Dr Takila Curry Dr. Takila Curry Scott Sauls March 23, 2011

Transcription

Dr Takila Curry Dr. Takila Curry Scott Sauls March 23, 2011
PRESENTERS:
Dr.
Dr Takila Curry
Scott Sauls
March 23, 2011
Š
Access refers to the ease with which students
acquire reading materials
ƒ
Š
Appeall means that
A
th t students
t d t are ffree and
d
encouraged to read information that they find
highly interesting
ƒ
Š
Varying reading material provided in a variety of
ways instead of requiring students to bring it from
home
Must be appropriate reading level
Conducive Environment refers to the
atmosphere provided for reading
ƒ
Ideally it is relaxed and comfortable
Students identify
topics of interest
to them
Students interact
with the
information
Students write about
their reading in their
notebooks
Students identify
reading material
Students are
provided with
p
uninterrupted time
to read
According to Macrorie (1988), “Teachers around the country and I have been challenging students to do what we call I‐searches – not Re‐searches, in which the job is to search again what someone has hich the job is to search again hat someone has
already searched – but original searches in which persons scratch an itch they feel, one so
persons scratch an itch they feel, one so marvelously itchy that they begin rubbing a finger tip against it and the rubbing feels so good that they dig in with a fingernail. A search to fulfill a need, not that the teacher has imagined for them b
but one they feel themselves. (p.14)”
h f l h
l
( 14)”
•PRRT ((Personal
Reading and Reaction
Time)
•Classes self contained
•All people read
including teacher and
principal
•Pick a topic of interest
that may change
•Students are assured
that there will be no test
•Students may have to
share with classmates
or write about what they
have read
•Answer interest
questions and share
•Helps with students
who may be struggling
with what to read
•SRL ((Silent
Reading and
Learning)
•30 minutes, 3 times
per week
•No talking,
sleeping, or doing
homework
•Read about
anything
•Divide into groups
to discuss topics of
interest
•Complete an
information form
with interests
•My
y Topic
p Period
(MTP)
•English classes 15
minutes longer in
Freshman/Sophomore
classes
•May read about
anything
•React to reading in
notebooks – not
checked
•No sleeping and no
homework
•Emphasis on
personal inquiry and
enjoyment of reading
“Some SSR programs use what is commonly called p g
y
‘book flooding’ (Pilgreen, 2000). In such cases, the teacher accumulates so many books it creates a veritable ‘flood’ of titles and authors. In most of the SSR programs reviewed by Pilgreen, these books were primarily fiction
were primarily fiction. •Books are secured
based on the students’
interests
•Secure the assistance
of the Media Specialist
•Do not be limited by
just books; Web sites
may also be used to get
resources
•Books are
accumulated
according to
student interest
•Be flexible with
what students read
(Sports & athletes,
animals, trades, etc.
can all be excellent
choices)
•Help
p students find
reading material
related to the their
topics
•Books,
•Books articles,
articles
documentaries on
DVD, and Web sites
may be used to secure
the necessary reading
material
“I recommend 20 – 30 minute sessions at least twice per week, and ideally more. Additionally, students should experience some version of SSR at every grade level
experience some version of SSR at every grade level through grade 10.” (Marzano, 2004)
“Students might also be allowed to go to areas of the school that provide comfortable space for silent reading.” (Marzano, 2004)
•Devote the first 20
minutes at least three
times a week after lunch
•EVERYONE reads
g support staff
including
and administration
•Make the room
comfortable – include
beanbag chairs, soft
rugs, etc.
•Should be a “relaxed”
time for everyone
•Quiet
Q
time is
observed; some
kids go to the Media
Center to observe
DVDs related to
their topic
•Utilize technology
resources to allow
students to extend
learning
•20 minutes a day,
y, 3
times per week
•Reinforce
expectations of no
homework or sleeping
•No announcements
are made and kids are
allowed to read
material that they are
interested in
According to Marzano:
“…all students should have an academic notebook with a section devoted to their topic of choice.” ““…the purpose of the student academic notebook h
f h
d
d i
b k
as described here is to enhance academic background knowledge ”
background knowledge.
p
f
Responses in the notebook should be free responses or structured responses and in most cases should be optional.
•Take 5 minutes to allow
student reflection
•Have students write
about what they have
read about
•Does not need to be
directed writing
although thought
provoking questions can
be used
•Use nonlinguistic
representations about
what has been read
•Take 5 minutes to
allow for student
reflection
•Have students
create a graphic
organizer
•Give thought
g
provoking questions
for kids to respond to
•If students choose
NOT to write have
them draw a picture or
create a graphic
organizer
“A considerable amount of research and theory “A
id bl
t f
h d th
indicates that a social environment optimizes learning” (see Bodrova & Leong, 1996; Martinez & Roser, 2003.)
(see Bodrova & Leong, 1996; Martinez & Roser, 2003.)
“The more students learn about a topic, the more they have need to share it with others. This is consistent with Pilgreen’s (2000) principle of encouragement.” As students hear others become excited about their d
h
h b
i d b
h i
topics, they feel validated in their own enthusiasm.”
•About once a week,
organize students into
groups of 3-5 to discuss
what has been read
•All members must
contribute something
•Have a volunteer to
share with the class
what was discussed
•These must be nonthreatening
•Every
y Friday
y during
g
the last 10 minutes
students share what
they have learned
•May be small group
or large group
format
•Be flexible with
sharing time
•Organize
g
students
into small groups
•Form groups based
on random criteria
(reading skills,
skills
common interests,
etc.)
•Look for and focus on
common interests
within the class to
generate discussion
Q
, IN THE SSR
“CONSEQUENTLY,
PROGRAM, TEACHERS SHOULD
ALLOW AND ENCOURAGE
STUDENTS TO SEEK
INFORMATION ON WHATEVER
TOPICS THEY DESIRE,
DESIRE
REGARDLESS OF HOW NARROW
OR SPECIFIC THOSE TOPICS
MIGHT BE.”

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