Grade 03 Social Studies Unit 12 Exemplar Lesson 02

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Grade 03 Social Studies Unit 12 Exemplar Lesson 02
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 9 days
Grade 03 Social Studies Unit 12 Exemplar Lesson 02: How Can I Help?
This lesson is one approach to teaching the State Standards associated with this unit. Districts are encouraged to customize this lesson by supplementing
with district-approved resources, materials, and activities to best meet the needs of learners. The duration for this lesson is only a recommendation, and
districts may modify the time frame to meet students’ needs. To better understand how your district may be implementing CSCOPE lessons, please
contact your child’s teacher. (For your convenience, please find linked the TEA Commissioner’s List of State Board of Education Approved Instructional
Resources and Midcycle State Adopted Instructional Materials.)
Lesson Synopsis
This lesson develops student understanding of how good citizens acting alone or working together, can improve the community and help other people.
TEKS
The Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills (TEKS) listed below are the standards adopted by the State Board of Education, which are required by Texas
law. Any standard that has a strike-through (e.g. sample phrase) indicates that portion of the standard is taught in a previous or subsequent unit. The
TEKS are available on the Texas Education Agency website at http://www.tea.state.tx.us/index2.aspx?id=6148.
3.11
Citizenship. The student understands characteristics of good citizenship as exemplified by historical and contemporary
figures. The student is expected to:
3.11A Identify characteristics of good citizenship, including truthfulness, justice, equality, respect for oneself and others,
responsibility in daily life, and participation in government by educating oneself about the issues, respectfully
holding public officials to their word, and voting.
3.11C Identify and explain the importance of individual acts of civic responsibility, including obeying laws, serving the
community, serving on a jury, and voting.
3.12
Citizenship. The student understands the impact of individual and group decisions on communities in a constitutional
republic. The student is expected to:
3.12B Identify examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community.
Social Studies Skills TEKS
3.17
Social studies skills. The student applies critical-thinking skills to organize and use information acquired from a variety
of valid sources, including electronic technology. The student is expected to:
3.17E Interpret and create visuals, including graphs, charts, tables, timelines, illustrations, and maps.
3.18
Social studies skills. The student communicates in written, oral, and visual forms. The student is expected to:
3.18B Use technology to create written and visual material such as stories, poems, pictures, maps, and graphic organizers
to express ideas.
GETTING READY FOR INSTRUCTION
Performance Indicators
Grade 03 Social Studies Unit 12 PI 02
Draw a picture of yourself as a good citizen working (individually or with a group) to solve community problems in the future. Write a biopoem to explain what is being done and
why.
Standard(s): 3.11A , 3.11C , 3.12B , 3.17E , 3.18B
ELPS ELPS.c.5G
Key Understandings
Local ordinary people show good citizenship through performing acts of civic responsibility, believing in truth, justice, equality, and responsibility for
the common good, and acting in ways that exemplify those beliefs.
— What are the characteristics of good citizenship?
— What are the individual acts of civic responsibility, and why are they important?
— What are some examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the community?
— Can I interpret and create visuals?
— Can I use technology to create written and visual material and express ideas?
Vocabulary of Instruction
volunteer
Last Updated 05/09/13
Print Date 06/20/2013 Printed By Karen Johnson, MIDLAND ISD
community service
problem solving
page 1 of 18 Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 9 days
Materials
none
Attachments
All attachments associated with this lesson are referenced in the body of the lesson. Due to considerations for grading or student assessment,
attachments that are connected with Performance Indicators or serve as answer keys are available in the district site and are not accessible on the
public website.
Teacher Resource: 6 Characteristics of Good Citizenship KEY
Teacher Resource: Diane Scovell KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Camille Sproule KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Benjamin Banneker KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Zan Holmes KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Mary Wright Edelman KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Susan Hellums KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Jovita Idar KEY (optional)
Teacher Resource: Mayor Bob Josserand KEY (optional)
Handout: Learning Chart About Community Helpers
Teacher Resource: Individual Acts of Civic Responsibility KEY
Teacher Resource: Pattern for a Bio Poem KEY
Teacher Resource: Steps in the Problem Solving Process (optional)
Resources
Consider researching district-approved resources and websites for characteristics of citizenship.
