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the PDF - Asbury Solomons
BRINGING YOU NEWS FROM ASBURY SOLOMONS: SEE PAGES 9-12
nticipate More
11100 Asbury Circle
Solomons, MD 20688
An Asbury publication dedicated to redefining the
Why settle
for just a pool?
Like most retirement communities, we have a pool. Unlike them, we also have a waterfront
location. So in addition to having fun at the pool, here you can stroll the shoreline, watch
the boats or even jump into a kayak and paddle away to the Chesapeake Bay. Add to that
a lifestyle filled with conveniences, financial and health care security, and a wonderful
variety of friends, and you’ll wonder…why settle for just a pool? If settling for less isn’t
your style, there’s no sense choosing any place other than Asbury Solomons.
Call 1-800-953-3300 or visit www.AsburySolomons.org for more information.
expectations of aging
Inspired – and
Inspiring Others
n
Getting Fit Without
Getting Up?
n
Tips for the
At-Home Caregiver
n
-12
11100 Asbury Circle • Solomons, Maryland 20688 • 1-800-953-3300
• Services and amenities to enrich the art of everyday living. • Waterfront location.
OM
S:
ON
SEE
AS
SOL
Y
R
BU
PA
9
GES
Greetings
from the Executive Director –
Andrew Applegate
Resources
Feature
5 Inspired and Inspiring Others
Asbury News
3 Asbury Living – A Resident’s View
W
elcome to Anticipate More. This publication will provide insights
into life at Asbury Solomons along with articles highlighting the
mission, vision and financial strength of the Asbury system of
which this community is proud to be a part. The Asbury brand of “Anticipate
More” stands for a commitment to thinking ahead, to creating confidence and
belief in the future, to creating exciting expectations for aging that can be met.
The Inspired Living article on page 5 features Asbury Solomons resident
Dave Winterle who continues to work at the age of 74, traveling all over
the United States to support disaster relief efforts. We hope you’ll try the
delicious recipe from one of Asbury’s executive chefs, our step-by-step seated
strengthening exercises and take a look at Asbury communities’ environmental
stewardship efforts, including Asbury Solomons’ ongoing oyster cultivation
project benefitting the Chesapeake Bay.
Turn to page 9 to get more information about life at Asbury Solomons,
including our new Value Pricing methodology for apartments and cottages,
which we launched in 2013.
Our hope is that as you turn these pages, you will also be inspired to
consider Asbury Solomons for the retirement life of your dreams. The
Calendar of Upcoming Events on page 10 provides you with several
opportunities to explore our beautiful waterfront community; or you may
call our toll-free number 800-953-3300 to schedule a personal tour with
one of the Residency Specialists.
Whether you attend an event or decide on a personal tour, now is the time
to explore Asbury Solomons in person! I look forward to meeting you!
4 Seeing Green
8 The New Silver Screen
1
3 Chef’s Table
13 Planetree Branches Out
| Asbury Home Services | www.AsburyHomeServices.org
Asbury Methodist Village at Home
serving Montgomery County, Md.
Amy Ostrolenk
301-216-4747
[email protected]
Asbury Solomons at Home
serving Calvert County, Md.
Linda Wooge
410-394-3556
[email protected]
Bethany Village at Home
serving Cumberland County, Pa.
Karen Bruner
717-591-8332
[email protected]
Inverness Village at Home
serving Tulsa, Okla.
Misty Lord
918-388-4475
[email protected]
Springhill at Home
serving Erie County, Pa.
Robin Sornberger-Otis
814-860-7424
[email protected]
1
4 Getting Fit Without Getting Up?
Q: What made you eager to become the founding director of
15 About Asbury
living in a retirement community, but can’t afford that
option.
Springhill at Home?
16 Real Estate Solutions
17 Music and Memory Loss
18 Introducing Asbury at Home
Asbury Solomons
9 Love the 2nd Time Around
1
0 Calendar of Upcoming Events
1
1 Meet an Asbury Associate
1
2 Value Pricing
AsburySolomons.org
Anticipate More is published semi-annually by Asbury for
those interested in Asbury’s services and for Asbury residents,
associates and partners.
Editor: Cathy Canning, Communications Manager
Design: FatCat Studios, fatcat-studios.com
Contributors: Cathy Ritter, V.P. Marketing and
Communications, Eric Anderson, Director of Communications,
Susan Tomasello, Communications Manager,
Ingrid Amos, Marketing Coordinator, Susan Crossley, and
Cathy Moxley
Comments or Feedback? Contact Cathy Canning, Editor, at
301-350-2103 or email, [email protected]
To view a digital issue of this magazine, go to
www.AsburySolomons.org, and click on the News &
Events tab.
A: One thing that really stands out is that our associates
We can create an individualized package of services as
well as do an in-home evaluation and get equipment
into the house that will help, like grab bars – or look
at reconfiguring the home’s current living spaces.
Isolation can become problematic as you age. We
provide transportation to appointments, shopping
and social events. Our services also include meal
preparation, laundry, housekeeping, reading with
someone, writing letters, or just chatting. Our Personal
Care Attendants can assist with bathing, hygiene, and
medication reminders. We can really make a difference
in a client’s day!
These are the very same services we are providing on
a daily basis to help residents remain independent in
their homes at Springhill.
and caregivers are here because they want to be. Many
of them have raised their families and have that caring
gene that they want to continue using.
Q: You started your career as a certified nursing assistant,
worked your way to becoming a registered nurse and
helped establish three home health and hospice agencies in
Erie. When did you know working with older adults was
your mission?
A: It truly stems back to a personal link. I grew up close to
my grandparents and built a home next door to them
as an adult raising my own family. They were very
independent and desired to remain in their own home
as long as possible. I helped care for them. When I left
acute care for long-term care, I saw that I could make
a difference in someone’s day every day just through
something like bringing a smile to their face. I knew
in my heart of hearts that I had a passion for working
with older adults.
Q: What do Asbury Home Services’ organizations offer that
Q: What are your most important pieces of advice for people
who prefer to age at home?
A: First, don’t think that you are giving up your
independence by allowing others to lessen your load.
Also, be open-minded about the support services
available and be willing to try them out. I have so many
stories of clients who are pleasantly surprised that
allowing us to help gives them more energy to enjoy
what they really like to do.
