Links to Literacy

Transcription

Links to Literacy
Links to Literacy
Presented by the Polk Local Assistive
Technology Team
WHAT ARE LITERACY CENTERS?
Our Goal
Literacy Stations are:
Areas within the classroom
where students can work alone
or interact with one another
using instructional materials to
teach, reinforce and/or enrich
a skill or concept.
Diller, Debbie. Literacy Work Stations. Portland: Stenhouse Publishers, 2003.
Why are they important:
Eric Jensen writes
“A change in location is the easiest way
to get the brain’s attention”
• Gives students the opportunity to
practice previously learned skills
• Helps to promote independence as
well as collaboration
Differences between Traditional
Centers and Literacy Stations
Traditional Centers
• Materials may have
only been introduced
once
• Centers change on a
weekly basis
Literacy Stations
• Materials are taught
first then placed in
station
• Stations stays up all
year. The material is
changed to reflect
topics, level or
strategies taught
Differences between Traditional
Centers and Literacy Stations
Traditional Centers
Literacy Stations
• Centers are often used by
students when they finish
their work
• All students do the same
activity
• Student use stations in a
meaningful independent
manner daily
• Materials are
differentiated to meet
different needs and levels
Three Core Literacy Centers
• Reading Comprehension
• Fluency
• Word Study
– Oral Language, Phonemic Awareness, Phonics,
Vocabulary
*Each activity should be leveled for
independent reading (95-100%
accuracy)
Southall, Margo. Differentiated Literacy Centers. New York City: Scholastic, 2007.
Planning to Meet Needs
• Assessment Data
– Formal and Informal Assessment
• Level of Support
• Learner Profile
– Interest Inventory
Southall, Margo. Differentiated Literacy Centers. New York City: Scholastic, 2007.
Teachers Role
• Modeling
– Students must first see many demonstrations
• Risk Free
– Practice with a peer when learning something
new
• Independent Work Level
– Differentiate assignments to meet students
individual levels and avoid behavior problems
• Clear Explicit Expectations
– Be sure that students really understand the
activities and review the rules often
• Accountability
– Tracking student use and progress
Ideas for Setting Up a Station
• Directions
– Auditory; Tape recorder, Single message
device(BigMacK)
– Visual;(Microsoft Word with clipart, Boardmaker,
Writing with Symbols. Pix writer)
• Buddy or Me
• Activity easily accessible and differentiated for all
students (responses-verbal, typed, written)
• Assistive Technology
– Is not always a computer
• Special Activity
– supplemental/differentiated activity
• Accountability log
Organizing
• Rotations
– Avoid catch up time
•Rotate twice
•Add a work study center
•Choice menu for those who finish quickly
• Time each center 20-25 minutes
– Allow 3 minutes for clean up
• Have visuals to label centers
• Do Not Disturb for the teacher
• Tracking and Organizing
Southall, Margo. Differentiated Literacy Centers. New York City: Scholastic, 2007.
FLORIDA’S READING FORMULA
Florida's Formula
for Reading Success
6+4+ii=iii
THE SWEET SIX
Oral language (New!)
Phonemic awareness
Phonics
Fluency
Vocabulary
Comprehension
And we include writing
Florida Center for Reading Research
http://fcrr.org/SCASearch/
Fab 4
• Screening
Progress monitoring
Diagnosis
Outcome measures (New!)
Ii: Initial Instruction
90 Minute block
* An effective reading program has to integrate the six
instructional components of effective reading
instruction into a comprehensive and cohesive
instructional design.
* Classroom teachers must use assessment data to plan
for and provide "student-tailored" instruction that
includes the following:
Explicit instructional strategies
Coordinated instructional sequences
Differentiated instruction
Print-rich instruction
* Whole group/small group
* All students, using differentiated instruction
iii=Immediate Intensive Intervention
90-minute reading block
* Small group or one-on-one
* Students with reading deficiencies
* Minimum of 20 minutes/day until
deficiency is remedied
May be provided by:
* Classroom teacher
* SAI teacher
* ELL teacher
* Reading recovery teacher
* Reading resource teacher
Oral Language
• Oral language involves both speaking
and listening for vocabulary
development.