Advance Preparation
1.
2.
3.
4.
5.
Become familiar with content and procedures for the lesson, including possible problems that might need solving in your own community.
Refer to the Instructional Focus Document for specific content to include in the lesson.
Select appropriate sections of the textbook and other classroom materials that support the learning for this lesson.
Preview materials and websites according to district guidelines.
Prepare materials and handouts as necessary including making technology available for each student (lab or laptops?)
Background Information
Individuals considered by many as good citizens have often acted to improve their local communities and sometimes those actions may help many others beyond their
communities. Historical figures like Benjamin Banneker and local leaders like Diane Scovell demonstrate many characteristics of good citizenship such as valuing equality and
having respect for others.
Local good citizens often organize resources and people within the community to help advance the lives of all. Good citizens have acted to improve health care, expand education
opportunities, overcome prejudice, and encourage others to action. President John F. Kennedy spoke of acting as a community helper and good citizen when he stated, "Ask not
what your country can do for you - ask what you can do for your country."
GETTING READY FOR INSTRUCTION
Teachers are encouraged to supplement and substitute resources, materials, and activities to meet the needs of learners. These lessons are one
approach to teaching the TEKS/Specificity as well as addressing the Performance Indicators associated with each unit. District personnel may create
original lessons using the Content Creator in the Tools Tab. All originally authored lessons can be saved in the “My CSCOPE” Tab within the “My
Content” area.
INSTRUCTIONAL PROCEDURES
Instructional Procedures
ENGAGE - Being a Good Citizen in the Community
Notes for Teacher
NOTE: 1 Day = 50 minutes
Suggested Day 1 – 50 minutes 1. Describe an imaginary scenario where someone has pledged to donate one million
dollars to the class. The person giving the money says the class can only have the one
million dollars if the class uses the money to do something good for the community and
the people who live here. (Remind the students this is not real, it is just pretend.)
Last Updated 05/09/13
Print Date 06/20/2013 Printed By Karen Johnson, MIDLAND ISD
TEKS: 3.12B; 3.17E
Instructional Note:
Refer to Unit 09, Lesson 03 Handout: Steps in Decision Making
Process for additional discussion.
page 2 of 18 Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 9 days
2. Ask students to imagine the gift of a million dollars, and then ask questions such as:
How would we find out what people in our community need? (research and
ask questions)
How would we make a decision about how spend the money? (make a list of
choices and vote on it)
What other questions do the students have?
3. In groups of four, students make a list of things the community might need. Possible
ideas:
A new playground
A swimming pool
A YMCA
Better garbage pick up
A community garden
After school care for children
A new medical clinic
A better (fill in the blank) _______________
4. Students share ideas and begin a class list of things to do that would help the
community. Refer to Unit 09, Lesson 03 Handout: Steps in Decision Making
Process for additional discussion.
EXPLORE – Oh, say can you see?
Suggested Day 2 – 50 minutes 1. Quickly review the characteristics of good citizenship from the Teacher Resource: 6
Characteristics of Good Citizenship KEY and post them as an anchor chart for this
lesson.
Attachments:
2. Facilitate a discussion on the differences strong and positive leaders make to
thousands of people in a community. Lead students to the conclusion that leaders take
the time and effort to work together to make positive changes when there is a problem
or a need in the community.
3. Reproduce 4 copies of the biographies included in Teacher Resources or develop
biographies of local community leaders and reproduce as needed. Reproduce Teacher
Resource: Learning Chart about Community Helpers, one per student. If not using
the provided biographies, a different chart with appropriate names will need to be
developed.
