March 21, 2014

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March 21, 2014
March 21, 2014
WEST WINDSOR
& PLAINSBORO
NEWS
Headliners:
Former Chief Cox Dies, page 11; Kristian Dudchak Leads North Tennis, 16; Liz Adams Art on View, 28.
School Budget OKd Despite 2 Dissenters
T
he budget was the hot topic
at the March 11 WW-P
school board meeting, with
state aid, budget caps, and process
fueling the debate.
The budget presented was virtually the same as the one presented at the February 18 board meeting, with one exception. As assistant superintendent for finance
Larry Shanok explained, “The
state just sent us information regarding how much state aid we
will be receiving this year. And,
unexpectedly, the amount has
gone up from last year” — a total
of $7,961,085, an increase of approximately $200,000 over last
year.
Shanok explained that this additional aid will be allocated to
special education instruction and
transportation (for those students
transported to out-of-district
schools). The total proposed budget for 2014-’15 will be
$164,625,300, an increase of 1.34
percent over last year’s budget.
Bowties and Butterflies: West Windsor resident Ilene
Dube’s mixed media work, on view at the Gallery at Mer­
cer College to April 3, was selected for a Purchase Award
from the County Cultural and Heritage Commission.
S
cience became a hot topic for
the West Windsor-Plainsboro
School Board, at both the
March 12 board meeting and a
March 13 “Coffee with the Principal” at High School North.
At the board meeting the conceptual physics class, taught by
Danielle Bugge of High School
South, gave a presentation demonstrating how a hands-on approach
has been utilized to encourage students to learn physics concepts and
also to learn to love science. The
students demonstrated their rocket
launch project, as well as how the
donation of a high-speed camera
has enhanced their learning by allowing them to look back at experiments and view results not visible
to the naked eye.
The students said that this class
has helped them learn independence and life skills, reinforced the
21st-century competencies, and allowed them to retain the information better than if it was just presented in lecture format.
By contrast, another science
class that attempts to teach students
through a non-traditional, hands-
by Sue Roy
For taxpayers this means a total
tax levy increase of 2.35 percent,
the maximum allowed under New
Jersey state law.
“We have to balance the idea of
fiscal restraint with the impact on
students, particularly class size
considerations,” said Shanok. “If
you compare West WindsorPlainsboro to other high-performing school districts, our student-
By a vote of 7-2, the
WW-P School Board
approved a 2014-’15
budget that includes a
2.35 percent tax levy
increase.
to-teacher ratio is higher than all
of them, and our student-to-administrator ratio of 247 to 1 is significantly higher than even the
next highest district. And yet our
actual per pupil costs are in the
middle. Some districts, such as
Spotlight on Science: iS Biology pilot Working?
on methodology has not been receiving such high accolades.
Several parents appeared at the
board meeting to express concern
over the honors biology pilot program, currently in place at High
School North. This program, which
was begun during the second half
of 2013, is being offered in all biology classes taught by teachers
Robert Corriveau and Kristina Nicosia (including their college prep
biology courses). And many of the
parents whose students are enrolled
in these classes — and the students
themselves — have expressed dissatisfaction with the course.
At the board meeting, though
parents did acknowledge that the
programs’ goals — to teach students to think independently and to
allow for individualized teaching
of students — are certainly laudable, they expressed concerns
about how the course is being implemented. Said parent Yingchao
Zhang, “When we are making curriculum decisions, we need to con-
by Sue Roy
sider how students learn, and how
they can learn better. We need to be
very careful and move slowly. We
should have a full evaluation of a
pilot program and obtain feedback
Parents want to know:
Are honors biology students ‘really learning
knowledge as opposed
to skills?’
from the students, parents, and others, before we claim ‘success.’”
“I have a ninth grader in honors
bio,” said Adam Baker. “And it has
been a very poor experience for
him. I have heard nothing positive
from any parent whose child is in
this class. The teachers are good;
it’s the new style of teaching, the
new methodology, which is the
problem. There is a real disconnect
between the goals of the pilot and
P RINCETON
O TOLARYNGOLOGY
A SSOCIATES
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the reality. The teachers are very
slow to give feedback to the students because it is difficult to manage all of these projects. There is a
lot of down time for the students,
and they are losing their enthusiasm. Before we expand this type of
pilot program to honors chemistry
or any other subject, we should
make sure we have it right in biology first.”
Another
parent, Angelina
Caldwell, noted that “the students
are learning good skills but not
enough basic information. It is
great that the district is willing to
try new things, and you are to be
applauded for that, but we need to
assess these types of programs to
make sure they are really working.
Are the students really learning
knowledge as opposed to skills?”
Board president Tony Fleres responded. “One of the strengths of
this district is our concerned parents, who work with us for the benefit of our students. I thank all of
you for coming here.”
Princeton, spend more per pupil,
and others, such as Montgomery
and South Brunswick, spend less.
We are not anxious to increase our
student to teacher and administrator ratios much more, because our
students will surely be negatively
impacted.”
Board of Education president
Tony Fleres justified the proposed
tax levy increase. “For the past
two years we have had the perfect
storm of events that allowed us to
have a zero percent tax levy increase, or even a reduction, especially because previously we had
to budget for the charter school,
which never materialized, so we
hadn’t needed to spend the money
on the charter school. Now we no
longer budget for that, so the
money is no longer available for
future tax relief. But we knew that
this couldn’t go on indefinitely —
costs and expenses continue to
increase, and we are at the point
where if we don’t increase the
Continued on page 12
Superintendent David Aderhold
also thanked the parents and invited them to a follow-up meeting at
High School North to further discuss the concerns with the honors
biology program. Though he would
not promise an immediate resolution, he assured parents that he
would listen carefully to their concerns and address them.
Approximately 150 parents attended that follow-up meeting,
which was one of the four “Coffee
with the Principal” meetings hosted and sponsored by the North Parent, Teacher, and Students Association (PTSA). And the tone was decidedly less formal at this meeting.
Aderhold, Assistant Superintendent Martin Smith, Science Curriculum Supervisor Rebecca
McLelland-Crawley, Principal Michael Zapicchi, and many members
of the board of education were in
attendance.
PTSA President Suparna Mahableshawarkar explained, “we host
a ‘Coffee with the Principal’ event
every marking period. And at every
WW-P’s Free Community neWsPaPer
Continued on page 15
WWPinFo.Com
Letters: When Will WW Bury Its Power Lines?
Plainsboro Taxes Up .98 Percent
New Construction on Its Way in WW
WW-P Dancers Present ‘The Little Mermaid’
Police Reports
29
Classifieds
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issue Date: marCh 21, 2014
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31
2
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
Joan Eisenberg
Views & Opinions
Office: 609-951-8600 x110
Cell: 609-306-1999
[email protected]
www.JoanSells.com
Greater Princeton
Not to be Missed!
Owner/Sales
Associate
To the Editor:
Greenstein for
Congress
T
his is an open letter to the
Howard Hughes Corporatate Senator Linda Greenstein
tion and to the West Windsor
is running to replace Repre- Planning Board as well as the comsentative Rush Holt in the munity at large. From my reading
12th Congressional District. West of an article in the March 7 edition
Windsor was represented by Linda of the WW-P News, the Hughes
Greenstein in the State Assembly group is looking for suggestions as
and Senate for 10 years, and during to how to develop the parcel of land
that time she provided exemplary that is the former American Cyanaservice, always making her pres- mid site.
ence known and responding to loI would like to see this site becal needs as well
come a solar cell
as making us
farm.
proud of her
One suggestion for
To encourage
thoughtful, prothe
Hughes
Howard
Hughes:
Make
gressive, and ingroup to develthe American Cyanadependent
op a solar farm
views. That is
mid site a solar cell
they should be
why the underoffered either
farm.
signed current
tax free or farm
and
former
land assessment.
members of the West Windsor I would like to see the Hughes
Township Council are pleased to group come before the planning
endorse Linda Greenstein for Con- board with a concept that this solar
gress.
farm is much more than just an orGeorge Borek, dinary solar farm. It could be an
Kristina Samonte experimental site for the latest in
Current Members,
solar technology.
West Windsor Council
The Hughes group and PSE&G,
Jacqueline Alberts, which has an office near the site,
Diane Ciccone, Alison Miller, could be encouraged to partner up.
Franc Gambatese, As a part of the status of a researchHeidi Kleinman development and production facility (i.e. to turn a profit), the Hughes
Past Members,
West Windsor Council
S
Robbinsville: 5 BR, including Fabulous In-Law Suite on 1st Floor, 4.5 BA,
3 Car Garage. Meticulously maintained and decorated, this lovely home
features Hardwood Flooring, Recessed Lighting, Ceiling Fans and High &
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Open Letter to
Howard Hughes
Continued on page 5
Call Joan Today for More Information or to see a Property!
Office: 609-951-8600 x110 Mobile 609-306-1999
Sara Hastings
Editor
Lynn Miller
Community News Editor
Sue Roy
Municipal News Editor
Samantha Sciarrotta
Sports
Suzette Lucas
Photography
Vaughan Burton
Production
Amanda Arena
Michael Zilembo
Account Executives
Stacey Micallef
Production Manager
Lawrence L. DuPraz 1919-2006
Founding Production Advisor
Euna Kwon Brossman
Michele Alperin, Bart Jackson
Dan Aubrey
Contributing Writers
Richard K. Rein
Editorial Director
For inquiries, call 609-243-9119.
Fax: 609-452-0033.
E-mail: [email protected]
Home page: www.wwpinfo.com.
Mail: 12 Roszel Road, Suite C-205,
Princeton, NJ 08540.
Co-publishers:
Jamie Griswold and Tom Valeri
TESTIMONIALS
• WhyNews
DonWe welcome letters. E-mail [email protected]
© 2014 Community
Service.
na?
THE AMERICAN DREAM: HOME OWNERSHIP
LET'S DO IT TOGETHER!
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100 Canal Pointe Blvd.
Princeton, NJ 08540
609-987-8889 Office
609-903-9098 Cell Preferred
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MARCH 21, 2014
THE NEWS
CallawayHenderson.com
39 North Main Street
Cranbury, NJ 08512
609.395.0444
HIGHTSTOWN
Donna Levine
$164,000
EAST WINDSOR
Janet Stefandl
$260,000
MONROE
Donna Levine
$375,000
MONROE TOWNSHIP
Margaret Peters
$1,220,000
PRINCETON
Cheryl Goldman
$2,650,000
ROOSEVELT
Anne Setzer
$325,000
WEST WINDSOR
Catherine Stinson
$429,900
WEST WINDSOR
Janet Stefandl
$1,248,000
PRINCETON
Maura Mills
$2,800,000
INTRODUCING
NEWLY PRICED
CRANBURY
Anne Setzer
$325,000
CHESTERFIELD
Danielle Spilatore
$485,000
PRINCETON
Ronald A Connor
$1,325,000
PRINCETON
Cradle Rock Road
$2,995,000
WEST WINDSOR
Vanessa Gronczewski
$575,000
PRINCETON
Robin Froehlich
$1,399,000
PRINCETON
Amy Stackpole Brigham
$3,150,00
INTRODUCING
NORTH BRUNSWICK
Michelle Blane
$169,000
HIGHTSTOWN
Donna Levine
$179,000
OH
NEW CONTRUCTION
INTRODUCING
BORDENTOWN CITY
Alison Stem
$214,500
PLAINSBORO TOWNSHIP
Gloucester Street,
$340,000
WSJ “House of the Day”
EAST WINDSOR
Janet Stefandl
$227,500
PLAINSBORO TOWNSHIP
Merlene Tucker
$350,000
WEST WINDSOR
Barbara Rose
$585,000
PRINCETON
Maura Mills
$1,850,000
PRINCETON
Province Line Road
$3,375,000
WEST WINDSOR
Maura Mills
$235,900
PLAINSBORO TOWNSHIP
Yakenya Moise
$369,000
PLAINSBORO
Jane Henderson Kenyon
$629,900
EAST BRUNSWICK
Gail Eldridge
$1,950,000
PRINCETON
Jane Henderson Kenyon
$3,500,000
PRINCETON
Lise Thompson
$1,997,000
PRINCETON
Laura Huntsman
$4,300,000
NEWLY PRICED
HAMILTON
Kathryn Baxter
$240,000
ROOSEVELT
Donna Levine
$375,000
SOUTH BRUNSWICK
Carolyn Spohn
$850,000
OH
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Each Office Is Independently Owned And Operated. Subject To Errors, Omissions, Prior Sale Or Withdrawal Without Notice. Sotheby’s Auction House fine art used with permission.
3
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
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My Priorities Are Simple. They’re Yours!
Suburban Mom
W
hen I tell my kids that
I’m going to be the kind
of grandmother who literally rolls around on the floor with
her grandchildren, it’s because I
learned it from my mom. Kyungha
Park Kwon, aka Katie, on the eve
of her 80th birthday, still works out
and runs after my dad — literally
and figuratively. She left Korea at
the age of 28 to settle in a country
where she knew nothing of the language or culture, bravely and without complaint. I owe my life and
the good things in it to her.
During the Korean War, she and
her family fled Seoul. She was 16
when she went into the world to
find work to help feed the hungry
mouths at home. She landed as a
secretary at the Naval Academy library, where she caught the eye of
my father. He was her boss, but he
took a special interest in making
sure that she would continue her
education, though it was disrupted
by the civil war.
When the war ended, with his
help and encouragement, she attended the prestigious Ewha Women’s University in Seoul. Shortly
after graduating, she married him.
by Euna Kwon Brossman
It remains somewhat of a sore
spot with me that the Korean elders
— notorious for their lack of tact —
would cluck over me when I was
young. I can still remember the
sting of their comments, “Oh, your
mother was so beautiful and how all
the young men used to flock around
The way of mothers is to
do everything in their
powers to make their
loved ones comfortable.
her, and how persistent your smart
father was to win her. Isn’t it too bad
that you look like your father and
not your mother?” Even so, I never
resented my beautiful mother. She
was the soft parent, our cushion
against our more stern, disciplinarian father and the harsh world.
It is only with the wisdom of my
years and life experience that I can
appreciate how difficult life must
have been for her in those early
years. She couldn’t speak English;
she didn’t have any family near
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her; and any kind of Korean community simply did not exist in central Michigan in the early ’60s,
where we settled for our first years
in America. There were no Korean
grocery stores. Every few months,
her mother — my grandmother —
would send us huge brown packages laden with the smells and
tastes of the old country. Sometimes there would be a small toy or
treasure for my brother and me. But
mostly those packages were fragrant with red pepper powder to
pickle kimchee at home. We
breathed in the scent of seaweed in
flat sheets and the salted dried
squid that my mother would roast
over the open flame on the stove.
I can’t begin to imagine how
lonely my mother must have been,
with my father at work all day and
only two small children for company. How she must have pined for
the sweet familiarity of home and
eagerly breathed in the love packed
in those brown boxes that traveled
over the Pacific Ocean. I think of
my mom like one of the pioneer
women of the old, Wild West —
steadfast and strong, making a new
life in a strange land with courage.
I remember so wanting to be like
the other kids. I invited three of my
best friends from first grade over
for lunch one day, and told my
mother to make American food. I
remember walking into the house,
peeking into the kitchen, and seeing the table set for four. The
Campbell’s chicken noodle soup
was steaming from the bowls, and
four plates were laden with sandwiches, an American food she had
learned how to make. But I told her
that Ann’s mother had invited us
and she was going to make pizza,
so never mind about lunch.
Capital Properties & Estates
Cell(Preferred)(609)955-1310
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ne of our earliest collective set
of memories — my brother
and I — involve the Saturday
morning driving lessons my father
would give my mother in our 1964
Plymouth. I still hear the whine of
the engine, the switching of the
gears and my father’s impatient
voice. How I hated those mornings,
trapped in the back seat by loud
voices, wishing we were home
watching cartoons. It would be
years before my mother would
drive, and even then, reluctantly.
I also used to be so impatient
with my mother for what I perceived to be her passivity in letting
my dad be the boss of everything.
“Why don’t you stand up for yourself,” I would grumble, with my
mid-’70s feminist sensitivities.
“Why do you have to serve him his
food on a tray so he can watch the
news? Why do you have to iron his
shirts every morning? Let him do it
himself!” She would respond in her
sweet way, “I don’t have to do it, I
want to do it. He’s your dad.”
Now I get it, because I find my
mother in myself all the time. They
say it will happen and you want to
deny its truth, but it is indeed the
way of mothers and daughters and
time. Like my mom, I do everything in my power to make the lives
of my loved ones happy and comfortable. I serve them food on a tray
(sometimes) and I would iron a
fresh shirt for Bill if he wanted (he
would rather send them to the dry
cleaner, thank goodness). The best
thing I have learned about being a
mom is from my own mom, who is
this family’s original Suburban
Mom. She’s the best and way more
kind and patient — and beautiful
— yes, I have heard it so — than I
will ever be. So happy birthday, my
dear mother, my Ummah.
MARCH 21, 2014
Correction
Letters & Opinions
Continued from page 2
group will make public what discoveries are
found. Every member of our community, especially those of us who live in a home or live
in an apartment or work in a building could
benefit from the knowledge gathered at such a
facility. Additionally, the young people of our
community can see the possibilities for the future. Perhaps someone in the area might even
have an idea that could be tested at this station.
Steve Tayler
Plainsboro
Before Other Projects,
Bury the Utility Poles
S
everal years ago, there was a very brief,
passing discussion regarding burying the
power / utility poles in the commercial district
of Princeton Junction. I know this because I
mentioned it.
Linda Geevers stated “it would be too expensive.” Really? Did she have any cost estimates?
As previously written, this cost seems not
to have bothered Princeton, Plainsboro, Robbinsville, and many other area communities.
If West Windsor is (still) the Best Town in
the World, why has this initiative not progressed? Because the mayor didn’t think of
it? He has had 20 years or more than 7,300
days to do something.
By contrast, the public gets three minutes
every two weeks to make constructive suggestions.
This should be a much higher priority over
the Asian Pocket Park. Perhaps with the power poles removed, we can grow and harvest
bamboo along both sides of the roadway?
Subterranean utilities should be considered before any new paving is done through
the commercial district. Under no circumstances should the county do the paving because its quality of construction is reprehensible. Fact.
Pete Weale
I
n its March 7 issue the News misspelled the names of two attendees at
the West Windsor Arts Council’s gala in
its “Faces in the Crowd” feature. They
are John and Rhonda Wydra, not Sydra.
