PLEASE NOTE: There will not be a July Meeting

Transcription

PLEASE NOTE: There will not be a July Meeting
This is our tentative calendar of events. Please check the website for
up-dated information: www.schattenbaum.org
See the Driver’s Ed Schedule for our DE dates.
Date
Event (*monthly meetings)
July
15 (Sun)
Location
Summer Family Picnic
August
15 (Wed)
24 – 26 (Fri – Sun)
Mercer County Park
* Appraisals & Car Show
Schattenbaum Showdown PCA Club Race
Bung’s
NJMP Thunderbolt
September
19 (Wed)
* Topic TBA
Bung’s
October
TBA
Oktoberfest
TBA
November
14 (Wed)
*Digital photos night
Bung’s
December
TBA
Holiday Gala
TBA
DE TECH SESSIONS
Schattenbaum’s tech sessions usually take place at: Provost Motorsports
850 Rt 206 S, Bordentown, NJ 08505 Ph: 609 298 3555 Sessions are typically held a few weeks before our DE events.
Please check the website for specific dates.
Dates
SCHATTENBAUM REGION PCA DRIVER’S EDUCATION SCHEDULE
Track
March 17 - 18
April 6 - 7
April 20
June 22
July 19
August 3 - 4
August 24 - 26*
September 14
October 19
November 3 - 4
Saturday /Sunday
Friday / Saturday
Friday
Friday
Thursday
Friday / Saturday
Friday - Sunday
Friday
Friday
Saturday /Sunday
NJMP Lightning / Thunderbolt
Summit Point
NJMP Thunderbolt
NJMP Lightning
NJMP Thunderbolt
Summit Point
NJMP Thunderbolt*
NJMP Lightning
NJMP Thunderbolt
NJMP Lightning / Thunderbolt
*Advanced DE drivers only. This event takes place during the Schattenbaum Showdown PCA
Club Race
REGISTER FOR ALL SCHATTENBAUM DE EVENTS ON-LINE AT:
www.motorsportreg.com
In This Issue
Page
News and Articles
LEADERSHIP DIRECTORY
President
Alex Hilgetag [email protected]
Vice President
Robert Henuset [email protected]
Treasurer
Jeff Muller [email protected]
Secretary
Bob Helm [email protected]
SECTION CHAIRS
Autocross
Robbie Provost [email protected]
Concours
Robert Lerman [email protected]
Drivers Education Chief Instructor
Pete Tremper [email protected]
Drivers Education Registrar
Pete Debusmann [email protected]
Dealer Relations
Dan Petchel [email protected]
Goodie Store
John Beidler [email protected]
Membership
Kim Lerman [email protected]
Newsletter Editor
Dan Merton [email protected]
Programs
Robert Henuset [email protected]
Social Events
Claudia Debusmann & Danielle Hilgetag
[email protected]
Tech Support
Robbie Provost [email protected]
Tourmaster
Robert Lerman [email protected]
Track Chair
Dan Petchel [email protected]
Track Safety
John Beidler [email protected]
Webmaster
Rob Cohen [email protected]
Monthly Meetings …………………….. …...………………….
Lobster Run Recap .………….. ………………………………
Summer Picnic …………………………………………………
Touring News ……………………………………….………….
Add a Caption ………………………………………………….
Wine Tasters Concours Recap ……………………………….
Do They Have it Reversed? ……………………………..……
Grand Am & Club Race at NJMP …………………………….
3
4
5
8
8
9
11
12
Regular Features
Club Calendar…………………………………………………
Driver’s Ed Schedule …………………………………………
Leadership Directory………………………………………....
New Members ………………………………………………..
Pack at the Track .……………………………………………
Petch Sez…………………………….……...………………..
Swap n’ Sell…………………………………………………..
1
1
2
2
7
13
14
WELCOME NEW SCHATTENBAUMERS!