4. Place 4 copies of one person’s biography at each station.
Station 1: Diane Scovell or other local community leader
Station 2: Camille Sproule or other local community leader
Station 3: Benjamin Banneker or other local community leader
Station 4: Dr. Zan Holmes or other local community leader
Station 5: Marian Wright Edelman or other local community leader
Station 6: Susan Hellums or other local community leader
Station 7: Joveta Idar or other local community leader
Station 8: Mayor Bob Josserand or other local community leader
5. Divide the class into eight small groups.
6. For Day 1, students rotate through four stations reading the biographies at each
station and filling out the chart for those four people.
Teacher Resource: 6 Characteristics of Good
Citizenship KEY (anchor chart for class)
Teacher Resource: Diane Scovell KEY (4 copies to
be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Camille Sproule KEY (4 copies
to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Benjamin Banneker KEY (4
copies to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Dr. Zan Holmes KEY (4 copies
to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Marian Wright Edelman
KEY (4 copies to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Susan Hellums KEY (4 copies
to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Joveta Idar KEY (4 copies to
be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Mayor Bob Josserand KEY (4
copies to be placed in one center, optional)
Teacher Resource: Learning Chart About
Community Helpers (1 per student, optional)
TEKS: 3.11A; 3.12B; 3.17E
Instructional Note:
If developing biographies of local community members, a chart
similar to Teacher Resource: Learning Chart About Community
Helpers with appropriate names will need to be developed.
Depending on the strength of the groups, consider assigning roles.
One person is the reader; another person reads the questions; a
third person writes the answers, etc. to ensure that everyone in the
group is participating.
EXPLORE – Oh, say can you see?
Suggested Day 3 – 50 minutes 1. Students groups continue to rotate through the 4 stations not visited yesterday.
Attachments:
2. Distribute the Teacher Resource: Learning Chart About Community Helpers (1 per
student, optional) and have students fill out the chart with information for all eight
people.
3. Facilitate a whole group discussion about the characteristics that the groups
discovered while reading about the individuals.
Last Updated 05/09/13
Print Date 06/20/2013 Printed By Karen Johnson, MIDLAND ISD
Teacher Resource: Learning Chart About
Community Helpers (1 per student, optional)
TEKS: 3.11A; 3.12B
Instructional Note:
If developing biographies of local community members, a chart
similar to Teacher Resource: Learning Chart About Community
Helpers with appropriate names will need to be developed.
page 3 of 18 Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 9 days
EXPLAIN - Common Characteristics of Citizenship
Suggested Day 4 – 10 minutes 1. Using the completed charts as reference, students participate in a class discussion
expressing what they learned from the examples of the 8 community leaders and other
good leaders, especially referring to the characteristics of good citizenship anchor
chart.
Ask:
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B; 3.17E
What do the leaders have in common?
ELABORATE - Civic Responsibility
Suggested Day 4 (continued) – 15 minutes 1. Students recall other people (in addition to the 8 they just read about) that they know
Attachments:
who volunteer or do good things in the community, or they may remember other people
Teacher Resource: Individual Acts of Civic
studied throughout the year in social studies lessons.
Responsibility KEY (anchor chart for class)
2. Scribe student responses as they recall names and deeds.
3. Students read the Teacher Resource: Individual Acts of Civic Responsibility KEY
(anchor chart for class) and explain how it applies to the people studied.
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B
ELABORATE - Community Bio Poem
Suggested Day 4 (continued) – 25 minutes 1. Teacher demonstrates writing a Bio Poem using the Teacher Resource: Pattern for a
Bio Poem KEY.
Attachments:
2. Students write a Bio Poem about one community person they have studied.
3. Students make sure to use some of the terms from the list of good citizenship
characteristics.
Teacher Resource: Pattern for a Bio Poem KEY
(anchor chart for class)
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B; 3.17E; 3.18B
4. Students may use technology when creating the final copy of their bio poem.
EXPLORE - Improving the Community
Suggested Day 5 – 30 minutes 1. Thinking back to the community needs brainstormed at the beginning of the lesson,
students work in pairs to begin listing projects in their own community that would help
people who live there.
TEKS: 3.12B; 3.17E; 3.18B;
2. Students use district-approved resources to conduct an internet search on possible
community problems.
