOMI/ Seoul
Hostler Burrows/ New York
Industry Gallery/ Washington DC & Los Angeles
Jason Jacques Inc./ New York
Johnson Trading Gallery/ New York
Jousse Entreprise/ Paris
Magen H Gallery/ New York
Mark McDonald/ Hudson
Moderne Gallery/ Philadelphia
Nilufar Gallery/ Milan
Ornamentum/ Hudson
Pierre Marie Giraud/ Brussels
Priveekollektie Contemporary Art | Design/ Heusden
R 20th Century/ New York
Venice Projects/ Venice
Design On/Site Galleries
Antonella Villanova/ Florence
presenting Delfina Delettrez
Booo/ Eindhoven
presenting Front
Design Space/ Tel Aviv
presenting Michal Cederbaum & Noam Dover
Erastudio Apartment-Gallery/ Milan
presenting Gaetano Pesce
Mondo Cane/ New York
presenting RO/LU
Victor Hunt Designart Dealer/ Brussels
presenting Sylvain Willenz + CIRVA
Volume Gallery/ Chicago
presenting Snarkitecture
RO/LU/ Nature/Nurture (after Otto Hertber Hajek)/ 2012/ Mondo Cane
Design Talk
Wednesday 5. December/
6–7pm
Design Pioneers/
Diane von Furstenberg in conversation with
Stefano Tonchi
Design Miami/
5.–9. December 2012/
Meridian Avenue & 19th Street/
Adjacent to the Miami Beach Convention Center/
Miami Beach/
designmiami.com
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
9
INTERVIEW
Vito Acconci
THE ART
NEWS
NETWORK
Artist and designer
From my space to yours
Shaking off the “controversial” label has been a lifetime’s work. By Nicole Swengley
V
ACCONCI: PHOTO: TONY VALAINIS
ito Acconci (right)
began his career as
a poet concerned
less with the
meaning of words
than the pagespace they inhabited. In the late
1960s, he became a photographer,
video and performance artist using
his own body as a subject. Between
1969 and 1973, he performed and
developed more than 200 conceptually structured, body-related
works, many incorporating subversive social commentary, including
Seedbed, 1971, during which he lay
masturbating beneath floorboards
at Sonnabend Gallery while vocalising fantasies via a loudspeaker
about visitors walking overhead.
In 1988, he founded Acconci Studio,
focusing on architecture and landscape design with an emphasis on
public/private spaces. The studio
has been awarded this year’s
Designer of the Year prize by Design
Miami. Acconci has taught at Yale
University and Parsons School of
Design. He currently teaches at
Brooklyn College and is adjunct
associate professor at the Pratt
Institute in the graduate architecture and urban design department.
The Art Newspaper: Design
Miami’s Designer of the Year
award is a huge accolade. How
do you feel about receiving this
recognition of your work?
Vito Acconci: I’ve gotten used to
people not thinking of “Acconci
Studio”—only of “Vito Acconci”—
and my 1970s work about the
body that made me, made my reputation. It has also ruined my reputation, holding me back in time
as if I’ve never done any work
since the 1970s. Even worse, it has
stopped some people from thinking I could ever do any work that
lived up to that. I hope it makes
me think and do work that I
couldn’t before. I hope people
think more about Acconci Studio
than about Vito Acconci.
Your projects span a wide
breadth of disciplines. Did one
interest lead to another? And
which has become the most
important for you?
When I thought of myself as a
writer in the 1960s, I questioned
what made me go from the left to
the right margin, from one page to
another. As I thought of the space I
was also thinking about time.
Then I thought: “Why am I limiting myself to a piece of paper
when there’s a world out there?”
I focused on performance in the
early 1970s because the common
language of the time was “finding
oneself”. In a time like that, what
else could I do but turn in on
myself and then go from me to
you? Photography, film and video
were sidesteps—spaces in front of
you—whereas I was more interested in the space where you were
in the middle. Now I’m involved
with peopled spaces—that’s design
and architecture.
Much of your earlier work has
been confrontational and controversial. How important is it
for you to push the boundaries
of art and architecture?
I don’t think I ever intended a
piece or performance to be controversial. Confrontational, yes—
because I like working close-up.
When thinking about a project, I
might consider it from a distance
but when I think of a person being
there, myself, for example, I need
to be in the middle of things.
I don’t want views from afar.
Can you describe the connecting thread linking all your
work from your first projects
to the present day?
Specificity. I’m drawn to abstract
ideas but I don’t like abstract
words because they tell a person
what to think. They don’t let people think for themselves. I’ve
wanted things we’ve done to show
themselves as facts. It’s up to individual people to sum up—to
abstract—from those facts.
Do you feel your conceptual art
was understood at the time you
produced it—and now?
I don’t know if I ever did so-called
“Conceptual art”. My activities/performances in the early 1970s
used my body and other people’s
bodies. My installations in the
later 1970s were spaces visitors
walked through or sat inside. Once
something is tangible, it probably
can’t be conceptual. At the same
time, you can’t do anything unless
you first have an idea. The idea
guides or impels you. The words
“Conceptual art” gave museum
and gallery-goers an upper hand:
the feeling of knowing something
other people don’t know.
Which, of all your projects,
makes your heart beat fastest?
Our project for a new World Trade
Center in New York. It’s a building
full of holes. If a building is going
to be blown up, then maybe it
should come pre-exploded. It can
act as urban camouflage so a
potential terrorist flying overhead
says we don’t have to deal with
that one. And when a building is
full of holes, the rest of the city—
parks, street vendors—comes
inside. When buildings mix private
and public spaces, each is more
understandable, more graspable,
when matched with its opposite.
When you are designing a
space, which elements are the
most important—aesthetics,
functionality or the experience
people will have?
Not functionality so much as multifunctionality. If something has a
number of uses, you might not find
them all at once. You get to know
them and use them only after time.
I’ve never understood aesthetics:
the word smacks of “appreciation”,
being far enough away from something that you can savour it, sniff
it, from afar. It seems as if you’re
letting yourself be taken in by
something. I’m a fan of complexity,
of getting almost lost, getting
entangled in the folds.
What are you currently
working on?
A project in Indianapolis—a tunnel through a building. As you
walk or cycle through, you activate
sensors above and below that set
off LED lights like swarming fireflies that move from one person to
another.
Tell me about your Design
District installation.
It’s a mix of physical and virtual.