Most importantly, our services support the client’s
desire to age in place. We will provide continuity of
care and offer peace of mind to the client and family.
have made a real difference in people’s lives?
Follow us on:
A: We know that many people want to remain in their
On the Cover: Resident Mildred ‘Mudd’ Poole enjoys a stroll along the beach with her dog.
Asbury Solomons combines the beauty and relaxation of resort-style living with all the benefits of a Continuing Care Retirement Community. Located in Solomons,
Md., on the banks of the Patuxent River, Asbury Solomons provides a lifestyle of wellness for today’s active seniors complete with a secure plan for future healthcare
needs. Choose from a variety of independent living options, all with the assurance of assisted living and skilled care on site, if ever needed. In partnership with Asbury,
a national leader in retirement living, Asbury Solomons provides a unique environment for exceptional living.
Asbury Solomons | 11100 Asbury Circle
| Solomons, MD 20688
Marketing Office: 800-953-3300 or 410-394-3029
own house or where ever they call home. Sometimes
their house may not have the ideal set up for aging.
Perhaps they don’t have a good network for support
– or are straining the one they do have. Some people
could really benefit from the lively social interactions of
©2013 Asbury Communities, Inc.
2 | ASBU RY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E A SB U RY.ORG
A SB U RY.ORG A S BU RY A N T I C I PAT E M OR E | 19
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asbury living
PRICELESS LEGACY
PHOTO CREDIT: SUSAN TOMASELLO
I
Murray Schulman captures 25 memoirs
of his life in The First 80 Years.
Murray Schulman lives at Asbury
Methodist Village. He is a past member
of the Villa Residents Council and the
Marketing Partnership Advisory Committee
(PAC), Dean Emeritus of the resident-run
Keese School of Continuing Education and
currently Resident Co-Chair of the Future
Projects PAC and facilitator of the “Writing
Our Memoirs” class.
A SBURY. ORG ‘ve often wondered about my grandparents’ lives and
their immigration from the Russian Pale of Settlement in
the early 1890s. Two portraits of my maternal grandparents
around courtship age and a solitary picture of dad’s mother
when quite old are all I have. None support the proverbial “a
picture is worth a thousand words.” I want much more.
While my parents took many photos and shared
anecdotes of their own life, there are no written memories
for me to cherish and pass on. And I was no better prepared
until….
Mia and I came to Asbury Methodist Village in December
2006 for many of the same reasons others do: the lifestyle,
amenities and services for seniors living comfortably,
independently and securely while “aging in place” in a
continuing care retirement community.
I didn’t anticipate that in October 2007 I would register
for a Keese School course “Next in Line: Writing Your Life
Story.” The guest lecturer, Armiger “Jay” Jagoe, author of
You Are Next In Line, inspired a group of us to put our own
histories on paper. Our writing group has grown to nearly
30 residents motivated to pass on their own stories about
the road they’ve traveled. (A memoir-writing class is also under
way at Asbury Springhill in Erie, Pa.)
Memoirs are stories of your life and not a year-by-year chronological
account – which does seem daunting! They capture relevant experiences:
key turning points and milestones, significant mentors, lessons learned,
setbacks and successes, great adventures, humorous events, etc. New
insights often arise when recalling life’s moments and further details
come to mind after the first draft.
For your descendants, paying attention to your first 30 years is crucial,
since it’s a time when they barely knew us. Seeing into such a vastly
different time period can make even commonplace details fascinating.
Consider how much change has occurred since our grandparents’ time.
Wouldn’t we all love to have write-ups of their experiences?
I‘ve met the challenge by publishing The First 80 Years. It includes
25 memoirs and photographs. These days it’s possible to print a
dozen or so from Print On Demand companies at a modest cost. My
future generations will know me as far more than just a leaf on the
genealogical tree. Developing the legacy may be the most satisfying,
memorable and valuable accomplishment of my retirement years.
Could it be yours, too?
>> RESIDENT’S COLUMN
Snapshots of Our Lives Leave a
ASBURY ANTI CIPATE MORE | 3
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sustainable solutions
Seeing
GREEN
S
tewardship is a core value of Asbury and is
demonstrated by residents and staff alike through
projects aimed at conserving natural resources. Here
are just a few of the sustainability initiatives making the
Asbury system a better steward.
Asbury
In 2011, Asbury began testing the waters, literally, on
a program to better manage its laundry costs. Last year,
the program expanded to all five Asbury communities,
with the gallons of water saved surpassing the milliongallon mark. Asbury achieved these results through
its partnership with Sodexo, which provides facilities
management and dining services for all communities.
Asbury Methodist Village
Not every retirement community can set aside 17 acres
for the protection of wild animals. Asbury Methodist
Village is putting its good fortune to good use. Certified
as a Wildlife at Work site, the community recently earned
a second designation from the Wildlife Habitat Council:
Corporate Lands for Learning. This is due to the dedication
of the resident-run Wildlife Habitat team.
In 2012, the community also converted its campus to
LED outdoor lighting, which will reap an estimated $44,000
in annual savings and reduce its carbon footprint to boot.
Asbury Solomons
These residents prefer their oysters in the water, not
on the half shell. Oysters are vital to the Chesapeake
Bay’s health, but have been decimated by disease and
over-harvesting. Through the Go Green Committee’s
partnership with the Southern Maryland Oyster
Cultivation Society (SMOCS), Asbury Solomons:
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has turned its breakwater into a reef for more than
100,000 oysters from SMOCS sites,
nurtured more than 6,000 juvenile oysters – called spat
– in cages off its dock for three years,
4 | ASBU RY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E Asbury Methodist
Village’s 17-acre Wildlife
preserve – and the entire
campus – is awash with
cherry blossoms and
budding old-growth
trees each spring.
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purchased 10,000 additional spat
for direct transplantation onto the reef, and
has begun participating in a study testing the rate of
disease among its transplanted oysters.
Inverness Village
In 2012, Inverness Village recycled close to 111,868
pounds of recyclable materials each month, including
electronic devices. That’s approximately 56 tons of
waste that did not go to a landfill. Further, it uses
environmentally friendly cleaning products.
Springhill
Last fall, the community greatly reduced its water
runoff by installing an outdoor irrigation system that
utilizes storm water collected in the campus’s pond.
