first MTP joint sprain `turf toe`_noquote_branded

Transcription

first MTP joint sprain `turf toe`_noquote_branded
Patient Information Sheet
First MTP Joint Sprain ‘Turf Toe’
First MTP Joint Sprain ‘Turf Toe’
This is a sprain to the 1st metatarsalphalangeal
joint (big toe), commonly caused by forced
hyperextension or forced hyperflexion resulting
in a sprain to the joint capsule and or ligaments.
Diagnosis
The diagnosis is usually made from the history
and from clinical testing. Further investigations
such as x-ray, MRI and ultrasound can be
undertaken to confirm the diagnosis and to
assess other structures.
Treatment
Treatment may include the following:
Illustration showing toe being
placed in hyperextension and
mechanism of acute injury
How does the Injury Occur
Sudden Onset
• The 1st MTP joint is forced into hyperextension
by landing on the front aspect of the foot
• When attempting to kick a ball the big toe
strikes the ground and is forced into
hyper-flexion
Gradual Onset
Predisposing factors include the following:
• Training on hard surfaces
• Poor foot biomechanics such as excessive
flattening
• Stiffness throughout the ankle, mid-foot or
forefoot.
• Soft flexible footwear
• Decrease Weight Bearing – After acute injury
a period of rest or relative rest may be
beneficial
• Taping – Taping could be used to help
support, protect and unload the joint.
• Footwear – Stiff soled shoes may be
recommended to make sure there isn’t too
much load being placed through the joint.
• Cortisone – If there are persistent symptoms
that do not settle after appropriate time then
cortisone may help with settling the
symptoms. This needs to be medically
prescribed and administered.
Photograph showing support
tape being applied to the toe
Pain Generator
• The pain generator is usually the synovitis
(inflammation) that occurs through the MTP
joint and also damage to the surrounding
soft tissue.
• Symptoms are usually in and around the big
toe with localised swelling and redness.
335 Hillsborough Rd, Warners Bay NSW 2282
T.(02) 4954 5330 | F.(02) 4954 5380 | [email protected] | W.www.advancedphysio.com.au

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