LÁHKO

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LÁHKO
LÁHKO
Karst landscape in
a class of its own
2°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
3°
Rich and varied karst
landscape
Láhko is the karst national park. Karst
­topography is a geological formation shaped
by the dissolution of carbonate rock by water.
Calcite marble is the predominant rock type in
the national park and leaves its mark on the
landscape and the flora. Caves, clints and grikes,
dolines, stream sinks (swallow holes), natural
bridges and blind valleys are found everywhere.
The calcareous bedrock forms a basis for rich
plant life and interesting wildlife. The national
park has many special ecosystems, including
­calcareous lakes. Láhko is encircled by large
hydroelectric plant reservoirs.
The park borders up to the Saltfjellet-Svartisen
National Park and the Langvassdalen-Ruffedalen
Nature Reserve, and is thus part of one of the
largest protected areas in Norway.
Subterranean river (MH)
4°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
5°
Skiing, with the Simlebreen glacier in the background (TOM)
E NJ O Y THE SCENERY
Hiking in Láhko is a marvellous experience. Spectacular
karst formations, ranging from millimetre-deep rills to
large fissures and shafts, are seen everywhere. Rivers
vanish beneath the ground only to reappear in a completely different place. Corbel’s canyon, with its water traps,
caves and underground rivers, is especially interesting.
Outdoor activities
Hunting and fishing are popular pastimes and several
lakes have good fish stocks. The two most used starting
points for trips are the car parks near the Langvatnet and
Namnlausvatnet lakes. They offer short, easy walks into
the park.
Outdoor activities are well prepared for in Láhko.
T-marked paths cross the park from Langvatnet to
Namnlausvatnet and over to Gråtådalen, a valley in the
east. Local hunter and angler associations have several
cabins in and around the park, which can be ­rented. The
Norwegian Trekking Association has ­unlocked cabins just
outside the park in Gråtådalen and close to Fellvatnet.
There is also an open turf hut in Kvitstein­dalen. Those
who prefer not to hike along marked paths should visit
the northern and eastern parts of Láhko.
The area is less
accessible in
­winter because the
­mountain roads
that approach
the park are not
ploughed. Láhko
is, never­theless,
­popular for ice
­fishing and for
­skiing. The ski
­season lasts until
May in this area.
On Corbel’s bridge (MH)
6°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
7°
A natural bridge on the Sundvasselva river (LAU)
LA NDSCAP E AND GEO LOG Y
Large, continuous area of alpine karst
Many lakes and rivers
Virtually all of the Láhko National Park is within an
­exten­sive belt of carbonate rocks. The park is a unique,
unbroken, alpine limestone plateau. The water ­dissolves
the bedrock, forming a variety of karst features. Some diorite and granite outcrops are found in the northwest, and
layers of mica schist and mica gneiss occur ­everywhere.
The national park has many lakes, notably Fiskvatnet,
Svalvatnet and Seglvatnet. The bedrock leaves its mark
on the rivers, which often vanish underground for longer
or shorter stretches before reappearing.
The central part of the park is a plateau at around 600 m
a.s.l., encircled by mountain massifs and alpine peaks. A
north-south row of mountains reaches heights of 10001300 m a.s.l. and forms a prominent wall and boundary
to the east. Small glaciers originating in the Simlebreen
glacier are eye-catchers. Much of the Svartisen ice cap
can be seen in the south.
The calcareous lakes have rich bottom vegetation with
lime-demanding stoneworts, giving good biotopes and
feeding conditions for benthic creatures and fish.
