Green - Sustainability at Wake Forest

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Green - Sustainability at Wake Forest
GREEN
GUIDE
A Deacon’s Guide
to Sustainable Living
This Green Guide was created by students, for
students, to let you know all about sustainable
living at Wake Forest University.
But what does that mean? Sustainability is commonly defined as meeting the
needs of the present without compromising the ability of future generations to
meet their own needs. It means integrating our thinking about environmental,
economic, and social well-being into every activity with which we are involved.
SUSTAINABILITY
INTERNSHIPS
Apply online at
sustainability.
wfu.edu
GO
GREEN!
If everyone in the world used as many resources as the
average American we would need 5 planet Earths!
We’ve prepared this guide because everyone is affected by the decisions each
of us makes every day. And whether this guide encourages you to change a few
light bulbs in your house or inspires you to join the sustainability movement at
Wake Forest, we want you to have the resources to get involved.
The problem is that we only have one. We must consume fewer
resources if future generations are to thrive. Try out some of the
ideas listed below to reduce your footprint on the Earth, and make
your life more sustainable. Every little action counts, so do your part.
This guide contains information that will be useful to you during your entire stay
at WFU, so check it out and keep it handy. Enjoy!
GREEN FUN
VOTE
- 2010 Office of Sustainability Interns
Join a student organization that promotes sustainable
practices and programs.
By voting, everyone can have
a say in the direction the city,
state, and country are headed,
and elected officials can be
held accountable for the decisions they make. Register to
vote in Forsyth County; visit the
county webpage (co.forsyth.
Get involved and invest in the Winston-Salem community.
Join SEAC, the Sustainability Listserv, and the WFU Sustainability
Facebook page to get info on green happenings around campus.
TABLE of
CONTENTS
PAGE 1-3
PAGE 4-6
PAGE 6-7
PAGE 8-9
PAGE 10-11
PAGE 12-13
PAGE 14
PAGE 15
PAGE 16
PAGE 17
PAGE 18-19
PAGE 20-23
PAGE 24
PAGE 25
Wake Forest Goes Green!
Highlights on Campus
Green Education
Reduce, Reuse, Recycle
Green Media
Green Dining
Green Market
Outdoor Activities
Unique Cultural Activities
Volunteer Resources
Get Involved
Green Transit
Green iPhone Apps
Green Study Abroad
Get off campus and take a trip to a local state park to enjoy nature.
Remember to carpool.
nc.us) or go to the post office.
CLEAN GREEN
impact
In the year since its
creation, nearly 250
people have joined
the WFU Sustainability
facebook group to
stay informed about
sustainability programs
across the university.
Join the movement!
Search WFU Sustainability on Facebook.
Many cleaning products have all sorts of chemicals in them that
are not only dangerous for humans but can also get into and pollute
the water system. However, there are alternatives. “Green” cleaning products are usually made from non-toxic and biodegradable
materials, and often come in recycled packaging. Read the label to
make sure that they are not made with toxic or petroleum-based
ingredients and/or look for the Green Seal label. Common brands
include 7th Generation, Nature’s Source and Simply Green.
GREEN EVENTS
COMPOST
You can compost
anything that was
ever a plant (no
meat or dairy).
Learn more about
composting at the
campus garden.
Hosting an event on campus with your new club or organization?
Plan your event with sustainability in mind using our new Event
Planning Guide. Check it out at sustainability.wfu.edu/resources
for tips on planning meetings on campus, finding responsibly
sourced materials, working with The Posh Plate for catering and
minimizing waste from your event.
1
GO GREEN!
impact
GREEN THRIFT
Try finding what you need from second-hand stores, consignment
shops, Craigslist.com, freecycle.org, or Facebook marketplace.
Chances are you can find what you’re looking for without going to
the store and paying full price. If you have to buy new, shop local!
Buying products from locally owned businesses helps support the
local economy and can also mean shorter transport distances for
your goods. See page 14 for great local stores.
EAT AND SHOP GREEN
Buy regionally produced food.
Buy groceries at farmer’s markets.
Grow your own food or help out in the Campus Garden.
Eat less meat.
Buy organic produce.
Bring reusable grocery bags while shopping.
Look for the green leaf signs at the Pit indicating local
and/or organic food.
GREEN
GRADUATION
PLEDGE
Wake Forest 2011
graduates will be
the first to sign a
green graduation
pledge. More information about the
pledge and how to
sign it will be available to you before
your graduation.
REDUCE WATER USE
RECYCLE
WASTE REDUCTION
Get a filter and reusable water
bottle so you can stop buying
bottled water – tap water is just
as clean as bottled water, and
a filter will make it taste great.
Make sure your bottle does not
contain Polyvinylchloride (PVC)
and Bisphenol A (BPA) - chemicals found in some plastics.
Use the recycling collection
bins for bottles, cans and paper.
Buy well made things that you
really need.
Get rid of your old cell
phones, cameras, iPods and
CDs in TechnoTrash bins,
located in ZSR Library, the
Benson Copy Center and
the Book Store.
Before throwing your stuff
away, see if there’s a way to
reuse it and double its lifetime.
Take shorter, cooler showers,
to save water and the energy
needed to heat the water.
Dispose of hazardous waste,
such as paints, batteries, and
motor oil at the 3RC EnviroStation. Look online for directions.
Turn off water when brushing
teeth and shaving.
See the table in this guide
for more information on waste
Only wash full loads of
laundry and dishes.
reduction and recycling on
campus.
2
GO GREEN!
The campus-wide shift
to CFLs resulted in a 7%
decrease in electricity
consumption from June
2007 even as electricity
prices have increased.
GREEN TRANSIT
Walk, bike, take a bus or
carpool. If you need a car for
personal use, reserve a Zipcar.
Combine trips and errands,
take it easy on the gas and
brake pedals, and go slower on
the highway (you will improve
your gas mileage).
Turn off your computer if you’re not going to be using it for one
hour or more. Don’t forget to turn off your printer, television, and
speakers when they aren’t in use. A power strip makes this easy:
plug all your electronics into one, and flip the switch when you
aren’t using them.
Buy compact fluorescent light bulbs – most of them are spiral
shaped. They last about 10 times longer than regular incandescent
bulbs and use 75% less energy.
Turn your lights off when you don’t need them.
During the day, try opening the blinds for natural light.
Look for the Energy Star label when you buy new electronics.
Keep your room thermostat set to 68 degrees in the winter and
78 degrees in the summer, and on nice days keep windows open to
naturally regulate the temperature.
Turn down the thermostat at night – pile on blankets and layers
instead of increasing the temperature – and turn off the heat completely when you’re out of your room or apartment.
Don’t idle your engine for more
than 10 seconds – it takes less
gas to turn it off and back on.
