QuarterlyFall11 final.qxp:Quarterlywtr05 final layout

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QuarterlyFall11 final.qxp:Quarterlywtr05 final layout
QuarterlyFall11 final.qxp:Quarterlywtr05 final layout
the libretto for an opera based on her
family’s story, On Gold Mountain: The
One-Hundred-Year Odyssey of My Chinese American Family.
But if your first glimpse of See was
at a book signing, one might assume
her stroll to the podium would be as
the store’s owner, regretfully announcing the author couldn’t be in attendance. And so the plot thickens
when people discover someone so
identified with the Chinese culture
doesn’t fit the mold.
“I don’t look Chinese at all – I
have red hair and freckles, so I know
that’s kind of strange,” she says
with an upbeat tone of understanding and delight. “I think that in my
own family, you look around and
how do you identify yourself? It’s
the people you see around you. I
saw a lot of Chinese faces, so that’s
what I thought I was. Now I realize
if I went to Chinatown today, a place
I know so well and know every
shop, there are a lot of people who
would look at me and say, ‘She
doesn’t belong here.’
“When I go to China, it’s kind of
a larger version than Chinatown. I
feel like I get it and understand the
country and it feels very comfortable. But I realize that how I look
would not completely be accepted.
“I’m going to go to places where I
look exactly like I belong. And the
things people will say, I won’t get it
all. So that pushed me to think about
who I am, where do I fit in? It’s the
same thing as everyone else, mine
just has some twists on it, I suppose.
I’m trying to fit in and explain myself
to other people. So it sort of goes both
ways. I don’t know if that’s what
keeps me going or looking for new
stories, but it certainly is part of it.”
See describes herself as someone
who “has always been intrigued by
stories that have been lost, forgotten
or deliberately covered up.” But she
doesn’t identify herself with the
overlooked or oppressed characters
in some books, insisting she “had a
voice” as a child and flourished
within her biracial, bicultural family.
And she proudly notes the family’s
business, F. Suie One Company, has
been in operation since 1874, with
its present location on 1335 East Colorado Blvd. in Pasadena.
8/12/11
2:50 PM
Page 9
C
armine's Italian in South Pasadena opened in 1996 and continues to thrive as one of the leading Italian restaurants in the community.
Of recent Carmine's Italian has undergone a complete transformation. Emerging back into the community as a beautiful Old World
Trattoria with just the right elements of modernism.
The dining room is home to old black and white family photos,
beautiful concrete floors, high backed white leather booths, gorgeous
chandeliers and moody lighting, with the aromas of fresh garlic and
marinara in the air.
We still have all of your favorites on our menu, but have some wonderful new additions such as Filet Mignon, Osso Bucco, Seafood
Risotto, Sea Bass, and Polenta Marinara just to name a few.
We have a cozy private dining area, a beautiful patio, and offer full
service take out, delivery and catering for lunch and dinner. The dining
room is open for lunch and dinner 7 days a week. We are happy to take
your reservations and can accommodate large groups.
Carmine's has also launched the opening of their reinvented bar, the
Holy Water Room, which sits adjacent to the dining room. In true Al
Capone style, the bar area hosts a sunken 1920's baby grand piano, high
top oak tables, a stainless steel bar that sits 24 people, and snakeskin
wingback chairs.
The living room area consists of machine gun wallpaper, a marble
fireplace, museum shelving, chesterfield couches and an oversized
black velvet tufted ottoman.
We serve the full menu in the bar day and night and offer an amazing happy hour menu from 3:30 to 7:30 Monday through Saturday. We
have a wide selection of wines and beers, a long list of delicious signature drinks and a grand selection of spirits.
Carmine’s Italian & Holy Water Room
424 Fair Oaks Avenue • South Pasadena • (626) 799-2266
311 East Live Oak Avenue • Arcadia • (626) 445-4726
FALL 2011 • THE QUARTERLY MAGAZINE 9