This will help local fishermen by cutting down on
runoff into a nearby stream. Big plans are also afoot for
2013, including adding a bird and butterfly-friendly
habitat near the pond and expanding the campus’s
LED lighting.
A SB U RY.ORG
PHOTO CREDIT: SUSAN TOMASELLO
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feature
Hal and Jan Garman relax poolside
at Asbury Methodist Village, where
their Beloved Community program
has hosted several pool parties for
local youth.
A
sk Jan Garman, a former teacher,
about the Beloved Community mentoring
program she helps drive, and she talks about the excitement of seeing growth, the
exposure to new points of view and radically different life stories – all very serious and
high-minded. But she quickly starts laughing and shares a story that shows just what a
kick she gets out of it, too.
“A couple of weeks ago, we were meeting with the kids in our mentoring group, and
they found out Hal [Jan’s husband is the project’s founder] and I were married,” Jan
recalls. “They asked me how long we’d been married, and I told them we’d been together
for 55 years. One of the girls looked at me, looked at Hal, and then asked, ‘Was he cute
when you married him?’ I thought, ‘Well, I still think he’s cute!’ They just come at things
from such a different perspective,” she chuckles.
A SBURY.ORG ASBURY ANTI CIPATE MORE | 5
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feature
Whether it’s volunteering within the retirement community
where they live or focusing their efforts outward, Asbury
residents are busy doing exactly what they want to be
doing – making good use of their time and talents.
“It’s not doing for someone else, it’s doing it with
someone else,” said Hal, explaining what made him
jump straight back into community service – after
spending 40 years as a minister and community activist – upon moving to Asbury Methodist Village. “I invest myself in the Beloved Community not for the joy
I derive, but because my inner self tells me that I am
doing the right thing. It does something for my spirit.”
That saying – in the spirit of John Wesley’s credo
to “Do all the good you can” – seems to be a driving
force for many of Hal and Jan’s contemporaries. Like
the Garmans, many are eager to spend this new chapter of their lives continuing to explore, grow and give.
And it’s certainly an attitude that permeates Asbury’s
five continuing care retirement communities. Plenty of
residents continue to work part- or full-time after moving to an Asbury campus, but for the many who don’t,
volunteering is a way of life.
Whether it’s volunteering within the retirement
community where they live or focusing their efforts
outward, Asbury residents are busy doing exactly what
they want to be doing – making good use of their time
and talents.
For David Winterle, that means working for the
Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), a
job he applied for in 1996 after careers in the military
and local government. Though Winterle is a part-time
employee, FEMA’s mission means that he may go
6 | ASBU RY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E months without working and then put in 12-hour days
when a disaster strikes.
Asked if he could offer an example of why this work
was meaningful to him, he began a story but had to
stop after a moment to regain his composure.
“One person that has always stood out was a retired
Navy individual, and the guy was having a hard time
getting registered,” David says. “His home was totally
flooded, and he was living in part of it with black mold
and everything. I can recall – just as I’m doing even
now – I recall having to pull over on the side of the
road driving home to start crying. But in the moment,
you’re dealing with people who are breaking down and
crying, and you’ve got to be the supportive one.”
David was in a Holiday Inn on the New Jersey shore
when he was interviewed for this article, fighting a
cough that had already sent him to urgent care multiple times. Asked if he thought he should slow down
and set a firm date for retirement, he had an answer
ready: “I’ve set my deadline. It’s when I can’t do it
anymore.”
For Hal, Jan, and the 30-some other residents who
take part in the Beloved Community Initiative, that
feeling is familiar.
Named after an idea of social justice espoused by
Martin Luther King, Jr., Asbury’s Beloved Community initiative was inspired by a lecture Hal and Jan
attended. Speaking on the toll that gun violence was
David Winterle
Asbury Solomons
taking on Washington, D.C., youth, the head of the Children’s Defense Fund outlined a volunteer project that
piqued Hal’s attention. “As we were driving home, I said
to Jan, I wished I could help, but it was too far away for
that kind of time commitment. She said, ‘Why don’t you
help the kids in Gaithersburg?’ ”
Hal reached out to Asbury Methodist Village’s Director of Pastoral Services, Dr. Martha Brown, who put
Hal in touch with the Wesley Theological Seminary and
other contacts. From this seed, the idea has sprouted in
myriad directions. The project has helped bring about
two after-school photography clinics and an art show, an
ongoing mentoring program with local elementary school
children, three parties for local high school kids in the
community’s pool, a conversational English class for local
Latino women with residents as partners and more.
For David, it’s not the money
that drove his decision to embark on a
third career of helping
others because there
are certainly easier
ways to earn a paycheck. His assignments
over the past few years read like a top-10 list of national
news: hurricanes, wildfire and floods.
Typically, David works about six months out of the
year and enjoys fishing at his Asbury Solomons home
during his off time. But after a few months, he notes, his
wife “will look at me and say, ‘Well, I think it’s time for
you to go again.’ This keeps my brain charged and makes
me feel good. I get antsy without it.”
Hal and Jan’s schedules are a bit less hectic than David’s, and that’s just fine with Hal as long as he is spending at least part of his time serving others.
A recent mentoring session began with several of the
mentors leading the 13 attendees in a round of song for
those celebrating their birthdays. Then, it was time to take
dinner orders – residents donate meal credits to provide
the students with dinner in the dining room – and begin
the group lesson before breaking into smaller sessions.
“To the outsider, the mentoring group may look easy,
but all of us come home dead-tired,” Hal says. “The kids
are full of energy. But we come back the next time ready
to meet the challenge all over again. [Working with these
children] drives home my privilege, and I wonder, ‘Why,
what makes me deserve this?’ It makes me feel humble
and like I need to be sharing what I can.”
ASBURY ANTI C IPATE MORE | 7
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web power
The New
SILVER SCREEN
P
erhaps you already know that older persons are embracing new technology
because you’re one of them. People 65-plus make up one of the fastest
growing markets for iPads and are flocking to social media sites like Facebook
and Pinterest. Here’s a look at one of our favorite financial blogs geared toward
older adults and five useful apps for your iPad or iPhone – compiled by The
Senior List, consumer review website, www.theseniorlist.com.