LangvassdalenRuffedalen NR
LÁKHO
NATIONAL PARK
Fellvasstua
Beiarstua
Sundvannshytta
Håkonbu
Fiskvasshytta
Gåsvannshytta
Fiskvannshytta
Svalvannshytta
Kvitsteindalsgammen
Gråtådalstua
Saltfjellet-Svartisen NP
Saltfjellet-Svartisen
NP
Digital cartography: Gåsvatn kart-tjenester, www.kart-tjenester.no Digital map data: Statens kartverk N250. Order no. MAD12002-R125240
LEGEND
National Park
Nature Reserve
Cabin, unstaffed
Open turf hut
0 km
2
4
6
M = 1:200.000
8
10 km
10°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
11°
Many waders, like golden plovers, ringed plovers and
Temminck’s stints, breed in the park. Lapland buntings
also seem to thrive well. Many birds of prey and owls are
active in years when small rodents are abundant.
The insect and benthic fauna has been little studied,
but there is known to be a remarkably high diversity of
­species on land and in the water.
Ptarmigan and willow grouse thrive in the park. The elk
is the only wild member of the deer family living here,
but semi-domesticated reindeer are also present. The
wolverine is the only large predator seen here every year.
Dotterel (DK)
A NI MAL AND B IRD L IF E
Important habitat for species
The Láhko National Park is an important habitat for
many species. Divers, ducks, waders, birds of prey and
passerines are common. Several species, including
scaup, twite, gyr falcon and black-throated diver, are on
the Norwegian Red List of endangered and vulnerable
species. Black-throated and red-throated divers use
many of the small and medium-sized lakes as feeding
and/or nesting sites, and some lakes are also staging
posts for geese, ducks and waders on autumn migration.
Mountain burnets mating (DK)
12°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
13°
H I S T O RY A N D C UL T URA L H E RI T A G E RE L I C S
The national park has many cultural heritage sites origi­
nating from former hunting and trapping activities,
Sámi settlement and reindeer husbandry, and more
recent times. Most of those recorded trace back to
reindeer husbandry, and include settlements, migration
routes, reindeer fences, tent sites and hearths. Some are
thought to be older than 100 years.
A common blue on wood cranesbill (DK)
Alpine gentian (DK)
PLA NT L IFE
Several Red Listed species
The flora is extremely rich, and includes some demanding and also rare species. Most of the Láhko National
Park is mountainous and calcareous, and is dominated
by mountain avens heath. Well over 200 plant species
have been recorded here, with alpine plants and lowland
plants growing side by side. Several species are on the
Norwegian Red List. The most interesting disco­veries
are perhaps Draba cacuminum ssp. angusticarpa, a
subspecies of whitlow-grass, and Carex scirpoidea, a
sedge, both of which are globally rare. Láhko is also a
core area for stoneworts (charophytes), Tolypella canadensis being the most notable.
People travelling through the area and using it in connec­
tion with their occupation and leisure activities have also
left many remains. The rivers in the area surrounding
Láhko have been used to generate hydroelectric power
for a very long time, and traces left by construction work
and other activities can be seen in the mountains, also
inside the park.
Láhko is now part of to the Saltfjellet Reindeer Grazing
District, but little grazing takes place within the park.
Domestic livestock have also grazed the area.
The park has little woodland. The only fairly large area
is Fellvasskogen, where birch trees predominate, but
rowans and goat willows also occur. The foliage has
been hard hit by autumnal moth larvae, and there is a
great deal of dead wood.
Rich fens dominate in depressions and on flat ground
beside rivers and lakes.
Fellvasskogen is tall-shrub woodland (KEM)
14°
Láhko National Park
Láhko National Park
15°
Láhko National Park
in brief
Reinkalv glacier (THC)
In a national park, you are
one of Nature’s guests
• You may go wherever you like, on foot or on
skis, but anything with an engine is basically
prohibited.
• You can stop wherever you like and pitch a
tent. Always tidy up afterwards and take your
rubbish with you.
• You can light a fire, but remember the general ban on fires in woodland from 15 April
to 15 September. Show consideration when
­collecting firewood.
• You can pick berries, mushrooms and common
plants for your own use. Show consideration
for karst formations, cultural heritage sites,
vegetation and animal life. Take extra care in
the breeding season.