Air dry clothes when possible and only dry full loads, cleaning lint
out of the dryer beforehand to allow it to be more efficient.
Fly less often and purchase
carbon offsets if you have to fly.
Visit Live Neutral for information: liveneutral.com.
Keep your computer screen only as bright as needed to reduce
electricity usage.
Use desk lamps instead of overhead lamps when possible.
Disable screen savers that prevent your computer from hibernating.
SAVE PAPER
Every time you go to print, ask yourself if you really need to print.
Conserve paper and print double-sided.
Buy in bulk to reduce packaging materials and the fuel used
to transport it to the store.
Donate or sell used, but not
abused, clothes, furniture, and
belongings.
SAVE ELECTRICITY
Set your printer to automatic double-sided printing.
Recycle newspapers or read them online instead.
Bring your own
reusable mug to
Starbucks and
Campus Grounds
for a discount!
Use fewer paper towels by using hand and dish towels instead.
Buy products made from recycled content, look for the FSC certified
logo, and buy chlorine-free paper to cut down on pollution.
Buy reusable plates and cutlery rather than those made from
disposable paper and plastic.
3
impact
HIGHLIGHTS
ON CAMPUS
Each year, students
disposed of 7000
to-go boxes from
dining locations
on campus.
PRINTER
CARTRIDGE
REFILLS
The University
Book Store offers
the option of
refilling printer
ink cartridges.
ECOFONT
Download Ecofont Vera Sans
at ecofont.com and save up to
25% of your ink or toner
during printing!
THEME
HOUSING
The new Sustainability Theme
House on Polo Road will focus
on the importance of local agriculture. Located right next to the
Campus Garden, residents in the
house will help CROP tend the
garden and collect food waste
for compost for the garden.
4
We’ve been working hard here
at Wake Forest to implement
new sustainability programs on
campus. Take a look at what
we’ve been up to...
REUSABLE TO-GO CONTAINER
Starting in the spring 2010 semester, Wake Forest implemented a
change-over to reusable take out containers at the Pit and in the
Mag Room. The goal behind this program is to reduce the number
of Styrofoam to-go boxes used on campus. Each year, students
disposed of 7000 to-go boxes from dining locations on campus.
Diners can now grab food to go and then drop off dirty to-go
containers in convenient locations across campus, including the
Pit, Benson grab-n-go, the Magnolia Room, and the North campus
sundry. Cashiers will give each diner a tag that will allow the diner
to get a clean to-go box the next time he/she wants food to go.
No need to carry around dirty boxes or to have to wash them. The
used boxes will be washed and sanitized by dining staff alongside
the dishes in the Pit.
EARTH DAY
The Piedmont Earth Day Fair is held every year in Winston-Salem
and for the past two years it has been held on the Wake Forest
campus. It is sponsored by Piedmont Environmental Alliance and
hosted by Wake Forest University Office of Sustainability. 8,000
people attended the 2010 fair which featured more than 100 exhibitors and Teaching Tents that showed students and community
members how to reduce their impact on our planet. The event is
always free to the public and features entertainment for all ages.
The fair is a Zero Waste event: recycling and composting bins are
available, but no “trash cans.”
ZIPCAR
Car sharing came to Wake
Forest at the start of the spring
2010 semester, with the launch
of the Zipcar program. The
Zipcar car-sharing program offers 24-hour access to vehicles
when students, faculty, and
staff need them. Membership
in the university program
is open to licensed drivers
18 years or older. The low
hourly rate includes gas and
insurance. Faculty, staff, and
students of the Wake Forest
campus community can apply
for membership at any time
on the Zipcar website:
zipcar.com/wfu.
BOOK STORE REUSABLE
BAG PROGRAM
Starting in the fall of 2009, University Stores launched a new
program, in partnership with Office Depot and HP, called Recycle
and Rewards. Students are given new sturdy-handled re-usable
shopping bags to carry newly purchased books. Use the bag
during the semester for your on-campus shopping needs and
get a 10% discount at any of the three Deacon Shops – in Kitchin,
Reynolda Village, and Hanes Mall. Return the bag at the end of
the semester during the book buyback period and get $1.00 back.
Participate in the program every semester!
{SUSTAINABLE}STYLE WSNC
FASHION SHOW
In spring 2010, Wake Forest hosted a sustainable style runway show,
partnering with local eco-fashion designer Jenny Hwa of loyale. This
show featured Hwa’s line along with twelve other eco-designers to
show the importance of incorporating eco-friendly style into our
daily lives. Participating designers included loyale, Loomstate,
John Patrick Organic, Stewart+Brown, Bodkin, and Lara Miller.
OUR MAGNOLIA TREES
In 1956, the University moved from the original Wake Forest
campus to the current Winston-Salem campus. It is said that
our magnolia trees made the move from the old campus; they
remain as Heritage Trees on the “Mag Quad” today.
PRE-ORIENTATION PROGRAM
The first-ever sustainability pre-orientation program at Wake
Forest was launched before the start of the fall 2010 semester.
The theme for this year was sustainable food systems. The group
visited farms, worked in the campus garden, met local restaurateurs
who are including regional produce and proteins on their menus,
and partnered up with S.P.A.R.C. on a service project.
Winston-Salem Campus Est. 1956
5
HIGHLIGHTS ON CAMPUS
GREEN EDUCATION
impact
RECYCLEMANIA
Wake Forest had
the least waste
per person of any
school in the ACC
In the spring of 2010, Wake Forest participated in RecycleMania,
a 10-week nation-wide competition between colleges and
universities to reduce waste and recycle more. Wake Forest’s goals
this year were to reduce the amount of municipal solid waste
produced and to increase the amount of recyclables collected per
person on campus. Among ACC schools, we generated the least
amount of waste per person. Help Wake Forest advance in the
rankings by recycling more, reducing your waste, and increasing
awareness on campus about the importance of these two actions.
Economics
History
241 Natural Resource
Economics
351 Global Environmental History
Education
271 Geography: The Human
Environment
English
302 Literature and Ecology
SOUTH RESIDENCE HALL
The first building on campus
designed to meet LEED
standards for environmentally
sound design, South Residence
Hall has been designed to
flawlessly integrate into the
university’s current architecture
without sacrificing sustainability.
Several unique features stand
out: Flat screen monitors will be
located next to the elevator on
each floor. These digital “dashboards” will display information
about water and energy consumption for the building, each
floor, and even each hall so
that students can monitor their
energy and water use. Other
features of the hall include lowflow toilets and shower heads
as well as covered bicycle racks
to promote cycling on campus.
Additionally, storm water will
be filtered on site through a
man-made bio-cell retention
pond to remove contaminants
from rooftops and parking lots.
Water for showers and other
needs in the building is heated
by the sun in solar hot water
heaters mounted on the roof.