3. Students share lists in groups of 6, discussing and adding to the lists together.
Instructional Note:
This might be a good time for a community leader to
visit. Students could write questions to ask about
problems in the community. It is also a good time to
learn about city government.
EXPLAIN - Project Vote!
Suggested Day 5 – 20 minutes 1. Students come together as a class and create a list of possible community projects,
including problems that need solving.
TEKS: 3.12B; 3.17E
2. Place the list on a large chart and give each student an opportunity to vote for their top
3 choices. (Students can use sticky dots.)
3. Teacher counts and makes a new list of the top 5 ideas.
EXPLORE - Solving the Problem
Suggested Day 6 – 20 minutes 1. Using the Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process, students independently
brainstorm their own solution to one or two issues from the class list of community
problems.
Attachments:
Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process
(1 per student)
2. Individual students summarize their information to present to classmates.
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B; 3.17E; 3.18B
Instructional Note:
It is very important for the students to have an
opportunity to decide upon and plan a project as an
individual.
EXPLAIN - Community Solutions Part 1
Suggested Day 6 (continued) – 30 minutes 1. Students will listen carefully to one another as they meet in groups of four to share their TEKS: 3.11A; 3.11C; 3.12B
own personal ideas for solutions.
2. Students may ask questions of or add more details to each presentation.
EXPLORE - Community Solutions Part 2
Last Updated 05/09/13
Print Date 06/20/2013 Printed By Karen Johnson, MIDLAND ISD
Suggested Day 7 – 15 minutes page 4 of 18 Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12
Lesson: 02
Suggested Duration: 9 days
1. Students are placed in a new group to hear different problems, ideas, and solutions.
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B
2. Students may ask questions of or add more details to each presentation.
EXPLAIN - Planning a Local Solution
Suggested Day 7 (continued) – 35 minutes 1. After listening to a variety of community problems and solutions, each student chooses Attachments:
one they would like to work on themselves. This may be different from the one they first
Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process
selected, or they may have more information added to their original selection.
(1 per student)
2. If available, students may use technology to create a plan for getting volunteers to help
with the problem, drawing a chart and planning out the details needed to get the work
TEKS: 3.11A; 3.12B; 3.17E; 3.18B
accomplished. Students use the Handout: Steps in the Problem Solving Process.
3. Each student sets a goal for the project and predicts an outcome if the project is
completed.
4. Each student draws a picture of themselves doing the work to solve their community
problem.
5. Students choose one or two good citizenship characteristics that they believe apply to
them and record it on their picture.
EXPLAIN - Presenting Solutions
Suggested Day 8 – 30 minutes 1. Students present their projects, charts, and drawings in groups of 6. Each student will
have 5 minutes to present.
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B
ELABORATE - Predicting Outcomes
Suggested Day 8 (continued) – 20 minutes 1. Students write a prediction about what difference their project would make in the future
of the community. They should explain how their choices would affect the community.
TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C
2. Facilitate a discussion reflecting on the decision they were asked to make on the first
day of the lesson. Ask:
How would having the gift of 1 million dollars impact the decisions or actions taken in
the community?
How could the community work to make things happen without the money?
3. Continue the discussion by checking for mastery of Key Understandings by asking the
following guided questions:
What are the characteristics of good citizenship?
What are the individual acts of civic responsibility, and why are they important?
What are some examples of actions individuals and groups can take to improve the
community?
EVALUATE - Drawing Responsibility
Grade 03 Social Studies Unit 12 PI 02
Suggested Day 9 – 50 minutes TEKS: 3.11A, 3.11C; 3.12B; 3.17E; 3.18B
Draw a picture of yourself as a good citizen working (individually or with a group) to solve community
problems in the future. Write a biopoem to explain what is being done and why.