Russell Abate
Raymond Brindley &
Emily Bland
Joseph Busacca
Jason Rosenberg &
Nate Mayers
Tim Kalavruzos
Thomas McCaully
George Peltz
Joseph &
Jeffrey Rotella
Chris Scafario &
Sylvia Wower
Spencer Taylor
Nicholas Thon
Marlton, NJ
2003 Boxster
Wilmington, DE
Willingboro, NJ
2001 911
1982 911sc
Voorhees, NJ
Moorestown, NJ
Mount Laurel, NJ
Berlin, NJ
1987 928
2011 911 GT3RS
2010 GT3
1996 911
West Windsor, NJ
2005 911
Cherry Hill, NJ
Mount Laurel, NJ
Millville, NJ
2003 Targa
2008 Cayman
2000 986
On the Cover
Club members and guests enjoyed a
fabulous concours event at Amalthea
Cellars in May. This beautiful blue
Cayman was among the other
Porsches parked in the vineyard.
Read about the Wine Tasters
Concours and see more photos in
this issue.
Photo by Dan Merton
Please send your articles and
photos to the Editor:
[email protected]
Schatten Rappen’ is the official newsletter of the Schattenbaum Region of the Porsche Club of America (“the Club”). Articles published herein are the
opinions of the authors and not necessarily of the Club. The Editor reserves the right to edit all materials prior to publication. The Club, its officers,
contributors and the Editor do not accept legal responsibility for any errors or omissions that may be made in this publication. The Editor recognizes
that there are readers who take great pride in identifying typos and other mistakes. On occasion the Editor accommodates these individuals’ egos.
Porsche®, the Porsche Crest®, CARRERA®, and TARGA® are trademarks of Porsche, AG. Current and past issues of Schatten Rappen’ are available
st
on the Club’s website: www.schattenbaum.org. The deadline for submissions is the 1 of the preceding month. Please contact the Editor for
advertising rates. Advertisements in this newsletter do not constitute an endorsement by the Club or its officers.
Copyright© 2012 by Schattenbaum Region, PCA
The Club is always interested in hearing what its members would like to have for meeting topics.
If you have a suggestion for a meeting topic please contact our
Program Chair Robert Henuset: [email protected]
PLEASE NOTE: There will not be a July Meeting –
join us at our Summer Picnic on July 15th!
August Meeting – Wed., August 15th
Appraisals & Car Show
Our August will be our annual Appraisal Night combined with a
gimmick judged car show in the lot at Bungs Tavern. This will be a
great reason to get out for a mid-week drive to Bung’s and have fun
with fellow Schattenbaumers.
Members can have their Porsches appraised by our own Guru of All
Things Porsche Dan Petchel. Having a recent appraisal is of great
value to owners should there be an insurance issue regarding the
value of your vehicle.
We will gather at 6:00pm with light refreshments served at 6:30.
Many members come early and enjoy dinner at Bung’s.
Left: Dan P admires
a 914 at a recent
club event.
Right: These lovely
ladies aren’t likely to
be at the meeting
but who knows what
surprises Robert H
has for the August
meeting? (come to
Bung’s to find out!)
Photos by Bob Helm
MOST meetings take place at Bung’s Tavern on Rt. 130.
For directions and more info go to Bung’s website: http://bungstavern.net/
By Rob Lerman with photos by Gerd Lengfeld
Schattenbaum held its 10th annual Lobster Run on Sunday June 10th. Turnout
was impressive with roughly 25 cars and 40 people. The location for this
year’s event was Bar-Anticipation in Belmar. The event was held in Bar-A’s
Mahogany room surrounded by numerous bars, a man-made beach and
notable and relatively young crowd of partygoers who look like they just
hopped off the real beach. Weather was fantastic, upper 70s and not a cloud
in the sky - great touring weather. Participants raved about the food, which
included Manhattan Clam Chowder, tomato and mozzarella appetizer, 1-1/2
lb lobsters cooked to perfection, baked potato, green beans and assorted
berries for desert. I think we may have found a new resting spot! Special
thanks to Nick Sapner for recommending the place, Mike Sokoloff for
volunteering to lead the South Tour group and Claudia Debusmann for taking
care of registration. Thanks again to all who participated and I hope you
enjoyed it as much as my wife Kim and I did.