You walk through clouds or mesh
and settle inside a cubby-hole. You
hear my voice, winding from one
enclave to another: “This is the second saddest story I ever heard…”
• A Design Miami talk with Vito Acconci
and Mitchell Joachim is due to take place
on 6 December (6pm-7pm)
• Acconci Studio’s Here/There, Now/Later
is at the Buena Vista Building, Miami
Design District, until 9 December
TURIN
Il Giornale dell’Arte
founded 1983
www.ilgiornaledellarte.com
LONDON
The Art Newspaper
founded 1990
www.theartnewspaper.com
ATHENS
Ta Nea tis Technis
founded 1992
PARIS
Le Journal des Arts
founded 1994
www.lejournaldesarts.fr
TURIN
Il Giornale
dell’Architettura
founded 2002
www.ilgiornaledell
architettura.com
MOSCOW
The Art Newspaper
Russia
founded 2012
[email protected]
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Allemandi in 1983
Watch our exclusive new web series at TheArtNewspaper.tv.
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We will not rest
© UBS 2012. All rights reserved.
10
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
INTERVIEW
Los Carpinteros
From Havana with attitude:
Sánchez (left) and Valdés
Art and design collective
The other
and the same
A
rt Basel Miami
Beach gets a taste of
Cuba with the
launch of Güiro, a
bar-cum-art installation by the Cubanborn, Madrid-based artist collective
known as Los Carpinteros. The bar,
firmly rooted in Cuban culture, is
named after and inspired by the
ubiquitous Cuban percussion
instrument made from the dried
wooden fruit of the higuera tree;
guïro is also a Cuban slang term for
a party. The slatted bar structure,
home to a curated programme of
live music and performances, is
filled with books and random
objects selected by the artists.
Blurring genres and media is a speciality of Los Carpinteros, whose
works subvert the usual practices
of art, architecture and design,
prompting questions about the
functional and aesthetic roles of
objects. The collective now consists
of Marco Antonio Castillo Valdés
and Dagoberto Rodríguez Sánchez
(Alexandre Arrechea departed in
June 2003). The three artists met
when they were students at
Havana’s Instituto Superior de Arte.
From the outset, the group adopted
an anarchic approach, taking the
name of Los Carpinteros (the carpenters) in 1994 to show their kinship with an older tradition of artisans and the need to connect with
the craft-led element of making art.
The “Transportable City” series,
consisting of ten tents modelled on
Cuban landmark buildings, was an
early innovation; launching at the
seventh Havana biennial in 2000,
the itinerant installation travelled
Biography
Marco Antonio Castillo
Valdés and Dagoberto
Rodríguez Sánchez
Born: Cuba, 1971 (Valdés) and 1969
(Sánchez)
Education: Instituto Superior de Arte,
Havana (Valdés graduated in 1995,
Sánchez in 1994)
Selected solo shows: 2012 “Los
Carpinteros”, Faena Arts Centre, Buenos
Aires 2011 “El Gran Picnic”, Galería
Habana, Havana
Selected group shows: 2010 “The New
Decor”, Hayward Gallery, London 2009
“Sites”, Whitney Museum of American
Art, New York
to MoMA PS1 in New York and the
Los Angeles County Museum of Art
in 2001. The concept highlighted
migration as a result of natural disasters or war. Their recent work is
equally political; earlier this year,
an exhibition at the Faena Arts
Centre in Buenos Aires featured
three large-scale installations,
including Avião, 2011, a Piper
Comanche plane riddled with
wooden arrows, drawing attention
to the disparity between technology and the age-old traditions of
remote pockets of Brazilian society.
Together, Valdés and Sánchez
explain what motivates their multidisciplinary works, why mundane
materials matter and how they
teamed up with Absolut Art Bureau
for their waterfront watering hole.
The Art Newspaper: You trained
at art college in Cuba. How did
this inform your ideas?
Los Carpinteros: We had an artistic
training in Cuba, it was intense
and long. We started studying at
art schools when we were children, and ended up at the Instituto
Superior de Arte [in Havana]. We
met
there and
began working together as a
part of a class programme named El Otro, El
Mismo, (the other, the same) and
since then, we have worked
together for the past 20 years.
Is your art meant to make
people laugh?
If people get to understand our
work it’s great, but if people also
laugh, it’s a luxury.
How did you make the transition from painting to designinspired pieces?
We actually didn’t make this transition, our work has always
involved varied fields and different
disciplines. We make installations,
sculptures, actions and even sometimes films. But drawing is also
one of the main branches of our
work and we use it as our memo
pad, our diary, the space where we
project and discuss our ideas. The
immediacy of this media allows us
to use it this way, so it acts often
as [the basis for] projects which
later materialise as sculptures or
installations;
on other
occasions, they
[the drawings] are
Utopian reflections of the main
[themes] we deal with.
Who inspires you most: artists
or designers?
Depends on the season… most of
the time we get inspiration from a
lot of other things. Our work is
more focused on everyday objects
and their functions; we are
obsessed with the utility of materials and functionality. We are concerned with the way human beings
create utilities. Our eyes are always
wide open to social practices and
their relationship with visual and
material contemporary culture.
Do you still consider yourself
artisans?
It is very difficult nowadays to
understand art through separate
disciplines; making art today can
be understood as a game of dice,
sometimes we behave like artisans, sometimes like motherfuckers; what matters is to turn this
experience into a value in itself.
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I N N O VAT I O N O F S O M E O F
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The Cuban collaborators who won’t be put in a box. By Gareth Harris
GÜIRO: COURTESY OF LOS CARPINTEROS AND SEAN KELLY, NEW YORK; ABSOLUT BOTTLE DESIGN AND ALL OTHER ABSOLUT TRADEMARKS OWNED BY THE ABSOLUT COMPANY
AB © 1985; © 1985 THE ANDY WARHOL FOUNDATION FOR THE VISUAL ARTS; © V&S VIN & SPRIT AB 1998/WIM DELVOYE; © V&S VIN & SPRIT AB 1995/ROBERT INDIANA
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
Is your art today political in
any way?
We cannot escape from politics, it
is everywhere like a virus, and it
infects even material culture nowadays. Things fabricated by human
hands always show somehow a way
of thinking, a way of behaving, and
even sometimes political notions.
Why is your Güiro structure,
commissioned by Absolut Art
Bureau, an important piece?
Collaboration is a word that doesn’t
scare us, especially as we have been
a collective for 20 years. For the
Havana biennial, we have just finished Conga Irreversible, an action
[based] in the streets: we collaborated with a composer, a choreographer, a costume designer, a filmmaker and around 100 other
people, from dancers to musicians.