Standard(s): 3.11A , 3.11C , 3.12B , 3.17E , 3.18B
ELPS ELPS.c.5G
Last Updated 05/09/13
Print Date 06/20/2013 Printed By Karen Johnson, MIDLAND ISD
page 5 of 18 Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 01
6 Characteristic of Good Citizenship KEY
Truthfulness (honesty)
Justice (doing what is right)
Equality (being fair)
Respect for self and others (positive and fair)
Responsible (doing what is right, doing what you said you would do)
Participation in government (education on issues, talking or writing to elected
officials)
©2012, TESCCC
01/22/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Diane Scovell Loves History and Beautiful Trees KEY
What if your community recorded no history? What if your community had
no trees?
In the big city of Dallas, Texas, Diane Scovell made a difference by keeping both
the history and the environment as a focus for the whole community.
Diane realized it was important to preserve the history of a city, or it could be lost.
An important part of the history of Dallas was its beginning in the French
community of La Reunion. As new buildings were being built in the downtown
area, Mrs. Scovell made certain to preserve the history of the older buildings,
such as Union Station. Built very near the original site of La Reunion, Union
Station is an important part of the railroad history of Dallas. Diane made certain
that Union Station was carefully preserved in its original style, working with an
architect to study and research the historic building. Today people visit the
station to see it as it was in its grandest days.
Later, Diane worked with others in Dallas to secure funding and donations for the
Old Red Museum which is housed in the Old Red Courthouse downtown. People
can now experience the history of Dallas, including its wonderful mix of culture.
Diane and other community leaders also worked together to create Pioneer Park
in downtown where they placed sculptures of long horn cattle, symbolic of the
cattlemen who blazed trails for the new state of Texas. Preston Trail was an
important piece of the history of Dallas, Texas, and is now preserved thanks to
the city and donors to Pioneer Park.
Next, Diane thought of trees: She noticed that downtown Dallas had few trees.
Diane worked with other community leaders to combine two organizations that
both cared about parks and growing beautiful trees. Calling the new organization
“Tree Scapes”, the volunteers knew that tall green trees would bring beauty to
people in the downtown areas. It worked. Now downtown Dallas has many
beautiful green trees and parks to improve the quality of life for people who live
and work in the community.
Today when visiting downtown Dallas, you can see and learn the history as it
was. You can also enjoy rows and rows of beautiful, green plants and trees.
Thank you, Diane Scovell!
©2012, TESCCC
01/22/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Camille Sproule Knows Children Need a Safe Place to Play
KEY
What if your school had no playground equipment?
Camille Sproule teaches at a school on the east side of the state of Washington. She knew the
equipment at her school was old and outdated. Her school badly needed fun and safe playground
equipment. She also knew children need not only a safe place to play, but children also need to exercise,
and stretch to help their brains get ready to learn.
Mrs. Sproule involved all the students at her school in a special fundraiser to earn the money for new
play equipment. She organized teachers and parents to help. Next, she involved other people in the
community by educating them about the importance of providing good, safe playground equipment.
She recruited community volunteers to raise money and assist in assembling the equipment when it was
delivered. She spoke with the local Rotary Club, the Kiwanis Club, the Colville Confederated Tribe and
other groups to explain the importance of the project and to ask for help with the funding. Meanwhile,
the students were also explaining the project and raising money to help. They spoke to their neighbors
and other people in the community. Some even wrote letters to their grandparents, aunts and uncles in
other towns to get more support for the project.
Many of the clubs, the citizens, and the local businesses agreed that a safe playground for the children
was important, so they donated money to pay for the new, safe equipment. Some people could not
donate money, but they donated time. One business in a nearby town helped by matching the amount
of money already given, therefore doubling the money donated.
Children and adults together volunteered, raised the money, and even helped choose the final design.
Because everyone in the community worked together, today there is a safe and busy school play
structure used at recess by students. It is even used at other times by people in the community,families
who come to visit in the summer, and on week-ends.
Thank you, Camille Sproule!
©2012, TESCCC
01/22/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Benjamin Banneker
What if your community had no weather forecast? KEY
In February 1791 Benjamin Banneker (1731–1806), an American surveyor (one who maps out
new lands for development), was appointed to help Major Andrew Ellicott survey 10-square
miles of territory for a new U.S. capital city. Banneker worked in the field for several months as
Ellicott's scientific assistant, helping to decide on the starting point for the survey.