What: Family picnic
Where: Mercer County Park WEST
When: Sunday July 15th noon – 5pm
MERCER COUNTY PARK WEST is located alongside Lake
Mercer and within walking distance of the Marina. Feel
free to bring Frisbees and other outdoor sports / activities
equipment. There is ample parking and restrooms.
We have reserved a covered pavilion –
this event is RAIN OR SHINE!
This is a CATERED event
YOU MUST REGISTER IN
ADVANCE!
Enjoy BBQ, soft drinks and
German beer!
ONLY $10 PER
PERSON!
Children under
12 are free!
QUESTIONS?
Please call or email Claudia: [email protected] or 609-714-9049
Directions to Mercer County Park West
North/South via Interstate 295 Take 295 to Exit 65A, Sloan Ave., East on Sloan Ave. After the second traffic light,
travel 0.7 miles to Paxson Ave. Turn left onto Paxson and proceed 0.9 miles to intersection of Hughes Drive and
entrance to Mercer County Park . The West Picnic Area is the first left turn inside the park.
From north via US Route 1 Take US Route 1 South of Princeton to Route 533 (Quakerbridge Road ). Make right into
jug handle crossing over Route 1 onto Route 533. Travel 2.2 miles and turn left onto Hughes Drive. Proceed on Hughes
Drive 0.5 mile to park entrance on left. The Picnic Area is the first left turn inside the park.
From south via US Route 1 Cross Toll Bridge into NJ on US Route 1. Take first right past the Quakerbridge Mall onto
Quakerbridge Road . Travel 2.2 miles and turn left onto Hughes Drive. Proceed on Hughes Drive for 0.5 mile to entrance
of Mercer County Park on left. The Picnic Area is the first left turn inside the park.
RESERVATION FORM ~ SCHATTENBAUM’S ANNUAL FAMILY PICNIC 2012
Member name
Number age 12 and older:
x $10 each = $
Number of children under 12 attending:
how many are coming so we have enough food!)
(please include this amount)
(Kids under 12 are free, but we need to know
Please send reservation form with check or money order to:
Claudia Debusmann, 30 Constitution Drive, Southampton, NJ 08088
Make payment payable to “Schattenbaum PCA” Reservations must be received by July 5th ~
Sorry, no reservations via phone or e-mail!
In addition to the usual picnic fun with kids on the playground, Frisbees, cold beverages and BBQ
foods, this year we will also have a low-key Car Show! The ample parking facilities and great
backdrop of Mercer Park West afford us an opportunity to have our cars on display, so shine up
those cars and get out the cameras! Participation in the car show is optional.
By Fred Pack
A dream (that never was) come true!
I would say that this story is about a dream come true except that I never even had the dream.
Here’s what happened …
Recently I became an instructor for the Empire State Ferrari Club and I attended their 2-day May
Watkins Glen event that was run just like a PCA DE. I ran my Boxster S in the red/instructor group and
my student, who was a ½ owner of a Ferrari Challenge Cup car, was in the Blue (Solo) group. I
devoted my instructing to the usual material – smooth inputs, learn the line, be consistent, etc. My
student did his best and was a reasonable Blue-level driver. It was clear to me that this Ferrari was a
magnificent example of the Prancing Horse. Riding in it was a very different experience than I generally get in a DE.
That evening I was telling someone how impressed I was with the Ferrari and he replied that obviously I should ask the
owners if I could drive it. I hadn’t thought of this myself but as soon as I heard it I realized it was a great idea so the next day I
asked them if I could drive the car for a few laps in the Green group – just to get a sense of what it was like. I’d drive very slowly,
I promised them. They responded that I should take it out for a full session in the Blue group with my student as the passenger
and give it my best shot. To say that I was pleased is a great understatement.