Environmental
Studies
201 Environmental Issues
One of the advantages of going to a liberal arts university is the
ability to take courses offered by any department. Take advantage
of your education and learn more about sustainability while doing
so. Sign up for a course that has a sustainability theme or pick up
a minor in Environmental Science or Studies, two exciting interdisciplinary minors geared at “developing the attitudes and values
consistent with a sustainable environmental future.” Listed are a
few courses that our interns have taken and have really enjoyed.
The following courses are required
for the environmental science minor:
Humanities
ENV201
Environmental Issues
365 Humanity and Nature
International Studies
260 Seminar on Global Trade
and Commerce Studies
163 Environmental Ethics
335 Renewable Energy
Entrepreneurship: Science,
Policy and Economics
375 Theological Perspectives
on Ecology
First Year Seminar
Religion
Sociology
155 Public Culture in America
363 Global Capitalism
CHM/PHY 120
Physics and Chemistry
of the Environment
ECN 241
Natural Resource Economics
(ECN 150 Prerequisite)
Interdisciplinary Minor
in Environmental
Studies
Philosophy
Entrepreneurship &
Social Enterprises
100 Seeking Sustainable
Energy Sources
GREEN
EDUCATION
353 History of Nature
Conservation in
Latin America
Interdisciplinary Minor
in Environmental
Science
The following courses are required
for the environmental studies minor:
ENV 201
Environmental Issues
ANT 339
Culture and Nature
ECN 241, 3 hrs
Natural Resource Economics
(ECN 150 prerequisite)
100 The Dirt on Development
Anthropology
339 Culture and Nature
Biology
113 Evolutionary and
Ecological Biology
Health & Exercise
Science
351 Nutrition in Health
and Disease
THE ZSR LIBRARY
Opened in 1956, the Z. Smith Reynolds
Library circulates over 100,000 publications
annually. The ZSR staff was and remains on
the forefront of sustainability; they were the
first to develop a Green Team on campus.
329 Tropical Biodiversity
(Summer Course)
350 Conservation Biology
377 Community Ecology
Chemistry &
Physics
120 Physics and Chemistry
of the Environment
6
7
REDUCE, REUSE,
RECYCLE
Types of Bins
on Campus
Use your to-go box whenever
you take food from the Pit. Return it for washing, get your tag,
and get a clean one next time.
Collect your recycling deskside and carry it to the bins in
your hall for sorting. Make sure
you put paper in one bin and
cans and bottles in the other
bin. If trash goes into either
of these, the whole bin will be
“contaminated.”
impact
You can take your personal bin
with you when you leave, or you
can leave it behind at move-out.
8
Move-out waste reduction campaigns kept
4.4 tons of waste out
of the landfill in 2010
What to Trash or
Take Away
Cans and Bottles Bins
Plastic marked #1 or #2
Plastic bottles with necks
e.g. water bottles, shampoo
bottles, milk jugs, or laundry
detergent bottles
Aluminum cans
Unbroken glass containers
Grocery bags – recycle these
at a local grocery store
Solo cups (unless they’re
marked #1 or #2)
Plastic marked #5 (like yogurt,
butter, or other plastic containers) – bring them to Whole
Foods and drop in the preserve
gimme 5 recycling bin by the exit
Comingled Paper Bins
Newspapers
Magazines
Junk mail
Printer paper
Notebook paper
Cardboard boxes
Cereal and shoe boxes
Soft cover books
Phone books
Egg cartons (with no
egg residue)
Paper towels and napkins
Tissues
Pizza boxes that are
contaminated with grease
Beverage cups with a waxy
coating
Styrofoam containers or cups
Printer cartridges
Cell phones, chargers
and accessories
MP3 players, iPods,
digital cameras
CDs, DVDs, CD-Rs, diskettes
and virtually all other types of
computer tapes
Rechargeable batteries and
their chargers
Hand-held games
Computer/Printer cords
and accessories
Regular, non-rechargeable
alkaline batteries
Computers and Printers –
send personal computers back
to the manufacturer or take
them to an electronics recycler
like the program at Goodwill;
all WFU computers need to be
returned to IS for repurposing
and/or recycling
If you’re a new student, you should have picked up three important
things on move-in day: a reusable to-go food container, a personal
recycling bin, and this very Green Guide. Lucky you! You’re on your
way to a sustainable lifestyle.
EN
GGRUEI D E
What to Recycle
MOVE OUT WASTE REDUCTION
Wake Forest students seem to collect a lot of stuff over the course
of two semesters. At the end of the year, there are a few great
programs designed to help you find a home for your extra stuff
somewhere other than in the dumpster.
Wake Forest partners with Better World Books every year to
collect books you can’t sell back to the bookstore. Better World
Books sells used books online and uses the money for literacy
initiatives worldwide. During finals week, keep a lookout for collection times and locations to drop off your books. There is also
a collection box located near the registers in the textbook store
where you can drop off books after getting the terrible news that
you won’t be getting any money back for them.
Have items in your residence hall room you don’t need anymore?
Deacs Donate is a program aimed at reducing waste by giving
your items to those in the Winston-Salem community who can use
them. Items like clothes, books, and furniture are given to charities
to be distributed instead of going to the landfill.
Recycle Your Notes is a campaign that promotes paper recycling
during finals week. Recycling bins are removed from residence
halls during the last week of classes. To prevent excess paper
waste, two paper collection days are held during finals week
outside the Bookstore. Stop by and deposit those notes you never
want to look at again – an environmentally friendly way to get that
cathartic release!
Technotrash Bins
(available in the Library,
Benson and the University
Bookstore)
9
GREEN
MEDIA
TV SHOWS
Blue Planet
DISCOVERY CHANNEL
Explorer
NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC
Focus Earth with
Bob Woodruff
Planet Green
Greensburg
Planet Green/PLGNA
Life
Discovery Channel
Planet Earth
Discovery Channel on DVD
Sustainability has become a
prominent theme in today’s
media, which is fantastic if
you ask us. Check out some
of these television shows and
movies, personally recommended to you by our
interns. We enjoy watching
these and hope you will too!
Need a break from textbooks? Try reading one of these sustainably-themed books hand-picked straight from the shelves of the
Office of Sustainability. We hope they inspire you to live sustainably
and continue learning about what is going on in our world.
Biomimicry:
Innovation Inspired by Nature
Janine M. Benyus
Dr. Seuss
How Societies Choose to Fail or Succeed
The Omnivore’s Dilemma:
Jared Diamond
A Natural History of Four Meals
Michael Pollan
The Garden
The Consumer’s Guide to Effective Environmental Choices:
Practical Advice from the Union of Concerned Scientists
The Overspent American:
Michael Brower and Warren Leon
Why We Want What We
Don’t Need
Cradle to Cradle: Remaking the Way We Make Things
Juliet B. Schor
Affluenza
Jeremiah Johnson
Avatar
King Corn
Blue Gold
An Inconvenient Truth
Coal Country
(Documentary)
National Geographic:
Earth Report - State of
the Planet 2009
Paul Hawken
Wall-E
Mathis Wackernagel and William Rees
Who Killed the Electric
Car?