Benjamin Banneker loved astronomy, and he created almanacs based on his observations. The
almanacs were so popular that he sold them in several states. Almanacs help people know all
kinds of information about local weather and the seasons. In his day, there was no radio or
television for important weather information.
Mr. Banneker also loved the mechanics of how things work. He once built a clock completely
on his own. It is considered to be the first clock ever assembled in the United States. With the
information he learned, he started a new business in his community to fix clocks and watches.
Banneker was well-informed about issues during his day. He knew African American people
did not have equal rights in the United States. He wrote a letter to Thomas Jefferson asking
Mr. Jefferson for justice for enslaved African-American people. In the letter, Banneker stated
that enslaved African-American people should be given the same rights and opportunities as
free people. He also gave Mr. Jefferson one of his almanacs.
Benjamin Banneker Park is located in Baltimore County, Maryland. Banneker was honored as a
productive citizen of the community who educated himself about the issues and wrote an
almanac to help others with the weather.
Thank you, Mr. Banneker!
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/12
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Zan Holmes Worked Against Racism and For Equal Education
KEY
In 1956, Zan Holmes Jr. arrived in Dallas to study at Southern Methodist
University. He had been in Dallas one week, living in a one-room apartment in
South Dallas, when he heard a car crash nearby. He went to assist and saw an
ambulance and police cars already at the accident. An injured African-American
man was not being helped by the white officers. In the era of the 1950s, there
were separate ambulances for people of different races. The officers were
waiting for the black ambulance to carry the wounded man to the hospital. The
man died before the ambulance came. Years later Holmes spoke about this
event saying, "I could tell they (the officers) felt bad about it, but we were all
bound by the ugly system of racism. I was just as bound by the system as they
were, because they couldn't do anything—and I couldn't do anything either.” That
event led him on a lifelong fight against racism, the practice of– judging people
because of skin color.
There was so much work to do. Dr. Holmes sought to change the community. He
focused his efforts on the school system in Dallas. In the late 1960s, he was
appointed to a commission that helped desegregate the schools of Dallas. Dr.
Holmes said, “I think that ... when we work together, form coalitions, and have
our destinies tied together, that's when we make our best progress. I've always
been a student of education and been engaged in the struggle to have equality of
education."
He also served as a state representative for Texas, a pastor for a church in
Dallas, and on the Board of Regents for the University of Texas.
Dr. Holmes is a kind, caring leader whose influence expands across areas of the
community. The Dallas school district honored Dr. Holmes by naming a new
middle school in his honor.
Thank you, Dr. Zan Holmes, for caring about equality in education and for
helping to fight racism.
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Marian Wright Edelman
What if you were a very young child who needed help? KEY
Born in South Carolina in 1939 to a loving mother and father, Marian Wright
Edelman did very well in school and loved music. Her parents taught her a strong
sense of service to others by their words and deeds. Edelman wrote, "Service is
the rent we pay to be living. It is the very purpose of life and not something you
do in your spare time." Marian’s parents expected her to help out with chores at
the nearby Wright Home for the Aged. She recalled, "The only time my father
wouldn't give me chores was when I was reading, so I read a lot."
She began her career as a lawyer in New York, and then moved to Mississippi.
Her career changed direction after she became a lawyer for the Child
Development Group in Mississippi. There she helped to restore federal funding
for the Mississippi “Head Start” programs – these help kids learn to read. Right
then she began a life-long career focused on children's interests and rights.
Under her guidance, the Children's Defense Fund (CDF) was founded in 1973.
The CDF became a major advocating, researching, and lobbying organization
designed to seek aid for children. Marian Wright Edelman wanted programs to
help children remain healthy, stay in school, and improve their lives at home.
In 1992, Edelman and the CDF began its "Leave No Child Behind" campaign. On
June 1, 1996, Edelman and the CDF held their "Stand for Children" rally in
Washington, D.C. An estimated 200,000 supporters showed up to march in
support of children and the CDF's goals of raising money to help young children.