The car is a 2000 F360 Challenge Cup car. This is the competition version of the 400hp V8 F360 road car, and is the Ferrari
equivalent of the Porsche GT3 Cup Car, substantially lightened from the street car with lots of carbon fiber and equipped with a
double-clutch paddle-shifter transmission. I had some trepidation but that very quickly dissipated as I got down to work.
I had never driven a paddle shifter car before but I found that it couldn’t be easier. To upshift, simply pull on the right-side
paddle, with no need to lift off the throttle. To downshift, pull the left-side paddle and the system perfectly blips the throttle to
match the revs. It couldn’t be easier. (This system is the Ferrari equivalent of the Porsche PDK gearbox. Interestingly, at another
DE a week later my student asked me to drive his paddle-equipped BMW M6. In the BMW the paddles turn along with the
steering wheel. In the Ferrari, they are always at the 3 and 9 o’clock positions. I much preferred the Ferrari approach since in the
BMW you couldn’t be sure where the paddles are. The Porsche arrangement is like the BMW, so in my opinion the Ferrari has
the preferable approach.) Car enthusiasts often discuss which is better – manual gearbox or paddle-shift. My Boxster S has a
manual, and I enjoy doing the shifting. It connects me to the car and gives me a sense of involvement in the act and art of
driving. But I now fully appreciate that for track driving the paddle shifter is objectively better. The shifts happen in a tiny fraction
of a second and you never have to get off the throttle on upshifts. By contrast, each upshift in a manual requires most of a
second being off-throttle – this alone will cost you a lot of time, each and every lap. Also, with the paddle shifter you get to keep
both hands on the wheel at all times, which is meaningful. Lastly, you don’t have to devote any concentration to your shifting.
Add it all up and the paddle shifter comes out the winner.
The F360 Challenge is a staggering
machine. It has superb balance being midengined like the Boxster/Cayman, great
acceleration (less than 2500 lbs and 410hp) and
fantastic cornering capability. The most startling
element for me, though, was the braking. The
car had racing slick tires. I had never driven a
car on slicks before and I can only say that as
unbelievable as the cornering speeds were, it
was the braking which was most astonishing.
When I would get on the brakes hard as in
slowing for WGI’s Turn1 and the Bus Stop, I would feel as if I was punched in the shoulders by the seatbelts. You just don’t get
that level of braking on street tires or even on R-compound DOT-legal track tires. The actual brakes were Brembos as used on
Porsches, so the difference was the tires.
I spent my half-hour devouring most of the other cars on the track -- the notable exceptions were the F458 Challenge cars
which flew by me just as I flew by the other cars. The session was so thrilling and was truly a dream come true (even though I
hadn’t had the dream). The car was just amazing and I can see why so many of our PCA friends have bought GT3 Cup Cars –
these experiences are addicting. At about the 20-minute mark of my session I realized that when I got back to the pits I would
likely be asked what I thought of the car, and the obvious answer popped into my head. Sure enough, as I got out of the car at
the end of the session one of the owners asked, “So, what did you think of the car?” I gave my prepared answer, “I shouldn’t
have asked for the ride.” He replied, “I understand; now you want to buy one.”
2012 Tour and Concours Schedule
July
TBD
7 (Sat)
August
4 (Sat)
18 (Sat)
September
1 (Sat)
15 (Sat)
29 (Sat)
TBD
October
27 (Sat)
November
10 (Sat)
24 (Sat)
TBD
December
8 (Sat)
22 (Sat)
Lunch tour
Cars n’ Coffee
Jersey Shore
Cherry Hill
Cars n’ Coffee
Cars n’ Coffee
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill
Cars n’ Coffee
Cars n’ Coffee
Cars n’ Coffee
Driving Tour
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill
Cars n’ Coffee
Cherry Hill
Cars n’ Coffee
Cars n’ Coffee
Driving Tour or Concours
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill
Cars n’ Coffee
Cars n’ Coffee
Cherry Hill
Cherry Hill
“Damn, this Kool Shirt is a babe
magnet - I should’ve started wearing it
a long time ago!”