Going Local:
Erin Brockovich
Flow
Food, Inc.
William McDonough and Michael Braungart
Plan B 3.0:
The Ecology of Commerce: A Declaration of Sustainability
Our Ecological Footprint:
Reducing Human Impact on the Earth
Creating Self-Reliant Communities in a Global Age
Michael H. Shuman
The Green Book:
The Everyday Guide to Saving the Planet One Simple Step at a Time
Planet in Peril
Elizabeth Rogers and Tomas M. Kostigen
The Secret Lives of
Everyday Things
John C. Ryan and Alan
Thein Durning
The Sustainability Revolution
Andres R. Edwards
The Travels of a T-Shirt in
the Global Economy:
Pietra Rivoli
Thomas Friedman
The Weather Makers:
Michael Pollan
How Man is Changing the
Climate and What it Means
for Life on Earth
It’s Easy Being Green:
Tim Flannery
Science Channel
Discovery Home
Stuff:
Why We Need a Green Revolution-- and How It Can Renew America
In Defense of Food: An Eater’s Manifesto
World’s Greenest
Homes
Lester R. Brown
Hot, Flat, and Crowded:
PSB
Survivorman
Mobilizing to Save Civilization
An Economist Examines the
Markets, Power, and Politics
of World Trade
CNN
Scientific America
Frontiers
The Lorax
Collapse:
MOVIES
Alone in the Wilderness
BOOKS
A Handbook for Earth Friendly Living
Crissy Trask
Living Green:
A Practical Guide to Simple Sustainability
Deep Economy:
The Wealth of Communities and
the Durable Future
Bill McKibben
Greg Horn
10
11
GREEN
DINING
COFFEE AND
LIGHTER FARE
SOMETHING
FOR EVERYONE
Caffe Prada
Breakfast of Course
(Mary’s Too!)
390 North Broad Street
(336) 793-2468
Tuesday – Saturday 11:30ish to
7:30ish; Closed Sundays and
Mondays
Handmade gelato and sorbetto –
need we say more? Okay, they also
have great coffee, sweets, and a
unique selection of gifts.
Krankies
211 East 3rd Street
(336) 722-3016
Monday-Wednesday 7am-10pm;
Thursday-Friday 7am-12am;
Weekends 9am-12am
Krankies offers a wide variety of
free-trade and organic coffees
from around the world; the beans
are roasted on-site. A great place to
discover local musicians and artists,
watch movie screenings, and experience Winston-Salem culture. Check
out the farmers market hosted here
every Tuesday from 11am -1pm.
SimplYummy Café
122 Reynolda Village
(336) 724-9779
723 Trade Street
(336) 723-7239
Monday-Thursday, 7am-9pm;
Friday, 7am-3am; Closed Sundays
Formerly Mary’s of Course, the
newly expanded location on Trade
Street offers an expanded menu and
much later hours. Prided as WinstonSalem’s “worst kept secret,” Mary’s
offers food for the soul created with
Minglewood Farms produce, local
stone-ground grits, and delicious
veggies from Mary’s own garden.
Diamondback Grill
751 North Avalon Road
(336) 722-0006
Open daily at 5:30pm
Diamondback is located in a quiet
residential neighborhood, and prides
itself on its sports bar with televisions
and laid back atmosphere. This local
restaurant has a range of food from
sandwiches, salads and burgers to
gourmet entrees and serves organic
produce from local Minglewood Farm.
Foothills Brewing Company
Monday – Friday 7am -5pm;
Saturday 8am - 3pm;
Closed Sundays
638 West 4th Street
(336) 777-3348
Located in Reynolda Village,
SimplYummy Café is perfect for
those in need of a little time away
from campus. With its eclectic
atmosphere, tasty food selection,
and wide variety of hot drinks,
including organic Durham, NC-based
Counter Culture Coffee, it’s no wonder
Wake students are regular customers.
A Wake Forest favorite! There’s
something for everyone here, from
the many varieties of hand-crafted
beers brewed on location to the
delicious (and local!) Hilltop Farm
Ostrich burgers. For the 21 and
older crowd, check out the reusable
64 oz Foothills Growler, Foothills
solution for reducing bottle waste.
12
11am – 2pm daily
Need a change of scene?
Here’s a sample of some great
locally-owned places where you
can grab a bite to eat and feel
good about doing so. These
restaurants serve locally produced and/or organic foods,
as well as vegetarian fare.
While they aren’t completely
sustainable, they are taking
steps in the right direction.
We like this and recommend
supporting their endeavors
to become more sustainable.
To learn more about local,
seasonal foods in our area, visit
slowfoodpiedmont.org.
Milner’s American Southern
630 South Stratford Road
(336) 768-2221
Tuesday-Thursday 11:30am9:30pm; Friday 11:30am-10pm;
Saturday 4pm-10pm, Sunday
11am-4pm; Closed Mondays
Milner’s is a family-run restaurant
featuring Southern American cuisine with a modern flair. Enjoy the
atmosphere and a delicious menu
filled with seasonal produce and
local meats. Milner’s offers one of
the best Sunday brunches in town.
Mooney’s Mediterranean Café
104 West Fourth Street
(336) 722-4222
Monday – Saturday 11am to 9pm;
Closed Sundays
Great falafel and smoky baba
ganouj at really affordable prices
make this casual Lebanese café a
winner, especially with vegetarians.
The owners are very friendly and
the take-out menu is perfect for
a meal on-the-go.
Mozelles Fresh Southern
Bistro
Soup’s Vietnamese
Pho & Grille
878 West Fourth Street
(336) 703-5400
219 West 4th Street
(336) 917-3000
Lunch: Monday – Friday 11pm2pm; Dinner: Monday – Friday
5pm-9pm; Saturday 5pm-10pm
Monday – Thursday 11am - 2pm
and 5pm - 9pm; Friday – Saturday
5pm - 11pm; Closed Sundays
Located in the West End district,
Mozelles is the place to go for
international cuisine with a southern
twist. A local favorite with delicious
entrees and a great atmosphere,
this is one restaurant you don’t want
to miss. If you go, be sure to try
the tomato pie.
Serving traditional Vietnamese
cuisine (with a Thai flair) in the heart
of Winston-Salem, Soups is a must
if you are craving pho. They even
offer a vegetarian version of this
classic meal-of-a-soup.