Encore – Part of The Wall Street Journal’s Market Watch website, this
blog features short articles on topics relating to retirement. Recent
topics have included how to find the best dividend stocks, an article
on longevity and Social Security and the tale of a 101-year-old British
marathon runner. blogs.marketwatch.com/encore
NPR or CNN – Both free apps give you access to live news,
shows and the ability to share them through social networking sites.
Pandora – This free app gives you access to scads of free music –
though if you want it ad-free, you have to pay – and to customize
your “stations” to play just what you like.
Magnifying Glass with Light – This free app turns your phone or
tablet into a magnifying glass, and even sheds a little light on the
subject. Forgot your reading glasses? No problem!
MedWatcher – Developed in collaboration with a branch of the FDA,
this free app sends safety alerts for drugs and medical devices. Users
can also report adverse side effects to the FDA through the app.
Don’t count yourself among the tech savvy?
CO
MPUTER NOV
I
CE
Type this address into the URL box at the top of your computer screen:
www.gcflearnfree.org/internet.
Operated by Goodwill Community
Foundation, this site offers free,
basic tutorials on everything from
how to read a web page and
use Google and email to more
complex tasks like creating your
own blog or Facebook page.
TH
E
8 | ASBU RY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E Wired at Asbury
On Asbury’s quest to find a
better way, technology often
provides answers. In 2012, our
Information Technology team
completed the conversion of
Asbury’s skilled nursing centers to
a system of electronic medical
records (EMRs) – winning a Silver
Award from McKnight’s LongTerm Care Technology Awards for
improving and reducing transitions
between skilled nursing and acute
care. Currently, Asbury is working
on a pilot project between one of
its communities and a large acutecare system that would make its
EHRs operable by caregivers from
both organizations.
Also in 2012, Asbury installed
a wireless emergency
alert and response system
for residents that improves
communities’ ability to monitor
and quickly react to falls and other
emergencies. By wearing a small
pendant, residents can travel
anywhere on campus, knowing a
press of the pendant’s button will
alert monitors around the campus
of their location and need for
assistance.
Currently the system, called
Situational Awareness and
Response Assistant (SARA), is in
place at Asbury Methodist Village,
Asbury Solomons, Bethany Village
and Inverness Village. Springhill
utilizes a different alert system.
A SB U RY.ORG
Asbury SOLOMONS
currents
L I F E S T YL E
Frank and Peggy Brooks
W
hen your courtship is
a whirlwind, it makes
sense that your wedding
would include one,
too. But it’s not every couple who
would go ahead with the big day in
the face of a hurricane. Yet Barbara
Wehrmann and Lowell Hinchliff said
that if the minister could be there,
they could, too, and were married
in Asbury Solomons’ community
room in August 2011 – the room’s
beautiful waterfront view blocked by
large, plywood sheets and the priest
dripping wet under his robe.
They are one of numerous
couples at Asbury Solomons who are
happily surprised to be enjoying love
a second time around.
Although few statistics track
exactly how many older adults are
finding love and even marriage in
retirement communities, it’s not
surprising that they are. A University
of Missouri study shows about
ASB URY SO L O MO NS . O R G 500,000 Americans age 65 and older
remarry each year.
AARP’s love and relationships
expert Pepper Schwartz, a University
of Washington sociologist, attributes
these love stories to longer life,
greater social acceptance and more
evidence of the health and emotional
benefits of a loving union.
Barbara and Lowell met at the
community’s gardens, where they
each had a section, and Hinchliff
says that it was love at first sight.
Barbara was a newcomer, having
moved to the community just six
months earlier. Like their wedding,
their courtship was a whirlwind.
They met in May and married
in August.
Frank and Peggy Brooks
also found love again at Asbury
Solomons, marrying in 1992. Frank,
92, moved to the community shortly
after it opened in 1997 with his
wife, who passed away several years
later. “I thought that was it. I was
satisfied,” he said. “My first wife was
quite wonderful. I was not interested
in getting married again.”
Peggy, 84, was living alone with
a big house and yard three years
after her husband’s death. Curiosity
brought her to Asbury for a visit after
driving by one day. “I didn’t even
know what a retirement community
was all about before then, but I
decided it was the place for me,”
she said. “I lived here for two years
before Frank and I started dating.
I always said I would never get
married again. Well, Sir Galahad took
my hand, and I changed my mind.
He was such a gentleman. That made
me love him even more.
“I was scared to death [about
starting another relationship],” Peggy
admits. “But the last 10 years of my
life have been absolutely wonderful.
We hold hands. It was one year, two
years and now 10!”
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Although few statistics track exactly how many older adults
are finding love and even marriage in retirement communities,
it’s not surprising that they are.
Asbury Solomons Currents
Love the Second
Time Around
ASBURY ANTICIPATE MORE | 9
Asbury SOLOMONS
currents
CO N TACT US
U P COM IN G E VENTS
Friday, April 5
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Asbury Solomons Currents
Meet the
Marketing Team
C
all 410-394-3029 or 800-953-3300 to schedule a personal tour of
Asbury Solomons, Southern Maryland’s only accredited waterfront
retirement community. You can reach us via email, too. We would love
to show you around! Or visit www.AsburySolomons.org and click on
Contact Us on the home page. Anticipate More out of life!
Dawnn Hahn, Residency Specialist
[email protected]
“I am fulfilled each day by developing and maintaining
rewarding relationships with our residents.”
Retirement
Living U. –
Retirement 201
– Healthcare
Services
Thursday, April 25
Apartment Parade of Homes Friday, May 3
Retirement Living U. –
Retirement 301 – Economic
Advantages
Discovery Luncheon
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Friday, May 10
Wednesday, July 17
Friday, August 2,
Wednesday, September 18
Taste of Asbury
Katie Crane, Residency Specialist
[email protected]
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“I find great satisfaction in serving the new and current
residents of Asbury Solomons.”
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Wednesday, May 15
Friday, July 12
Wednesday, August 21
Friday, September 6
Lunch & Learn
Friday, June 7
Friday, August 16
Friday, September 27
(Extreme Weather – Doug Hill)
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Ingrid Amos, Marketing Coordinator
[email protected]
“I am proud to be part of a team that is dedicated to making
people’s transition into retirement living the best experience
possible.”