• Hunting and fishing are permitted. Remember
to buy hunting and fishing licences. Never use
live fish as bait, or transfer live fish from one
river or lake to another.
• You can take your dog with you, but remember
to keep it on a lead from 1 April to 20 August.
ISBN (Trykt) 978-82-8284-113-9 ISBN (PDF) 978-82-8284-114-6
Layout: Guri Jermstad AS. Photo: Anders Langangen (AL), Dagfinn Kolberg/Kolberg Naturfoto (DK),
Mia Husdal (MH), Trond Olav Madsen (TOM), Lars A. Uttakleiv/Aurland naturverkstad (LAU),
Thomas Holm Carlsen/Bioforsk Nord Tjøtta (THC), Kjell Eivind Madsen (KEM).
Front cover: Skiing, with Skjelåtind (1637 m a.s.l.) in the background (KEM),
Karren (flutes and rills) are typical karst formations (DK). Rear cover: Saravann (AL)
Print: GRØSET™
Where:
The boroughs of Gildeskål, Meløy and Beiarn in the county of
Nordland.
How to get to the Láhko National Park:
Power station roads approach the park from Sundsfjord in Gildeskål
and Fykanvatnet in Meløy. Fv 17 (the main coastal road) is the main
road in the district. An express passenger boat and the daily coastal
Hurtigruten ship call at Ørnes. In Beiarn, you can enter the park at
Gråtådalen or Arstaddammen. You get to Beiarn on Fv 812 and Fv
813. From Sundsfjord, take the power station road to parking sites at
Hellarfjellet or Langvatnet; the road is not ploughed in winter. From
Glomfjord, take the power station road from Fykanvatnet to parking
sites at Namnlausvatnet and Storglomvatnet; this road is generally
cleared by Easter.
Information on accommodation and other services:
Nord-Norsk Reiseliv AS: www.visitnordland.no
Meløy Tourist Information Office: www.visitmeloy.no
Cabins and huts:
Fellvasstua, Bodø Trekking Association
Håkonbu near Sundvatnet and a hut at Fiskvatnet; Gildeskål
Association of Hunters and Anglers
Cabins at Svalvatnet, Fiskvatnet, Sundvatnet and Gåsvatnet; Glomfjord
Association of Hunters and Anglers
Turf hut in Kvitsteindalen; Meløy Borough Council
See also www.njff.no, www.ut.no and www.godtur.no
Check the standard of the cabin beforehand and whether it is ­unlocked
Tips:
Corbel’s canyon near Saravatnet is in an area with a great variety of
karst formations. Corbel’s bridge is spectacular, and also figures in the
national park logo.
Maps:
Norge 1:50 000: 141 Svartisen (1928 I Glomfjord) and 142 Beiardalen
(2028 IV Arstaddalen and 2028 III Blakkådal). Ramblers map of Meløy.
The large Saltfjell map.
Established: 2012
Size: 188 km2
Adjacent protected areas:
Saltfjellet-Svartisen National Park
Langvassdalen-Ruffedalen Nature Reserve
Management:
www.nasjonalparkstyre.no
Supervision:
Norwegian Nature Inspectorate, phone +47 73 58 05 00
More information:
www.norgesnasjonalparker.no
NORWAY’S
NATIONAL PARKS
Norwegian National Parks are our common
natural heritage
We set up National Parks to safeguard large
areas of countryside – from the seashore to the
mountaintops. For Nature’s own sake, ourselves
and future generations. National Parks boast
magnificent scenery with varied animal and
plant life, waterfalls, glaciers, lofty mountains,
endless plateaus, deep forests and lush woodlands, and beautiful fjords and coasts. You will
also find cultural heritage remains showing how
the areas were used in the past. The National
Parks offer a multitude of opportunities for
­thrilling encounters with natural history.
Make use of our magnificent nature – on its
own terms.
Welcome to Norwegian National Parks.
www.miljodirektoratet.no

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