• Children need opportunities to engage
in frequent conversations talking and
listening to responsive adults as well as
with their peers.
Oral Language
• Oral language as the primary support
for thinking, leads naturally to written
communication, which, in turn helps
readers expand their thinking and use
oral language with greater skill.
• It is a way for readers to construct
knowledge, generate new thinking,
clarify their own thinking and rehearse
thoughts for writing
Oral Language Strategies
Generating Questions
• Students who ask questions about what
they read comprehend more…
• Readers practice generating questions
& answers as they read text using sticky
notes or they may orally ask questions
during partner reading
• Increase student talk by teaching
students how to ask questions and use
partner talk opportunities
Oral Language Strategies
Class Discussion
Text discourse guides students to
understand text at a more
sophisticated level.
Wilkinson & Silliman, 2000
Text discourse builds on ideas and
promotes meaningful connections
between ideas.
Gersten et al., 2001
Oral Language Strategies
Summarizing and Retelling
• Prompt students to talk in complete
sentences
• When you model a retell, try to use
some of the target vocabulary in the
retell if possible
• Demonstrate how to use simple
sketches and diagrams when
completing retell sheets
• Retell sheets may be used for
monitoring and student partner checks
(evidence of learning)
Santoro, Chard, Howard & Baker, 2008
Oral Language Strategies
• Recognize when students have
contributed to a discussion by
repeating or rephrasing:
T: Brian noticed that the mother in the
story was angry.
• Present questions that turn the thinking
back to students for further
consideration.
T: Maria thinks the girl is upset. Does
anyone know why she is upset?
Phonemic Awareness
• The ability to hear, identify, and
manipulate sounds of spoken words.
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Recognizes individual sounds (phonemes)
Recognizes same sounds
Recognizes odd sounds in words
Combines sequence of sounds (blending)
Breaks a word into separate sounds
(segmenting)
Phonemic Awareness
Resources
• Software
– Phonics Companion
– Earobics 1,2 & Adolescent
– Kidspiration
• Internet Resources
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http://www.songsforteaching.com
http://www.findsounds.com
www.enchantedlearning.com/Rhymes.html
http://www.uiowa.edu
http://www.freereading.net/
Phonemic Resources
• Lite Tech
– Tape Recorder
• DLM
• Jack Hartman
– Language Master/ Tutorette
– Whisper Phones
• Mid Tech
– Leap Frog Desk, Mat, Pad
Phonics
• Understands the relationship between
letters of written language and sounds
of spoken language
– Identifies useful series of sounds
– Teach them in a logical sequence
– Apply sounds to reading and writing
Phonics Resources
• Software
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Startwrite
Phonics Companion
Reader Rabbit
Baileys Book House
Lets Go Read
• Internet
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Starfall.com
www.kizclub.com
http://pbskids.org/lions/
http://pbskids.org/lions/videos
http://www.earobics.com/gamegoo/gooey.html
Phonics Resources
• Lite Tech
– Page up
– Magnetic or stamp Letters
– Word Walls
• Mid Tech
– Franklin Homework Wiz
– Cheap Talk /Partner 4
Fluency
• Read text accurately and quickly
– Bridge between word recognition and
comprehension
– With Fluency a child needs to read &
reread decodable words and connect the
text
– Two approaches to improve Fluency
•Direct
•Indirect
Fluency and Automaticity
1. Have the students read orally for one
minute from text at their grade level.
Ask students to read in a normal
manner, not too fast or too slow.
2. Administer 3 probes.
3. Count the number of correct words in
one minute. Include errors in the one
minute period.