Visit us on Facebook at www.facebook.com/asburysolomons
10 | AS B URY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E l
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Wednesday,
June 19
Summer
Celebration –
with Executive
Chef John Long
ASBURYSOLOMON S.ORG
PR O F I L E
Meet Associate
Kenny Bates
relationships with residents as the
top reason they love their job. How have residents inspired you or
made your job more enjoyable?
A: I’ve learned a vast amount. I even
got tips on how to ask a girl out!
They give me motivation to keep
pushing myself. A lot of them have
been through very tough times,
the Great Depression and World
War II. They know how tough
things can get and that you can
Q: How would you rate your colleagues
at Asbury Solomons in terms of
dedication and service?
A: They’re tremendous. They’re
very passionate people who truly
care for the residents and their
well-being and the Planetree
philosophy. It’s like an extended
family here.
Q: You’re on the community’s Planetree
Steering Committee. Resident wellbeing is Asbury’s first core value and
has always been a priority. How
much of a difference has it made?
A: It really freshens your perspective.
Early in our Planetree sessions, we
were asked how we would want
our grandparents to be treated if
they were here. That’s a simple
concept, but it’s not something
I thought about on a day-to-day
basis. Now I do. Asking residents
what they prefer and making sure
they have choices in how their day
unfolds; those goals are part of our
everyday thinking now.
Q: You began working at Asbury
Solomons as a volunteer during
high school. Has working at Asbury
Solomons inspired you to stay in and
move up in this field?
A: When I first began my
undergraduate degree, I planned
on getting my master’s in finance.
People ask me why that changed,
and I do think working here had
an impact. I felt like I could get
more fulfillment in life by giving
back to people as part of my dayto-day job. Just recently, one of our
residents passed and her family
came to us [in dining] and told
us how much she had enjoyed
a program where the chef does
cooking demonstrations with
simple dishes and residents pitch
in and help. They said, ‘Thank you
so much. She really loved this.’
We’re proud to see our caring and dedication recognized by U.S. News & World Report. Asbury Solomons’
Health Care Center was named a top nursing center in the country! To read why we received this
prestigious designation, visit www.AsburySolomons.org and click on the story posted on our home page.
A S B URY SO L O MON S.O R G Asbury Solomons Currents
Q: Asbury associates always rank
get through them, so I take their
advice to heart.
l
Kenny Bates works in dining with
residents of Asbury Solomons’
skilled nursing and is one of the
community’s Planetree facilitators. At
the core of Planetree is a philosophy
of collaboration and the belief that the
best care happens when providers work
closely with recipients to meet their
expectations and preferences. He is
working toward his master’s degree in
healthcare administration and hopes
to enter Asbury’s Administrator-inTraining program upon graduation.
ASBURY ANTI CI PATE MORE | 1 1
Asbury SOLOMONS
currents
COM M UN I T Y
2013 Entrance Fee Pricing News!
2 We are introducing a new pricing
methodology.
Why a new pricing methodology?
Under the old method, entrance
fees were determined by floor plan
and view. This method did not take
into account other factors that might
make a certain residence less or more
desirable than a residence of the same
floor plan.
Value, Better and Premium
The new method introduces
Value pricing on select apartments
l
Asbury Solomons Currents
1 Entrance fee pricing is not increasing from
the 2012 level.
12 | ASBURY AN T I CI PAT E M O R E and cottages that have
attributes – such as
location or view – that
make them slightly less
desirable than other
residences. Using this
method has resulted in
lower entrance fees on
several residences.
Premium pricing is
assigned to residences
with a river view and
reflects the 2012 river
view prices.
Better pricing is
applied to the remaining
residences that do not
fall into the Value or
Premium category and
reflects the 2012 nonriver view prices.
Because pricing is now
specific to each residence,
your Residency Specialist
will provide exact pricing on
available inventory only. The price
sheet that is distributed to those not
ready to join the community will
contain a range of pricing by floor
plan.
As always – your Residency
Specialist is available to answer any
questions about this new approach
and how it benefits you. We look
forward to you joining the Asbury
Solomons community!
ASBU RYSOLOMON S.ORG
l
chef’s table
From Asbury’s Kitchen to Yours
A
dd some zing to your dinner with this recipe from Asbury Chef Gary Hepler,
Director of Dining Services for Springhill.
“This is very good and very hard to mess up,” says Chef Gary. Serve with orange
zest-infused rice and a salad. Enjoy.
Peruvian Roasted Chicken
n SERVES: 2-4
n COOK: 45 minutes
MARINADE INGREDIENTS:
l
l
l
l
/3 cup soy sauce
1
2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
5 garlic cloves
2 teaspoons ground cumin
l
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1 teaspoon paprika
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1 tablespoon vegetable oil
1 whole chicken (about 3 ½ pounds), quartered
Accompaniment: lime wedges
PREPARATION:
FUN CHICKEN
FACTS
The average Am
er
more than 80 po ican eats
unds of
chicken each ye
ar.
It is against the
la
chicken with a w to eat
fork in
Gainesville, Geo
rgia, the
‘Chicken Capit
al of the World
.’
Blend soy sauce, lime juice, garlic, cumin, paprika, oregano, 1/2 teaspoon pepper, and oil in a blender. Put
chicken in a large sealable bag and add marinade. Seal bag and marinate in refrigerator, 8 to 24 hours – the
longer the better. Preheat oven to 425°F. Roast, basting occasionally with pan juices, until chicken is cooked
through and internal temperature is 165°F, about 45 minutes.
l
culture change
PLANETREE BRANCHES OUT
A
sbury’s partnership with Planetree, which began
in 2011, is putting down solid roots in each of its
communities, where Planetree Steering Committees
comprised of residents and associates are hard at work.
At the core of the Planetree philosophy is the belief that
the best care happens when providers collaborate with
recipients to meet their expectations and preferences.
Residents of Asbury healthcare neighborhoods and their
families are likely to notice the most significant changes –
and likely have already noticed differences in dining, daily
routines and other areas where choice and preference are
receiving more attention.
At Asbury Methodist Village’s Wilson Health Care
Center, a project adding 24-hour bistros with help-yourself
sandwiches, fruit and healthy snacks is almost complete.