This list of touring events and car shows will
be up-dated as events are confirmed.
Please check the website
for up-to-date information
Cars n’ coffee events take place in the parking lot of the
Starbucks 2050 Route 70 West, Cherry Hill, NJ
8:00 am till 11:00 am
info: [email protected]
Bob Helm took this photo of Kevin Marcus
and his new friends at the Grand Am race.
Although no caption is really needed (that
smile tells us what Kevin is thinking), perhaps
you’ve got an idea.
Send your caption or call-out suggestions to
the Editor [email protected]
and they will appear in an up-coming issue.
Feel free to suggest a call-out for the ladies
too but please - Keep it clean folks!
Thanks to all who attended this great event!
By Rob Lerman with photos by Dan Merton and Dave Kalokitis
Schattenbaum held its annual Spring Wine Tasters Concours at Amalthea
Winery in Atco, New Jersey on May 20th. We had a very nice turnout, many
interesting and very clean cars in a setting with the vineyard as a backdrop.
This year we had two categories; Porsches model years 2000-2012 and
models pre-2000. The overall winner for the 2000-2012 category was Gerd
Langenfeld and his immaculate 2005 911. The overall winner in the Pre-2000
category was Dave Frank for his gleaming 1986 911 Turbo. Craig Mollenhauer
won the Judges’ Choice award with his clean, rust-free 1975 914.
Special thanks to all those that helped make the day go smoothly, including
judges Pete Debusmann, Kevin Marcus and Gerd Langenfeld (no, he didn’t
judge his own car,) Membership Chair Kim Lerman, Social Chair Claudia
Debusmann and Club President Alex Hilgetag.
Left: Claudia and Kim with the
gourmet sandwiches and
salad.
Right: Craig Mollenhauer’s 914.
Below: The judges and
category winners.
All photos on this page by DM
Concours Winners
Category: 2000-2012
1st Place: Gerd Langenfeld 2005 911
2nd Place: Robert Henuset 2001 Boxster
3rd Place: Lenny Klim 2011 Cayman
Category: Pre 2000
1st Place: Dave Frank 86 911 Turbo
2nd Place: Rob Lerman 911 Targa
3rd Place: Philip Barbaro 87 911 Coupe
Judges’ Choice:
Craig Mollenhauer 1975 914
DK
Car owners took care of last-minute details
before the judges gave each car a thorough
inspection.
DM
DK
The weather cooperated and we enjoyed
fabulous food and drink - it was another
great Club event!
DM
DK
DM
DM
Bob Helm
One of the first things you learn when
photographing sports is that not all media
credentials are equal. Some give you more
access than others and some put you higher
in the pecking order for key shooting
locations. Media outlets like Sports
Illustrated and Getty images will often have
first pick of key locations but the king of the
hill are TV Networks followed by radio. At the
NJMP Continental Challenge someone
forgot that and violated the First Commandment; Thou shalt not get in the way of TV, by interfering with one of the post race
interviews. Fortunately this was a tape-delayed race, Sunday’s Grand Am of course is live. This prompted a meeting on Sunday
morning to “remind” everyone and mention that any violator who held a Grand Am or NASCAR Hard Card (full season
credentials) would lose them immediately and permanently. TV pays the bills and is king.
Then they went into the post race ceremonies to reassure everyone that they would get what they needed. The post race
period is carefully choreographed to satisfy everyone’s needs. At Grand Am (and ALMS) it is less structured than at NASCAR
because there are fewer sponsors but the familiar “Hat Dance” is a key element along with the post race TV interview, the
Podium Trophy Ceremony and Champagne spray. Normally I do not photograph these as you have to get there early, it is a mob
scene and while most pro equipment is “water resistant” it is not Champagne proof and I have seen a few cameras and lenses
make a trip to the shop for a professional cleaning (read costly disassembly and cleaning). This time was different as Andy Lally
had the possibility of his 100th Podium in Grand Am competition.