Grade
Fall
Winter
1
Spring
60 WPM
2
53
78
94
3
79
93
114
4
99
112
118
5
105
118
128
6
115
132
145
7
147
158
167
8
156
167
171
Fluency Resources
• Software
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Kurzweil, Wynn,textHelp
Soliloquy
Living Books
Fluent Reader
• Internet Resources
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www.magickeys.com/books
www.readingrockets.org
www.LDonline.org
Readers theater website (www.Reading Lady.com)
(3 Little Wolves)
– Dolch Powerpoint List
Fluency Resources
• Lite Tech
– Timers & Time timer software
– Taped recorded stories
– Students read to a tape
• High Tech
– Scanners & Computers
Vocabulary
Vocabulary is expressive (what you say)
and receptive (what you understand)
– Words used to verbally communicate
effectively
– Words that you use to write
– Words that you recognize in print
Selecting Vocabulary
• Tier 1 - basic words (baby, happy)
• Tier 2 – high-frequency words for
mature language users – key focus for
instruction (prefer, absurd)
• Tier 3 – low frequency words with
meaning limited to specific domains
(peninsula, isotope)
Center Possibilities
• Students tell what words mean using their
own words
• Have students give examples and non
examples
• Pair words and have students consider how
they are related: Would you suppress a
profound thought?
• Match words to pictures
• Fit words into closed sentences
• Match words to definitions in timed activity.
• Give examples of word use in alternate
contexts
Vocabulary Resources
• Software
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Kidspiration/Inspiration
Boardmaker
Reader Rabbit
Writing with Symbols
Pix Writer
Picture It
StartWrite
Intellitools programs
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merriam-webster.com /wordcentral.com
vocabulary.com
readwritethink.org/materials/comic/index.html
www.readwritethink.org/materials/wordbuild/
Factmonster.com/WordWise
• Internet
Vocabulary Resources
• Lite Tech
– Franklin Dictionary
– Reading Pen
– All-Turn-It Spinner
Comprehension
• Understanding what is read
– Make connections to self or real world
– Graphic Organizers
– Find Main idea and details
•Drawing conclusions
– Retelling/Summarizing
– Asking and answering “WH” questions
Comprehension Resources
• Software
– Kurzweil/Wynn/ Read&Write Gold/
eReader
– NaturalReaders
– Inspiration/Kidspiration
– Don Johnston, Start-to-Finish Books
– Intellitools, BalanceLiteracy
• Internet
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www.storyplace.org
www.tumblebooks.com
http://www.storylineonline.net/
http://www.janbrett.com/
www.readprint.com
Comprehension Resources
• Symbol World
• Lite Tech
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Color filters
Reading guides
Post It Notes
Highlighter pens & tapes
Arrow
Page Fluffers
• Mid Tech
– Iris Pen II
– Reading Pen
• High Tech
– Scanners & Computer
EliveSymbol World
Contains:
News
Films
Fun(Jokes)
Games
Features
Community
Recipes
Writing
• Writing Centers can help students
develop, practice and demonstrate
their literacy skills.
• Recent research that 70% of the
students graded classroom responses
are a result of written communication
Writing
• Writing Mechanics
– Raised Line Paper
– Pencil Grips
– Highlighters, pencils,
pens
– Writing Guides
– Slant Board
– Alpha Smart, Neo,
DANA, Writer
– Intellikeys
– Mini keyboards
– Software StartWrite
– Wikkistix
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Lite Tech
– Electronic Spell Check
– Digital Recorder
• High Tech
– Discover
– Computers
Writing Software
• Software
– Talking word Processors
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Scholastic Key
Customize Office Toolbar
Co: writer
Write Outl oud
IntelliTalk3
Kurzweil, Wynn, Read & Write
Gold
• Speak Write 101 (Polk County
only)
– Voice Recognition
• Dragon Naturally Speaking
• Word 2000 & XP
• Symbols to Text
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Clicker 4
Writing With Symbols
Pix Writer
Picture IT
• Multi Media
– BuildAbility
– PowerPoint
– IntelliPics Studio
Writing Internet Resources
• Internet
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www.readwritethink.org/materials/storymap
www.eduplace.com/graphicorganizer
www.literacycenter.net/parents_teacher
www.dltk-kids.com/type/writing_paper.htm
• Inspiration/Kidspiration
• Draft: Builder
http://www.polk-fl.net/staff/resources/ese/resources.htm

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