A S BURY.O RG Several communities are working on creating smoother
transitions between residential and assisted living, while others
are looking at creating associate support and bereavement
services. Each community’s focus derives from surveys and
from Steering Committee recommendations, so none are the
same. But they all mean better service for residents.
For instance, a Bethany Village staff member recently
spearheaded the addition of a library service for residents
in MapleWood Assisted Living – particularly for those with
memory issues. Working with resident volunteers, she
created a program where book buddies survey interested
residents about the types of books they enjoy, bring
selections on a cart each week and then return to pick them
up. The bonus is a personal visit and chat – and a new
friendship.
ASBURY ANTI CI PATE MORE | 1 3
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keep moving
HOW TO GET
STRONGER
Without Getting Up
From Your Chair!
by Cathy Moxley
E
xercise programs, like people, come in all shapes and
sizes. And there are incredible benefits to be derived
from any and all types of exercise. One of the most
valuable types is strength training. What does that translate
to for older adults? Stronger muscles mean being able
Seated Chest Press
l
l
l
Wrap the exercise band
behind your back and
grip it on each side
under your arm pits.
to carry our own groceries, get out of a chair with ease,
and walk farther and faster. Stronger muscles help ward
off joint problems, decrease the risk of osteoporosis, and
improve posture and back pain. Give them a try!
Bicep Curl
l
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Press out in front of you
until your elbows are
almost straight.
Slowly return to starting
position and repeat.
l
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Seated Row
l
l
l
Sit upright close to the
edge of the chair with
legs extended a bit,
heels anchored to the
floor and knees bent.
Wrap the exercise
band around your feet,
crisscross the band and
then hold one end in
each hand.
Pull on the band,
squeezing your shoulder
blades together.
Slowly return to starting
position and repeat.
14 | AS B URY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E Sit with feet firmly
planted on the floor in
front of you.
Anchor the tubing
securely under your
feet and grip firmly with
each hand.
Keeping your elbows
by your side, curl your
palms up towards your
shoulders.
Slowly return to starting
position and repeat.
Triceps Extension
l
Grip the band with
both hands in front
of you, leaving
approximately 8-12
inches of band
between your hands.
l
l
Anchor one hand right
above the chest. With
the other arm, extend
the elbow until your
arm is straight out to
the side.
Slowly return to
starting position and
repeat.
A SB U RY.ORG
AB O UT AS B U RY
A few guidelines
A
:
Select a stur
dy
l
chair without w
heels.
If you experience
true pain, especi
ally in a joint,
stop immediately
.
Perform each ex
ercise slowly an
d smoothly.
Move through th
e full range of m
otion as long
as no pain is expe
rienced.
Breathe evenly
during the full ra
nge of motion.
Perform 8-12 re
petitions or unti
l you feel as thou
the muscles are
gh
fatigued.
l
sbury is an
organization providing
management for a system
of five continuing care
retirement communities
and life-enhancing
services for older adults.
l
l
l
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Asbury Methodist Village
Abdominal Crunch
l
Sit upright close to the
edge of the chair and
cross your arms over
your chest.
Asbury Solomons
Vision
Anticipate More:
Redefining the
expectations of aging
through our commitment
to quality, innovation,
performance excellence,
the delivery of lifeenhancing services and
compassionate care.
Mission
Doing all the good
we can:
by enriching the lives
of those we serve
by encouraging
continued growth
and learning
by embracing
individuality
by enabling personal
fulfillment and dignity
through the entire span
of life.
l
l
l
Slowly lean back until
your shoulder blades
barely touch the back of
the chair.
Hold for just a small
moment, then slowly
return to the starting
position and repeat.
l
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Bethany Village
Leg Press
l
l
l
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Inverness Village
l
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Slowly return to
starting position and
repeat. Switch to
the other leg when
finished.
PHOTOS BY: SUSAN TOMASELLO
A SBURY.O RG Core Values
Sitting upright, lift one
leg, wrap the band
around the bottom of
your shoe, and grip
firmly in each hand.
Press your foot out
until the knee is almost
straight.
l
l
Commitment to
residents, associates,
volunteers and
partners
Stewardship and
financial strength
Quality and innovation
Integrity
Asbury
Communities, Inc.
20030 Century Boulevard
Suite 300
Germantown, MD 20874
Springhill
301-250-2100
ASBURY ANTI
CI PATE MORE | 1 3
Asbury.org
l
foundation focus
REAL
ESTATE
SOLUTIONS
W
hen Tim and Judy Trissler moved into Bethany Village
in Mechanicsburg, Pa., they were still maintaining
their former home, which had been on the market for more
than a year. Just as they were dreading another winter of
caring for a house that was no longer home, the Asbury
Foundation presented them with an opportunity not only to
stop worrying about their home, but fund a charitable gift
annuity.
The outcome inspired a new way of giving at Asbury.
By donating a gift of real estate to Asbury, the donor can
receive income for life or a tax-free life insurance payout for
their heirs while benefiting Asbury’s benevolent care fund,
which provides assistance to residents who have outlived
their financial resources through no fault of their own. In
the Trisslers’ case, the annuity funded through their real
estate gift gave them an immediate income tax deduction
plus a monthly income. It also paid for a life insurance
Tim and Judy Trissler outside
their home at Bethany Village.
Tim and Judy Trissler,
policy that will paypictured
out the outside
value oftheir
the home they gifted –
home at Bethany Village.
tax-free – to their heirs.
As the Trisslers learned, gifting real estate can be a winwin solution. Qualified residents opting for a charitable
gift annuity can choose to receive a monthly, quarterly,
biannual or annual income. J.D. Shuman, CFRE, senior director of development for
the Asbury Foundation, learned of the benefits of this gift
vehicle after attending a conference of the Association for
Healthcare Philanthropy.
Tim Trissler loved the tax and financial benefits. “We
were fortunate that we did not need to sell our home
in order to fund the entrance fee,” Tim explains. “We
realized it really was a blessing for us to be able to support
benevolent care at Bethany and at the same time remove the
stress of selling our home in a down market and be able to
pass the value of our home on to our kids. God has blessed
us throughout our lives, and we need to pass on that
blessing to others.”
“It’s a detailed process, with a lot of variables,” says J.D.
“It doesn’t work for everyone, but when it works, it’s an
incredible benefit to everyone involved.”