For Güiro, Absolut proposed a new
idea of participation that we hadn’t
yet explored. It is about the creation of something that has a
defined functionality. This situation
has made us think about another
kind of interaction between the
public and the work, which
includes a lot of new “features”:
alcohol, space, illumination, sound,
furniture, to name a few. Thus the
Güiro has been created from more
than just financial support.
Why does the panopticon
concept (18th-century
A render of Güiro, 2012, an
art bar installation by Los
Carpinteros in collaboration
with Absolut Art Bureau
philosopher Jeremy Bentham’s
building designed with a central point for observation and
most closely associated with
prisons) appeal to you? How
have you developed this idea in
relation to Güiro?
We have put a few ideas into a single structure. We basically wanted
to build a series of shelves that
then turn into an architectural
space. In other words, a piece of
furniture that would behave as a
building. This piece belongs to a
series of structures that uses the
language of panoptic prisons to
create civic spaces. We appropriate
real, existing buildings and we
transform their size and functionality until they can serve as a reading room. This time we have
moved the needle a little bit, and
used the natural shape of a güiro,
which is a musical instrument
made from a fruit, as [a basis],
instead of a building.
Does a Miami-based project
have special resonance for you?
Although Miami is a city where the
Cuban population is very important, this work has not been
created specifically for this public.
But we feel that exhibiting there is
somehow like exhibiting in our
country, which is always a challenge because we are dealing with
sensitive topics. This is our first
presentation in a public space that
will interact fully with the community [in Miami]. It will be interesting to see people’s reactions.
What are your future projects?
This month, besides Güiro, we have
a solo show, “Silence Your Eyes”, at
the Hannover Kunstverein (until 3
February 2013); this is a travelling
exhibition we first held at the
Kunstmuseum Thun [Switzerland]
last April. We are also participating in a couple of group shows:
“Food”, in Musée Ariana, Geneva
(19 December-24 February 2013)
and “Cartografías contemporáneas. Dibujando el pensamiento” (Contemporary cartography: drawing thought) at the
Caixaforum Madrid (until 24
February 2013). In 2013, we start
the year with a solo show at
Matadero Madrid, opening on 26
January [until 21 April], and we
will also have solo shows at Sean
Kelly Gallery, New York in May,
Galerie Peter Kilchmann, [Zurich]
in June, and Edouard
Malingue Gallery, Hong
Kong, in September.
• Los Carpinteros’
Güiro, on the
oceanfront between
21st and 22nd Streets,
South Beach, is open
from 5pm until 2am
(until December 8)
11
Absolut Art Bureau
• Absolut Art Bureau, the art arm of the Absolut
vodka company, is an associate sponsor of Art
Basel for the next three years and unveiled the
Absolut Maybe Bar by the artists Ryan Gander and
Mario García Torres at Documenta 13 last summer.
Absolut has been on the art scene since 1986,
when it invited Andy Warhol to create the first
advertisement inspired by the Absolut bottle.
• Michel Roux, the chief executive of Carillon, the
US importers of Absolut vodka, initiated the collaboration with Warhol. Other big names followed:
Keith Haring (1986), Ed Ruscha (1988), Douglas
Gordon (1992) and Robert Indiana (1995).
• In 1998, Belgian artist Wim Delvoye asked
artists from Jordan to fill five empty Absolut bottles with coloured sand, which was layered to create images of camels and desert landscapes.
• In 1997, the Rolling Stones guitarist Ronnie
Wood made the self-portrait Absolut Wood while
the Miami-based artist Romero Britto designed a
bottle label for Absolut in 1989, and was commissioned in 2003 to create the 25th anniversary
Absolut bottle.
• The project came to an end in 2004; after
years in storage in venues in Paris and London,
the 850-strong collection, now owned by the
Swedish government, was donated in 2008 to
the Museum of Spirits on the island of
Djurgården near Stockholm. The exhibition
“Face it!” (until September 2013) includes 69 of
the 850 works commissioned by Absolut vodka
between 1986 and 2004. G.H.
Absolut artists: (from top) Andy Warhol,
Wim Delvoye and Robert Indiana
Visit the Private Sales
Online Gallery
Fall Session · Open thru December 21
The Online Gallery offers a convenient and
flexible way to view works available for
private sale outside the auction timeline.
This season’s selection of Post-War and
Contemporary art features works by Andy
Warhol, Robert Indiana, Ugo Rondinone
and Alexander Calder.
Contact
Alexis Klein
Associate Vice President, Specialist
Post-War and Contemporary Art
[email protected]
+1 212 641 3741
christiesprivatesales.com
ROBERT INDIANA (B. 1928)
Love, 1966
oil on canvas
12 x 12 in. (30.5 x 30.5 cm.)
©2012 Morgan Art Foundation /
Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York
relief fund
Image: NOAA
HURRICANE SANDY
RELIEF RESOURCES
The Art Dealers Association of America offers our heartfelt
sympathies and support to all those who have suffered
unimaginable losses as a result of Hurricane Sandy. ADAA has
compiled relief resources for our members and the entire arts
community—including information on the ADAA Relief Fund,
federal and state assistance, insurance, and conservation—
on our website www.artdealers.org.
ADAA RELIEF FUND
CONTRIBUTORS
(LIST IN FORMATION)
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Pace Gallery
Sotheby’s
TWO x TWO for AIDS
and Art
David Zwirner Gallery
Alexander and Bonin
Gallery
Art Production Fund
Art.sy.
ArtSpace
Association of
Professional Art
Advisors
C.G. Boerner, LLC
Rena Bransten Gallery
Ronni Casty
William N. Copley
Estate/ CPLY LLC
Tibor de Nagy
DeWitt Stern Group, Inc.
Ellen Donahue
Talley Dunn Gallery
Andrew Edlin Fine Arts
Ronald Feldman
Fine Arts, Inc.
FITZ & CO.
Forum Gallery
Fraenkel Gallery
Agnes Gund
Independent Curators
International
Paul Kasmin Gallery
Sean Kelly Gallery
Kirsh Foundation
Holdings Ltd.