Old Fourth Street
Filling Station
871 West Fourth Street
(336) 724-7600
Monday-Tuesday 11am-9pm;
Wednesday-Thursday 11am-10pm;
Friday-Saturday 11am-12am; Sunday 10am-9pm
This quaint restaurant is known for its
great food and casual atmosphere,
including a heated terrace with
outside seating. Fourth Street uses
locally grown produce and herbs
and serves Grayson beef.
6th and Vine
209 West 6th Street
(336) 725-5577
Tuesday – Sunday 11am – Late;
Closed Mondays
6th and Vine has the feel of a bistro
with a southern flair. Enjoy a large
selection of sandwiches, daily flatbread specials, salads, and entrees
featuring seasonal produce and
Grayson beef.
Shorty’s Restaurant
Benson Food Court –
Wake Forest Campus
Monday – Friday 7:30am-12:00am;
Saturday 11am-12am;
Sunday 1pm-12am
No time to leave campus but
want a sit-down meal? Shorty’s is
your place. Shorty’s has been a
Wake Forest tradition since Shorty
Joyner’s restaurant started serving
students on the Old Campus starting in 1916. This newly remodeled
version offers a restaurant experience without leaving campus. The
menu features Grayson beef as
an option for every burger on the
menu and Foothills beer on tap.
Sweet Potatoes
529 North Trade Street
(336) 727-4844
Lunch: Monday – Saturday 11am –
3pm; Dinner: Tuesday – Saturday
5pm-10pm;
Brunch: Sunday 10:30am – 3pm;
Not open for dinner Sundays and
Mondays
Sweet Potatoes describes its
cuisine as “unique, southern inspired, uptown, down-home
cooking.” Located in the arts district, the restaurant has an upscale
feel while keeping its country roots
with locally sourced sweet potatoes
from Surry County.
Thai Sawatdee
2281 Cloverdale Avenue Northwest (Located inside Harris Teeter
Grocery Store)
(336) 725-1332
11am – 10pm daily
Yes, it’s located inside a grocery
store. If you can forgive the ambiance, you won’t be sorry. This is
delicious Thai food at a price that
can’t be beat. Phone in your order
to save time, or order at the counter
and do a little shopping while you
wait. Thai Sawatdee offers lots of
great vegetarian options.
Village Tavern
102 Reynolda Village
(336) 748-0221
Monday - Thursday 11am - 11pm;
Friday - Saturday 11am – 12 am;
Sunday 10am – 10pm
Located in Reynolda Village, the
Tavern is a Wake Forest favorite.
With a wide variety of food, including
regionally sourced beef, the Tavern
has a menu that is sure to please.
West End Café
926 West Fourth Street
(336) 723-4774
Monday-Friday 11am – 10pm;
Saturday 12pm – 10 pm;
Closed Sundays
Named after the historic WinstonSalem district, West End Café is
THE spot for chili, sandwiches, soups
and more. There is something for
everyone on the extensive menu of
classic café fare in a self-described
casual elegant dining atmosphere.
FINE DINING
Fabians
1100 Reynolda Road
(336) 723-7700
Wednesday: 7pm; Thursday - Saturday 7:30pm; Sunday 5pm - 9pm;
Closed Mondays and Tuesdays
Using only the freshest and best
ingredients, including local and
organic produce, Fabians provides
an unforgettable and unique dining
experience every time.
Reservations required.
Meridian Restaurant
411 South Marshall Street
(336) 722-8889
Tuesday – Sunday 4:30pm - 10pm;
Closed Mondays
Another fine dining experience
you don’t want to miss! Located
in a restored Cotton Mill building,
Meridian prides itself on serving
only the freshest and most delicious
local ingredients.
Noble’s Grill
380 Knollwood Street
(336) 777-8477
Monday-Thursday 11:30am 2:30pm, 5:30pm – 10pm; Friday
11:30am - 3:00pm, 5:30pm - 11pm;
Saturday 5:30pm - 11pm; Closed
Sundays
For a fine dining experience, visit
Noble’s. Known for incorporating
seasonal produce from Minglewood
Farm and local farmers markets
into the menu, Noble’s also serves
pork from Redgate Farm and goat
cheeses from Goat Lady Dairy.
13
GREEN
MARKET
Krankies Coffee (downtown)
Market
211 East Third St
Every Tuesday from 11am-1pm
Reynolda Farm Market
1200 block of Reynolda Rd, behind
the Krankies Coffee Trailer
Monday - Saturday 7 am to 8 pm
Whole Foods
41 Miller St
(336) 722-9233
8am – 9pm daily
Fresh Market
3285 Robinhood Rd
(336) 760-2519
Monday-Saturday 9am-9pm;
Sunday 10am-8pm
14
601 South Broad St
(336) 245-8790
Monday - Saturday 8am - 8pm;
Sunday 1pm - 6pm
Mock Orange Bikes
Edward McKay Used Books
and More
Plato’s Closet
690 Jonestown Rd
(336) 659-7786
Monday - Friday 10am - 6pm;
Saturday 10am - 5pm
Cherry & Sixth St, in the Arts District
(near 6th and Vine Restaurant)
Tuesdays & Thursdays 9am–2pm;
May through October
Magnolia House of Health
492 West End Blvd
(336) 722-6678
Monday - Friday 9:30am – 6pm;
Saturday 9:30am – 5pm
Etc. Consignment Shoppe
Downtown Farmers Market
2750 Reynolda Rd
(336) 724-9688
Tuesday - Saturday 10am - 5:30pm
CLOTHING
AND MORE
115 Oakwood Dr
(336) 724-6133
Monday - Saturday 9am-9pm;
Sunday 12pm-6pm
FARMERS
MARKETS &
GROCERIES
Ken’s Bikes
Golden Flower Tai Chi Center
612 North Trade St
(336) 727-1131
Goodwill
2701 University Pkwy
(336) 725-1203
208 Jonestown Rd
(336) 768-9778
Great Outdoor Provision
Company
402 South Stratford Rd
(336) 727-0906
Monday – Friday 10am - 9pm;
Saturday 10am - 6pm;
Sunday 1pm - 6pm
Habitat for Humanity of
Forsyth County ReStore
341 Witt St
(336) 765-2950
Monday - Friday 10am – 6pm;
Saturday 9am – 5pm
House of Plants
507 Harvey St
(336) 765-5301
608 Hanes Mall Blvd
(336) 659-0476
Monday - Saturday 10am – 8pm;
Sunday 1pm – 6pm
REI in Greensboro
3334 West Friendly Ave
(336) 323-3117
Monday - Saturday 10am - 9pm;
Sunday 12pm - 6pm
Re-tale
922 Burke St
(336) 331-3408
Wednesday – Saturday 10am – 6pm
Snob Consignment
465 West End Blvd
(336) 724-2547
Thrive
361 West End Blvd
(336) 331-3369
Tuesday – Friday 11am – 6:30pm;
Saturday 9:30am – 1pm
Village Outdoor Shop, Inc
114 Reynolda Village
(336) 748-2195
Monday - Saturday 10am - 6pm
World Village
37 Miller St
(336) 725-9114
Monday – Friday 10am – 6pm;
Saturday 10am – 5pm
OUTDOOR
ACTIVITIES
Winston-Salem is home to a wide variety of outdoor activities to
suit any athletic or adventure level. In the foothills of the Brushy
Mountains, the Piedmont is bustling with activity all within driving
distance. Check out some of the listed hiking, biking, and climbing
trails when you need to get out of the Wake Forest bubble.
impact
More than 200
students participate in adventure
trips sponsored by
Outdoor Pursuits
each semester.
wfu.edu/
campusrec/op/
Contact Wake Forest Outdoor Pursuits for more
information on outdoor activities.