If you watch races on TV you are familiar with
part of the activities. The winner and the top two
cars pull into the winner’s circle where they are met
by co drivers and crew. They answer a few
questions car-side and then move to the podium for
the trophy presentation. In races with more than one
class they repeat it for each class. What you do not
see on TV is that when the DP drivers get out they
start with the routine I just described and get a short
break before going to the podium while the TV crew
repeats with the GT drivers. GT drivers get a short
break while waiting for the DP activities to conclude
before they start their interviews. At the conclusion
of the GT interviews the GT drivers go to the Media
Room where print media interviews commence (like
the F1 interview post race interview room). At the
same time the DP drivers go to get their trophies.
They then go to the Media Room and the GT drivers
go to the Podium.
This is a change from how they used to do it
according to the Grand Am official. They used to
send the DP drivers into the interview room first, ending the TV show with the DP trophy presentation. The change was caused
by the fact that after the winners were interviewed most of the media left and the GT drivers showed up to an empty media room.
Most interest was on the overall winner. At one time the big draw was the prototype class as that is where the state of the art
cars from Porsche, Audi, Ferrari, etc competed and GT was mostly Pro-Am drivers that helped fill the grid. Now the DP is spec
racing with cars that, for cost reasons, do not change from year to year. With ALMS gone are the factory teams and they have a
hard time filling the grid with competitive cars and drivers.
In both series the real competition is in the GT classes. More cars, more marques, more passing, more excitement and
more fan interest but second class coverage by the media. Look around the paddock at any race and you will see Porsche,
Corvette, Ferrari, BMW and Mazda corrals with hundreds of cars. Do you see a single manufacturer of DP chassis like Riley or
Crawford? No, not one.
Prototype racing is fun to watch when you have top Manufacturer teams competing with state of the art cars. The problem
for Grand Am and ALMS is trying to make prototype racing attractive to manufactures while maintaining some control over cost.
BMW and Porsche have been lobbying for more international cooperation on rules so that they can build one car that can
compete in many series. We live in a time where there is tremendous innovation in automobile design, engine and fuel, traction
control, along with aero packages and even autonomous driving control. Yet in DP we get cars that with the exception of the new
Riley built “Corvette” the cars have looked the same for the last ten years. Even in ALMS most of the prototype cars look alike.
Exciting cars like the Porsche 917, 935, 936 and the RS Spyder just do not meet the rules or the new spirit of competition.
Andy Lally’s 100th Grand Am Podium.
Dan Petchel
Porsche Sports Cars
During the course of a week I talk to many people about their older cars and get phone calls about parts, upgrades and
generally how to fix things. Some folks get caught up in the aftermarket add-ons while others want speed. However, there is a
great misconception about speed and upgrading older Porsches. Translated, this means some owners are going the wrong
direction. We have great sports cars but yes, they can be made better. Sounds like a good topic for an article, so here goes.
1. Everybody starts with wanting more horsepower. Wrong. They should be looking for speed (speed and horsepower are two
different things).
2. Next let’s put on a trick exhaust. Wrong again. The only street exhaust worth anything is the SSI system made for 75-89
911’s.
3. Next we need bigger brakes. You guessed it, wrong again. You wanted to go faster, and what do brakes do? Correct – they
slow you down. Besides, big brakes add weight.
4. Now we need fancy wheels. Wrong, but you are getting closer.
5. Rear wing. Half right.
6. Bigger sway bars. Again, half right.
Dan Merton
Now that we have those items out of the way, we can really start going faster.
1. Suspension. All Porsches (except the GT 3) make compromises for street handling as opposed to going fast in the corners.
The compromises are made in the ride height, ride quality, stiffness, camber and toe. Compromises need to be made
because of smooth ride, road conditions, clearance issues and DOT standards. The answers are to lower the car, stiffen it
up, and put camber in it. Best cars for this are the 90 newer 911s. The 944s have an advantage here for they came with
coil over suspension (though other limitations come in to play).