Barbara Krakow Gallery
Peter and Jill Kraus
Lehmann Maupin
Galerie Lelong
Dominique Levy Gallery
McCaffrey Fine Art
McKee Gallery
Menconi & Schoelkopf
Fine Art , LLC
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Achim Moeller
Mnuchin Gallery
Pace Prints
Patrick Seguin
Senior & Shopmaker
Gallery
Dorsey Waxter
15
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
IN PICTURES
1
A walk on the sunny side
A snowman and other sculptures catch some rays as Art Public takes over Collins Park
2
1
4
Alice Aycock, Sculpture C, 2012,
Galerie Thomas Schulte (Berlin),
C18, Fredric Snitzer Gallery
(Miami), B16
2
Pierre Ardouvin, Bonhomme de
neige, 2007, Galerie Chez Valentin
(Paris), N38
3
Randy Polumbo, Love Stream #2,
2012, Paul Kasmin Gallery (New
York), A7
4
Juliana Cerqueira Leite, Climb, 2012,
Casa Triângulo (São Paulo), E12
3
5
Ugo Rondinone, I feel, you feel, we
feel through each other into our
selves, 2012, Gladstone Gallery
(New York), H12
6
5
6
IMAGES: © VANESSA RUIZ; WWW.VANESSARUIZ.COM
José Davila, Untitled (The Space
Beneath Us), 2012, Galería OMR
(Mexico City), B19, Travesía Cuatro
(Madrid), N22
16
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
BOOKS
Under the influence: Ed Ruscha,
Los Angeles County Museum on
Fire, 1965-68 (below), John
Everett Millais, Ophelia, 1852
Loving and loathing
CONTEMPORARY ART
A
rtists are, like the
rest of us, simultaneously inspired
and intimidated by
the scale of their
predecessors’
achievements. That ambivalence
towards those who have gone
before has been exaggerated by
the past century’s tendency
towards artistic iconoclasm. In an
era that sanctifies novelty, artists
have become loath to acknowledge
any debt that might compromise
their claim to originality.
This absorbing book, which
compiles the reflections of 78 contemporary artists on the artist or
work of art that has most profoundly influenced them, hints at
the combination of filial awe and
anxiety that so many artists feel.
Combining short texts with reproductions of the works under discussion, In My View also disabuses
the reader of the notion that the
contemporary artist is endlessly in
rebellion against the canon. Here,
artists pay their dues to their creative inheritance.
One of the great pleasures
of this elegantly designed and
cleverly conceived publication is
the frequent reminder it provides
of how tangled those ancestries of
influence are. Ed Ruscha is among
those to tacitly acknowledge the
notion of artistic parentage when
he describes much of his own
work as the “offspring” of a celebrated painting that has
enthralled him since his youth.
The reader might be surprised to
The dialogue is not
necessarily one-sided.
New art can cast
fresh light onto old
learn that the painting on which
this archetypally cool Californian
conceptualist confers paternity is
John Everett Millais’s Ophelia, 1852,
the very acme of overwrought PreRaphaelite sentimentalism. Yet the
revelation is extraordinarily illuminating. Looking again at
Ruscha’s Los Angeles County Museum
of Art on Fire, 1965-68, we see that it
is painted from a similar perspective to Ophelia, and that the
organisation of architectural
shapes describes a supine form
comparable to that of the heroine’s dead body. Ruscha describes
the language of his painting as
“bucolic and pastoral”—words that
would not spring naturally to
mind when considering his oeuvre
but which make perfect sense in
the context of this comparison.
By reproducing the two works,
In My View also encourages the
reader to reappraise Millais’s work
in light of its influence on Ruscha.
The later artist’s appropriation of
certain compositional elements
enables the viewer to see the
Englishman’s work afresh, which
is no small gift given its ubiquity.
In another enlightening entry,
Rachel Whiteread tells us that the
proportions of the casts she used to
create Ghost, 1990, her incarnation
in off-white plaster of the empty
spaces of a Victorian townhouse,
derive from the precisely ordered
compositional geometries of Piero
della Francesca’s Baptism of Christ,
1448-50. The consequence is that
Whiteread’s monument to architectural space is suffused with a
sense of clarity and purity that
descends from, but is not reducible
to, the compositional rigour of the
Early Renaissance master.
We are reminded that the dialogue between artists of different
periods is not necessarily onesided. New art can cast fresh light
onto old. The advent of Frieze
Masters in London is the latest
example of a wider acknowledgement that contemporary art is
actively engaged with work from
the past. In My View feels impeccably timed because it allows artists
to expand upon their personal
relationships with specific works
without the intervention of art historians or curators eager to identify connections that support their
own pet theories. In the introduction, the editor, Simon Grant,
draws attention to the absence of
“aggressive posturing or any fierce
desire to define oneself in opposition to past masters”, and the book
communicates an appreciable
sense of a community that extends
beyond an artist’s peers.
That magnanimity is a result of
the fact that the artists have nominated positive influences. An
equally interesting compilation
could be made of artists’ reflections
on the works they most hate, and
the book does suffer when artists
simply offer up homilies in praise
of a work with which the reader is
already adequately acquainted.
Much as I would recommend In My
View, I found myself yearning for a
bit of spite, a hint of patricide. This
is one half of the story well told.
Ben Eastman
In My View: Personal
Reflections on Art
by Today’s Leading Artists
Simon Grant, ed
Thames & Hudson, 208pp, £19.95 (hb)
RUSCHA: PHOTO: LEE STALSWORTH. © ED RUSCHA, 2009. COURTESY OF HIRSHHORN MUSEUM AND SCULPTURE GARDEN, SMITHSONIAN INSTITUTION
Artists’ reflections on the predecessors who inspired them make for an
enthralling read—but a bit of spite would have been even better
SIGMARPOLKE
AT ART BASEL MIAMI
VISIT US ON BOOTH C11
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F R A N C E 7 R U E D E B E L L E Y M E T E L 3 3 1 4 2 7 2 9 9 0 0 R O PA C . N E T
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December 6–9, 2012
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25.28 APR 2013
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arlborough Graphics
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19
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
CALENDAR
Art Basel Miami Beach
KEY
Listings are arranged
alphabetically by category
• Exhibitions
• Commercial galleries
• Art fairs
Exhibitions
Wolfsonian-Florida
International University
Bass Museum of Art
1001 Washington Avenue,
Miami Beach
2100 Collins Avenue,
Miami Beach
• Esther Shalev-Gerz:
Describing Labour
• The Endless Renaissance:
Six Solo Artist Projects
UNTIL 7 APRIL 2013
• Bhakti Baxter: Construction
of Good
6 DECEMBER-17 MARCH 2013
www.bassmuseum.org
UNTIL 7 APRIL 2013
Cisneros Fontanals
Art Foundation
• Postcards of the Wiener
Werkstätte: Selections from the
Leonard A. Lauder Collection
1018 North Miami
Avenue, Miami
www.wolfsonian.org
UNTIL 31 MARCH 2013
• Unsaid/Spoken
5 DECEMBER-MARCH 2013
World Class Boxing
www.cifo.org
170 NW 23rd Street, Miami
• Aaron Angell: Raga for Fishwife
De la Cruz Collection
UNTIL 28 FEBRUARY 2013
23 NE 41st Street, Miami
www.worldclassboxing.org
• Pleat Construction: Jim Drain
Commercial
UNTIL 8 DECEMBER
www.delacruzcollection.org
101 Exhibit
FURTHER
LISTINGS
101 NE 40th Street, Miami
• Chambliss Giobbi: Se7n
UNTIL 31 JANUARY 2013
www.101exhibit.com
www.theartnewspaper.