Arc Seeks Awareness of
Mental Disabilities
F
or some, the month of March will represent the end to a very snowy winter. To
others, it will mean the start of March Madness, the college basketball tournaments.
However what many New Jersey citizens
might not realize is that March is also National Developmental Disabilities Awareness
Month, an opportunity to highlight and recognize the abilities and accomplishments of individuals with intellectual and development
disabilities across the state. This recognition,
originally declared via proclamation in 1987
by President Ronald Reagan, provides an occasion for self-advocates, families, and advocacy organizations like the Arc of New Jersey
to raise awareness about developmental disabilities and the challenges these individuals
face.
Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities are your neighbors. They
are employed by your local businesses and
they attend services with you at your place of
worship. Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities belong in the community, living integrated lives with families
and friends. National Developmental Disabilities Awareness Month is a chance to take
a second look at accessibility in your town, or
at ways you can increase inclusivity on a
community level. Individuals with intellectual and developmental disabilities can lead
independent and productive lives here in New
Jersey, as long as their fellow citizens provide
a welcoming environment for them to do so.
Thomas Baffuto
Executive Director, Arc of New Jersey
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IT’S OUR PLEASURE TO HONOR ALL OF THESE AWARD WINNERS.
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NJAR® Circle of Excellence
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NJAR® Circle of Excellence
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Princeton Junction/W.Windsor Office
609-799-3500
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5
6
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
People
in the
News
Community, South
Advance to National
Science Olympiad
C
ommunity Middle School
and High School South’s
Science Olympiad teams
advanced to the national championship with first-place finishes in
the state championship on March
11. Students from Grover Middle
School and High School North also
participated in the 22nd annual
state finals, where 26 middle
schools and 26 high schools competed at Middlesex County College
in Edison. The competition is designed to encourage students’ interest in science and technology. The
national championship will be held
at the University of South Florida
in May.
T
he Community Middle School
Science Olympiad team,
coached by Kyle Schimpf and
Raisa Donnard, with assistance
from Arthur Downs and Bob
Krzyzkowski, won the state championship.
The CMS students received nine
gold medals, four silver medals,
four bronze medals, and earned
medals in five other events. Each
competitor on the team earned a
medal at the championship. Detailed results follow.
Anatomy: second place for
Shannon Weng (grade eight) and
Jason Yang (grade eight). Boomilever: second place for Devanei
Solai (grade seven) and Arsh Rupani (grade six). Can’t Judge a
Powder: fourth place for Charles
Dai (grade nine) and Ranjan Mahanth (grade eight). Crime Busters: first place for Uday Shankar
(grade nine) and Revanth Gumpu
(grade nine). Disease Detective:
fifth place for Jason Yang (grade
eight) and Eshita Sangal (grade
eight)
Dynamic Planet: second place
for Mridul Bansal (grade eight)
and Anshu Jonnalagadda (grade
eight). Entomology: third place for
Albert Sebastian (grade eight)
Leung (grade nine). Robo-Cross:
fifth place for Uday Shankar
(grade nine) and Devanei Solai
(grade seven). Rocks and Minerals:
first place for Albert Sebastian
(grade eight) and Nick Leung
(grade nine). Rotor Egg Drop: first
place for Matt Hong (grade six)
and Arsh Rupani (grade six).
Shock Value: third place for
Uday Shankar (grade nine) and
Revanth Gumpu (grade nine).
Simple Machines: first place for
Eshita Sangal (grade eight) and
Mridual Bansal (grade eight).
Solar System: Sixth place for
Anshu Jonnalagadda (grade
nine) and Shannon Weng (grade
eight). Sound of Music: Eighth
OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM
OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM
Renee
McDevitt
and Yash Gupta (grade seven).
Experimental Design: third place
for Shannon Weng (grade eight),
Nick Leung (grade nine), and
Hasit Dantara (grade eight). Helicopters: first place for Nikhita
Subbiah (grade eight) and Shivani
Prusty (grade seven).
Heredity: first place for Jason
Yang (grade eight) and Charles
Dai (grade nine). Meteorology:
third place for Hasit Dantara
(grade eight) and Anshu Jonnalagadda (grade nine).
Metric Mastery: fourth place for
Yash Gupta (grade seven) and Eshita Sangal (grade eight). Road
Scholar: first place for Mridul
Bansal (grade eight) and Nick
Smita
Jadhav
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Douglas
Koo
EAST WINDSOR
LAWRENCEVILLE
he High School South Science
Olympiad Team also placed
first in the state. Team advisors are
Meenakshi Bhattacharya and
Sunila Sharma. Detailed results
follow.
Anatomy and Physiology:
OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM
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rd turn to Lawrencveille Sq Village keep right to
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right on Fern Dr. $300,000
OPEN SUNDAY 1-4 PM
place for Matt Hong (grade six)
and Nikhita Subbiah (grade
eight). Water Quality: first place
for Revanth Gumpu (grade nine)
and Charles Dai (grade nine).
Write It — Do It: Eighteenth place
for Shivani Prusty (grade seven)
and Ranjan Mahanth (grade
eight). Biology Blitz: second place
for Anna Hsu (grade eight) and
Jonathan Wang (grade eight).
Eva
Nowakowska
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PRINCETON JUNCTION OFFICE ● 609-799-3500 ● 53 PRINCETON HIGHTSTOWN RD
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MARCH 21, 2014
fourth place for Angela You and
Ishan Majumdar; Astronomy:
second place for Bill Yan Huamg
and Chaitanya Asawa; Boomilever: second place for Ben Lee and
Alex Zhou; Chemistry Lab: second place for Andrew Chen and
Aleck Zhao; Circuit Lab: third
place for Kevin Li and Jason Shi;
Compound Machines: first place
for Kevin Li and Jason Shi; Designer Genes: fourth place for Angela You and Ishan Majumdar;
Dynamic Planet: third place for
Chaitanya Asawa and Bill Huang;
Elastic Launch Glider: second
place for Ben Lee and Alex Zhou;
and Entomology: second place for
Michael Mu and Tommy Liang.
Experimental Design: fifth place
for Angela Mao, Yinan Zhang,
and Michael Mu; Forensics: third
place for Angela Mao and Andrew
Chen; GeoLogic Mapping: second
place for Bill Huang and Jason
Shi; Maglev: second place for
Shaurya Luthra and Chaitanya
Asawa; Mission Possible: fifth
place for Bharat Jaladi and Shaurya Luthra; Rocks and Minerals:
fifth place for Angela You and Aleck Zhao; Technical Problem
Solving: fifth place for Aleck Zhao
and Jason Shi; Water Quality: second place for Pranay Nadella and
Yinan Zheng; and We’ve Got Your
Number: and first place for Kevin
Li and Ishan Majumdar.
H
igh School North placed second in the state. The team advisor is Jim Looney, with assistance from Regina Celin, Kerry
Pross, and Holly Crochetiere.
Honors received include:
Anatomy and Physiology: first
place for Ronald Wang and Roger
Jin; Astronomy: third place for
Rohan Agrawal and Bolong Xu;
Chemistry Lab: fourth place for
Matthew Zang and Vincent Wu;
Circuit Lab: second place for Chris
Shao and Brice Huang; Designer
Genes: second place for Bolong
Xu and Sundar Solai; Disease Detective: fourth place for Bolong Xu
and Jeremy Zhang; and Dynamic
Planet: Sixth place for Avinash
THE NEWS
7
Winners: The Science Olympiad teams from High
School South, opposite left, and Community Middle
School finished first at the state championship and
will compete in the national finals in May.
Subramanian and Rohan Agrawal.
Elastic Glider: fourth place for
Felix Su and Andrew Hong; Forensics: second place for Roger
Jin and Matthew Zang; Geo Mapping: third place for Varun Subbiah and Rohan Agrawal; Maglev:
first place for Louis Wang and
Cody Yang; Mission Possible:
third place for Felix Su and An-
drew Hong; Rocks and Minerals:
first place for Varun Subbiah and
Avinash Subramanian; and Technical Problem Solving: first place
for Brice Huang and Vincent Wu.
T
he Grover Middle School Science Olympiad Team placed
fourth in the state competition.
Coaches include Rae McKenna,
Tara Hipple, and Chris Castner.
Young Author
V
Cub Scouts Bridge
C
ub Scouts’ Pack 48 celebrated
the 104th anniversary of scouting with its annual Blue and Gold
banquet on Saturday, March 1, at
the Millstone River School in
Plainsboro. Cub Scout families
across the pack gathered as 10 Webelos scouts crossed over the
bridge to become members of area
Boy Scout troops.
Aayush Chopra, Thomas Durie, Ishan Gupta, Ranit Gupta,
Pranav Mahableshwarkar, Bryan Sai, and Parth Sharma advanced to Troop 40. Joseph Di
Russo, Ryan Roberts, and Benjamin Tomfohrde bridged to Troop
66.
Arrow of Light, Cub Scout’s
highest award was received by Aayush Chopra, Joseph DiRusso,
Thomas Durie, Ishan Gupta, Ranit Gupta, Pranav Mahablesh-
Scouts’ Honor: Greg Di Russo, back left, Ranit Gupta,
Parth Sharma, Aayush Chopra, Ryan Roberts, Caillin
Ryan, and Bob Durie; and Nancy Durie, front left, Bry­
an Sai, Ishan Gupta, Thomas Durie, Joseph Di Russo,
Pranav Mahableshwarkar, and Benjamin Tomfohrde.
warkar, Ryan Roberts, Parth
Sharma, and Benjamin Tomfohrde. Caillin Ryan, a Boy Scout
in Troop 66, earned the Den Chief
service award for his service to den
1 during three years.
Pack 48 families have come together through the past year with
several projects serving the local
community, such as cleaning up local hiking trails, mulching the playground for the Cherry Tree Club,
and a food drive benefiting the Crisis Ministry for food pantries in
Trenton and Princeton.
Leaders and scouts from Troops
40 and 66 attended to welcome
their new members. Pastor Peter
Froehlke, who joined the Prince of
Peace Church this past year, addressed the gathering. Pack meetings are regularly held at the Prince
of Peace Church on PrincetonHightstown Road in West Windsor.
E-mail [email protected] for
information.
The Cub Scout Tigers, Wolves,
and Bears were also awarded badges for their achievements and contribution to the community during
the year. There were also skits performed by boy scouts and a professional magic show by Joe Fischer
with audience participation.
ijay Singh, 13, of West
Windsor has written and
published a book. “The Chassmistic Chronicle” is a 160-page
book available in paperback at
www.lulu.com.
“I have been writing for three
years,” he says. “I carry a notebook with me, and I write my
ideas in it.” Singh is an eighth
grader at Grover Middle School.
Singh sums up the story: The
main character of the book, Calvin King, has a divorced mom
and no siblings. He is best friends
with a boy named Joey Lee and
his twin sisters Megan and Sarah. He soon realizes that Joey is
part of a group called the Titoms,
who are at war with a group
called the Chassims. Once Calvin goes into Joey’s room, he
finds a stone that electrocutes its
power into Calvin, making him a
Titom. Joey brings Megan, Sar-
ah, and Calvin to a training academy for Titoms.
His parents are Vaishali and
Sharad Singh. His father is an
investment banker at UBS, and
his mother is a nurse at the University Medical Center of Princeton at Plainsboro.
Hill Wallack News
Chess Champions
T
E
homas F. Carroll III of West
Windsor has been selected for
2014 New Jersey Super Lawyers
list. He is a partner at Hill Wallack.
Super Lawyers, a Thomson Reuters business, is a rating service of
outstanding lawyers from more
than 70 practice areas who have attained a high degree of peer recognition and professional achievement. The annual selections are
made using a patented multiphase
process that includes a statewide
survey of lawyers, an independent
research evaluation of candidates,
and peer reviews by practice area.
Visit superlawyers.com.
ight students from Town Center Elementary School were
awarded third place in the K-3
group for the New Jersey State Elementary Chess Championship. In
addition, Derek Clasby, a second
grade student, was awarded an individual trophy for fifth place.
Students also include first grade
student Sarthak Chauhansecond;
second grade students Sahas
Chodhari, Vidith Iyer, Derek
Clasby, Pravav Tholeti, Ved
Phirke, and Srisainandan Indla;
and third grade student Garv
Continued on following page
8
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
A WW-P NEWS ADVERTISING FEATURE
Real Estate Insights with Donna Reilly
A
Rebecca Rogers
Sales Associate
• Graduate Realtor Institute
• Accredited Buyer Representative
• Certified Residential Specialist
®
OF PRINCETON
343 Nassau Street • Princeton, NJ 08540
Office: 609-452-1887, ext. 7114
www.rebeccarogers.com
RADHA CHEERATH
BROKER ASSOCIATE
Will the New Mortgage Rules Affect You?
s we enter spring — traditionally the busiest real estate season — it’s important to make sure buyers and
sellers work with a qualified real
estate representative who will
help clarify the new legal and
regulatory changes in the mortgage market.
Learning from recent history,
where a great many mortgages
were given to consumers without enough regard to the consumer’s ability to repay those
loans, there is now greater emphasis placed on an ability-topay mandate. For example, the
Consumer Financial Protection
Bureau (CFPB) issued a rule,
effective January 10 of this year,
to implement laws requiring
mortgage lenders to consider
the consumer’s ability to repay
home loans before extending
them credit.
It’s important to understand
the key elements of the new
rules and regulations. Here are
just some — please call today
for an in-depth explanation of all
the changes and to find out how
they may apply to you and your
real estate plans.
Ability-to-Repay Determinations. The CFPB designed this
regulation to ensure that every
borrower is a qualified borrower,
based on the buyer’s income,
assets, credit history, and financial obligations.
Decrease in FHA Loan Limits. The Federal Housing Administration lowered its maximum
loan limits for higher-priced
properties. Homebuyers looking
for a larger loan may now have
to apply for a jumbo loan, likely
with a larger down payment.
Tighter Regulations for the
Self-Employed. Being your own
boss brings a number of great
advantages, but it also has issues specific to loans.
Let’s ensure you understand
all your mortgage loan requirements before even starting
your hunt for a new home. And
remember, up to the minute
West Windsor market information is always available at
West-Windsor-Homes-NJ.com
or Facebook.com/West.Windsor.
Homes.NJ.
Please call today for an in-depth explanation of all the changes to mortgage
rules and to find out how they may apply to you and your real estate plans.
"Excellence is not an act, but a habit"
NJAR Circle of Excellance Level Platinum 2013
Mercer County Top Producers Association 2013
Email: [email protected]
Cell: 609-577-6664 • Office: 609-750-4118
Radha Cheerath
Put Our Expert Marketing Techniques & Excellent Negotiating Skills
in Getting the Best Price for Your Home in Today's Market!
For a Free Marketing Consultation & Pricing Evaluation
on Your Current Home, Call Radha Today!
6 Regal Court Monroe, NJ. Gorgeous custom built
Colonial. 4BR, 2.5 Bath, 2.5 car garage. 1.38 acre,
Spacious living rm, Dining rm, and kit. w/separate
breakfast area. Full Walk out basement with workshop.
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RESIDENTIAL BROKERAGE
66 West Countryside Drive, South Brunswick NJ.
Faulkner model w/ 2BR, 2.5BA, gar., fin. bsmt. w/wet
bar. Upgraded Kit., rec. lighting, Cath. Ceil., hdwd./
ceramic tile flooring throughout. $389,000 or rent for
$2,400/month
UNDER CONTRACT
17 Courtside Lane South Brunswick, NJ. Stunning
4BR, 2.5BA Colonial at Courtside Estate. Library,
fam. rm, FP, full bsmt. Many more features. $809,000
50 Princeton-Hightstown Rd. • Princeton Jct., NJ
609-799-8181
CHIHLAN “LANA” CHAN
• Certified Relocation Specialist
• NJAR Circle of Excellence since 1993
Gold Level 2003, 2008, 2009, 2010, 2012
Platinum Level 2013
• Solid Reputation and Proven Track Record
G
RE
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set me apart from other realtors
West Windsor 6 Acre Farmette: $1.2M. 4,185 sq. ft. of home with tree farm.
Lana Chan, (Office) 609-799-2022 x 171
(cell) 609-915-2581
email: [email protected]
44 Princeton Hightstown Rd.,
Princeton Junction, NJ 08550
Continued from preceding page
Chauhan. The school’s assistant
principal is Jeanine Bryde and the
principal is Brian Stevens.
Private Schools
Pennington School: Upper
school students on the dean’s list
include West Windsor residents Niral Ramesh, a junior; and Emma
Kramer, a sophomore.
Stuart Country Day School of
the Sacred Heart: Aana Bansal, a
senior from West Windsor, is the
2014 New Jersey winner and a
2013 New Jersey Runner Up for
the NCWIT Award for Aspirations
in Computing. Bansal is a finalist
in the national competition.
The NCWIT Awards recognize
high school women for their computing-related achievements and
interests as part of an effort to encourage more young women to
choose careers in technology.
In College
Berkeley College: Danielle
Johnson of West Windsor is on the
president’s list.
Bucknell University: Students
on the dean’s list include: High
School North graduates Fred Guo
of Plainsboro and Ralph Otis, Allison Shook, and Daniel Steinberg of West Windsor; and Taylor
Zahn of West Windsor, a 2010
graduate of Montgomery High
School.
College of New Jersey: West
Windsor resident Joanna Ju, a
member of the TCNJ Choir, will be
performing at Lincoln Center as
part of the third annual Project
Hand-in-Hand concert to benefit
Japan’s long-term recovery from
the earthquake and tsunami that hit
the nation in 2011. The choirs, led
by John P. Leonard, along with 90
high school students from the
earthquake disaster-area in Japan,
and the New York City Opera Orchestra, will collaborate to perform
Carol Orff’s “Carmina Burana:
Secular Songs for Singers and
Choruses to be Sung Together with
Instruments and Magic Images” on
Wednesday, March 26, at 7:30 p.m.
Visit handinhandconcert.com or
Checkmate: Town
Center chess players
include Sahas Chod­
hari, front left, Vidith
Iyer, Derek Clasby,
Pravav Tholeti, and
Sarthak Chauhan, and
Garv Chauhan, back
left, Ved Phirke, and
Srisainandan Indla.
Also pictured are assis­
tant principal Jeanine
Bryde and principal
Brian Stevens.