What is the Asbury Foundation?
The Asbury Foundation is a not-for-profit affiliate of Asbury
with a mission of securing funding for benevolent care, community
outreach and new programs and services. Benevolent care provides assistance to residents who
have outlived their financial resources through no fault of their own. For information about the
Foundation, visit www.TheAsburyFoundation.org.
In 2012, more than $2.12 million in annual funds and unrestricted gifts were contributed to
help meet immediate benevolent care needs in Asbury communities, and more than $257,000
was pledged to endowment funds to support future needs.
»The Caring Classic Golf Tournament is an annual fundraiser held by the Foundation that is supported by
Asbury’s board members, associates and business partners.
16 | AS B URY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E A SB U RY.ORG
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the at-home caregiver
UNCHAINED MELODY ...
AND MEMORIES
Music Can Soothe Anxiety and Depression in People with Memory Loss
by Susan Crossley
F
>> TEC H NO LO GY N O VIC E
Village, we put all iPods on the song shuffle mode so the
or more than 100 years clinicians have known that
mind cannot anticipate the next song, and the order is
people who have lost the ability to speak can sing the
always new. For a meaningful gift, have family members
words they want to say. At The Oaks Skilled Nursing at
pick up an iTunes gift card at the grocery store – or a techBethany Village, we have partnered with a project called
savvy grandchild set up the iPod.
Music and Memory, which is researching how music
ITunes also has free downloads like classic radio shows,
can help people who are
podcasts of public radio productions, classic audio books,
experiencing memory losscooking shows and university courses. The playlist can
related issues like depression
easily expand.
and anxiety.
By replacing ear buds with headphones, anyone with a
If you know someone who is experiencing cognitive
hearing aid can listen to their music without the interference
declines or depression related to aging, this is a relatively
of traffic outside or the noise of the refrigerator.
easy and inexpensive type of therapy to introduce at
Through my work at Bethany Village, I understand
home. We have all experienced the flashback of memory
how the slow playing of chimes can calm the breathing
when we hear a song from our past. It generates within us
of someone experiencing anxiety and how music can
an emotion and picture from a time almost forgotten.
create a flood of memories and emotions that allows me to
With some $50 iPod Shuffles and comfy headphones,
learn more about an individual. Now, through Music and
we have reduced dependence on anti-anxiety medications,
Memory, I’m gaining a new understanding of the power
reduced pain and had a positive effect on depression
of music.
with some of the residents taking part in the program.
By diverting the mind with loved music, even old radio
Susan Crossley is Director of Recreation for The Oaks Skilled Nursing at
shows, the mind has a chance to relax and regroup, no
Bethany Village in Mechanicsburg, Pa. She has been with Asbury for six years
longer dwelling on negative thoughts.
and is a Certified Activity Director, a Certified Dementia Practitioner, Certified
Music and Memory (www.MusicandMemory.org)
Dietary Manager and a Remo-trained Healthrhythms Drum Circle Facilitator.
Her own playlist includes Samuel Barber’s “Adagio For Strings” and K.T.
supports the premise that a personalized music playlist
Tunstall’s “Suddenly I See.”
provides meaningful, positive activity for any individual.
Taking the time to find out what those
songs are is the key to having a
Setting Up and Loading Songs to an iPod or MP3 Device
successful playlist. It is not simply
If you’re a technology novice – and don’t have a grandchild handy – here’s a
enough to select the song God Bless
website that offers step-by-step videos on
America. If the one who sings it best
setting up an iPod and an iTunes account
for that individual is Kate Smith, give
and downloading songs from CDs onto
them Kate Smith. Download the Big
your iPod. Go to www.videojug.com and
Band sound of Woody Herman or Puff
click on the Technology & Cars box. You
the Magic Dragon that they sung to their
will see a directory on the left-hand side
children.
of the page with the heading iPods and
Picking the right music can provide
Music Players.
hours of enjoyment. At Bethany
A S BURY.O RG ASBURY ANTI CI PATE MORE | 1 7
l
asbury at home
An Inverness Village at Home
associate and client return
from a day of shopping.
Making a
World of Difference
ONE CLIENTat a Time
A
sbury’s newest service branch, Asbury Home Services, is officially open
for business. The in-home services that Asbury created to help thousands
of campus residents remain independent within their homes are now also
available to those living beyond our continuing care retirement communities.
Asbury hired a highly regarded expert to head this effort, Bill Pickhardt,
who created and managed home services for one of the largest systems in
the country. Since last fall, Pickhardt has been shaping this new service,
offering and recruiting directors to head the effort in each of the five service
areas. Anticipate More spoke with one of them, Robin Sornberger-Otis, R.N.,
of Springhill at Home, to get her take on why a little help can make all the
difference in the world.
18 | AS B URY AN T IC IPAT E M O R E Robin Sornberger-Otis, R.N.
A SB U RY.ORG
Greetings
from the Executive Director –
Andrew Applegate
Resources
Feature
5 Inspired and Inspiring Others
Asbury News
3 Asbury Living – A Resident’s View
W
elcome to Anticipate More. This publication will provide insights
into life at Asbury Solomons along with articles highlighting the
mission, vision and financial strength of the Asbury system of
which this community is proud to be a part. The Asbury brand of “Anticipate
More” stands for a commitment to thinking ahead, to creating confidence and
belief in the future, to creating exciting expectations for aging that can be met.
The Inspired Living article on page 5 features Asbury Solomons resident
Dave Winterle who continues to work at the age of 74, traveling all over
the United States to support disaster relief efforts. We hope you’ll try the
delicious recipe from one of Asbury’s executive chefs, our step-by-step seated
strengthening exercises and take a look at Asbury communities’ environmental
stewardship efforts, including Asbury Solomons’ ongoing oyster cultivation
project benefitting the Chesapeake Bay.
Turn to page 9 to get more information about life at Asbury Solomons,
including our new Value Pricing methodology for apartments and cottages,
which we launched in 2013.
Our hope is that as you turn these pages, you will also be inspired
to consider Asbury Solomons for the retirement life of your dreams.
The Calendar of Upcoming Events on page 10 provides you will several
opportunities to explore our beautiful waterfront community; or you may call
our toll-free number 800-953-3300 to schedule a personal tour with one of
the Residency Specialists.