com/whatson
David Castillo Gallery
2234 NW 2nd Avenue, Miami
Fairchild Tropical
Botanic Garden
• Dark Flow Lurking
10901 Old Cutler Road,
Coral Gables
www.davidcastillogallery.com
UNTIL 31 DECEMBER 2013
• Pardo on the Allée
Describing Labour
UNTIL 31 MARCH 2013
Wolfsonian-Florida International University, Miami Beach
• Chamberlain at Fairchild
UNTIL 7 APRIL 2013
5 DECEMBER-30 APRIL 2013
www.wolfsonian.org
• Design at Fairchild:
Sitting Naturally
UNTIL 31 MAY 2013
• Chapungu: Custom and
Legend, a Culture in Stone
UNTIL 31 MAY 2013
Diana Lowenstein
Fine Arts
2043 North Miami Avenue,
Miami
• Loris Cecchini
Investigating the relationship between labour and its representation,
Esther Shalev-Gerz’s exhibition at the Wolfsonian is largely built
around a series of films the artist recorded of 24 people describing
various objects drawn mostly from the museum’s collection. The
paintings, photographs, prints and sculptures selected all depict
labourers, whom Shalev-Gerz argues have been largely absent from
artistic representation since 1945: “We know other faces—politicians,
celebrities, criminals, but not the worker, the one who makes.” The
show also includes new photography and text work by the artist.
(Above, Esther Shalev-Gerz, Grinding Metal Castings, 2012.) P.P.
5 DECEMBER-JANUARY 2013
www.dlfinearts.com
Dimensions Variable
100 NE 11th Street, Miami
• Odalis Valdivieso
www.fairchildgarden.org
UNTIL 5 JANUARY 2013
Frost Art Museum—
Florida International
University
Prints and Objects
UNTIL 28 APRIL 2013
Norton Museum of Art
The Triad
www.dimensionsvariable.net
UNTIL 13 JANUARY 2013
www.margulieswarehouse.com
1451 South Olive Avenue,
West Palm Beach
180 NE 39th Street,
Unit 222, Miami
Frederic Snitzer Gallery
10975 SW 17th Street, Miami
UNTIL 21 APRIL 2013
Miami Art Museum
• Sylvia Plimack Mangold
• Mark Messersmith:
Fragile Nature
www.lowemuseum.org
101 West Flagler Street, Miami
9 DECEMBER-3 MARCH 2013
• Sumakshi Singh:
Circumferences Reforming
• New Work Miami 2013
• Rob Wynne
7-14 DECEMBER
UNTIL 5 JANUARY 2013
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
Little Haiti Cultural Center
UNTIL 2 JUNE 2013
UNTIL 6 OCTOBER 2013
www.thetriad.org.uk
• 35th Anniversary Group Show
• Ivan Navarro: Fluorescent
Light Sculptures
212-260 NE 59th Terrace
www.miamiartmuseum.org
www.norton.org
Vizcaya Museum
and Gardens
www.snitzer.com
3251 South Miami
Avenue, Miami
Freedom Tower
• Art [email protected] Lowe
• Global Caribbean
UNTIL 27 JANUARY 2013
7 DECEMBER-16 FEBRUARY 2013
• To Beauty: a Tribute
to Mike Kelley
www.theglobalcaribbean.org
UNTIL 24 FEBRUARY 2013
Margulies Collection
at the Warehouse
• American Sculpture
in the Tropics
UNTIL 20 MAY 2013
Museum of Contemporary
Art (MOCA NoMi)
Rubell Family Collection
Joan Lehman Building, 770 NE
125th Street, North Miami
• Alone Together
95 NW 29th Street, Miami
• Lucas Arruda: Desert Model
UNTIL 5 JANUARY 2013
• Bill Viola (see above)
• Oscar Murillo: Work
• Josiah McElheny: the
Light Club of Vizcaya
591 NW 27th Street, Miami
5 DECEMBER-3 MARCH 2013
5 DECEMBER-AUGUST 2013
UNTIL 18 MARCH 2013
• Selections from the Collection
www.mocanomi.org
www.rfc.museum
www.vizcayamuseum.org
5 DECEMBER-2 AUGUST 2013
2247 NW 1st Place, Miami
600 Biscayne Boulevard,
Miami
• Foreverglades: Renzo Nucara,
Carlo Rizzel, Alex Angi, Marco
Veronese, William Sweetlove
thefrost.fiu.edu
Locust Projects
Events
3852 North Miami
Avenue, Miami
• Theaster Gates: Soul
Manufacturing Corporation
(see p20)
DON’T MISS:
W hotel and the Setai
Art Video Nights
Art Public Opening Night
5PM
Collins Park,
Miami Beach
The French artist duo Kolkoz is
staging a soccer tournament on
the beach on a pitch that looks
like the moon, with teams
including artists and collectors.
New World Center,
SoundScape Park,
500 17th Street, Miami Beach
UNTIL 21 DECEMBER
8.30PM-10PM
• Jacin Giordano: Wound,
Bound, Tied and Knotted
Head down to the Bass Museum
of Art for a night of public art
and performances by Jason
and Alicia Hall Moran, My
Barbarian and Alex Israel, with
local food trucks providing
snacks and drinks.
UNTIL 21 DECEMBER
• Nicole Eisenman: Intentions
UNTIL 31 DECEMBER
www.locustprojects.org
Lowe Art Museum
University of Miami, 1301
Stanford Drive, Coral Gables
• Christo and Jeanne-Claude:
Luna Park
My Barbarian will be part of Art Public’s opening night
Collins Park, between the
Güiro Art Bar
Oceanfront, between 21st and
22nd Streets, South Beach
5PM-2AM
End the night with drinks at the
Art Bar installation by Cuban
artist group Los Carpinteros.
8PM AND 9PM
A programme of video art on
two themes. “Love, Time &
Decorum” explores body language, behaviour and motion,
while “Music, Magic &
Melancholia” is inspired by the
music of Sigur Rós and Antony
and the Johnsons, and reflects
on the range of emotions that
music can provoke.