As founder, leader and key spokesperson for the CDF, Mrs. Edelman worked to
persuade the United States Congress to reform foster care, support adoption,
improve child care, and protect children who are disabled, homeless, abused or
neglected.
Her main interest today is still in feeding, clothing, housing, and educating as
many young American children, as soon as possible. What she learned from her
parents made her strong in all her efforts. She says, “If you don’t like the way the
world is, you have an obligation to change it. Just do it one step at a time.”
Thank you, Marian Wright Edelman, for serving others, and helping young
children!
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Marian Wright Edelman
What if you were a very young child who needed help? KEY
Born in South Carolina in 1939 to a loving mother and father, Marian Wright
Edelman did very well in school and loved music. Her parents taught her a strong
sense of service to others by their words and deeds. Edelman wrote, "Service is
the rent we pay to be living. It is the very purpose of life and not something you
do in your spare time." Marian’s parents expected her to help out with chores at
the nearby Wright Home for the Aged. She recalled, "The only time my father
wouldn't give me chores was when I was reading, so I read a lot."
She began her career as a lawyer in New York, and then moved to Mississippi.
Her career changed direction after she became a lawyer for the Child
Development Group in Mississippi. There she helped to restore federal funding
for the Mississippi “Head Start” programs – these help kids learn to read. Right
then she began a life-long career focused on children's interests and rights.
Under her guidance, the Children's Defense Fund (CDF) was founded in 1973.
The CDF became a major advocating, researching, and lobbying organization
designed to seek aid for children. Marian Wright Edelman wanted programs to
help children remain healthy, stay in school, and improve their lives at home.
In 1992, Edelman and the CDF began its "Leave No Child Behind" campaign. On
June 1, 1996, Edelman and the CDF held their "Stand for Children" rally in
Washington, D.C. An estimated 200,000 supporters showed up to march in
support of children and the CDF's goals of raising money to help young children.
As founder, leader and key spokesperson for the CDF, Mrs. Edelman worked to
persuade the United States Congress to reform foster care, support adoption,
improve child care, and protect children who are disabled, homeless, abused or
neglected.
Her main interest today is still in feeding, clothing, housing, and educating as
many young American children, as soon as possible. What she learned from her
parents made her strong in all her efforts. She says, “If you don’t like the way the
world is, you have an obligation to change it. Just do it one step at a time.”
Thank you, Marian Wright Edelman, for serving others, and helping young
children!
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
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Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Jovita Idar Believed in Equal Rights KEY
What if some people in your community were treated unfairly just because
of their race?
Miss Jovita Idar was one of eight children born in Laredo. Her parents were
writers and publishers of a small weekly newspaper called La Cronica. In 1903,
she earned a teaching degree in her hometown. After graduating, Miss Idar
began teaching school in Los Ojuelos, located approximately 40 miles east of
Laredo. There she found that the poor living conditions of the children in poverty
really bothered her. She felt that in her current position she could not help
improve the living conditions of the people who lived in that community. The
school could not even provide the teaching equipment she needed. Frustrated,
she resigned as a teacher to write for the family newspaper. As a writer she
could use her voice to explain the unfairness of poverty and race discrimination.
By 1910 civil war was occurring in Mexico. Mexican citizens and soldiers were
being wounded and there was not enough help. Much like Clara Barton during
the U.S. Civil War, Jovita and her friend Leonor Magnon traveled together to
Mexico to help care for the wounded. They worked with a group similar to the
Red Cross organization in the United States called the White Cross (La Cruz
Blanca)..
After her service during the Mexican Revolution, Jovita returned to her
community determined to find help with educating children of poverty. She
organized and became president of a social, political, and charitable
organization, the League of Mexican Women. The League provided free
education, food and clothing to Mexican children, as well as worked towards civil
rights, women’s rights, and a preservation of Mexican-American culture.