Aana Bansal, right,
received the 2014 NC­
WIT Award for Aspira­
tions in Computing.
www.facebook.com/ProjectHandInHand for information.
Emory College, the undergraduate, liberal arts college of Emory
University in Atlanta, Georgia, has
the following West Windsor residents on its dean’s list: Ankita Gumaste, Michelle Heker, Zachary
Mozenter, and Saahith Pochiraju.
Fairleigh Dickinson University:
Kenneth Lemley of West Windsor
has been inducted into FDU’s Phi
Omega Epsilon senior honor society.
McDaniel College: Jennifer
Litzinger of West Windsor performs the role of Zombie in “Evil
Dead: The Musical” at McDaniel
College, Westminster, Maryland,
from Wednesday to Saturday, April
16 to 19. Litzinger is a sophomore.
Call 410-857-2448 or visit www.
mcdaniel.edu for more information
Oxford College, the two-year
liberal arts division of Emory University located in Oxford, Georgia,
has the following students on its
honor list: Carissa Hunter and
Robert Bamford of West Windsor, and Pranav Venkatraman of
Plainsboro.
Stevenson University: Jan Do-
MARCH 21, 2014
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• One Visit Veneer
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w w w.To o t h F a i r y F
Dr. Marjan Habibian
503 Plainsboro Rd.
Plainsboro, NJ 08536
609-452-2600
a m i l y. c o m
Walk-In Teeth Cleaning
Available
(Subject to Availability)
Follow us:
Continued on page 11
Bhatla-Usab Real Estate Group
Why Choose a Single Agent
When You Can Have
A Whole Team Working For You?
REAL ESTATE
Harveen Bhatla 609-273-4408 • Dr. William Usab, Jr 609-273-4410
www.Bhatla-Usab.com
[email protected]
24-HR INFO CALL 800-884-8654, Enter ID
PRINCETON - 9 Woodhollow Rd. 4Br 3 ba
home in Windsor Green. Remodeled kit w/
sliding doors to patio, LR w new gas fireplace,
Fam Rm w/built in cabinets & picture window.
ID#314
PENNINGTON - 1632 Reed Rd. 3BR 2 bath,
Updated ranch on .84 acre lot., LR, DR,
remodeled kit. Hardwood floors thru out.
Newer furnace, Hopewell Valley School system. ID#204
PRINCETON JUNCTION. 27 Lorrie Lane.
5BR 3Ba contemporary with New Maple
hardwood floors, first floor office/5th BR and
FULL bath. Large deck. Full finished basement. ID #474
$450,000
CT
$725,000
RINGOES - 117 Wertsville Rd. Charming
Turn-of-the-century updated colonial. EIK,
Fam Rm w/woodstove, wide moldings,
HDWD full basement, patio. Sold strictly “as
is.” ID #384
RA
$552,500
$225,000
$300,000
PRINCETON JCT. - 7 Colonial Av. 3BR
home in Colonial Park on .57 acre tree shaded
lot. Fam Rm w/adjoining office area, vaulted
ceilings, 2 car garage. ID# 304.
$385,000
NT
NG
KI
AS ,500
ER 52
OV $5
D CE
L
I
SO PR
HIGHTSTOWN - 164 Clinton St. 4Br 2.5 Ba
colonial near Peddie Lake. EIK, FR w/fplc and
sliding doors to deck, hardwood floors, full
basement, and 1 car garage. ID #254
KINGSTON - 4414 Rte. 27. 5BR, 2.5ba colonial on .47 acre. First floor 5th BR or office,
Fam Rm w/fireplace, hardwood floors, stone
patio, 2 car garage. ID#394
CO
MONROE TWP - 78 Morgan Way 3 BR 2.5
Ba Townhome in Stratford Meadows. New
Construction. End Unit. ID#464
PRINCETON JUNCTION - 1 Brian’s Way. 4
BR 2.5Ba Colonial in Stony Brook., kitchen
with SS appliances & center island, FR w/
fireplace. Full finished basement. ID#424
$309,000
$425,000
$490,000
$649,000
R
S. BRUNSWICK - 2 Maurice Ct. 4Br 2.5Ba
colonial in Cedar Woods w/full finished basement, gourmet kitchen, FR w/fplc and sliding
doors to Trex deck. ID# 244
CT
PLAINSBORO - 1 Pollack Ct. 4 Br 2.5B
colonial. Updated kitchen w/new appliances,
family room, 3 car garage, full basement, sits
on 1.55 acre lot. Cul de sac. ID#344
SE
U PM
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N 3
PE /2
O N3
SU
PLAINSBORO - 1 Osprey Lane. 5Br 3Ba
Colonial in Princeton Manor. Gourmet Kitchen
by Cranbury Design, Sun Room, Large Paver
Patio, 5th BR/office and full bath on 1st floor.
ID#124
DE
$679,000
$835,000
HOPEWELL TWP - 11 Applewood Dr. 5BR
4.5Ba Tudor in Applewood. Sits adjacent to
Hopewell Valley Country Club. Screened
porch, deck, inground pool. ID#374
UN
PRINCETON JUNCTION - 1 Partridge Run.
4BR 3.5Ba Colonial in Windsor Ridge, spectacular kitchen w cherry cabinetry, SS appliances, sun room, MBR w/sitting room. Full fin
basement, 3 car gar. ID#274
$879,000
$999,999
RA
PLAINSBORO - 8 King Haven Ct. 5 Br,
5.5ba Colonial in Crossing at Grover Mill.
Gourmet kit w/top of the line appliances, Sun
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Albert P. Lombardo, 80, of
West Windsor died March 3 at St.
Francis Compassionate Care Hospice. Born in Morrisville, Pennsylvania, he was a longtime area resident. An Army veteran, he was an
engineer with Bell Telephone.
Survivors include his wife of 60
years, Grace Lombardo; his son
and daughter-in-law, Jimmy and
Donna Lombardo; his daughter,
Cindy Lombardo; his brothers and
sisters-in-law, Michael and Debbie
Lombardo and Angelo and Rachael
Lombardo; his sisters and brothersin-law, Joyce and Martin Otto and
Carol and Donald Otto; his grandson, Nicholas Lombardo; his
granddaughters and their spouses,
Jenna and Jason Davila and Dana
A FEW OF OUR SPECIALTIES
R
Rosemary O’Brien, 84, of Las
Cruces, New Mexico, died February 27. Survivors include daughter
and son-in-law, Kathy and John
Farrell of West Windsor. Donations
may be made to Mesilla Valley
Hospice or St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude place,
Memphis, TN 38105.
with this ad.
DE
Ralitsa Slavenkova, 35, of
West Windsor died February 25.
Born in Bulgaria, she was a graduate of University of Pennsylvania’s
Fels Institute of Government. She
was a policy analyst with Mathematica Policy Research. The family moved from East Windsor to
West Windsor in 2008.
Survivors include her husband
Atanas Tepavitcharov; children
Martin Tepavitcharov, in third
grade at Princeton Academy, and
Reneta Tepavicharov, age three;
and parents Reneta Indzhova and
Boyan Slavenkov of Bulgaria.
John S. Baymiller, 71, of Portland, Oregon, died March 3. Survivors include his sister, Judith
Baymiller of Plainsboro.
Teeth Whitening
UN
Deaths
Survivors include his wife, Cecelia Meehan Herman; a son and
daughter-in-law, David and Debra
Herman; and two granddaughters,
Johanna and Corinna. Donations
may be made to the National Stroke
Association, 9707 East Easter
Lane, Suite B, Centennial, CO
80112.
CT
rerna Gupta and John Denton
are planning a November wedding. Both are graduates of West
Windsor-Plainsboro High School,
Gupta in 1993 and Denton in 1990.
The future bride graduated from
Mercer Community College and
Kutztown University and is pursuing a master’s degree as a reading
specialist at Rider. She teaches special education at Brookfield School.
She is the daughter of Sushila and
Sat Gupta of West Windsor.
The prospective bridegroom received certification in construction
from Mercer County Vocational
School. He has been working at
ACE Hardware in Princeton for 11
years. He is the son of Marge Denton of Key West, Florida.
BUY ONE,
GET ONE FREE
cash management sales officer at
Citi Private Bank for 10 years and
became Citi Private Bank’s senior
vice president and private banker
for the law firm group in 2011.
RA
P
Elmer D. Herman, 79, a former
Plainsboro resident, died March 3
at Metropolitan Hospital, Miami,
Florida. He worked as a tool-anddie maker at Thomas & Betts in
Elizabeth for 35 years. He served in
the Army during peacetime.
S e r v i n g t h e C o m m u n i t y f o r O v e r 2 0 Ye a r s
NT
Engagement
and Joe Franzone; and two greatgrandchildren.
Donations may be made to St.
Francis Compassionate Care, 601
Hamilton Avenue, Trenton 08629;
or Leukemia & Lymphoma Society, Box 4072, Pittsfield, MA
01202.
family dental
CO
University of the Sciences:
Plainsboro residents on the dean’s
list include doctor of pharamcy students Rajesh Gadde, Rakesh
Gadde, Rasagnya Kota, Joon
Lee, Shreya Sabharwal, Prachetas Singh, and Masato Sugeno;
Victoria Lee, a doctor of occupational therapy student; and Nora
Osman, a doctor of physical therapy student.
West Windsor residents on the
dean’s list include Joseph Guan, a
doctor of pharmacy student; Christopher Matthews, a doctor of
physical therapy student; Erica Simi, a doctor of occupational therapy student; and Michael Wang, a
health science student.
hris Cordasco of West
Windsor, now a senior vice
president and relationship manager of Citizens Bank’s Professionals Banking Group, is responsible for handling the commercial-banking needs of law
firms in the Philadelphia and
Washington, D.C. areas.
Cordasco earned his bachelor
of arts in history from the University of Delaware and has been
a certified treasury professional
since 1999.
Cordasco worked as senior
vice president and treasury and
R
nato of Plainsboro is on the dean’s
list.
TOOTH FA RY
C
DE
To submit information
for People in the News,
E-mail Community News
editor Lynn Miller at
[email protected]
Senior VP
UN
Submit Your Story
THE NEWS
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THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
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67702
r
T
eam Top Brick won the first
place Core Values Award for
Teamwork at NJ State FLL Championships in a field of 60 teams.
This award recognizes a team that
is able to accomplish more together
than they could as individuals,
through shared goals, strong communication, effective problem
solving, and excellent time management.
Students from Grover Middle
School include Aneesha Gopal,
grade 7; Ronak Ramachandran,
grade 7; Adideb Nag, grade 7; and
Sameer Singh, grade 6. Students
from Community Middle School
include Akila Saravanan, grade 7;
Akanksha Tripathy, grade 6; and
Harini Srinivasan, grade 8). Sneha Tripathy is a third grade student at Wicoff Elementary School.
The coaches are Anita Ramachandran and Jay Ramachandran.
Robotics
T
he Bender Bots, a robotics
team with students from Vil25
years
in
the
same
location:
lage
and Community middle
24 years in the same location:
10 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, NJ 08536
schools, received the project award
10 Schalks Crossing Road, Plainsboro, NJ 08536
609-275-7272
for excellence in research, problem
609-275-7272
Superfresh shopping center
Superfresh
shopping
solving, and sharing innovative so(next door to the Indian
Hutcenter
restaurant)
(next door to the Indian Hut restaurant)
lutions with local communities at a
Also located at:
Also
located
at:
recent competition. This is the sec2083 Klockner Road, Hamilton Square, NJ 08690
2083 Klockner Road, Hamilton Square, NJ 08690
ond year this team has been recog609-588-4999
609-588-4999
nized for exceptional work in the
www.plainsborofootandankle.com
project area of the FIRST Lego
League competition.
This year’s competition theme
was Nature’s Fury. The Bender
350 Nassau Street
Bots conducted individual research
Princeton, N.J. 08540
and consulted expert Joseph Grib609-921-1900
Realtors
bins, lieutenant of West Windsor
Fire and Emergency Services, to
identify problems such as road
blocks and evacuation routes. After
interviewing High School North
your comments.
Principal Mike Zapicchi and victims of Super Storm Sandy, the
to make corrections if we hear from you by_________________________.
Bender Bots decided that live electrical wires following any natural
om you, the ad will run as is.
disaster or an incident was a unique
Very Short Walk •to NY
Train
& Schools
ewspaper: 609-452-7000
FAX:
609-452-0033
problem with the fewest solutions
available.
Open House Sunday 3/23, 1-4, Princeton Jct., West Windsor
The team presented its product
WEST WINDSOR TWP: Unexpected Drama! This charming Dutch Colonial was created in 2002 – an all
idea called the “Balltitude” to judgbut total renovation, with numerous interior surprises. First Floor Master. Dramatic, custom-designed,
now 2- story home with open staircase and 2-story LR & DR. Village lifestyle in the original Berrien City
es. The device uses solar cells, a
section of Princeton Jct. Think unique! Very Short Walk to NY-Philly trains. Large, functional and fun
back-up battery, an altitude sensor,
Gourmet Kitchen with 2-level island, tin backsplash, & marine pendant lights. The LR features a stonefront gas Fireplace, built-in cabinetry, and 2-story drama! Gorgeous “today” bathrooms, too. Not your
and a transmitter to sense abnormal
routine suburban home! The huge paver patio is accessed from
both the Kitchen & the Master Br & overlooks the expansive, fullydrops in the altitude of a power line
fenced backyard, backing to towering trees and preserved Green
to turn off the power in that section
Acres.
A block and a half or less to Maurice Hawk Elementary,
West Windsor HS South, the West Windsor Arts Center, and the
of the wire thus, reducing electrical
just-renovated Windsor Plaza, with its new shops & restaurants.
Superb West Windsor-Plainsboro School District & more. Marketed
hazard. After an electrifying perby Harriet Hudson. Directions: Route 571 to Alexander Rd, left on
formance, the team rejoiced with
Scott Rd to #41 on left. Offered at: $585,000
energetic robot runs, scoring a high
Listing Agent
of 255 points on the playing field.
HARRIET HUDSON
Members of the Bender Bots
team include team mentors from
609-577-7335 (cell)
High School North, Avni MandWeichert’s President’s Club
hania, grade 9; and Shrishti KeTop 1% Nationwide
dia, grade 12. Sixth grade students
Bender Bots: At top, Avni Mandhania, standing left, Vi­
haan Kedia, Anish Rajesh, coach Vish Kecia, Shray Vats,
coach Rajesh Ramachandran, Pranav Mahableshwar­
kar, Pranav Balachander, Eddie Chen, and Shrishti Ke­
dia. Seated, from left, Anika Mandhania, Daniel Wang,
Abigail Johnson, and Vinay Vishwanathan.
Team Top Brick: Coach Jay Ramachandran, left, Anee­
sha Gopal,Sameer Singh, Akila Saravanan, Ronak Ram­
achandran, Sneha Tripathy, Adideb Nag, Akanksha Trip­
athy, Harini Srinivasan, and coach Anita Ramachandran.
First Lego League: From left, Jay Rana, Rajiv Chatter­
jee, Saketh Subramanian, and Akhil Paulraj.
include Vihaan Kedia, Anish
Rajesh, Shray Vats, Pranav
Balachander, Anika Mandhania,
and Vinay Vishwanathan. Fifth
grade students include Pranav
Mahableshwarkar, Eddie Chen,
and Daniel Wang. Abigail Johnson is in fourth grade. The coaches
are Vish Kecia and Rajesh Ramachandran.
S
tudents of Millstone River
School from “Team IdeAmaze”
participated at the NJ FLL State
Championship on Saturday, March
8. They were among 60 teams who
had won regional qualifiers. Team
members include Jay Rana, Rajiv
Chatterjee, Saketh Subramanian, and Akhil Paulraj.
Team IdeAmaze received first
place in Core Values and Gracious
Professionalism at the state robotics championship. The term “Gra-
cious Professionalism” is a way of
doing things that encourages highquality work, emphasizes the value
of others, and respects individuals
and the community. The phrase
was coined by Woodie Flowers,
FIRST national advisor and professor emeritus at Massachusetts Institute of Technology.
Science Bowl
N
ew Jersey middle and high
school science bowls took
place at Princeton Plasma Physics
Lab on February 21 and 22. Grover
Middle School students Tim Jian,
Varnita Prakash, Sruthi Kataman, Aysha Sheik, and Amelia
Ashcroft received fifth place,
competing against 15 other teams.
The team coach is Grover Middle
School teacher Rae McKenna.
MARCH 21, 2014
Continued from page 9
Stanley Allen Coppock, 63, of
Davis, California, died March 8.
Survivors include his brother, David Coppock of West Windsor; a
niece, Julia Coppock of New York;
and a nephew, Andrew Coppock.
Robert Earl Boyce, 89, of Williamstown, New Hampshire, died
March 9. During World War II, he
served in the Pacific theater, building runways for B-29 bombers. He
was a master electrician.
Survivors include a son and
daughter-in-law, Adam and MaryAnne Boyce of West Windsor. Donations may be made to the United
Federated Church of Williamstown, PO Box 438, Williamstown,
VT 05679.
Bernard Z. Grafman, 83, of
Plainsboro died March 12 at the
University Medical Center of
Princeton at Plainsboro.
Born and raised in the Bronx,
New York, he was a radio disc jockey in Kentucky during his 20s, and
was later a salesman for Consolidated Paper in Brooklyn, New
York, until his retirement in 1991.
Survivors include his sister, Helen Koffler of Florida; two daughters and son-in-law, Pamela Zecca
of Boonton, and Beth and Daniel
Kenavan of West Windsor; and his
grandchildren, Drew, Jaclyn, Taylor, and Brendan. Donations may
be made to the National Psoriasis
Foundation at www.psoriasis.org.
Therese D. “Terri” Martinez,
81, of Westmont died March 13.
Survivors include a granddaughter
and her husband, Jayme and Warren D’Souza of West Windsor; and
great-grandchild Caiden D’Souza.
Donations may be made to Samaritan Healthcare and Hospice, 5 Eves
Former Police
Chief Cox Dies
Drive, Suite 300, Marlton 08053.
Jennifer Lynn Pruden, 62, of
Linden died March 16. She was the
director of the Union County Rape
Crisis Center for 20 years before
Come in for a
Spring Sale
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to 40 years of law enforcement
service. He was a past president
of the NJ FBI National Academy
Associates and the Mercer County Chiefs of Police. In 2008 the
West Windsor Police Building
was named the “Frank Cox Police Facility” in recognition of
his leadership in the community.