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
CALENDAR
KEY
Listings are arranged
alphabetically by category
• Exhibitions
• Commercial galleries
• Art fairs
Art Basel Miami Beach
and Kicco
UNTIL 26 JANUARY 2013
www.for-everglades.com
Galerie Helene Lamarque
125 NW 23rd Street, Miami
• Ohad Meromi: the Working Day
UNTIL 31 DECEMBER
www.galeriehelenelamarque.com
Gary Nader Fine Art
Harold Ancart; Galerie
Rodolphe Janssen: Justin
Lieberman; Kukje Gallery/Tina
Kim Gallery: Ghada Amer;
Galerie Eva Presenhuber:
Valentin Carron; Sorry We Are
Closed: Artist Jewellery; Venus
Over Manhattan: Betty
Tompkins; Chahan Gallery:
Ceramics by Peter Lane, Shizue
Imai, Antoinette Faragallah
62 NE 27th Street, Miami
5-9 DECEMBER
• Masterpieces from
the Berardo Collection
www.thembuilding.com
5 DECEMBER-MARCH 2013
Primary Projects
www.garynader.com
4141 NE Second Avenue,
Suite 104, Miami
JW Marriott Hotel
• Asif Farooq: Guns
1109 Brickell Avenue, Miami
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
• Martin Kreloff Retrospective
• Rebecca Raney: Raneytown
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
6 DECEMBER-26 JANUARY 2013
www.martinkreloff.com
www.primaryprojectspace.com
JW Marriott Marquis
Seven
225 Biscayne Boulevard
Way, Miami
2200 NW 2nd Ave, Miami
OHWOW
• Seven galleries team up to
present their own shows:
BravinLee Programs, Hales
Gallery, Pierogi Gallery,
Postmasters, P.P.O.W, Ronald
Feldman Fine Arts and
Winkleman Gallery
3841 NE 2nd Avenue, Miami
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
• It Ain’t Fair 2012
www.seven-miami.com
• Christie’s: Highlights from the
London Surrealist Auction
Miami fairs
Art Basel Miami Beach
Miami Beach Convention
Center, 1901 Convention
Center Drive
6-9 DECEMBER
www.miamibeach.artbasel.com
Miami’s art scene may be known
for its love of young talent but
this year’s Art Basel Miami Beach
(ABMB) is not immune to the fair
circuit’s increasing appreciation
of the past. While it may lack a
timeline as long as this year’s
inaugural London-based Frieze
Masters (11-14 October), the 11th
edition of ABMB promises strong
Modern material and
programmes exploring links
between generations. It also
welcomes a new selection of
Modern galleries into the fold.
Aqua Art Miami
Aqua Hotel, 1530
Collins Avenue
1850 Collins Avenue
6-9 DECEMBER
5-9 DECEMBER
www.aquaartmiami.com
www.inkartfair.com
Organised by a group of Seattle
dealers and held in the eponymous hotel, this contemporary
art fair focuses on emerging and
mid-career artists.
This compact fair has 15
exhibitors and focuses on
contemporary works on paper.
2930 NW 7th Ave, Miami
Art Asia Miami
M Building
• Closer
194 NW 30th Street, Miami
UNTIL 5 JANUARY
36th Street and North
Miami Avenue
Intercontinental Hotel
Dock next to Bayfront Park,
100 Chopin Plaza
• Gallery shows. Clearing:
www.spinelloprojects.com
5-7 DECEMBER
www.christies.com
6-9 DECEMBER
www.oh-wow.com
Spinello Projects
International Contemporary
Jewelry Fair
5-9 DECEMBER
5-9 DECEMBER
www.artasiafair.com
www.expoships.com
This small fair has a new venue
for its fifth edition and will have a
section devoted to contemporary art from South Asia.
The inaugural edition of the
jewellery design fair takes place
at the same mega-yacht venue
used for the Art Greenwich and
Art Sarasota fairs. More than
25 international exhibitors are
taking part.
Art Miami
3101 NE 1st Avenue
5-9 DECEMBER
Hot artist: Theaster Gates
“Soul Manufacturing Corporation” at Locust Projects, Miami
UNTIL 21 DECEMBER
www.art-miami.com
JustMad Mia
The largest satellite fair in Miami,
which now reaches its 23rd edition, is expanding. The contemporary art fair adds a new section, Context Art Miami, which
takes place in a 45,000 sq. ft
pavilion opposite the main fair. It
will feature more than 65 galleries
representing emerging and midcareer artists, while Art Miami
focuses on Modern and contemporary art with 125 galleries.
Soho Studios,
Wynwood Convention Center,
2136 NW First Avenue
www.locustprojects.org
What’s the hype? The socially conscious artist has experienced a
meteoric rise since he was included in the Whitney Biennial in 2010.
This year he had a major project at Documenta in Kassel, won the first
ever Vera List Prize awarded by New York’s New School to artists that
promote social justice, and was named a United States Artists fellow.
Where to see him: For his show at Locust Projects, Gates has gone
back to his pottery roots and created a mini-factory where “skilled
makers” will be producing objects on site. Like most of his work, the
installation will look at the issues of craft, labour and race. He has also
planned a programme of events for the space, including yoga lessons,
live DJs and bilingual readings. H.S.
6-9 DECEMBER
www.justmadmia.com
Organised by the team behind
MadridFoto, this is the first edition of the fair. It will focus on
emerging art and is due to
include 40 galleries.
Nada Art Fair
tional participants there will be
no sculpture park this year.
Scope Miami
Miami River Art Fair
110 NE 36 Street
and Midtown Boulevard
James L. Knight International
Center, 400 SE Second Avenue
www.scope-art.com
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
miamiriverartfair.com
Set in downtown Miami, this
contemporary art fair is due to
include more than 42 booth
exhibitors and a riverside
sculpture walk.
5-9 DECEMBER
A new venue for the 12th edition
of this contemporary art fair.
Eighty-five international
galleries are due to take part, in
addition to a section focusing
on around 15 younger galleries.
Sculpt Miami
Pool Art Fair
Sky House Marquis,
1100 Biscayne Blvd
46 NW 36th Street
and 3011 NE First Avenue
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
7-9 DECEMBER
www.sculptmiami.com
www.poolartfair.com
A contemporary sculpture fair
that hosts 26 solo projects.
This fair aims to create a meeting
place for unrepresented artists
and professionals.
Select Fair
Pulse Miami
Catalonia Hotel and Beach
Club, 1732 Collins Avenue
The Ice Palace,
1400 North Miami Avenue
www.select-fair.com
6-9 DECEMBER
www.pulse-art.com
Set in the Ice Palace Film Studio,
this contemporary fair now
presents its eighth edition with
its loyal group of exhibitors.