In 1917 she married Bartolo Juárez and moved to San Antonio, where she
established a free bilingual kindergarten for the community. As a volunteer, she
also interpreted for Spanish-speaking patients at the local county hospital.
Jovita Idar remained an active voice for reform and worked for civil rights in the
community all her life. She also helped with social justice by writing about the
poor living conditions of Mexican-American workers, the need for better
education, and the importance of equal rights for women.
Thank you, Jovita Idar!
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Mayor Bob Josserand Believes Everyone Can Help the Community
KEY
What if your community used all the water they had every single day?
That was happening in Bob Josserand’s community of Hereford, Texas in 1993. Every
day the water supply for the city was completely used up by the end of the day. Mr.
Josserand and his family live in the panhandle area of Texas, in that town of Hereford,
where good, clean water is scarce. Water pumps draw water from pipes drilled 300500 feet under the ground into the Ogallala Aquifer and store it in tanks before being
piped into each home or business that needs it.
As a highly successful cattleman, Mr. Josserand understands that all cattlemen need
water for their cattle. He also knows that farmers need water for crops. Perhaps even
more important, he understands that the people living in the community need safe,
clean drinking water. They also need water to fight fires if one should ever start. Using
up all the water each day is not a good situation.
Therefore, in 1993, Mr. Josserand campaigned for mayor of the town because he felt
he could help his community. He emphasized water needs and explained to people a
the need for a solution. Mr. Josserand was elected and has served for the last 20
years.
Right away, Mayor Josserand began meeting with people who live in the community.
He had small meetings and large meetings. After much research and discussion, the
community decided to dig new wells in a deeper aquifer, the Santa Rosa Aquifer, about
500 feet deeper than the Ogallala Aquifer. The city built new, larger storage tanks,
drilled wells, and the water problem for the community was solved. Today the
community has good, clean water safely stored for many days to come.
Mr. Josserand also made sure the community had beautiful new parks. One of the
parks, built entirely from community donations, includes a community center with a
large indoor and outdoor pool where people of all ages can swim and play. Other parks
serve as soccer fields and encourage healthy activity for families
Mayor Josserand also concentrates on working with leaders of the community to
attract new businesses to town while helping businesses that have already been in
Hereford for a long while. He reminds people that revenue and tax money from
businesses helps to pay for roads, schools, police and fire protection, as well as other
important city services. He made people aware that successful businesses help
everyone in the community. He believes in spending your money in your own
community first. Strong businesses are important to a healthy, happy community.
Mayor Bob Josserand works for clean water, clean air, beautiful surroundings, healthy
happy families and good strong businesses in his community.
Thank you, Mayor Josserand!
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Learning Chart About Community Helpers
After reading the story, fill out the information for the person you read about:
Who
Community Problems
Solutions
Diane Scovell
Camille
Sproule
Benjamin
Banneker
Dr. Zan
Holmes
Marian Wright
Edelman
Susan
Hellums
Joveta Idar
Mayor Bob
Josserand
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Individual Acts of Civic Responsibility KEY
Obeying laws
Serving the Community
Serving on a jury
Voting
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Pattern for a Bio Poem KEY
Line 1: First name only
Line 2: Four adjectives to describe person
Line 3: Friend of (people, animals or things)
Line 4: Who loves (three ideas, or people)
Line 5: Who feels (three other ideas)
Line 6: Who finds happiness in (As many as you want)
Line 7: Who fears (As many things as you want)
Line 8: Who helped the community…(two things)
Line 9: Who would like to see… (list three things that could happen)
Line 10: Who lives in (town, state, country)
Line 11: Last name only
©2012, TESCCC
01/11/13
page 1 of 1
Grade 3
Social Studies
Unit: 12 Lesson: 02
Steps in the Problem Solving Process
1.
Identify the
problem
©2012, TESCCC
2.
Gather
information
3.
List and
consider
options
4.
Consider
advantages
and
disadvantages
01/22/13
5.
Choose and
implement a
solution
6.
Evaluate the
effectiveness
of the
solutions.
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