MOUNTAIN
BIKING
Hobby Park, Winston-Salem
20 minutes from campus
Tanglewood Park,
Winston-Salem
20 minutes from campus
Horizon Park, Winston-Salem
20 minutes from campus
The Campus Recreation Office has
maps with local road biking trails
KAYAKING,
RAFTING,
AND TUBING
Dan River, North Carolina
New River, North Carolina
Gauley River, West Virginia
Haw River, North Carolina
Green River, North Carolina
We suggest checking out the
following for more info:
US National Whitewater
Center
5000 Whitewater Center Pkwy
Charlotte, NC 28214
(704) 391-3900
Dan River Company
1110 Flinchum Rd
Danbury, NC 27016
(336) 593-2628
HIKING AND
CLIMBING
Carvers Gap: Roan Mountain
State Park, Tennessee
2.5 hours from campus
Crowders Mountain State
Park, North Carolina
2 hours from campus
Grandfather Mountain,
North Carolina
2 hours from campus
Moores Wall Loop Trail:
Hanging Rock State Park,
North Carolina
50 minutes from campus
River Section Trail:
Pilot Mountain State Park,
North Carolina
30 minutes from campus
Strollway Trail: Salem Lake,
North Carolina
20 minutes from campus
Other state parks:
ncparks.gov/visit/main.php
Monday – Friday 9am – 5:30pm;
Saturday 9am – 5pm;
Sunday 1pm – 5am
15
UNIQUE
CULTURAL
ACTIVITIES
Winston-Salem is home to some
exceptional places of interest for
students looking for entertainment
outside of the Wake Forest norm.
Check out one of the following places,
bring a friend, and experience some of
the unique culture The Dash has to offer.
impact
During the 2008-2009
school year, two thirds
of the student body
completed 85,000
hours of community
service with over 150
community partners
around the globe.
a/perture cinema
Reynolda Village and Gardens
311 West Fourth St
(336) 722-8148
100 Reynolda Village
(336) 758-5593
THE ARTS
Billed as “an independent theater
in downtown winston salem. Two
screens, 160 seats, beer, wine,
and a whole bunch of movies
you’ve probably never heard of,
a/perture offers a great independent movie house experience.
Just a short walk from campus, Reynolda village once housed the
Reynolds family working farm, but is now converted into boutiques,
shops, restaurants, and breathtaking gardens.
The Arts Council of WinstonSalem and Forsyth County
intothearts.org/volunteers.asp
BB&T Ballpark
926 Brookstown Ave
In the spring, catch a Dash game
at the newly built BB&T stadium.
Parking can be tight, so we suggest grabbing a bite to eat on
Burke Street and then walking
on over to the stadium.
The Stevens Center
405 West 4th St
(336) 721-1945
The Stevens Center is home to
the Winston-Salem Symphony
and hosts a variety of events year
round, including concerts, operas,
and plays. Student discount
tickets are available.
StArt:
Student Art Gallery
This gallery features artwork by
Wake Forest students, is curated
by students, and is close by –
next to SimplYummy in Reynolda
Village. Free.
Downtown Arts District Association (DADA)
“The Downtown Arts District Association (DADA) is a neighborhood organization of artist studios, residences and businesses that
is dedicated to the promotion of arts and culture through education, entertainment, community interaction and trade.” Every month
shops, studios, and galleries open their doors with new artwork and
exhibits for First Friday Gallery Hops. These events are free and open
to the public featuring extended shop hours from 7pm until 10pm
throughout the year.
Old Salem
600 South Main St
(336) 721-7300
Old Salem Museums & Gardens offers the Historic Town of Salem
and the Museum of Early Southern Decorative Arts (MESDA). All
engage visitors in an educational and memorable historical experience about those who lived and worked in the early South. This is a
unique community of original museum buildings, authentic craftsmen
practicing their trade, and fascinating collections of rare antiques.
Reynolda House Museum of American Art
2250 Reynolda Rd
(336) 758-5150
The restored 1917 mansion of RJ Reynolds is now home
to a fantastic collection of American art, including pieces
from the colonial era to current day. Enjoy paintings and
sculptures from a variety of artists in a warm and welcoming
atmosphere. Free with Wake Forest student ID.
VOLUNTEER
Associated Artists of
Winston-Salem, Inc.
associatedartists.org
CIVIC SERVICE
The City of Winston-Salem
cityofws.org
Forsyth County Government
Online Home
forsyth.cc/CES/volunteer.aspx
HUMANITARIAN
Second Harvest Food Bank of
Northwest NC
hungernwnc.org
St. Andrews Gleaning Network
endhunger.org
Bethesda Center for
the Homeless
bethesdacenter.org
Samaritan Ministries
samaritansite.com
Winston-Salem Rescue Mission
wsrescue.org
One of the guiding principles of sustainable living is serving others
in the community and extending sustainable practices and ideals
to those around us. A great way to do this is by volunteering. At
Wake Forest, we live and breathe our motto Pro Humanitate and
encourage students to serve others. Here are a few organizations
you can get involved with in the Winston-Salem community. If you
can’t find an organization here that you’re interested in, you can
search for more opportunities on the VSC website.
ANIMALS
Forsyth Humane Society
forsythhumane.org
Animal Adoption and
Rescue Society
aarfanimals.org
ENVIRONMENT
Hands on Forsyth
handsonforsyth.org
Piedmont Environmental
Alliance
peanc.org
GAME DAY
RECYCLING
The 2010 Demon Deacon football season marks the first ever
Game Day recycling program at
the university. Come out to help
collect recyclables during pregame tailgates.
Habitat for Humanity –
Forsyth County
habitatforsyth.org
16
17
GET INVOLVED
Amnesty
International
Amnesty International (AI) is
one of the largest human rights
organizations in the world with
the goals of protecting and
preserving the rights of people
across the globe. Wake Forest’s
chapter focuses on protecting
the rights of all humans and
standing up against violations
of these rights. WFU’s AI
chapter is devoted to eliminating
ignorance about human rights
issues on campus because
awareness is the first step towards making a difference.