There will be 86 galleries, more
than half of them from the US.
6-9 DECEMBER
Located close to Art Basel Miami
Beach, this contemporary art
fair will feature 64 exhibitors.
Admission is free and a
separate section is devoted to
contemporary prints.
Untitled
Design Miami
Deauville Beach Resort,
6701 Collins Avenue
Meridian Avenue, 19th Street
6-9 DECEMBER
Overture
5-9 DECEMBER
5-9 DECEMBER
www.newartdealers.org
www.art-untitled.com
www.designmiami.com
More than 100 exhibitors are
expected to take part in the
tenth edition of the gallery-led
fair run by a not-for-profit organisation. This well established
satellite, which takes place in the
ballrooms of the Deauville, has
been feeling the pressure of late,
not least from the new kid on the
beach, Untitled.
NW 34th Street
and Buena Vista Avenue
The eighth edition of Design
Miami, sited next to ABMB for
the third year running, includes
25% more galleries (bringing the
total to 29) with a greater focus
on American design.
Fountain Miami
2505 North Miami Avenue
6-9 DECEMBER
Ocean Drive and 13th Street
5-9 DECEMBER
www.overturemiami.com
This contemporary fair is organised by the non-profit organisation Arts for a Better World, and
includes a selling exhibition of
100 works by Andy Warhol.
Miami Project
3011 NE First Avenue
at NE 31st Street
Thirty-five galleries are due to
take part in the seventh edition
of the contemporary art fair.
NE First Avenue, NE 30th Street
5-9 DECEMBER
UNTIL 9 DECEMBER
www.reddotfair.com
www.miami-project.com
More than 80 galleries are due
to take part in the sixth edition
of this fair, up from 51 last year.
To make space for the addi-
Suites of Dorchester Hotel,
This is the inaugural edition of
the contemporary and modern
art fair, organised by artMRKT,
The organisers of this new
satellite fair asked the New
York-based curator Omar
Lopez-Chahoud to select the
45 participating galleries,
rather than use a selection
panel. The fair will be in a tent
designed by John Keenan of
K/R Architects.
Red Dot Miami
www.fountainartfair.com
Ink Miami Art Fair
Gates’s “Soul Manufacturing Corporation”: a mini-factory
the company that also runs fairs
in Houston, San Francisco and
the Hamptons. Around 65 galleries are expected to take part.
Verge Art Miami Beach
Essex House and Clevelander
Hotels, 1001 Collins Avenue
and 1020 Ocean Drive
7-9 DECEMBER
www.vergeartfair.com
A contemporary fair that focuses
on emerging art.
GATES: LLOYD DEGRANE, UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO MAGAZINE, AND WORLD RED EYE
20
Absolut Art Bureau is a unit of The Absolut Company AB
AN ART BAR INSTALLATION BY
LOS CARPINTEROS
Open December 5–8
At Oceanfront, Miami Beach
Wednesday–Saturday, 5pm–Midnight
—
Absolut Art Bureau is Associate Sponsor of Art Basel
and Presenting Partner of Art Basel Conversations
—
www.absolutartbureau.com
Rendering of Güiro (2012), an art
bar installation by Los Carpinteros
in collaboration with Absolut Art
Bureau © Los Carpinteros/Courtesy
Sean Kelly Gallery
ENJOY WITH ABSOLUT RESPONSIBILITY®.
ABSOLUT® VODKA. PRODUCT OF SWEDEN. 40% ALC./VOL. DISTILLED FROM GRAIN. ©2012 IMPORTED BY ABSOLUT SPIRITS CO., NEW YORK, NY
AB Gallery
Gagosian Gallery
Hauser & Wirth
October Gallery
Agial Art Gallery
Galerie Brigitte Schenk
Horrach Moya
Ota Fine Arts
Art Sawa
Galerie El Marsa
Hunar Gallery
Paul Stolper Gallery
ARTSPACE
Galerie Enrico Navarra
kamel mennour
SFEIR-SEMLER
Atassi Gallery
Galerie GP & N Vallois
Kerlin Gallery
Simon Lee Gallery
Athr Gallery
Galerie Janine Rubeiz
Kukje Gallery / Tina Kim Gallery
The Breeder
Ayyam Gallery
Galerie Jérôme de Noirmont
Lam Art Gallery
The Park Gallery
Bait Muzna Gallery
Galerie Kashya Hildebrand
Leehwaik Gallery
The Third Line
CDA Projects Gallery
Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac
Leila Heller Gallery
Tina Keng Gallery
Edward Tyler Nahem Fine Art, L.L.C.
Galleria Continua
Lisson Gallery
Waterhouse & Dodd
EOA. Projects
Hanart TZ Gallery
Meem Gallery
22
THE ART NEWSPAPER ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION Wednesday 5 December 2012
DIARY
Art-worlders beware: a moral
dilemma is at hand. Roving the
environs of Art Basel Miami Beach
(ABMB) are the Chicago artist Allen
Vandever and his posse of helpers,
who, as part of his “Rescue and
Destroy” project, are placing the
fate of his work in the hands of
strangers. On being presented with
one of Vandever’s original collages,
fairgoers will have the option to
rescue and keep the piece by pledging a minimum donation of $10 or
to personally demolish it using
implements provided by the artist
and his pals. Whatever happens, it
will be a painful process for
Vandever, as the collages are apparently composed of precious personal ephemera that he describes
as “everything from high-school
sketchbooks to college photographs, paintings, drawings and
prints”. The artist’s less destructible oeuvre can be found at the
Verge art fair.
Down the aisle,
across the aisle
Andrew Kreps, whose eponymous
gallery is in New York, and Chiara
Repetto, a partner in the Milan
gallery Kaufmann Repetto, arrived
in Miami earlier than usual—not
to install complicated works of art,
but to get hitched. The couple tied
the knot on Saturday, and it was
apt that their nuptials took place
in Miami as they started dating at
the fair some years ago. And now
that they’ve walked down one
aisle, the two lovebird dealers can
blow kisses across another; for a
few years now, the organisers of
ABMB have placed their booths
directly opposite one another.