Whether you attend an event or decide on a personal tour, now is the time
to explore Asbury Solomons in person! I look forward to meeting you!
4 Seeing Green
8 The New Silver Screen
1
3 Chef’s Table
13 Planetree Branches Out
| Asbury Home Services | www.AsburyHomeServices.org
Asbury Methodist Village at Home
serving Montgomery County, Md.
Amy Ostrolenk
301-216-4747
[email protected]
Asbury Solomons at Home
serving Calvert County, Md.
Linda Wooge
410-394-3556
[email protected]
Bethany Village at Home
serving Cumberland County, Pa.
Karen Bruner
717-591-8332
[email protected]
Inverness Village at Home
serving Tulsa, Okla.
Misty Lord
918-388-4475
[email protected]
Springhill at Home
serving Erie County, Pa.
Robin Sornberger-Otis
814-860-7424
[email protected]
1
4 Getting Fit Without Getting Up?
Q: What made you eager to become the founding director of
15 About Asbury
living in a retirement community, but can’t afford that
option.
Springhill at Home?
16 Real Estate Solutions
17 Music and Memory Loss
18 Introducing Asbury at Home
Asbury Solomons
9 Love the 2nd Time Around
1
0 Calendar of Upcoming Events
1
1 Meet an Asbury Associate
1
2 Value Pricing
AsburySolomons.org
Anticipate More is published semi-annually by Asbury for
those interested in Asbury’s services and for Asbury residents,
associates and partners.
Editor: Cathy Canning, Communications Manager
Design: FatCat Studios, fatcat-studios.com
Contributors: Cathy Ritter, V.P. Marketing and
Communications, Eric Anderson, Director of Communications,
Susan Tomasello, Communications Manager,
Ingrid Amos, Marketing Coordinator, Susan Crossley, and
Cathy Moxley
Comments or Feedback? Contact Cathy Canning, Editor, at
301-350-2103 or email, ccanning[email protected]
To view a digital issue of this magazine, go to
www.AsburySolomons.org, and click on the News &
Events tab.
A: One thing that really stands out is that our associates
We can create an individualized package of services as
well as do an in-home evaluation and get equipment
into the house that will help, like grab bars – or look
at reconfiguring the home’s current living spaces.
Isolation can become problematic as you age. We
provide transportation to appointments, shopping
and social events. Our services also include meal
preparation, laundry, housekeeping, reading with
someone, writing letters, or just chatting. Our Personal
Care Attendants can assist with bathing, hygiene, and
medication reminders. We can really make a difference
in a client’s day!
These are the very same services we are providing on
a daily basis to help residents remain independent in
their homes at Springhill.
and caregivers are here because they want to be. Many
of them have raised their families and have that caring
gene that they want to continue using.
Q: You started your career as a certified nursing assistant,
worked your way to becoming a registered nurse and
helped establish three home health and hospice agencies in
Erie. When did you know working with older adults was
your mission?
A: It truly stems back to a personal link. I grew up close to
my grandparents and built a home next door to them
as an adult raising my own family. They were very
independent and desired to remain in their own home
as long as possible. I helped care for them. When I left
acute care for long-term care, I saw that I could make
a difference in someone’s day every day just through
something like bringing a smile to their face. I knew
in my heart of hearts that I had a passion for working
with older adults.
Q: What do Asbury Home Services’ organizations offer that
Q: What are your most important pieces of advice for people
who prefer to age at home?
A: First, don’t think that you are giving up your
independence by allowing others to lessen your load.
Also, be open-minded about the support services
available and be willing to try them out. I have so many
stories of clients who are pleasantly surprised that
allowing us to help gives them more energy to enjoy
what they really like to do.
Most importantly, our services support the client’s
desire to age in place. We will provide continuity of
care and offer peace of mind to the client and family.
have made a real difference in people’s lives?
Follow us on:
A: We know that many people want to remain in their
On the Cover: Resident Mildred ‘Mudd’ Poole enjoys a stroll along the beach with her dog.
Asbury Solomons combines the beauty and relaxation of resort-style living with all the benefits of a Continuing Care Retirement Community. Located in Solomons,
Md., on the banks of the Patuxent River, Asbury Solomons provides a lifestyle of wellness for today’s active seniors complete with secure plan for future healthcare
needs. Choose from a variety of independent living options, all with the assurance of assisted living and skilled care on site, if ever needed. In partnership with Asbury,
a national leader in retirement living, Asbury Solomons provides a unique environment for exceptional living.
Asbury Solomons | 11100 Asbury Circle
| Solomons, MD 20688
Marketing Office: 800-953-3300 or 410-394-3029
own house or where ever they call home. Sometimes
their house may not have the ideal set up for aging.
Perhaps they don’t have a good network for support
– or are straining the one they do have. Some people
could really benefit from the lively social interactions of
©2013 Asbury Communities, Inc.
2 | A SBURY AN T IC I PAT E M O R E A SB U RY.ORG
A SB U RY.ORG A S BU RY A N T I C I PAT E M OR E | 19
BRINGING YOU NEWS FROM ASBURY SOLOMONS: SEE PAGES 9-12
nticipate More
11100 Asbury Circle
Solomons, MD 20688
An Asbury publication dedicated to redefining the
Why settle
for just a pool?
Like most retirement communities, we have a pool. Unlike them, we also have a waterfront
location. So in addition to having fun at the pool, here you can stroll the shoreline, watch
the boats or even jump into a kayak and paddle away to the Chesapeake Bay. Add to that
a lifestyle filled with conveniences, financial and health care security, and a wonderful
variety of friends, and you’ll wonder…why settle for just a pool? If settling for less isn’t
your style, there’s no sense choosing any place other than Asbury Solomons.
Call 1-800-953-3300 or visit www.AsburySolomons.org for more information.
expectations of aging
Inspired – and
Inspiring Others
n
Getting Fit Without
Getting Up?
n
Tips for the
At-Home Caregiver
n
-12
11100 Asbury Circle • Solomons, Maryland 20688 • 1-800-953-3300
• Services and amenities to enrich the art of everyday living. • Waterfront location.
OM
S:
ON
SEE
AS
SOL
Y
R
BU
PA
9
GES

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