FROM CROP...
There are a number of opportunities for Wake Forest students to
get involved in organizations with sustainable values. Check out
the ones listed below or visit the Campus Life web site for more
information: wfu.edu/studentlife.
Wake Forest Habitat for Humanity
Habitat for Humanity builds homes for those less fortunate across
the globe. You can join Habitat in Winston-Salem. In the past,
Wake Forest students have helped to build the first “green” house
in downtown Winston-Salem. The home included energy and
water saving features.
Volunteer Service Corps
VSC is the place to go to get plugged into volunteer opportunities
on campus, in the Winston-Salem community, and abroad! Get
involved in Wake Forest traditions like DESK and Project Pumpkin, alternative breaks in New Orleans, and service trips to India,
Vietnam, South Africa, and Russia. Go to the VSC site to find out
more: vsc.groups.wfu.edu.
TO KITCHEN...
Outdoor Pursuits
Wake Forest’s outdoor adventure club, specializing in day trips
and overnight weekend trips, provides great opportunities to explore this biodiverse region. Get in touch with the great outdoors
and sign up for a trip today!
Student Environmental
Action Coalition
The Student Environmental Action Coalition (SEAC) is the longeststanding environmental club on campus. Members are active
in the environmental and sustainability movements on campus.
SEAC members volunteer in the community to clean up streams
and wooded areas. Members also take an environmental activism
role by writing letters and calling political leaders. SEAC is committed
to the sustainability movement by promoting alternative modes
of transportation and sponsoring bicycle tune-ups. The club
promotes energy reduction by sponsoring an annual Earth Hour
event on campus. SEAC also maintains a student sustainability
blog (sustainwfu.blogspot.com) and a Twitter account
(twitter.com/wfuseac).
TO COMMUNITY.
Get involved with CROP to help
raise produce in the campus
garden. The produce is used by
the Campus Kitchen group to
feed the community. Go to the
Office of Sustainability website
to find more information and
sign up for the listserv.
18
Wake Forest Campus Kitchen
Campus Kitchen is a food “recycling” program that repurposes
food that isn’t served in the dining halls to feed those in need in
the community. This organization was originally created by two
Wake Forest students in 1999, but it has grown into a national
program. Campus Kitchen was Wake’s first real sustainability effort,
re-purposing food that would otherwise be wasted to fight
hunger! Check out the Campus Kitchen website to learn more:
Political organizations are a
great forum for conversation
on current issues. Sustainability
and environmental issues are
on many students’ minds and
these organizations provide
our future leaders with the
background necessary to
get involved in making policy
changes that will positively
impact our planet. Political
leaders listen to student
groups that get organized, so
join your fellow party members
and make a positive impact on
campus and in the WinstonSalem community.
Sustainability
WAIT CHAPEL
CROP – CampusRaised Organic
Produce
College
Democrats,
College
Republicans &
Young Americans
for Liberty
Wake Forest participated in the 2010
Earth Hour this year. Over 200 students
gathered on the Quad to watch the
lights on Wait Chapel turn off in support
of this global movement. The university
joined over 120 countries and more than
a billion people around the globe in
promoting energy reduction actions.
The Office of Sustainability
wants you! Go online and join
our listserv and Facebook
group to get information
about volunteer opportunities
through the office and affiliated
groups on campus. Also check
out one of the internship opportunities on campus – we’d
love for you to join our team.
vsc.groups.wfu.edu/ckwfu.
19
GREEN
TRANSIT
Greyhound Bus
Service
Catch the Greyhound bus
downtown at 100 West 5th
Street and travel to locations
across the country. Greyhound
Lines, Inc. is the largest provider
of intercity bus transportation,
serving more than 2,300 destinations with 13,000 daily departures across North America.
TELEPHONE NUMBERS
Main: 336-724-1429
Baggage: 336-725-0661
Greyhound Charter: 800-454-2487
HOURS OF OPERATION
Hours of operation subject to
change. Please call to verify hours
before making travel arrangements.
TICKETING AND STATION HOURS
Monday-Sunday: 12:00 am-12:30
am, 9:30 am-11:59 pm
Holiday: 12:00 am-12:30 am,
9:30 am-11:59 pm
20
Wake Forest has recently expanded its alternative transportation
options to encourage students to stop relying solely on their cars
for transportation. If you need a ride on campus, to an apartment
complex, to Deacon Blvd, or even downtown Winston-Salem,
check out one of these convenient options - located right on
campus - before hopping in your car.
Solar Shuttle
Wake Forest offers a brand
new hybrid solar electric shuttle
as an alternative to driving
across and around campus.
This new shuttle operates
Monday-Friday from 8:30am to
3:30pm on a continuous loop.
It takes students around a main
loop that extends out to Martin
and Polo Residence Halls,
Student Apartments Lot R1,
the Law Parking lot, Main Bus
Stop, Reynolds Gym, Gulley
Drive, Winston and Salem
Halls, Scales and the Chapel.
Bike Registration
You can register your bike online at the University Police Department’s webpage or by visiting the Police Office and registering in
person. The Police Department strongly recommends registering
your bike to help return it to you in the case of theft.
Zipcar
No car? No problem! Wake Forest offers two shiny new Zipcars for
you to drive. Zipcar is a national car-sharing program that offers
students 24-hour access to vehicles – “wheels when you want
them.” You must be 18 years or older and have a valid driver’s
license to join. There is a registration fee and a modest hourly rate,
but the rate includes the price of gas and car insurance. Compare
that to car payments, car insurance, parking permits, and gas, and
your parents might just pay YOU to sign up for Zipcar! Visit
zipcar.com to sign up today.
Downtown
Shuttle Service
Amtrak Train
Service
Public
Transportation
Wake Forest provides a
nighttime shuttle to popular
downtown locations, operating Thursday through Saturday
nights from 8pm until the last
downtown pick up around
2:30am. The shuttle picks up at
the Benson University Center
and follows a continuous loop,
visiting the following locations:
The closet Amtrak Train station is located 19 miles away
from Wake Forest’s campus
at 100 West High Avenue in
High Point, NC. Amtrak does
provide Thruway connecting
bus service from downtown
Winston-Salem at 100 West
5th Street (Corner of 5th Street
& Trade Street). There are
additional Amtrak Thruway
connecting bus services from
Winston-Salem State University.