Survivors include his wife of
30 years, Christine (Rapking)
Cox; a daughter and son-in-law,
Lisa A. and Joseph Gorski;
granddaughter Kathryn Gorski;
niece Kathy Hunt; nephews
John, Timothy, and Mark Hunt;
mother-in-law Hortenzia Rapking; sisters-in-law Caroline, Triana, MaryMarie, and Frances;
and brother-in-law Mike.
The funeral was held March
12. Donations may be made to
FBINAA Charitable Foundation,
Box 165, Lecanto, FL 34465
(fbinaafoundation.org) or to the
American Cancer Society.
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Gerald Siegel of Plainsboro; and
nephews and nieces, David Siegel,
Jamie Siegel, and Matt Siegel.
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11
Spring Is Here!
F
rank J. Cox, 76, of Lawrenceville died at his home on
March 6. Born in Trenton, he was
raised in Princeton and moved to
Lawrenceville in 1988. Cox’s
mother worked for RCA in West
Windsor and his father ran a
men’s clothing store on the corner of Nassau and Chambers
streets from 1936 until the mid1980s.
He was a graduate of Princeton High School in 1955 and the
FBI National Academy in 1977.
Cox, who began his law enforcement career in 1962 with Princeton Township Police Department, was tapped to be the first
officer in the newly formed West
Windsor Police Department in
1968. Often patrolling in his own
car, he served as lieutenant and
was appointed chief in 1980.
Toward the end of his career as
police chief, he became the interim business administrator of
West Windsor Township.
Prior to his law enforcement
career, Cox worked for Opinion
Research Corporation in Princeton doing developmental research with various corporations
on personnel issues. He told the
News that work helped give him
insight into management and
people skills that would later become valuable in his career as a
police administrator.
He retired in 2001 with close
THE NEWS
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MARCH 21, 2014
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Office: 609.395.0444 • Cell: 516.521.7771
[email protected]
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Each Office Independently Owned And Operated. Subject to errors, omissions, prior sale, and withdrawal without notice.
which actually means that an increase of 2.35 percent is allowed.”
School Budget
“We are within the law and the
Continued from page 1
intent of the law,” Fleres said. “And
we didn’t even come close to 2 perbudget, the students will suffer.”
cent the past two years, much less
Continued Fleres: “We are takuse our allowances. So I am very
ing money from the fund balance
comfortable that we are following
reserves. In the proposed budget,
the law. And, if we were in violawe did not allocate extra money for
tion, we would be corrected by the
employee benefits. We are assumcounty, which reviews and ultiing that they will remain flat as they
mately approves our budget. And
have previously. Eventually they
while they may change some porwill increase, and that will also retion of it, they have given no indiquire us to tap into fund balances.”
cation that we have violated the
The fund balance reserve does
state law.”
not automatically replenish, he
Fellow board member Rachelle
noted. “Using more of the fund balFeldman-Hurwitz also voiced conance than we take in every year becerns, though not with the budget
comes problematic. Eventually,
itself. Her concern was with this
that practice has
year’s budget
to come to an
process.
end or we won’t
‘We are allowed to go to
“Larry Shahave the renok does a great
a
2.35
percent
tax
levy
serves we need
job with the
increase, and I support
for unexpected
budget, and I
expenses.”
that,’ Aderhold said. ‘In
am not opposed
“It’s like a
the future, I frankly see
to this budget
tube of toothitself. I am raismore increases. We will
paste.
Even
ing a process ishave to cut essential serwhen you think
sue. We had no
the tube is empvices if we don’t go to
budget retreat
ty, you can get
this year, nor
the
cap
limit.’
some
more
did we have intoothpaste out
depth conversations about the budof it if you squeeze hard enough.
get. Approving the budget is one of
But, at some point there is no more
our most important responsibilitoothpaste left. And we are at that
ties, and our collective voice matpoint now.”
ters. We need to come to the table
Board member Scott Powell disand go over the budget together.
agreed. “Under state law, we are
Because we were unable to do so
only supposed to increase the budthis year, I am voting against the
get by 2 percent every year, and we
budget as a matter of conscience.”
have gone over that. So I will not
Fleres again responded, pointsupport this budget because we
ing out that this budget is virtually
have gone over the 2 percent cap.”
the same as the one discussed at the
Fleres responded: “Saying that
board meeting a month ago, with
the cap is 2 percent is a nice sound
the exception of the increase in
bite. But state law actually allows
state aid. He also noted that the past
for 2 percent plus allowances,
year had been unusual in that it was
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Princeton Office
609-921-1900 (office)
609-462-3737 (cell)
[email protected]
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Facebook.com/West.Windsor.Homes.NJ
MARCH 21, 2014
the first time that Board elections
were held in November, instead of
April, which made it difficult to
schedule a budget retreat, especially since four of the nine board
members are newly elected and just
took office in January.
Superintendent David Aderhold
also spoke on the process issue.
“Normally, I do not comment on
budget discussions between board
members, but there are a few points
I would like to make. First, while
Shanok does work on the budget,
he is not the only one — literally
hundreds of my staff members
work on the budget every year.
Moreover, to say we didn’t have a
budget process is disingenuous at
best. We have been working on this
budget for over a year, and we have
had many, many conversations
about it, as we always do. In fact,
the budget process for the 2015-’16
budget has already begun.”
“In addition, I stand behind this
budget. We are allowed to go to a
2.35 percent tax levy increase, and
I support that. In the future, I frankly see more increases. We will have
to cut essential services if we don’t
go to the cap limit. It was not an
easy decision for the administration to make, and I know it is not an
easy decision for the board to make.
But if we are going to cut essential
programs and services for our students, I simply cannot stand behind
that. We have to do what is right for
the students,” he added.
The Board ultimately voted 7 to
2 to send the proposed budget to the
county for review with Powell and
Feldman-Hurwitz casting the dissenting votes. Once the county reviews and ultimately approves the
budget, it will be sent back to the
board, which will hold a public
budget hearing on Tuesday, April
29.
Plainsboro Budget: Taxes Up .98 Percent
F
THE NEWS
Wills & Estate Planning
13
ollowing Mayor Peter Can- levy,” Mayers explained. “We are
tu’s directive to reduce the anticipating receiving a recreationtax burden on residents, the al opportunities for individuals
Mary Ann Pidgeon
revised Plainsboro municipal bud- with disabilities (ROID) grant
get will increase the tax rate by less from the state, but we have not rePidgeon & Pidgeon, PC
than a penny. The budget originally ceived it yet, so by law we have to
Attorney, LLM in Taxation
submitted by township administra- remove it from the budget until we
tor Robert Sheehan called for a tax actually have a letter saying that the
increase of 1.5 cents.
grant will be awarded. When we do
600 Alexander Road
The revised budget, formally in- receive that letter, we will amend
Princeton
troduced at the March 12 Township the budget and add that line item
Committee meeting, calls for an back in.”
609-520-1010
increase of .98 cents, which equates
In addition, while the proposed
www.pidgeonlaw.com
to a tax impact of $38 for an aver- capital budget remains $2.7 milage home, valued at $386,200. The lion, the introduced budget conactual tax impact on individual templates a 5 percent down payresidents may be more or less than ment of $171,900 for capital proj$38, depending on the assessed ects, whereas the original budget
value of their homes.
called for a 5 percent down payTo reduce the tax levy increase ment of $139,369.
to less than a penny, the administraSaid Mayers: “Because of the
tion had to adjust some of the reve- many storms we experienced over
nue-side line items. According to the winter, the township decided to
Gregory Mayers, chief financial accelerate the replacement of the
The Princeton Area’s Premier Indoor Cycling Studio
officer for the township, the reve- municipal building roof. This capinue portion of the budget was in- tal project had not been included in
creased by $190,000.
the original budget. So we added
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balance. In addition, in light of
In addition to the new roof, the
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strong figures we have seen in Jan- proposed capital budget includes
LAS
uary and February, we felt comfort- projects such as: road maintenance
ALL C
able raising the revenue line item and repair; the purchase of public
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works
equipment;
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MON if we hear from you by_____________
will beforhappy
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we increased this by $50,000.
departments.
YOU’RE NOT MEASURING YOUR WORKOUT WITH WATTS,
“For the same reason, we in- If we
Thedon’t
township
committee
hear
from will
you, the adIFwill
run as is.
YOU’RE JUST NOT MEASURING YOUR WORKOUT!
creased the revenue line item for hold a public hearing on the budget
U.S. 1 Newspaper:
609-452-7000 • FAX: 609-452-0033
the cable franchise fees by $20,000. Thanks!
at the committee
meeting on
IT’S THE ULTIMATE SPINNING® EXPERIENCE!
This gave us the $190,000 we Wednesday, April 9. If there are no
needed to lower the municipal tax issues or changes, the committee
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levy,” said Mayers.
could also vote to approve the bud“We did reduce the expenditures get on that date.
WINDSOR PLAZA (IN THE BACK)
side by $20,000, but this actually
— Sue Roy
64 PRINCETON HIGHTSTOWN RD. WEST WINDSOR, NJ 08550
had nothing to do with the tax
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If your home is listed with another Real Estate Broker, this is not intended to be a solicitation of that listing.
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14
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
SAT Advice from a Mother Who’s Been There
A
person’s reaction to the SAT
depends on their age. To a
16-year-old, it is another
hurdle between high school and the
college of their dreams. For college
students it’s almost taboo: it takes a
pretty pathetic person to continue
gloating about SAT scores after
they’ve made it to college. And to
most people over the age of 30, it’s
a long-forgotten piece of your past
— until it comes time for your own
teenage children to take it.
That is what happened to Debbie
Stier, a divorced mother of two
teenage children in Westchester
County with a day job in book publishing. By her own admission, she
did terribly on the SAT when she
took it as a high school student in
1982. Her scores of 410 on the verbal section and 480 on math translated to a score of 1000 out of 1600
after the scale was recentered in
1995.
But that’s not why she set out to
retake the SAT as a 48-year-old.
Her “perfect score project” came
about when she realized that her
son Ethan’s chances of getting into
— and being able to pay for — college hinged on his ability to get
merit aid. And for her ADHD-addled son who confessed to being
perfectly happy sliding by with Bs,
she decided his best chance for
scholarship money would come
from a top SAT score.
As part of her effort to prepare
her son, Stier took the SAT all seven times it was offered in 2011,
raised her score by more than 300
points, and lived to tell the tale in
her book, “The Perfect Score Project,” published earlier this year by
Harmony ($19.26 on Amazon).
She also maintains a blog at perfectscoreproject.com. In an ap-
pearance sponsored by the High
School South PTSA, Stier visited
South on March 19 to share with
parents what she learned from her
experience and to answer their
questions and concerns.
Stier explained the motivation
and ground rules for her project: “I
thought maybe I could motivate
Ethan to care about the SAT, just a
little, if I climbed into the trenches
myself.
“Initially, though, the number of
test-prep options left me agog (over
a million on Google). My original
idea was to try out twelve different
methods of test prep the year before
Ethan would be taking his first
SAT. But as I saw how vast and
complicated the realm of SAT prep
appeared to be, I kept adding layers
to the idea. What was at first simply
the notion of taking an official SAT
at school with the kids mushroomed into a vow to take the test
every time it was offered in 2011
(seven times in all). And, I’d try out
different locations for each test,
which turned out to be a total of
five. (I didn’t anticipate the issue of
test centers booking up early and
ended up having to repeat a few). I
wanted to see if the location played
any role in the test experience, so I
chose schools ranging from an elite
private school in the suburbs to an
urban public school in the Bronx.
“My journey would start with
the first SAT of 2011, on January
22, and Ethan would take his first
SAT exactly one year after me — in
January of 2012. We’d overlap in
our preparation about halfway
through the year because (a) juniors take the PSAT in the fall (October of 2011 for Ethan; SAT No. 5
for me), so he’d need to study; and
(b) I know my son well enough to
realize he does better with some
spare runway to build momentum.
“In spite of the escalating nature
of the project, I was excited about
the ‘study together’ part and assumed that by halfway through the
year, with four SAT experiences
under my belt, I’d have my bearings and be able to adroitly show
my son ‘the SAT ropes.’
“Let’s clarify something from
the start, though: I did not expect
Ethan to pull off a perfect SAT
score (though I wouldn’t have discouraged him from trying had he
wanted to do so of his own accord).
I found that by putting the pressure
on myself, not on him, I was able to
hold the bar reasonably high without having to nag or push (too
much). I was “modeling” the behavior that I was hoping to cultivate in my son. In the end Ethan
came up with his own number,
which we both agreed was the right
one.”
I
n preparing for the test Stier tried
everything from the College
Board’s Question of the Day to Kumon math worksheets, Kaplan online test prep, and tutors and SAT
“experts” she found through her
blog, and the highly touted tutors
from Advantage Testing. Taking
the 2400-point SAT introduced in
2005 (and soon to be changed back
to the 1600-point format) Stier
brought her score from 1800 (680
critical reading, 510 math, 610
writing) in January, 2011, to top
scores of 760 on critical reading,
570 on math, and 800 on writing.
Some of the advice for students
and parents Stier offers throughout
her book:
Test location matters. A venue
where students are grouped in
smaller classrooms is preferable to
one where all test takers are in a
gymnasium or cafeteria. Centers
offering full-size desks also make it
easier to organize test materials.
Study from real SATs. The
College Board publishes a blue
book with full-length practice tests.
Complete them, mimicking actual
testing conditions as closely as
possible.
Conquer the College Board.
The College Board website (www.
collegeboard.com) has a wealth of
useful information and practice
materials, but they can be hard to
find. Once you have it, bookmark it
for easy access in the future.
Connect with your kid. “Most
teenagers are more interested in
their friends than in their parents
and the SAT,” Stier writes. “In fact,
the more into their friends they are,
the harder it will be to get their attention. A peer-oriented teenager
will need more enthusiasm and initiative from the parent to become
motivated than the one who is oriented toward adults.”
“Remain interested and involved, even if your teenager is resistant,” she continues. “Research
shows that adolescents do better
Debbie Stier, author of
‘The Perfect Score
Project,’ appeared at
High School South on
March 19 to share
some of her secret
sauce.
academically when parents are involved beyond monitoring homework.”
Pick the right prep book. A
good SAT prep book will be written
by a true SAT expert — not just a
prolific author with a PhD — and
will use materials from real SATs.
The book should address goals and
strategies in addition to basic skills.
Pick the right tutor. Like a
good prep book, a good tutor is
highly familiar with the SAT and
teaches both skills and strategy.
The tutor should be able to pick up
on a student’s strength and weaknesses and tailor their approach.
And any good tutor should be able
to supply ample references attesting to their strong work.
Retirement and Estate
Strategies Event
Lynda Dillman, Financial Associate will host guest speaker Richard J. Hopkins,
Financial Consultant, Thrivent Financial for Lutherans • 30 Years Experience •
NAIFIC, National Quality Award.
Rich Hopkins will share strategies on:
• How to accumulate and distribute money for retirement.
• How to pass money onto heirs or charities in a tax-wise manner.
• Increasing the probability of investment success, IRA strategies ... and more!
This workshop is hosted by Thrivent Financial and Highland Associates.
Tuesday, April 1st, 7:00
West Windsor Public Library • 333 N. Post Rd. • Princeton Jct, NJ 08550
Wednesday, April 2nd, 7:00
The “Elements” Clubhouse • 20 Murano Dr. • West Windsor, NJ 08550
Please RSVP to Richard Hopkins at 877-657-9363 ext 9 or [email protected]
by March 29th to reserve your spot.
Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states. Securities and investment
advisory services are offered through Thrivent Investment Management Inc., 625 Fourth Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55415, a FINRA and SIPC member and a
wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of Thrivent Investment Management
Inc. They are also licensed insurance agents/producers of Thrivent Financial for Lutherans. Thrivent Financial for Lutherans and its respective associates and
employees cannot provide legal, accounting, or tax advice or services. Work with your Thrivent Financial representative, and as appropriate, your attorney and/
or tax professional for additional information. No products will be sold. For additional important disclosure information, please visit Thrivent.com/disclosures.
27692C N12-13
Appleton, Wisconsin • Minneapolis, Minnesota • Thrivent.com • 800-THRIVENT (800-847-4836)
776305
MARCH 21, 2014
Development Projects on Deck in WW
W
by Sue Roy
ith West Windsor expecting plans
from Toll Brothers for a mixed-use
development on the Maneely
property south of Old Bear Brook Road, traffic changes are in the works for the adjacent
neighborhood.
Land use manager Sam Surtees explained
Old Bear Brook Road will be repaved and
closed off at Alexander and will become a
cul-de-sac, meaning there will be no access
to the new development via Alexander and
Old Bear Brook. A traffic circle will be constructed at the intersection of Bear Brook and
Old Bear Brook roads and will include a notyet-built access road to the new development.
The neighborhood will be connected to
nearby Princeton Junction Train Station and
its New South parking lot in an important
way. “There will be a widening of the sidewalk on the Bear Brook side,” said Surtees,
“and it will be continued, along with the bike
path to connect to the Vaughn Drive area. A
boardwalk will be constructed over the wetlands there, so that cyclists and pedestrians
will be able to travel across them to the parking lot and beyond. Construction for this
pathway has already begun and should be
finished quickly, weather permitting.”
The Toll Brothers development will in-
clude 51 luxury townhouses, 40 apartments
above 20,000 square feet of retail, and 188
corporate suites (in an “extended-stay hotel”
to be run by Toll Brothers).
The development will also include 72
Project Freedom apartments, allocated to
physically disabled low-income residents.
Surtees explained that while Toll Brothers
would be responsible for all other construction, Project Freedom will build its 72 apartments.
“Toll Brothers will likely be presenting its
conceptual site plan this spring, for review
by the Planning Board, architects and engineers, and the public,” Surtees said. “Project
Freedom will come in on its own, sometime
in the future, with its own site plan relating to
the 72 apartments. As of yet, we have no indication of when that will happen.”
I
n other development news, Boston Properties just brought a site plan concept to the
township for the construction of a
150,000-square-foot Class A office building
to be built in Carnegie Center West.
Construction is underway on the site of
the “green technologies” office building being built on Clarksville Road by Princeton
Junction Commons LLC. The company is
widening the sidewalk, adding a detention
basin and a parking lot, and constructing a
progress to the next topic. This was especially worrisome because students have been
Honors Biology
receiving “Ds” and “Fs,” rather than “inContinued from page 1
completes,” because of work that had not
one we have held, both last year and this yet been graded.