ART BASEL MIAMI BEACH DAILY EDITION
After the flood
The painting by Julian Hoeber in
Harris Lieberman’s booth has a
storm of a story behind it. When
Superstorm Sandy hit New York,
an exhibition of the artist’s work
was on view in the gallery. Hearing
of flooding, Hoeber, who was in
Los Angeles at the time, called the
gallery’s co-founder Michael
Lieberman in a panic. It turned out
his paintings were safe, but with
the crisis averted, he started to
ponder how they would have been
restored. “I’d seen a documentary
about the restoration of a Lucas
Cranach painting, where they
shaved off the wood support and
remounted the painted part on
linen,” he says. “I had a eureka
moment, thinking about having
paint removed from a support and
reattached in a fractured way.” He
painted on a piece of paper, balled
it up, sprayed it with water, kicked
it around his studio and then
attached it to a linen support. And
voilà—the painting is now at
ABMB. “It’s about controlling
destruction,” he says. “And orchestrating it a bit.”
Artoon by Pablo Helguera
Untitled antics
There was something for everyone at Untitled, the latest addition to the
constellation of satellite fairs clustering around Art Basel Miami Beach,
which occupies a shoreside tent on Ocean Drive. Striking a dramatic and
colour co-ordinated pose on the Y Gallery booth was the New Jersey real
estate broker and first-time Miami visitor Elaine Dweck (above), who,
when asked if she was looking for anything in particular, replied “a husband”. Over at (Art) Amalgamated, conversations of a more intense nature
were taking place, with the artist Paco Cao channelling the spirits of the
deceased celebrities Kurt Cobain, Whitney Houston, Michael Jackson and
Amy Winehouse to provide tarot readings for visitors. Whether this grim
quartet predicted a future spouse for Ms Dweck remains unknown.
Peter Anton—the fun
of the fair
The sensory-overloaded whirlwind
that is the art-fair experience has
reached new heights, with the
artist Peter Anton treating visitors
to the Art Miami fair in Wynwood
to a carnival ride that takes them
through a world devoted to
sensual imagery and sugary
treats. Sugar and Gomorrah
features not only piles of
cakes, but also nude models and plumes of flame.
This sugar-plum dream is
the artist’s most ambitious
creation to date. His giant sculptures of confectionery have earned
him the moniker “Candy Warhol”
and his works are collected by such
lovers of indulgence as the Rolling
Stones’ Keith Richards and the former US president Bill Clinton. But
with Anton aiming to stimulate
“cravings and passion”, the experience of his minute-long ride
requires a strong stomach.
Taco comes to Soho
Call it grit in the oyster or the
cuckoo in the nest, but Las Lucky’s
Taco Shop by the Californian artist
Kenton Parker is certainly an incongruous presence at Miami Beach’s
super-slick Soho House members’
club. This handy establishment
charges a mere dollar for dispensing such indispensable merchandise to late-night crowds as breath
mints, sodas and that most crucial
of hangover cures, the taco. Despite
the plethora of elaborate
gallery dinners
taking place
within this
bastion of Art
Basel cool, it
is guaranteed that
Las Lucky’s will not be
short of eager customers.
Tony Goldman tribute
Miami mourns Tony Goldman, the
property developer who was instrumental in transforming the city
from a retirement destination to an
art and celebrity magnet, and who
died of heart failure in September,
aged 68. Not only did he save
Miami’s decaying Art Deco gems,
he also invited street artists to use
his Wynwood buildings as canvases. How fitting, then, that
Wynwood Walls is opening a show
of lightbox paintings by artists who
were close to Goldman, while
Shepard Fairey has repainted his
mural to include a tribute to the
great man. The writing is indeed
upon the wall.
EDITORIAL AND PRODUCTION
(FAIR PAPERS):
Editors: Jane Morris, Javier Pes
Deputy editor: Helen Stoilas
Production editor: Ria Hopkinson
Copy editors: Anne-Marie Conway, James
Hobbs, Andrew McIlwraith, Iain Millar,
Emily Sharpe
Redesign art director: Vici MacDonald
Designer: Emma Goodman
Editorial researcher: Pac Pobric
Picture research: Katherine Hardy
Contributors: Georgina Adam, Louisa Buck,
Charlotte Burns, Sarah Douglas, Ben
Eastman, Melanie Gerlis, Gareth Harris,
Richard Hickman, Andrew Lambirth, Ben
Luke, Julia Michalska, Javier Pes, Richard
Pinsent, Riah Pryor, Ermanno Rivetti,
Cristina Ruiz, Toby Skeggs, Helen Stoilas,
Nicole Swengley, Christian Viveros-Fauné,
Ossian Ward
Photographer: Vanessa Ruiz
DIRECTORS AND PUBLISHING
Chief executive: Anna Somers Cocks
Managing director: James Knox
Associate publisher: Ben Tomlinson
Finance director: Alessandro Iobbi
Finance assistant: Melissa Wood
Marketing and subscriptions manager:
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Office administrator: Belinda Seppings
Head of sales (UK): Louise Hamlin
Commercial director (US): Caitlin Miller
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Ad production: Daniela Hathaway
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October 26 – December 15
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Destructible art
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GALERIA SUR
A RT B A S E L M I A M I B E AC H - B O OT H B .10
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Miami Design District
Tuesday December 4 — Sunday December 9
11am – 7pm
The dynamic destination for
design, art, luxury and culture
38th to 41st Streets between
NE 2nd Avenue and N Miami Avenue
Miami, FL 33137
Phone 305.722.7100
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Apt 606
Cartier
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Christian Louboutin
Dior Homme
En Avance
Hermès Editeur
Louis Vuitton
Maison Martin Margiela
Marni
Prada
Adamar Fine Arts: Glamour Reigns
– Warhol & Fendi Casa
Architecture For Dogs: A Kenya Hara Project
Craig Robins Collection
de la Cruz Collection Contemporary Art Space
Design Miami/ Designer of the Year 2012:
Acconci Studio
Inventory 03: Experience of a City
Inventory Projects: Luis Pons
Locust Projects
Luminaire Lab: Nendo & Piet Stockman
Mr. Andre: Love Graffitt
Muñoz & Company: Mestizo City
Ping Pong: Basel & Miami
Poltrona Frau & Le Corbusier: The Interior Of The Cabanon
Ray Azcuy: Inside/Out
ShopBAZAAR
StoreFront
Swampspace: 100 Years Of Artitude
Triad: Circumferences Reforming – Peel Till They Bloom
Until an empty space is transformed into a premier art show, co-directors Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler will not rest.
Until every detail receives the attention it deserves.
Co-directors Annette Schönholzer and Marc Spiegler
plan the Art Basel show in Miami Beach from start to finish
with one simple philosophy in mind:
Details matter. All of them.
We believe in this philosophy too, infusing it
into every commitment we make to our clients.
It’s why UBS is the proud main sponsor
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