If you’re looking for an affordable ride in the Winston-Salem
community, consider taking the
Winston-Salem transit system –
it’s only $1 a ride! There’s a good
chance you’ll ride one of the
city’s hybrid buses. There are two
routes that visit Wake Forest:
Finnegan’s Wake
Millennium Center
Mellow Mushroom
West End Opera House
As the nation’s intercity passenger rail operator, Amtrak
connects America. With 21,000
route miles in 46 states, the
District of Columbia and three
Canadian provinces, Amtrak operates more than 300 trains each
day — at speeds up to 150 mph
— to more than 500 destinations.
ROUTE 5
Wake Forest city bus stop to
Trade Street Transportation
Center
*Note: stops running through the
WFU campus at 6pm
ROUTE 16
Reynolda Road entrance to
campus at Wake Forest Road
to Trade Street Transportation
Center
Visit the Winston-Salem Transit
Authority webpage for more
information: wstransit.com.
21
GREEN TRANSIT
GREEN TRANSIT
RIDE THE WAKE LINE
Want to live off campus but don’t want to deal with the
hassles of on-campus parking? Or maybe you don’t even
have a car. If that’s the case, the Gold and Black shuttle
lines are the solution to your vehicular woes. The shuttles
run hourly during the week from 7:20am to 8:50pm (no
service from 10:50am to 11:20am- the shuttle drivers
need a break at some point!). The schedules and drop off
locations are listed below.
Visit wfu.edu/ridethewake for
more information, including
the new shuttle finder.
4
THE GRAY LINE
During the day, the Gray Line
provides shuttle services to the
off-campus parking lots, the
satellite parking lot, and the
Deacon Blvd office building.
In the evenings, running from
7pm-2:30am, the Gray Line
provides transportation across
campus. There is no service
from 10:30-11pm.
Stop Number
22
2
THE GOLD AND BLACK LINES
6
5
4
3
3
4
2
1
5
1
Wake Forest
Campus
3
THE GOLD LINE
7
Poteat
Field
2
8
Stop Number
Kentner
Stadium
1
Gene Hooks
Stadium
9
Shuttle
Stop Location
Departure
Time
Departure
Time
1
1
Benson Center front entrance, Lot C
xx:00
xx:30
2
North Campus Apartments at
Allen Easley and Aaron Lane
xx:03
xx:33
3
Polo/Martin/Student Apts cul-de-sac
in middle of 3 buildings
xx:05
xx:35
4
Student Drive - Stop 1Bus shelter in lower lot
xx:09
xx:39
5
Student Drive - Stop 2 Bus shelter in upper lot
xx:11
xx:41
6
First Assembly Lot Call box / Shuttle sign
xx:14
xx:44
7
Palmer/Piccolo Lot U near building entrance
xx:18
xx:48
8
Reynolds Gymnasium Front entrance
on Wingate Rd.
xx:21
xx:51
9
Johnson/Luter Front entrance on Gulley Drive
xx:24
xx:54
Shuttle
Stop Location
Departure
Time
Departure
Time
1
WFU ZSR Library entrance
xx:20
xx:50
2
Crowne Polo Clubhouse
xx:30
xx:00
3
Crowne Park Building 200 (mailboxes)
xx:35
xx:05
4
Corners at Crystal Lake Building 10
xx:40
xx:10
5
WFU Gatehouse Reynolda Road entrance
xx:45
xx:15
Shuttle
Stop Location
Departure
Time
Departure
Time
WFU Wake Forest Road
and Wingate Road (city bus stop)
xx:20
xx:50
2
Alaris Village Building 5005
xx:30
xx:00
3
Deacon Ridge Building 900 (traffic circle)
xx:37
xx:07
4
Crowne Oaks Clubhouse
xx:40
xx:10
THE BLACK LINE
Stop Number
1
23
GREEN iPHONE
APPS
Going Green…there is an app for that! Well, actually, a lot
of them. Here are some that we like (and they’re all free):
Locavore — from locallectual.
com, this app provides information about area producers,
independent retailers featuring
local goods, and restaurants
that feature local foods based
on your current location.
The Coupon Sherpa — eliminate paper waste (and save
money) with this app that loads
discounts for more than 120
national brand-name stores.
Just run a search, pull up the
coupon, and show it to the
clerk for instant savings.
The Good Guide — gives access to environmental ratings for
more than 70,000 food, toy, personal, and household products.
Go Green — a terrific introduction to going green; each time the app
is opened; another Green Tip is displayed and then saved to a list.
Carbon Tracker — a GPS enabled app that allows users to calculate their daily carbon footprint. Users can also create goals for
lowering their footprints and monitor their progress.
Easy Green — supplies eco-friendly tips that require minimal effort.
Whole Foods Market Recipes — delivers healthy recipes any
time of the day.
Green Gas Saver — from Appleseed Software, this app monitors
your car’s fuel efficiency and teaches users how to drive with
greater fuel efficiency.
Mission Zero — provides sustainability news feeds from
around the world.
Twavel — this social media application offers the ability to share
green tips with the entire Twavel community. It also provides a
carbon emission calculator for common travel types.
10:42 AM
GR EEN AP PS
Recycling Plant
1.7 mi
Sustainable Cafe 2.3 mi
Green Market
3.4 mi
Thrift Store
4.6 mi
Phon e
24
Email
Safar i
iPod
Green Card — use this app to share contact information without
wasting paper on personalized business cards.
Monterey Bay Seafood App — brings the latest Seafood Watch
recommendations directly to the iPhone. Users can make sustainable seafood choices quickly and easily whether shopping for
dinner or dining at a restaurant. At a time when the world’s oceans
are overfished, a seafood choice can make a big difference.
iRecycle — lists events and articles along with the most reliable
recycling information on the internet. It also helps users find
recycling locations anywhere in the US.
GREEN
STUDY
ABROAD
Wake Forest is nationally ranked for
student participation in study abroad
programs. Our students (67% of them!)
love to travel and experience other
cultures. If you’re planning on studying
abroad, why not take advantage of one
of the following sustainability themed
programs? Lucky you, all majors and
fields of interest are welcome and
encouraged to apply. Visit the Center for
International Studies for more information.
Danish Institute for Study Abroad
Copenhagen, Denmark
Sustainability in Europe
Institute for Study Abroad
Sustainability themed courses are available through
Butler University in the following countries: Australia,
Costa Rica, Mexico, New Zealand, and Peru.
The School for Field Studies
Atenas, Costa Rica
Sustainable Development Studies
St. Peter’s College Oxford,
Oxford, England
SIT Study Abroad
Byron Bay,
Australia
Sustainability and
Environmental Action
Jaipur, India
Sustainable Development
and Social Change
Oaxaca, Mexico
Sustainable Development
and Social Change
Summer program in Environmental Studies with an
emphasis on global climate change.
Project Nicaragua
Schools of Business program designed to promote
sustainable business models. Includes work at home
and a trip to Nicaragua in December.
25
Wake Forest Office of Sustainability [email protected]