Moreover, many parents felt that the core
year, the concerns about honors bio have
tenets
of biology had not been sufficiently
been brought up, and the topic has really hijacked the meetings. So we decided to have communicated to the students, who are still
required to take a traditional assessment at
one devoted exclusively to honors bio.”
“When the district decides to implement a the end of the year, and parents felt they
pilot program, the most important thing is to would not be ready for it. Some also voiced
communicate the idea to the parents. For in- concerns that they were at a disadvantage
stance, when the district implemented the vis-a-vis their counterparts at High School
Google Chromebook device pilot program South, where honors and regular biology are
for fifth graders, they did a very good job taught in a more traditional manner. Finally,
telling the parents, students, and staff that several parents noted that their children had
the pilot was being implemented. Yes, there lost their enthusiasm for learning biology.
Said Aderhold: “No one can deny that
were still some concerns and some parents
there
are many concerns with the honors biwho complained, but most people were satisfied because they had been kept informed. ology program. I hear all of you. I under“I wish we had had this meeting last year,” stand that you are worried about this pilot
Mahableshawarkar continued, “when the pi- concept being expanded to other subjects,
lot was first implemented. But Dr. Aderhold such as chemistry. And I can tell you that no
was not the superintendent back then. Now such decision to expand the pilot has been
that he has heard the parents and listened to made. I also understand that you are not just
their concerns as well as the students’ con- asking that the program be corrected for the
cerns, I am cautiously optimistic that some- future, but that you are looking for remedial
thing will be done to remediate the problem measures now for the students who are enrolled in the class now.”
this year.”
“I could tell you that all of your concerns
“But communication is the key. The need
will
be addressed in a week, or two weeks,
for communication is especially important
when we are talking about implementing a but that would be disingenuous. Before I
make any decisions, I
pilot at one high school
want to speak to the stubut not the other, or during
Aderhold
promised
a
dents, who are the ones
a transition year [such as
who are experiencing this
continued dialogue with
moving from eighth to
course every day. I want
ninth grade]. Ninth gradparents and students to
to hear what they have to
ers are new to high school,
address issues with bio
say, and how they really
are worried about grades,
and honors bio.
feel. We will take no
and the work load, and
names, and take no notes,
their parents are too. They
so that the students can
need to be kept informed.
speak
freely.
But
I owe it to them to hear
Older students probably would have handled
from them, and listen to any suggestions and
the pilot program better,” she added.
At the “Coffee with the Principal” meet- solutions they may offer,” he said.
“What I can promise you is that on weekly
ing, the parents were asked to categorize and
basis,
starting this week, I will communicate
prioritize their concerns with the program.
The responses were varied, though many with all of the parents of students enrolled in
parents expressed similar concerns. For in- bio and honors bio to let you know the status
stance, having this pilot program in a fresh- of my investigation, and any decisions or
man class was mentioned, because many changes that will be made. And we will conparents felt that new high schoolers might tinue to have a dialogue with the parents, the
not be ready for such an individually moti- administrators, the teachers, and the students
vated classroom. The lack of specific dead- to see what can be done to address the situalines for assignments was also noted. Par- tion. We will take action, but what that action
ents felt that younger students might not is going to be, I really don’t know yet. But
have the discipline to get work done without our primary concern is the well-being of the
students, and that is why I want to hear from
specific deadlines.
More complaints revolved around the them and have them be a part of the soluprocess itself. The long lag time between tion.”
Aderhold sent a summary E-mail to all of
when a students handing in projects and rethe
biology class parents, and has arranged
ceiving grades or feedback was mentioned
three
meetings this week with North bio and
by many of the parents. They felt that there
was too much downtime in the classroom, honors bio students. He will continue to
and, without feedback on work already com- keep parents apprised as decisions are made
pleted or turned in, the students could not on how best to resolve the many concerns.
30,000 office building “on spec.”
Finally, the township of West Windsor is
also currently involved in its own construction project: a detention basin on Meadow
Road at the intersection with Clarksville
Road.
“We are building the new detention basin
to benefit some of the buildings and homes
constructed along Clarksville Road and help
with storm water management,” said Surtees.
“In addition, we are building a sanitary sewer
line under the railroad tracks there. This will
allow everything to use gravity to run downstream, and will enable us to decommission
THE NEWS
15
New Construction: A traffic
circle and cul­de­sac will be
built in preparation for Tolls
Brothers’ development of the
Maneely property south of Old
Bear Brook Road.
one of the township’s pumping stations, the
one located at Avalon Watch. This will result
in cost savings for the township, because the
operating cost to run sewer lines is cheaper
than running pump stations,” Surtees added.
West Windsor: Zero Increase Budget
T
he proposed 2014 township budget
was introduced at the March 17 West
Windsor Town Council meeting, by
unanimous vote. Unlike the budget proposed by Mayor Shing-Fu Hsueh and the
administration, which had a 1.33 percent tax
increase, the Council’s amended budget offers a zero percent tax levy increase.
To hold the line on taxes, Council increased the revenue line items in several categories, most notably by raising the amount
the township expects to collect from Uniform Construction Code fees to $1 million.
In addition, the council approved the use of
roughly $185,000 from the fund balance reserve. Of this amount, about $101,000 is expected to be regained by increased revenues
from court fees and fines from greater police
activity. The fees collected in 2013 were unusually low, mainly because the police department had to fill five vacancies caused by
retirement, and the new hires spent a large
portion of the year at the police academy.
Police Chief Joe Pica agreed with the
council’s projected revenue increase with a
fully staffed force. There has already been a
greater police presence along Cranbury
Road in order to deter speeding, and more
tickets have been issued.
A public hearing on the budget will occur
at the Monday, April 28 council meeting.
Two other budget measures were addressed. First, an ordinance to exceed the
municipal budget appropriation limits and to
establish a cap bank was unanimously introduced. Business administrator Marlena
Schmid explained in a follow-up interview
that this item is approved every year as a
sound financial planning tool. Its purpose is
to allow any unspent surplus to be carried
forward to the following year, to be added to
the fund balance. Public hearing on this ordinance will also be held on April 28.
In addition, by a vote of 5 to 0, council
authorized a measure allowing for the local
examination of the 2014 budget, which the
state allows for two out of every three years.
During the third year, the state examines the
township’s budget. This option is only available to towns deemed to be fiscally sound.
Ellsworth Update. In other matters, the
Council also agreed to the release and termination of some restrictive covenants on the
Ellsworth property, which is a necessary
precursor to the redevelopment of the site.
“During a routine title search, the Ellsworth Corporation discovered the existence
of restrictive covenants dating back to
1949,” said Schmid. “These covenants, associated with the two residential lots adjacent to the current shopping center, prohibit
commercial uses on these lots. As part of the
redevelopment plan, one of these lots will be
made into a parking lot and the other a stormwater management basin. The covenants
have to be lifted before this can go forward.”
“Also adjacent to the property is a 22-acre
parcel of open space which is owned by the
township,” Schmid said. “This property was
purchased not only with township funds, but
also with funds from Mercer County and the
state Green Acres program. As part of the redevelopment plan, Ellsworth has agreed to
make this parcel into the first handicappedaccessible park in West Windsor. However,
because county and state Green Acres funds
were used, the county and the state must also
approve the lifting of the restrictive covenants on the adjacent properties, which
makes this a little more complicated.”
Now that the township has approved the
release and termination of the covenants,
Ellsworth will need the same approvals from
Mercer County and the state DEP. “Here at
the township, we are all looking forward to
the day when Ellsworth can start breaking
ground,” said Schmid, noting that the project
would be an asset to the whole township.
Other Council Business. A professional
services agreement between the township
and engineering firm Parsons Brinckerhoff
was also approved for an engineering inspection of the Grover’s Mill Dam, required
annually under state DEP rules, at a cost of
$9,628.
In addition, the council approved a contract with Greenleaf Landscape Systems and
Services for the maintenance of townshipowned cul-de-sac islands and street trees at a
cost of $82,520.
In other news, the Council appointed
three substitute township prosecutors for a
one-year term: William T. McGovern, Lyle
P. Hough Jr., and Alfred B. Vuocolo Jr. The
Council also reappointed Drewe Schoenholtz as an advisor on the Shade Tree Commission for a one-year term.
Finally, an ordinance relating to the rental
of Schenk Farmstead was introduced. Only
West Windsor residents and businesses will
be allowed to rent Schenk Farmstead, which
can accommodate up to 50 people. The rental amounts being charged will offset the
costs of insurance, maintenance, utilities,
and custodial services for use of the facilities.
After some discussion, council members
agreed that the proposed rental rates should
be as follows: social events, $400; weddings, $700; non-profit events, $250; and
corporate events, $500. A refundable security fee of $300 will also be required.
The public hearing on this ordinance will
be held at the council meeting on Monday,
March 31, at 7 p.m.
— Sue Roy
16
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
Spring Sports: The Season at a Glance
by Samantha Sciarrotta
T
he snow has finally melted,
and just in time — the spring
sports season is starting, and
High School North and High
School South squads are eager to
get outside. The crosstown rivals
won’t have to wait long to see how
their athletes compare as several
teams will face off during the first
days of the season.
Baseball: South and North will
meet twice this spring, in an earlyseason matchup on Tuesday, April
1, at South, and again on Saturday,
May 17, at North. North went 5-14
last year with a young team and returns its star pitcher, senior Christian Waters. South hopes to build
on a 16-9 season that included a trip
to the Mercer County Tournament
final, where the team lost to Notre
Dame, 7-3. The Pirates also advanced to the Group 4 quarterfinal,
though they will be working
through losses of ace Paul Balestrieri — now pitching for Cornell —
Mark Sitek, and Pat Boyle, all of
whom graduated in 2013.
Softball: The softball teams are
working with similar goals. North
went 4-13 last year, and South finished just above .500 at 10-9. Pirates starting pitcher Rachel Gagliardo had a solid 2013 and returns
this spring to finish out her high
school career. The softball teams
will also bookend their seasons
with crosstown matchups. North
plays at South on Tuesday, April 1,
and at home on Thursday, May 15.
Golf: Both schools’ boys’ and
girls’ golf teams followed their
trend of success last season. The
North boys went 10-4, and the girls
went 9-6 with then-freshman Saa-
Spring Blooms: South’s
Michael Song and
North’s Olivia Harpel.
chi Bedi as one of the team’s keys.
The South boys finished 12-3,
while the girls had the best finish of
them all, an undefeated 13-0. Jessi
Musumeci led the squad as a freshman and should continue her dominance this season. The boys’ golf
teams meet Tuesdays, April 1 and
29. The girls’ golf teams meet on
Wednesdays, May 7 and 14.
Lacrosse: In boys’ lacrosse,
North finished at 6-12, while South
finished at 12-5. The Pirates made
it to the quarterfinal round of both
the Mercer County and Group 3
tournaments. The North girls had a
stellar 2013 season, finishing at 172 and handing crosstown rival
South (8-10) a 21-7 defeat in the
quarterfinals of the Mercer County
Tournament. North ended its season with a loss in the Group 4 tournament quarterfinal. Both teams
face off on Saturday, April 12. Senior star Olivia Harpel returns to
lead the Knights.
Boys’ Tennis: The perennially
successful boys’ tennis teams will
meet twice in 2014: at South on
Wednesday, April 2, and at North
on Monday, May 5. The North
boys’ tennis team finished 12-8, including two losses to South, while
the Pirates ended the season at 202. North placed fifth in the county
tournament and South came out on
top for the ninth time in 10 years.
Kristian Dudchak was North’s
youngest player last season as a
sophomore and went further than
any other North player in the county tournament. Much of the team
returns this year, as seven of the
nine starters were juniors last year.
Just one player, Nihal Narsipur,
graduated.
South lost Thomas Weng, last
year’s county second singles champion, and Dan Vaysburd, half of the
first doubles county champion
team, but Michael Song, Martin
Malik, Raymond Fan, and Yuefeng
Zhu will be back.
Boys’ Volleyball: North plays at
South on Tuesday, April 1, and
plays host to the Pirates on Thursday, April 17. The Knights were
11-8 last year, and the Pirates were
7-14.
Letters of Intent
College-Bound:
North’s Simone
Counts, center, with
sister Sierra, seated
left, mother Cathe­
rine, and sister Nicole.
And North coaches
Monica Biro, standing
left, and Brian Gould
and guidance counsel­
or Lee Riley.
S
everal seniors from High
Schools North and South
have signed letters of intent for
college sports.
Two North track stars will
continue running in college.
Simone Counts will compete for
Howard University, and Pati
Dziekonska will attend Indiana
State University.
Multi-sport star Olivia Harpel
will play lacrosse for Northwestern University after graduation
from High School North.
At South, senior Sydney
Bornstein has signed on to swim
for Lehigh University.
Sisters Samantha and Kather-
Track & Field: All four track
and field teams ran, jumped and
threw to solid seasons. The South
boys finished second in the county,
and North followed at third. The
North girls placed seventh in the
county meet, while the South girls
also came in second. The Knights
ine McCormick, leaders on
South’s field hockey squad, will
both join the team at American
University next fall.
will look to senior standouts Simone Counts and Pati Dziekonska
— both of whom recently committed to college track programs (see
above) — to lead the way. The
teams will compete head-to-head
in a tri-meet at Hopewell Valley on
Wednesday, April 30.
Coming to the USA for the First Time
The Official
Real Madrid Foundation
Youth Soccer Clinics
Train with Ciudad
Real Madrid Youth Coaches
Teach. Grow. Achieve.
Learn TENNIS & GOLF in an energetic real-time style right at school
through West Windsor-Plainsboro Community Education.
**We provide all equipment
Summer Dates
July 7-11, July 14-18, July 21-25
Open to Boys and Girls U8 to U17. Space is limited.
Brought to you by
Learning
Objective Class Activities
Engage
Educate
Explore
Embrace
Empower
Shaking hands, character development theme and
athletic development activities
Review, new instruction and academic-based lesson
Practice Stations and rules/etiquette lesson
Game, review and achievement awards
Shaking hands and take-home activity
The TGA Enrichment Program is shaped by our 5 E’s Learning Objectives to
provide a fun, safe and educational experience for every student.
Register at www.realmadridprinceton.com
To learn more, please visit www.playtga.com/mercer
To register, please visit www.ww-p.org then click on ‘quick links’ at the top
right-hand corner, then click on the COMMUNITY EDUCATION link.
MARCH 21, 2014
THE NEWS
CHOOSE US AS YOUR PARTNER IN HEALTH & WELLNESS.
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with personal viewing screens.
Free weight area with a wide variety of
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Over 150 group fitness classes weekly including
Les MillsTM, Zumba®, Pilates Barre, aqua, yoga,
cycle, Tai Chi & much more.
A quarterly nurse assessment including a health
history review, body fat analysis, hydration level
analysis & girth measurements.
Two 1 - hour evaluations with a personal trainer,
including a functional movement screening
& personalized training program. With reassessment every 6 - 8 weeks.
Comprehensive Aquatic Center with a lap pool,
therapy pool & spa pool.
Nutritional seminars, healthy cooking demos,
support groups and other medically-based
programs guided by our Medical Advisory
Board.
Full amenity locker rooms with sauna, steam
rooms & towel service.
Complimentary child care with closedcircuit monitoring.
(Salt-water filtered pools in Plainsboro
location.)
OTHER AMENITIES INCLUDE:
• Swim Lessons, Swim Team, Aqua Parent & Me Classes + FitKids Programs • Pilates Reformer
• Lifeguard Certification & WSI Certification Courses • Healthy Café & Day Spa • Functional Training Area (Plainsboro)
• Community Education Center • Land & Aquatic Physical Therapy • Phase III Cardiac Rehabilitation
• NEW! Martial Arts (Plainsboro) • Nutritional Counseling + Personal Training Program
TWO WEEKS
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* two weeks free with purchase of membership at the Princeton or Plainsboro
Location. Offer ends 4/2/14. Cannot be combined with any other offer. First time
visitors only. Must be 18 years or older. ID Required.
TWO GREAT LOCATIONS!
1225 State Rd | Princeton, NJ 08540 | 609.683.7888
7 Plainsboro Rd | Plainsboro, NJ 08536 | 609.799.7777
www.PRINCETONFITNESSANDWELLNESS.com
17
18
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
DAY-BY-DAY IN WW-P
For more event listings visit www.
wwpinfo.com. Before attending an
event, call or check the website
before leaving home. Want to list
an event? Submit details and photos to [email protected]
Classical Music
Friday
March 21
Folk Music
On Stage
Breaking Up is Hard to Do, OffBroadstreet Theater, 5 South
Greenwood Avenue, Hopewell,
609-466-2766. Musical set in the
Catskill Mountains in 1960 features 18 songs from Neil Sedaka.
$29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert.
7 p.m.
Peter Pan, Kelsey Theater, Mercer Community College, 1200
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333. Musical about a
magical world. $20. 8 p.m.
Film
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-9529. Screening of “Caramel,” Lebanese, 2007. 6:30 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. “Guido da Siena: Forerunner of the Renaissance: presented by Anne Young.
Free. 12:30 p.m.
Dancing
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11
p.m.
Karaoke Dance, American Legion Post 401, 148 Major Road,
Monmouth Junction, 732-3299861. Free. 8:30 p.m.
Literati
Preview Day, Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale, Princeton Day
School, 650 Great Road, Princeton,
732-895-5347.
www.
bmandwbooks.com. More than
100,000 books expected to be
sold to benefit scholarships to both
women’s colleges. $20 admission.
10 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Bach 2 Rock, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-9529. Caryn
Lin performs on four, five, and six
string electric violins. 3 p.m.
David Jones, Princeton Folk Music Society, Christ Congregation
Church, 50 Walnut Lane, Princeton, 609-799-0944. Songs of the
sea, ballads, and music hall songs.
$20. 8:15 p.m.
Comedy
Al Caz, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt
Regency, 102 Carnegie Center,
West Windsor, 609-987-8018.
Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Comedy Night, HA Comedy Productions, Grovers Mill Coffee
House, 335 Princeton Hightstown
Road, West Windsor, 609-7168771.
www.heleneangley.com.
Helene Angley of West Windsor
hosts. Comedians include Tom
Ragu, Brian Grossi, Mike Warsaw,
and more. 8 p.m.