2. Tires. Tires need to be ultra-high performance with a soft compound, little tread and wide. Hoosiers are what you want for
the track (see you were close on wheels).
3. Brake performance. Porsches come from the factory with great brakes but with a brake pad compound that is a
compromise for high performance driving (i.e., too soft a compound). High performance brake pads for the track are
designed to work and hold up under extreme temperatures. These allow a consistent feel and stopping power. Higher
temperature brake fluid is not a bad idea, either.
4. Seats. Most Porsche seats (except for the Euro GT3 seats) are designed for some support but mostly for getting in and out
of the car. Without the right seats you will use the steering wheel to hold on to rather than steer. One needs a true sports
racing seat for the track and spirited driving situations.
5. Belts. Normal seat belts are designed to hold you in place in extreme movement or an accident. Racing harnesses are
design to hold you in place making you, the seat and car one. Now you can drive.
6. Aero work. (Yes I know, comes with a GT3) A rear wing will create down force along with a front spoiler or splitter to
prevent air going under the car and create lift.
7. The sum of the total: All improvements should work together and not conflict with each other. That is the real trick that few
consider – the final result really can be more than the sum of the parts.
With all this being said, Porsche still makes about the best sports car out of the box and that is why we love them so.
Drive the cars.
Classified ads are free to PCA members. To place an ad please email the
Editor Dan Merton; [email protected]
Cars for sale Call Dan: 609-351-2068
73 Carrera RS Tribute car. Black & gold, new paint, new engine, new trans, call
75 911 Carrera (Real), 25 of 195, white/graphics,3.0 new engine, trans & clutch. $29,500
85 911 Coupe White, 3.2,street/track, short box 5 spd, roll bar, seats harness, turbo brakes. $24,000
86 911Targa Black/black,91K,new engine, clutch, interior nice, recent paint $21,500
87 911 Targa White/black, 158K miles, rebuilt motor, fair condition. $15,900
87 911 Carrera Gray/blue, rebuilt motor, clutch & Trans, SSI, new brakes &shocks, adj sway bars.$15,900
87 911 Targa, Red/black, restored, new engine, clutch, brakes, SSI, sport exhaust.$23,500
90 964 C2 Black/black,70 k motor,PSS9 susp,rollbar,993brakes,seats,more $26,500
90 964 C2 Diamond Grey/blue 50k original car inside and out. minor paint work, 16' wheels. $19,900
92 964 Blue/grey, Track & street, new motor, sport susp, Short box, Ltd Slip, seats, bar.$33,500
93 RSA White/black 114k $36,500 93 RSA Black/BK non-sun ltd 74k $39,900 93 RSA Black/bk ltd 48k $39,900
95 993 Coupe Blue/grey, Big reds, sport susp, short gears, LTD Slip,3.8 tail, splitter, belt $34,500
02 996 Turbo Silver/black,60k miles, upgraded suspension. $45,000
Project Cars
79 930 Turbo Cab roller, 74 911 Orange roller, 70 Tube frame chassis, 72 911E complete car
68 912 roller needs restored metal work done, 67 911 roller 30yr project, needs put together
Call Dan: 609-351-2068 or e-mail for details and pics. [email protected]
1978 Porsche 911SC, Targa w/ Whale Tail. White w/ black interior. Excellent condition, 95,000 miles. All recommended
upgrades; chain tensioner, pop off valve, SSIs, new style clutch, HD engine & transmission mounts, plus many more upgrades;
Bilsteins ,turbo tie rods, lowered to Euro specs, sport steering wheel, K&N air filters, Hella headlights etc. Garage kept, only driven
in good weather. 2nd owner since 1996. Well maintained, records & photos available. Strong engine, rebuilt transmission.
Drives like new. $14,000. Contact Don Camisi 609.439.3180 or [email protected]
SCHATTEN RAPPEN'
1019 Sycamore Avenue
Laurel Springs, NJ 08021

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