Vic Dibitetto and Eric Potts, Sarcasm Comedy, Tavern on the
Lake, 101 North Main Street,
Hightstown,
732-SARCASM.
www.sarcasmcomedy.com. The
“milk and bread” guy returns to the
stage. Register. $20 for show. 8
p.m.
On the House Comedy Night,
Station Bar and Grill, 2625 Route
130 South, Cranbury, 609-6555550. Hosted by Mike Bonner. 9 to
10:30 p.m.
Craft Fairs
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, craft demonstrations,
gourmet foods, entertainment, interactive children’s performances,
and live music. $10. 10 a.m. to 6
p.m.
Mental Health
Lecture Series on Autism, Eden
Institute Foundation, Princeton
University, 609-987-0099. Open
forum where authorities present
new finding and future possibilities
for the treatment and awareness
of autism. “Neurology of Autism”
by Margaret Bauman, M.D., Harvard Medical School. “Understanding and Treating Severe Behavior Problems in Persons with
ASD” by V. Mark Durand, University of South Florida. “Youth with
Autism: Bridges from School to
Adulthood” by Paul Wehman, Virginia Commonwealth University;
and “Creating the Future by Considering the Past: One Mother’s
Reflection on 20 Years of Autism
Research” presented by Helen E.
Hoens, who recently concluded
service as a justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court. Register. $75
includes breakfast and lunch. 9
a.m. to 4 p.m.
Wellness
Twelve Step Recovery, Yoga For
Sobriety, St. David’s Church, 90
South Main Street, Cranbury, 609403-6679. Bring recovery into your
yoga practice. E-mail [email protected] $5. 6 p.m.
Tax Assistance
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897. Register. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
At the Silva Gallery: ‘Simon Says’ by Renee Kumar
of West Windsor is part of ‘5: five artists, five vi­
sions,’ at the Pennington’s school gallery opening
Tuesday, March 25.
Author Event
For Seniors
Gotham City Networking, Mediterra, Hulfish Street, 609-6889853. Lorette Pruden, author of
“Finish Your Book: A Time Management Guide for Authors” and
“Formerly Corporate: Mindset
Shifts for Success in your Own
Business.” Program and lunch.
Register. $35. 12:15 p.m.
Computer Lab, Princeton Senior
Resource Center, Suzanne Patterson Building, 45 Stockton
Street, 609-924-7108. Drop in for
help with computer and technology questions. Free. 10 a.m.
Socials
Happy Hour, Young Professionals in Health Care, Pure Lounge,
3499 Route 1 South, West Windsor. www.yphprinceton.com. Register to [email protected] 6
to 8 p.m.
Lunch and Learn, Princeton Senior Resource Center, Suzanne
Patterson Building, 45 Stockton
Street, 609-924-7108. “It Could be
Poison” presented by Barbara
Vaning, Princeton HealthCare
System, includes identification,
dos and don’ts of medications and
household cleaners, and more.
Bring your own lunch. Beverages
and desserts provided. Register.
Free. Noon.
MARCH 21, 2014
Saturday
March 22
Dance
The Little Mermaid, West Windsor Plainsboro Dance Company, Grover Middle School, Village
Road, West Windsor, 609-7999677. www.thedancecorner.org.
Register. $11. 7 p.m. See story.
On Stage
Peter Pan, Kelsey Theater, Mercer Community College, 1200
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3333. Musical about a
magical world. $20. 2 and 8 p.m.
Film
Sneak Preview Screening, Arts
Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8777.
Screening of “Out,” a short film by
Charles Evered, a Princeton resident and former artist in residence.
Free. 3:30 p.m.
Art
Art for Families, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
University Art Museum, 609-4970020. “The Many Faces of the
Princeton University Art Museum.”
10:30 a.m.
Art and Wine, Terhune Orchards,
330 Cold Soil Road, Lawrenceville, 609-924-2310. Wine tasting,
art exhibit and sale, explore the
farm and barnyard, and more.
Noon to 5 p.m.
Dancing
Family Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, Monument Drive, Princeton, 609-924-6763. Mad Band and
Sue Dupre. $5; $15 per family.
Potluck dinner at 6 p.m. 4 p.m.
Jersey Jumpers, Central Jersey
Dance Society, Unitarian Church,
50 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton,
609-945-1883. Swing, jitterbug,
and lindy hop. Lesson followed by
an open dance. $12. No partners
needed. Beginners welcome. 7
p.m.
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, 1 Monument Drive, Princeton, 609-924-6763. $10. 7:30 to
11 p.m.
Literati
Bryn Mawr-Wellesley Book Sale,
Princeton Day School, 650 Great
Road, Princeton, 732-895-5347.
More than 100,000 books expected to be sold to benefit scholarships to both women’s colleges.
10 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. Jean Hanff Korelitz, author of “You Should Have
Known,” will read from her new
novel. 3 p.m.
Classical Music
Nassau Arts, Nassau Presbyterian Church, 61 Nassau Street,
Princeton, 609-924-0103. John
Rutter’s “Requiem” presented by
the adult choir of the church and
the Princeton y Seminary Singers.
Accompanied by a chamber orchestra and the Meagan Woods
Dance Company. Free-will donation to benefit the Crisis Ministry of
Mercer County. 7 p.m.
Concert, Bravura Philharmonic
Orchestra, Richardson Auditorium, Princeton University, Princeton,
609-790-9559.
www.
bravuraphil.org. Concert features
Chuanyun Li, a young violinist
from China, who will perform
Tchaikovsky’s Violin Concerto with
the orchestra. It will be his only
solo performance with an orchestra on the East Coast this concert
season. The concert is presented
by the Kai Yue Foundation. $25 to
$100. 7:30 p.m.
Concert, Dryden Ensemble, Miller Chapel, Princeton Theological
Seminary, 64 Mercer Street, Princeton, 609-466-8541. “Bach’s
Birthday” features chamber music
for violin, oboe, viola da gamba,
and harpsichord. $25. 7:30 p.m.
Folk Music
The Carole King Songbook, Concerts at the Crossing, Unitarian
Church, 268 Washington Crossing-Pennington Road, Titusville,
609-406-1424. Concert includes
classic songs spanning Carole
King’s music career from her early
days as a songwriter to music from
“Tapestry,” “Music,” and “Wrap
Around Joy.” The performers are
Brittany Ann, Natalie Acciani, Kat
Quinn, Anna Dagmar, Allie Farris,
and Meg Braun. $20.
Live Music
Beatles Fest, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. www.groversmillcoffee.
com. Beatles music all night long.
Performers include Jim Matlack,
Jack Timmerman, and Franc
Gambatese. 7:30 p.m. See story.
Mark McManus, It’s a Grind Coffee House, 7 Schalks Crossing
Road, Plainsboro, 609-275-2919.
www.itsagrindnj.com.
Acoustic
pop. 8 to 10 p.m.
Comedy
Al Caz, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt
Regency, 102 Carnegie Center,
West Windsor, 609-987-8018.
Register. $22. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
THE NEWS
19
Craft Fairs
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, craft demonstrations,
gourmet foods, entertainment, interactive children’s performances,
and live music. $10. 10 a.m. to 6
p.m.
Faith
Meeting, Bhakti Vedanta Institute, 20 Nassau Street, Princeton,
732-604-4135. bviscs.org. Discussion, meditation, and Indian
vegetarian luncheon. Register to
[email protected] 2 p.m.
Wellness
Daddy Boot Camp, Princeton
HealthCare System, Community
Education & Outreach Center, 731
Alexander Road, West Windsor,
888-897-8979. Parenting and
hands-on-skills for fathers-to-be.
Register. $25. 9 a.m. to 12:30
p.m.
Secrets of the Chakras, Center
for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. Presented by Heni Glant. Register.
$27. 10 a.m.
Intro to Journey Into Power, One
Yoga Center, 405 Route 130
North, East Windsor, 609-9180963. www.oneyogacenter.net.
Workshop presented by Valerie
Skillman. Register. $30. 2 p.m.
History
Clean-up Day, Princeton Battlefield Society, Princeton Battlefield. Volunteer to help clean and
restore small portions of the park.
E-mail [email protected] 1 to 4 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Central Jersey Chess Tournament, New Jersey Chess, Princeton Academy, 1128 Great Road,
Princeton.
www.njchess.com.
Open to kindergarten to grade 12
of all levels. All players receive a
medal or trophy. Register online,
$35; on site, $45. E-mail [email protected]
njchess.com for information. 1:30
to 6 p.m.
For Families
Read and Explore Program, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-9242310. “Getting Ready for Spring.”
Register. $5. 10 a.m.
Bowling Benefit: Anjali Sharma, left, High School
South PTSA representative; Wendy Schutzer of the
Cherry Tree Club; and Kathy Lane, event coordina­
tor, are working together for the benefit bowling af­
ternoon on Thursday, April 3, at Colonial Bowling
and Entertainment in Lawrence. Sessions are from 4
to 6 p.m. and 5 to 7 p.m. Register by E­mail to Kathy
Lane at [email protected]
Summer Camps Open House,
Mercer County College, 1200
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-586-9446. www.mccc.edu.
Information for Camp College,
Sports Camps, and Tomato Patch
Camp. Meet camp directors, tour
the facilities, and register. The
camps seek counselors and area
teachers interested in summer
employment. Noon to 2 p.m.
Mom-Son Event
West Windsor Recreation, Laser
Park, 45 Everett Drive, West Windsor,
609-799-6141.
www.
wwparks-recreation.com. Laser
tag games, pizza, soda, ice cream
cake, and more. $50 per couple;
$20 each additional child. Register. 1:15 and 2 p.m.
For Teens
Mercer County Math Circle,
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. Advanced group for high
school and advanced middle
school students at 2 p.m. Recreational group for students in
grades 6 to 12 at 3:14 p.m. 2 p.m.
Lectures
21st Century” focuses on telephone and video interviews, what
the interviewer is looking for, and
common interview questions.
Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Chinese Language and Culture,
West Windsor Library, 333 North
Post Road, 609-799-0462. Explore Chinese dietary culture,
Confucianism, the influence of
western culture, and contemporary China. Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Princeton YMCA, 59 Paul Robeson Place, Princeton, 609-4979622. www.princetonymca.org.
Adam Goucher and Tim Catalano,
co-authors of “Running the Edge,”
speak. Register. Free. 11 a.m.
Outdoor Action
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning
Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-638-6552. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
Family Nature Programs, New
Jersey Audubon, Plainsboro
Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road,
Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. www.
njaudubon.org. “Woodcock Ramble.” Register. $5. 6 p.m.
Workshop, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. “The Interview in the
Continued on following page
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20
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
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Continued from preceding page
Schools
Open House, Quakerbridge
Learning Center., 4044 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609933-8806.
www.quaker-bridge.
com. Information about summer
academic camp. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Open House, Waldorf School,
1062 Cherry Hill Road, Princeton,
609-466-1970. Information about
school and camps. Meet teachers,
staff, take a tour, and sample a
camp activity. Register. Free. 10
a.m. to noon.
Singles
Dance Party, Steppin’ Out Singles, Crowne Plaza, 390 Forsgate
Drive, Monroe, 862-397-4723.
Ages 40 plus. $15. 8 p.m.
Socials
Keys to the Kingdom: Breaking
Free from Limitations, Center
for Relaxation and Healing, 666
Plainsboro Road, Suite 635,
Plainsboro, 609-750-7432. Presented by Mark Van Der Gaag, a
relationship coach. Register. $27.
2 p.m.
Sunday
March 23
History
Cookie Jar Exhibit, Cranbury
Museum, 4 Park Place East,
Cranbury, 609-409-1289. www.
cranbury.org. Several dozen cookie jars of Elsie the Cow, Disney
characters, and more. Vintage
cookbooks and kitchen implements are also on exhibit. These
include “Betty Crocker’s Cookbook for Boys & Girls” published in
1957. 1 to 4 p.m.
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. Two-hour walking
tour around downtown Princeton
and Princeton University campus.
$7. 2 p.m.
Kids Stuff
Youth Field Hockey Program,
USA Field Hockey’s Fundamen• Our Specialized Programs
tals, Princeton Day School. www.
The Little Mermaid, West Wind• Make Learning Fun and Exciting
oafha.org. Program for boys and
sor Plainsboro Dance Compagirls in two groups, ages 6 to 11
ny, Grover Middle School, Village
• Our Curriculum Helps Students
and 12 to 14. Saturdays through
Road, West Windsor, 609-799• Improve Concentration,
October 26. Rain or shine. Players
9677. www.thedancecorner.org.
• Confidence & Discipline In School
must provide their own mouth and
Register. $11. 1 p.m. See story.
Trial Program
shin guards. Wear sneakers and
athletic clothing. Goggles and helOn Stage
mets are not allowed. Register onPeter
Pan,
Kelsey
Theater,
MerTo: ___________________________
line. $100. Led by Tracey Arndt,
cer Community College, 1200
head of field hockey at PDS and
Old Trenton Road, West Windsor,
Includes
2
Weeks
retired USA Women’s National
From: _________________________
Date & Time: ______________________
609-570-3333.
www.
kelseyInstruction Plus Uniform
team member; and Cristopher Matheater.net. Musical about a magiloney, former member of the USA
cal
world.
$20.
2
p.m.
Here is a proof of your ad, scheduled
to
run
___________________.
Master Yoon Kak Kim
Men’s National Squad and author
of “Field Hockey: Understanding
one of the most successful
Film
Please check it thoroughly and payishead
special
attention
to
the
following:
the Game.” Through May 18, rain
coaches of the U.S National
Global Cinema Cafe, Princeton
or shine. 9 to 10:30 a.m.
Your check mark will tell us it’s okay) Tae Kwon Do Team. Master
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Kim has earned international
Street, Princeton, 609-924-9529. For Families
recognition.
Phone number
Fax number
Address ScreeningExpiration
Date
of “Unmanned:
America’s Drone Wars,” a feature docu- Open House for Summer Camp,
Fernbrook Farms, 142 Bordenmentary film. 4 p.m.
town Georgetown Road, Chester295 Princeton-Hightstown Road
field, 609-298-4028. Tour the farm
Art
on a wagon, visit the animals, and
Southfield Retail Center • West Windsor
Art and Wine, Terhune Orchards,
meet the staff. Programs include
www.unitedblackbelt.com
330 Cold Soil Road, LawrencevFiddlehead Day Camp for ages 6
ille, 609-924-2310. Wine tasting,
to 11 and Young Stewards Enrichart exhibit and sale, explore the
ment program for ages 12 to 14. 1
farm and barnyard, and more.
to 3 p.m.
Noon to 5 p.m.

Dance
Only $39


United Black Belt

609-275-1500
Matthew S. Steinberg, DMD, FAGD
Providing Compassionate DENTAL CARE
to the Community for Over 25 Years.
Prevention is the Key
to a
Healthy Smile
The Office Center
666 Plainsboro Road • Suite 508 • Plainsboro, NJ
www.drmatthewsteinberg.com
Emergencies
and
New Patients
Welcome!
Hours by
appointment
609-716-8008
Literati
Lectures
75th Anniversary Celebration,
Bryn Mawr-Wellesley
Book
Sale,
Princeton Adult School, Friend
Call
or
fax
us
with
your
Princeton Day School, 650 Great
Center Auditorium, Computer SciRoad, Princeton,
732-895-5347.
ence Building, Princeton Universicomments.
More than 100,000 books expectty, 609-683-1101. www.princetoned to be sold
towill
benefit
scholaradult
school.org. “Focus on the
We
be
happy
to
make
ships to both women’s colleges.
Arts,” a conversation and recep10 a.m. to 7corrections
p.m.
tion, with Emily Mann, artistic diif we hear
rector of McCarter Theater; WilClassicalfrom
Music
liam Lockwood, director of special
you
programs at McCarter; James
Princeton Brass Band ChampiSteward, director of Princeton Uniby__________________
onship Concert,
Rider Universiversity Art Museum; Christopher
ty, Luedeke Theater, Rider UniDurang, Tony Award winning play_________.
versity, Lawrence,
609-896-7775.
wright for a play that premiered at
www.rider.edu. Program includes
McCarter;
we don’t
hear
you, and Derek Bermel,
works by If
Edward
Gregson
andfrom
composer, clarinetist, and former
John Williams. Directed by SteadFree.
will2 p.m.
run as is.artist-in-residence at the Institute
phen Arthurthe
Allen.
for Advanced Study. Moderated by
Stan• Katz, director of Princeton
Thanks! WWP News
Live Music
University’s Center for Arts and
Kenny Cunningham,
Alchemist
Cultural
609-243-9119
• Fax:
609-Policy Studies. Register.
& Barrister, 28 Witherspoon
$25. Rescheduled from March 2. 4
Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555.
p.m.
243-9020
21 plus. 10 p.m.
Craft Fairs
Sugarloaf Crafts Festival, Garden State Exhibit Center, Somerset, 800-210-9900. www.sugarloafcrafts.com. Fine artists, craft
designers, craft demonstrations,
gourmet foods, entertainment, interactive children’s performances,
and live music. $10. 10 a.m. to 5
p.m.
Socials
Annual Luncheon and Fashion
Show, The Contemporary, Trenton Country Club, 201 Sullivan
Way, West Trenton, 609-7319128. “There’s Snow Fashion Like
Spring Fashion” features professional models with Barbara
O’Connor Productions. Benefit for
area charities. Register. $50.
11:30 a.m.
Guest Violinist: Ch­
uanyun Li perfoms with
Bravura Philharmonic
in Richardson Audito­
rium on Saturday,
March 22.
Monday
March 24
On Stage
Community Think Gathering,
McCarter Theater, Terra Teatro,
91 University Place, Princeton,
609-258-2787. Collaboration between theater and audience to
create new opportunities for the
performing arts. Attendees will receive a voucher for two tickets.
Register to [email protected]
org. Free. 6 p.m.
Film
Second Chance Film Series,
Princeton Adult School, Friend
Center Auditorium, Computer Science Building, Princeton University, 609-683-1101. Screening of “A
Late Quartet.” $8. 7:30 p.m.
Literati
Half Price Day, Bryn MawrWellesley Book Sale, Princeton
Day School, 650 Great Road,
Princeton, 732-895-5347. 10 a.m.
to 7 p.m.
Author Event, Barnes & Noble,
MarketFair, West Windsor, 609716-1570. www.bn.com. Tom Angleberger, author of “Princess Labelmaker to the Rescue: An Origami Yoda Book.” 4 p.m.
Author Event, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-9529. ChangRae Lee, author of “On Such a Full
Sea,” will discuss and sign copies
of his latest book. 7 p.m.
Health
American Cancer Society’s Look
Good, Feel Better, Princeton
HealthCare System, 1 Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro, 888-8978979. Program to combat the appearance related side effects of
cancer treatment. Free. 6 p.m.
History
Timeline New Jersey, West Windsor Senior Center, 271 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609799-9068. Program presented by
Walter Choroszewski includes
New Jersey history from the dawn
of the Highlands to the ice age and
the present. Register. $5. 11 a.m.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. Drop in for soups,
sandwiches, desserts, tea, coffee,
and conversation. Register at
www.meetup.com/Princeton-Singles 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Tax Assistance
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897. Register. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
MARCH 21, 2014
Raising the Red
Flag in ‘Les Miz’
P
layful Theater Productions
presents “Les Miserables,” a
musical based on the novel by Victor Hugo, for three weekends at
Kelsey Theater this spring. Performances are Friday, March 28, to
Sunday, April 13. A reception with
the cast and crew follows the opening night performance on March
28.
The show begins in 1815 and
takes us on the journey of Jean
Valjean, an honest man driven to
steal a loaf of bread for his starving
family. After 19 years of hard labor
he breaks parole determined to start
a new life but Javert, a police inspector, continues to track him. The
revolution in France becomes the
focus of “Les Miz” as a group of
students build a barricade.
Shawn Doremus of Plainsboro
plays the role of Enjolras, the leader of the student revolutionaries.
Raised in Forked River, he became
interested in performing in theater
as a freshman in high school. As a
vocalist in the school’s choir, the
choir director encouraged him to
audition for the spring musical, and
he was cast in “The Music Man.”
He played the French horn in
marching band in the fall and in the
spring he was in the musicals. “I
became a drama kid,” he says.
Doremus graduated from Liberty University in Virginia with a
bachelor’s degree in secondary
Tuesday
March 25
School Sports
North Boys’ Lacrosse, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. At Hillsborough. 7
p.m.
On Stage
Lewis Center for the Arts, Princeton University, 185 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-258-1500.
“Acting Sondheim Songs,” a conversation with Becky Ann Baker.
Free. 3 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Silva Gallery of Art,
Pennington School, 112 West Delaware Avenue, Pennington, 609737-8069. www.pennington.org.
First day to “5: five artists, five visions,” an exhibit featuring the
work of Renee Kumar of West
Windsor and others. Reception on
Friday, April 11, 5:30 to 8 p.m. On
view to April 25. 11 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Dancing
International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Riverside
School, 58 Riverside Drive, Princeton, 609-921-9340. Ethnic dances of many countries using original
music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner
needed. $3. 7 to 9 p.m.
Literati
Box Day, Bryn Mawr-Wellesley
Book Sale, Princeton Day School,
650 Great Road, Princeton, 732895-5347. www.bmandwbooks.
com. More than 100,000 books
expected to be sold to benefit
scholarships to both women’s colleges. Bring your own box or purchase one. A standard box of
books is $10. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. Poetry reading
featuring Paul Muldoon, Idra
Novey, and James Richardson,
along with Adina Lasser, Tim D.
Housand, and Katie Hibner, all
winners of the 2013 Leonard L.
Milberg secondary school poetry
prize. 6 p.m.
English education and theater performance. At school he worked in
the office as well as set and prop
building, and lighting design.
After college graduation, Doremus spent a summer as an actor at
the Blue Ridge Summer Theater
Festival, where he played Macduff
in “Macbeth” and Solinus in “The
Comedy of Errors. “It was my farewell to Virginia,” he says.
A student teacher in Lacey
Township’s middle school, Doremus has been teaching English,
public speaking, and screenwriting
at South Brunswick High School
for a year. He moved to Plainsboro
from the shore. “It is a good
change,” he says.
His parents, both from Langhorne, Pennsylvania, did theater
together in high school. “Both
sides of the family are very musical,” he says. “My grandfather led a
big band.” His brother, who performed in “Grease” in high school,
is now an academic advisor for veterans studying online. His mother
works for the school system in
Lacey Township, and his father is
an operations manager with Williams-Sonoma.
The first Broadway show he saw
was “Les Miserables.” He was only
12 and remembers openly crying.
“It has a special place for me,” he
says. “I’ve had the soundtrack
memorized for 14 years.” He did
not see “Les Miz” again until the
film last year. “I’ll always love live
theater over a movie version.”
Previous roles at Kelsey Theater
include Houdini in “Ragtime” and
Tom Sawyer in “Big River.” Although this is his third time at
Kelsey and the third time working
with Frank Ferrara of West Windsor as the director, he still had to
audition for “Les Miserables.”
“As Enjolras I do a lot of singing, build a barricade, wave the big
red flag, lead half the cast to their
deaths, and die” says Doremus.
— Lynn Miller
Les Miserables, Kelsey Theater, Mercer Community College, 1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor. Musical based on Victor
Hugo’s novel set in 1815 France.
$20. 609-570-3333. www.kelseytheater.net.
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449. Men of all ages
and experience levels are invited
to sing in four-part harmony. Free.
7:30 to 10 p.m.
Investment Portfolios, Hickory
Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner Road, East Windsor, 609-4481330. “How to Build, Implement,
and Monitor Your Investment Portfolios” presented by Integrated Asset Management. Register. 7 p.m.
Faith
Socials
Lenten Services, Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau
Street at Vandeventer Avenue,
Princeton, 609-924-2613. www.
princetonumc.org. Meditation followed by a light lunch. Noon.
ESL Conversation Class, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren
Street,
609-275-2897.
www.
lmxac.org/plainsboro. Register. 7
p.m.
Mental Health
Wednesday
March 26
Twelve Step Recovery, Yoga For
Sobriety, East Windsor Fire Department, 51 One Mile Road, East
Windsor, 609-403-6679. www.
yoga4sobriety.com. Bring recovery into your yoga practice. E-mail
[email protected] net
for information. $5. 6 p.m.
Parenting Workshops
West Windsor Library, 333 North
Post Road, 609-799-0462. www.
mcl.org. Coping with challenges,
abuse and domestic violence,
symptoms of mental health disorders, common pitfalls, and more
presented by Parantap Pandya, a
mental health clinician. Register. 7
p.m.
Parent University, West Windsor-Plainsboro School District,
High School South, 346 Clarksville Road, West Windsor, 609716-5000. www.ww-p.org. Coffee
and conversation with Barbara
Kalmus, director of the Princeton
Education Network. Register by Email to [email protected] 7
p.m.
r
e
m
m
Su
e Fun! e
MUSIC LESSONS
SUMMER MUSIC CAMP
Weekly Camp - Ages 5-14. Learn to play
many instruments and read music.
Idol singing, arts and crafts, and MORE!
Visit our website for details.
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Lectures
Wellness
21
Les Miz: Sean Dore­
mus of Plainsboro
plays Enjolras.
Pop Music
Jewish Bereavement Group,
Jewish Family and Children’s
Services of Greater Mercer
County,
Congregation
Beth
Chaim, 329 Village Road East,
West Windsor, 609-987-8100.
Open to any Jewish adult, regardless of affiliation, who has lost a
loved one within the past 18
months. Facilitated by Beverly
Rubman, chaplain. Register by Email to [email protected] Donations invited. 7 to 8:30 p.m.
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22
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
MARCH 26
Continued from preceding page
Dancing
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, 1 Monument Drive, Princeton, 609-924-6763. $8. 7:30 to
10:30 p.m.
Literati
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. Joan Breton Connelly, author of “The Parthenon
Enigma,” in conversation with Angelos Chaniotis, professor ancient
history and the classics at the Institute for Advanced Study. 6 p.m.
Evenings with Friends, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8822. William Helmreich, author of “The
New York Nobody Knows: Walking
6,000 Miles in the City.” Presentation followed by interaction with
the author. Register. $50. 6:30
p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. Hosted by Eric Puliti. Registration begins at 9 p.m.
21 plus. 10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Cornerstone Community Kitchen, Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton, 609-924-2613.
Hot meals served, prepared by
TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30 p.m.
History
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. New
Jersey governor’s official residence. Group tours are available.
Registration required. $5 donation. 1 p.m.
Tour and Tea, Morven Museum,
55 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-924-8144. www.morven.org.
Tour the restored mansion, galleries, and gardens before or after
tea. Register. $20. 1 p.m.
Lectures
Distinguished Lecture Series,
Mercer County Community College, Kelsey Theater, 1200 Old
Trenton Road, West Windsor,
609-570-3324. www.mccc.edu.
“From Entrepreneurship to Spaceship” presented by Greg Olsen, a
Princeton resident, entrepreneur,
scientist, and the third private citizen to orbit the earth on the International Space Station. He will talk
about starting and selling two
startup businesses as well as his
voyage on the ISS. Noon.
Public Lecture, Institute for Advanced Study, Wolfensohn Hall,
Einstein Drive, Princeton, 609734-8228. www.ias.edu. “Univalent Foundations: New Foundations of Mathematics” presented
by Vladimir Voevodsky, professor
in the school of mathematics.
Free. 4:30 p.m.
Financial Literacy Seminar, McGraw-Hill Federal Credit Union,
120 Windsor Center Drive, East
Windsor, 800-226-6428. www.
mcgrawhillfcu.org. “Making Sense
of College Costs, Financial Aid,
and Student Loads” begins at 5:45
p.m. Seminar, parking, and dinner
included. Register by E-mail to
[email protected]
Free. 5 to 7 p.m.
Schools
Open House, The Lewis School,
53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org.
Information about alternative education program for learning different students with language-based
learning difficulties related to dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. 1 p.m.
Thursday
March 27
School Sports
North Boys’ Lacrosse, 609-7165000, ext. 5134. Oakcrest. 7 p.m.
On Stage
Kiss Me Kate, University of the
Arts, Merriam Theater, 250 South
Broad Street, Philadelphia. A musical version of “The Taming of the
Shrew” features Kris Robinson of
West Windsor at Baptista. Also Friday, March 28, at 7:30 p.m.; Saturday, March 29 at 2 and 7:30 p.m.;
and Sunday, March 30, at 2 p.m.
$20. 7:30 p.m.
Art
On Tour: Village School students are part of the Na­
tional Children’s Choir, which performs in Atlanta
Symphony Hall on Saturday, March 22 as the culmi­
nation of the Organization of American Kodaly Edu­
cators’ annual conference. Pictured are Julia Turca­
nu, front left, Jack Carter, Lakshmi Sinha, and Shan­
non Joseph; and teacher Amy Carter, back left, Lind­
say Kartoz, Alexis Borek, Moriah Rivera, Daniel
Weiss, and Disha Kohli.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 609948-4448. vivatango.org. All levels class at 8 p.m. Intermediate
level class at 8:30 p.m. Open
dance, socializing, and refreshments from 9:30 to 11:45 p.m. No
partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m.
in the book include George Washington, George Gallup, Albert Einstein, Paul Robeson, Bebe Neuwirth, Peter Benchley, and others.
6 p.m.
Classical Music
Joyce DiDonato, Princeton University Concerts, Richardson
Auditorium,
609-258-2800.
princetonuniversityconcerts.org.
This is DiDonato’s only one of four
recitals in the U.S. in 2014. The
mezzo soprano presents songs
and arias by Vivaldi. Rossini,
Schubert, Schumann, and others.
Craig Terry accompanies on piano. $20 to $45. 8 p.m.
Literati
Change Your
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Art Exhibit, Princeton University
Art Museum, Princeton campus,
609-258-3788. Discuss the prints
of Edvard Munch with Calvin
Brown, Starr Figura, and others.
5:30 p.m.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. Richard D. Smith,
author of “Legendary Locals of
Princeton.” Personalities included
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The Max Of West
Windsor
217 Clarksville Road
MARCH 21, 2014
THE NEWS
Entrepreneur Turned Astronaut: Greg Olsen speaks
as part of Mercer County College’s distinguished
lecture series on Wednesday, March 26.
Jazz & Blues
Lecture and Concert, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, 609-924-9529.
“Sarah Vaughan: 90th Birthday
Celebration in Song” presented by
Beverly Owens. 3 p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic Night, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. 7 p.m.
Paul Plumeri Trio, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.
theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Benefit Galas
Spring Into Student Success,
Mercer County College, Mercer
Oaks Golf, 725 Village Road West,
West Windsor, 609-570-3293.
www.mccc.edu. Hors d’oeuvres,
light buffet, open bar, desserts, silent auction, awards program, and
entertainment by student musicians to benefit student scholarships. Register. $120; two tickets
for $225. 6 to 9 p.m.
Faith
Friday
March 28
On Stage
Les Miserables, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. Musical
based on Victor Hugo’s novel set
in 1815 France. Shawn Doremus
of Plainsboro portrays Enjolras.
Ensemble members include Elizabeth Ferrara of West Windsor. Her
father, Frank Ferrara, is the director; and her mother, Shannon Ferrara, is the musical director. $20. A
reception with the cast and crew
follows the opening night reception. 8 p.m. See story.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Princeton University, 185 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-258-1500.
www.princeton.edu/arts.
Workshop reading of Euripides’ “Hippolytus” with an original vocal
score by senior Chris Beard. Free.
8 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. “Dutch Mannerism” presented by Frances
Preston. Free. 12:30 p.m.
Dancing
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272.
www.princetonfolkdance.org. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. $5. 8 to 11
p.m.
Continued on following page
Public Lecture, Princeton Theological Seminary, Mackay Campus Center, 609-497-7963. Mitri
Raheb, author of “Faith in the Face
of Empire: The Bible Through Palestinian Eyes.” 5 p.m.
Labyrinth Meditation Walk, St.
David’s Episcopal Church, 90
South Main Street, Cranbury, 609897-9769. www.stdavidscranbury.
com. Taize prayer service followed
by a walking through the circular
path of the labyrinth. A wood finger
labyrinth is available for those unsteady on their feet. 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Gardens
Spring Garden Lecture, Morven
Museum, Present Day Club, 72
Stockton Street, Princeton, 609924-8144. “Ornamental Plans and
American Garden Design” presented by Denise Wiles Adams,
author of “American Home Landscapes: A Design Guide to Creating Period Garden Styles.” Register. $30. 10 a.m.
Wellness
Introduction to Earth-Based
Spirituality, Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite 635, Plainsboro,
609-750-7432. Presented by Sharon O’Brien. Register. $25. 7 p.m.
Lectures
Online Forum, Einstein’s Alley,
Internet, 609-799-8898. www.
einsteinsalley.org. “Building Powerful Strategic Partnering for Companies in Einstein’s Alley.” Speakers include Pamela S. Harper,
founding partner and CEO of Business Advancement; and D. Scott
Harper, senior partner, Business
Advancement. Register. Noon.
Meeting, Princeton Photography
Club, Johnson Education Center,
D&R Greenway Land Trust, 1
Preservation Place, Princeton,
732-422-3676.
www.princetonphotoclub.org. “Through the Lens:
World Around Us,” a special meeting with “It’s All About the Birds” by
Walt Varan; “Celebrating the Female Figure” by Herb Way, and “I
Am Going Home” by Samuel Vovsi. Refreshments. Free. 7:30 p.m.
For Seniors
Kosher Cafe West, Jewish Family and Children’s Service, Congregation Beth Chaim, 329 Village
Road East, West Windsor, 609987-8100.
www.jfcsonline.org.
“The Subversive Seder” presented by Cantor Stuart Binder who
will explore ways to enhance your
seder with creative mischief. Register by E-mail to [email protected]
jfcsonline.org. $5 includes a Kosher-style lunch. 12:30 p.m.
Thomas Grover Middle School
10 Southfield Road • West Windsor
March 22, 2014 at 7pm
March 23, 2014 at 1pm
$10 in advance • $11 at the door
Tickets Available at The Dance Corner (609)799-9677
23
24
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
SOFA & RECLINER
SALE
MARCH 28
Continued from preceding page
Literati
Fund for Irish Studies, Princeton
University, Lewis Center, 185
Nassau Street, 609-258-1500.
“The Riddle of Erskine Childers”
presented by Erskine Childers, focuses on his great grandfather.
Free. 4:30 p.m.
Classical Music
50% OFF
Rider Furniture.com
4621 Route 27, Kingston, NJ • 609-924-0147
Faculty Series, Westminster
Conservatory, Rider Art Gallery,
Lawrenceville,
609-921-2663.
High Winds, a conservatory faculty ensemble. World premiere of
“Six Appalachian Folk Songs” by
Craig Levesque and Haydn’s Trio
in G Major. Craig Levesque joins
the ensemble to present the world
premier of Samuel Livingston’s
Quartet in C. Free. 12:15 p.m.
PSO’s Behind the Music, Arts
Council of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon Street, 609-924-8777.
4:30 p.m.
La Traviata, Boheme Opera NJ,
Kendall Theater, College of New
Jersey,
609-771-2885.
Fully
staged production of Verdi’s opera
directed by Reegan McKenzie. Joseph Pucciatti conducts the orchestra and chorus. Pre-show talk
at 7 p.m. English supertitles. $30
to $50. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Now Enrolling
Summer Adventures Camp
Fall 2014-2015
(limited spaces available)
KINDERGARTEN EXTENSION
AM and PM Classes
3- and 5-Day Options Available
2014-2015 School Year
Princeton Meadow Preschool
545 Meadow Road • Princeton, NJ 08540
(609) 987-1180 • www.princetonmeadow.com
[email protected]
Princeton Meadow Preschool admits students of any race,
color, religion, and national or ethnic origin.
add color to your life
at ywca princeton!
St. Patrick’s Irish Shindig, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9249529. Musicians include Ellen
Wolff from Blue Jersey Band, Nancy Halter, and Bill O’Neal. Register
to perform with Ed Hermann at
908-285-1795. $5 includes refreshments. 6 p.m.
Comedy
Shuli from Howard Stern, Catch
a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102
Carnegie Center, West Windsor,
609-987-8018. www.catcharisingstar.com. Register. $19.50. 8 p.m.
Danny Broad and Bob Dibuono,
Sarcasm Comedy, Tavern on the
Lake, 101 North Main Street,
Hightstown,
732-SARCASM.
www.sarcasmcomedy.com. Eric
Potts hosts. Register. $20. 8 p.m.
On the House Comedy Night,
Station Bar and Grill, 2625 Route
130 South, Cranbury, 609-6555550. Hosted by Mike Bonner. 9 to
10:30 p.m.
Wellness
Twelve Step Recovery, Yoga For
Sobriety, St. David’s Church, 90
South Main Street, Cranbury, 609403-6679. Bring recovery into
your yoga practice. E-mail [email protected] for information. $5. 6 p.m.
Lectures
Behind the Music, Arts Council
of Princeton, 102 Witherspoon
Street, 609-497-0020. Composer
Julian Grant discusses the influence of one of his earlier pieces
upon the creation of his latest orchestral work “Dances in the
Dark.” The new works will premier
on Sunday, March 30, at the Princeton Symphony Orchestra’s classical concert series. 4:30 p.m.
Singles
spring classes
begin march 24th!
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889. Non-denominational support group for men and women.
Free. 7:30 p.m.
Tax Assistance
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897. Register. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For Seniors
www.ywcaprinceton.org (609) 497-2100
Computer Lab, Princeton Senior
Resource Center, Suzanne Patterson Building, 45 Stockton
Street, 609-924-7108. Drop in for
help with computer and technology questions. Free. 10 a.m.
From Howard Stern:
Shuli appears at Catch
a Rising Star on Friday
and Saturday, March
28 and 29.
Saturday
March 29
School Sports
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North Boys’ Lacrosse. At Montgomery. 7 p.m.
North Girls’ Lacrosse. Eastern. 7
p.m.
South Boys’ Lacrosse. At Princeton. 7 p.m.
On Stage
Community Think Gathering,
McCarter Theater, Hickory Corner Library, 138 Hickory Corner
Road, East Windsor, 609-2582787. Collaboration between theater and audience to create new
opportunities for the performing
arts. Attendees will receive a
voucher for two tickets to a performance of their choice. Register by
E-mail to [email protected]
Free. 3 p.m.
Les Miserables, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. www.
kelseytheater.net. Musical based
on Victor Hugo’s novel set in 1815
France. $20. 8 p.m.
Live with That, Passage Theater,
Mill Hill Playhouse, 205 East Front
Street, Trenton, 609-392-0766.
www.passagetheatre.org.
OnStage Ensemble presents original
monologues and scenes about senior experiences examining decisions that have shaped and reshaped lives including starting college at age 40. Adam Immerwahr
directs. $10 to $12. 8 p.m.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Princeton University, 185 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-258-1500.
Workshop reading of Euripides’
“Hippolytus” with an original vocal
score by senior Chris Beard. Free.
8 p.m.
Film
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-9529.
Screening
of
“Transamerica,” 2005. 1 p.m.
Art
Art for Families, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton
University Art Museum, 609-4970020. “Art Tales.” 10:30 a.m.
Dancing
English and Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne
Patterson Center, Monument
Drive, Princeton, 609-924-6763.
Instruction followed by dance.
$10. 7:30 p.m.
Live Music
3-26 Rodney & Eva, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. Beatles music all
night long. 7:30 p.m.
Laurie Davis, It’s a Grind Coffee
House, 7 Schalks Crossing Road,
Plainsboro, 609-275-2919. Acoustic pop. 8 to 10 p.m.
Pop Music
Peter Yarrow, Monroe Township
Cultural Arts Commission, Monroe Middle School, 1629 Perrineville Road, Monroe, 877-77Click.
$25. 7 p.m.
Good Causes
Guys and Dolls Bingo, The Teal
Tea Foundation, Elks Club, 835
West Bridge Street, Morrisville,
PA, 855-832-5832. www.tealtea.
org. Benefit for “Give Women a
Lift” program to provide transportation to women undergoing chemotherapy or radiation treatment
for a gynecological cancer and to
ovarian cancer research. Prizes
include items for men and women
of all ages. $35 includes 11 games.
Jewelry sale and more. 6 p.m.
Benefit Afternoon, OPERAnauts
to Congo, Trinity Church, 33 Nassau Street, Princeton. operanauts.
net. “Fandango,” an adaptation of
the opera “Le Nozze di Figaro”
created by Joy Bechtler and arranged by Craig Levesque for
wind quintet and marimba. Benefit
for the group’s mission to an international artist exchange program.
Sung in Italian with English dialogue. Wedding cake and punch
will be served. $35; $100 per family. E-mail [email protected]
com for information. 7:30 p.m.
Benefit Galas
Gala, National Junior Tennis
League of Trenton, Hyatt, Carnegie Center, West Windsor, 609341-1698. Benefit to support free
summer, academic, and nutritional programs for less privileged
children. Red carpet entrance,
cocktails, dinner, live and silent
auctions, and music. Honorees include Ed and Judy Stier and McGraw-Hill Federal Credit Union.
Register. $225. 6:30 to 11:30 p.m.
Comedy
Shuli from Howard Stern and Eric Potts, Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center,
West Windsor, 609-987-8018.
Register. $22. 7:30 and 9:30 p.m.
Recycling
Writing Workshop, Sharpening
the Quill, Acacia Restaurant,
2637 Main Street, Lawrenceville,
609-430-0321.
www.laurenbdavis.com. For emerging and experienced writers. Morning session includes a lecture and writing
exercises, and the afternoon is
dedicated to critiquing. $85 includes lunch. Register online or
E-mail
[email protected]
com. 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.
Household Chemical and Electronics Waste Disposal Day,
Mercer County Improvement
Authority, John T. Dempster Fire
School, 350 Lawrence Station
Road, Lawrence, 609-278-8067.
Aerosol cans, household, car, and
rechargeable batteries, photographic chemicals, used motor oil
and oil filters, lighter fluid, propane
gas tanks, pesticides/herbicides,
pool chemicals, paint thinner,
stains and varnishes, anti-freeze,
driveway sealer, gasoline, and insect repellents. Rain or shine.
Must show proof of Mercer County
residency. 8 a.m. to 2 p.m.
Classical Music
Wellness
Literati
Westminster Schola Cantorum
Spring Concert, Westminster
Choir College, Bristol Chapel,
Princeton, 609-921-2663. www.
rider.edu. “Journey’s,” a program
of classic and contemporary choral masterworks. James Jordan
conducts. $20. 8 p.m.
Infinite Possibilities Course,
Center for Relaxation and Healing, 666 Plainsboro Road, Suite
635, Plainsboro, 609-750-7432.
Presented by Franne and Bob Demetrician from One Spirit Interfatith Seminary in New York City.
Register. $100 includes their book.
9 a.m. to 5 p.m.
MARCH 21, 2014
Schools
Zumba Class, Princeton Presbyterian Church, 545 Meadow
Road, West Windsor, 609-9871166. E-mail donnabalducci.
zumba.com. Free. 10 a.m.
Open House, Quakerbridge
Learning Center., 4044 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609933-8806.
www.quaker-bridge.
com. Information about summer
academic camp. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
For Families
Open House, Montessori Corner
at Princeton Meadows, 666
Plainsboro Road, Plainsboro,
609-799-6668.
princetonmeadowsmontessoricorner.com. 10
a.m. to 1 p.m.
Open House, The Lewis School,
53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org.
Information about alternative education program for learning different students with language-based
learning difficulties related to dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. 10 a.m.
Lectures
Chinese Language and Culture,
West Windsor Library, 333 North
Post Road, 609-799-0462. Explore Chinese dietary culture,
Confucianism, the influence of
western culture, and contemporary China. Register. Free. 10 a.m.
Socials
Scrap-A-Rama, St. David’s Episcopal Church, 90 South Main
Street, Cranbury, 609-897-9769.
Demonstration of crafts, supplies
available. $45 includes breakfast,
lunch, dinner, snacks, dessert,
and reserved table work space for
a project. Register by E-mail to [email protected] 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Workshop, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. Stress management
workshop presented by Carol
Rickard, a stress and wellness expert. Register. Free. 10:30 a.m.
Composition on Location, Princeton Photo Workshop, Princeton
University, 609-921-3519. Opportunity for photographers of all levels to learn and to practice their
craft. Explore the campus using
the rules of composition. Register.
$59. 11 a.m.
Sunday
March 30
On Stage
Getting Your House Ready for
Sale, West Windsor Library, 333
North Post Road, 609-799-0462.
Home inspections, smart repairs,
and more. Register. Free. 2 p.m.
Les Miserables, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. Musical
based on Victor Hugo’s novel set
in 1815 France. $20. 2 p.m.
Outdoor Action
Princeton Canal Walkers, Turning
Basin Park, Alexander Road,
Princeton, 609-638-6552. Threemile walk on the towpath. Bad
weather cancels. Free. 10 a.m.
Live with That, Passage Theater,
Mill Hill Playhouse, 205 East Front
Street, Trenton, 609-392-0766.
OnStage Ensemble presents original monologues and scenes about
senior experiences examining decisions that have shaped and reshaped lives including starting college at age 40. Adam Immerwahr
directs. $10 to $12. 3 p.m.
Family Nature Programs, New
Jersey Audubon, Plainsboro
Preserve, 80 Scotts Corner Road,
Plainsboro, 609-897-9400. www.
njaudubon.org. “How Does Your
Garden Grow?” Register. $5. 3
p.m.
Continued on following page
E
xpect the unexpected as you
delve into the magical world of
Ariel, who is transformed from a
mermaid into an enchanting young
woman who captivates the handsome Prince Eric. Be prepared for
creative and musical twists as Ariel
encounters both evil and friendly
creatures during her many adventures above and below the sea.
Dance Corner’s narrated production of “The Tale of the Little Mermaid” features ballet, pointe, jazz,
tap, lyrical, and hip hop dance to
appeal to children and adults of all
ages. The show will be at Grover
Middle School on Saturday, March
22, at 7 p.m.; and Sunday, March
23, at 1 p.m.
Ryan Wilityer dances the role of
Prince Eric and Rebecca Schwartz
portrays Ariel. Both are seniors at
High School North. Jessica Lewinson, a senior at High School South,
is Ursula. Abby Tattle, a junior at
North, is Flounder. Sydney Tattle, a
freshman at North, is Flotsam,
Marguerite Girandola, a senior at
North is Scuttle, Nicole McCarthy,
also a senior at North, is Jetsam.
Gina Ethe, a senior at Hightstown
High school, is Sebastian.
Dancers from West Windsor include Sydney Abitanto, Regan
Blessing, Kayla Chait, Evan Chartock, Anna Chen, Lona Chugh, Ved
Chugh, Winnie Cohen, Emma Colon, Callia Cordasco, Faith Falkowitz, Julia Felice, Mia Ferri, Caroline Foley, Marguerite Girandola,
Sarah Glickson, Hannah Goldschmidt, Maya Goldschmidt, Norman Goldschmidt, Reed Henry,
Sydney Herriott, Diya Hundiwala,
Hope Jaworowski, Isabel Josephson, Eve Kavalov, Lula Kavalov,
Courtney Kobus, Kelsey Kobus,
Julia Kozakowski, Lauren Kuczmarski, Jessica Lewinson, Char-
lotte
Lichtenstein, and Kimberly Litzinger.
Also
from
West Windsor are
Casey McElroy,
Kelly McElroy,
Sanjana Musafir,
Aditi
Nayak,
Akash
Nayak,
Hope Pandolpho,
Julia Perl, Nate
Pirrera, Sophie
Pirrera, Amanda
Popovic, Olivia
Popovic, Christine
Rexroad,
Brendan Roy, Josephine
Ryan,
R e b e c c a
Schwartz, Kaila
Shah, Niki Simhadri, Pia Singh,
Rebecca Slater, Corinne Smith,
Shannon Smith, Abigail Tattle,
Kelsey Tattle, Sydney Tattle, Trieu
Tran, Regina Trevino, Rachel Trokenheim, Paloma Villota, Alex Vogel, Ryan Wilityer, Kate Wirth,
Madeline Wirth, Jasmine Woo, and
Emma Yanagi.
Dancers from Plainsboro include Katherine Antos, Shira
Black, Nadia Burston, Elizabeth
Cruz, Christine De Jong, Sarah De
Jong, Erica Harris, Amelia Hohf,
Lillian Hohf, Katie Kane, Grace
Kolker, Amanda Kowalski, Cayla
Lemkin, Nicole McCarthy, Fransesca Moriello, Brooklyn Palumbo,
Alexa Rubin, Lindsay Rubin, Natasha Singer, Amanda Strapp, Iris
Tseng, and Sophia Vivona.
Choreographers include Amy
DeCesare and Roni Wilityer, directors of the Dance Corner, along
with past and present teachers from
the school. The set designers and
builders are Ed Legge and Peter
She’s in Love: Ryan
Wilityer and Rebecca
Schwartz rehearse for
their roles as Prince
Eric and Ariel.
Wilityer. Volunteer coordinators
include Rosie Karlin, Lisa McElroy, Patricia Shargo, and Jill Tattle.
The production will be narrated by
Plainsboro resident Scott Karlin,
who by day is a computing facilities manager at Princeton University.
— Lynn Miller
The Little Mermaid, West
Windsor Plainsboro Dance Company, Grover Middle School, Village Road, West Windsor. Saturday, March 22, 7 p.m.; and Sunday,
March 23, 1 p.m. Register. $11.
609-799-9677. www.thedancecorner.org.
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THE NEWS
2 Tree Farm Rd.
Suite A-110
Pennington, NJ
609-737-4491
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Join
usatatMarch
ournext
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open
house!
Wed,
12
at
9house!
a.m.
Join
us
our
open
Wed,
March
12
at
9
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at
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next
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house!
Wed, March 12 at 9 a.m.
a.m.
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Grade88
Wed,
23
at
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12
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a.m.
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at
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at
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at
9
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Wed,
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at
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Wed,
Aprilprogram
23atat99options
a.m. now available:
• Pre-K
Wed,
23
a.m.
Pre-K
program
options
now
available:
Wed,••April
April
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at
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a.m.
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program
options
now
available:
Five
days
a week, options
three days
a week
or five half-days
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program
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•Five days a week, three days a week or five half-days
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program
options
now aavailable:
Five Lower
days
a week,
three
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or five lab,
half-days
• • •NEW
classrooms,
computer
science
Five Lower
days
aSchool
week,
three
days
week
or five lab,
half-days
Pre-K
program
options
now aavailable:
•• Five
NEW
School
classrooms,
computer
science
days
a
week,
three
days
a
week
or
five
half-days
NEW
Lower
School
classrooms,
computer
lab,
science
lab
and
commons
area
complete
by
Fall
2014
• Five
days
a
week,
three
days
a
week
or
five
half-days
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Lower
School
classrooms,
computer
lab,
science
lab
and
commons
area
complete
by
Fall
2014
lab and
commons
area
complete
by Fall
2014
NEW
Lower
School
classrooms,
computer
lab,
science
• • NEW
Middle
School
facilities
complete
by
Fall
2015
lab and
commons
area
complete
by Fall 2014
NEW
Lower
School
classrooms,
computer
lab, science
••• NEW
Middle
School
facilities
complete
by
Fall
NEW
Middle
School
facilities
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by2014
Fall 2015
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by Fall
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4101 Princeton Pike, Princeton, New Jersey 08540 l 609-986-1702
26
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
A Hard Day’s Night
T
he Beatles’ appearance on the
“Ed Sullivan Show” on February 9, 1964, was a magical day for
so many young people at the time.
It spurred many to seek music lessons and for some a career in music. Some of those inspired in 1964
will appear at Grover’s Mill Coffee
House in West Windsor for its annual Beatles Fest on Saturday,
March 22, at 7:30 p.m.
Jack Timmerman has been playing guitar and keyboard since the
day he saw the Beatles 50 years
ago. “They were truly the inspiration to do so,” he says. He lives
near the Jersey Shore.
Chris Apple is married to Timmerman’s niece, Jessie. “We share
a love of the Beatles and have
bonded at family gatherings entertaining everyone with our renditions of favorite Beatles tunes,”
says Apple.
“Jack has been participating in
the annual Beatles Fest at Grover’s
Mill for years and asked us to join
him last year and again this year to
celebrate the 50th anniversary of
the Beatles on Ed Sullivan,” says
Apple. “It’s a great opportunity to
gather with friends and play a
handful of songs that everyone
loves.”
Band members include Timmerman on guitar and keyboards, Apple on bass and vocals; Liam Moroney on guitar and vocals, Andy
Letke on drums, keyboards, and
vocals. Known as the Little Rockers Band, they teach classes and
perform at parties, concerts, and assemblies for pre-K to second grade
in and around New York and New
Helter Skelter: Jack
Timmerman, left, Chris
Apple, Andy Letke, and
Liam Moroney. Below,
Jim Matlock.
Jersey, in addition to teaching rock
music lessons to teens.
“We’ve been in various bands
and traveled all over the U.S. and
abroad together over the years,”
says Apple. “We all have a love of
the Beatles and have performed in
many Beatles-related projects together.”
“Since we just celebrated the
50th year of the Beatles playing on
Ed Sullivan the tribute this year is
even more special,” says Jim Matlock, one of the musicians performing. “I first saw them at my cousin’s
home that night — of course in
black and white — and loved their
music ever since. It seems to define
our generation.”
Matlack, 58, began playing guitar at age 9 and later learned the
harmonica. Born and raised in Ewing, he studied music at Trenton
State College. “Like many my age,
I like a lot of styles of music but especially music with great harmonies,” he says. “I gravitated to
groups like the Beatles, the Byrds,
Simon and Garfunkle, Peter and
Gordon, Chad and Jeremy, as well
as singer/songwriters like James
Taylor and Glenn Campbell as the
style of playing and singing I enjoyed doing the most.”
Married for 36 years, he has two
grown daughters. “My three-yearold granddaughter loves the Beatles, especially Ringo,” he says. If
Licensed
Insured
Matlock’s granddaughter attends
the concert he will play “Octopuses’ Garden” by Ringo from the
“Abbey Road” record.
“The songs I chose for the evening are some of my favorite acoustic tunes of the Beatles that I perform with my band, Roundabout,”
he says. “All nice tunes to sing and
play.”
The show will open with “Yesterday,” performed by Franc Gambatese, co-owner of the coffee
shop. He will also sit in on several
songs during the evening.
The Ed Sullivan Set includes
“Twist & Shout,” “All My Loving,” “Till There Was You,” “She
Loves You,” “I Saw Her Standing
There,” “I Want to Hold Your
Hand,” “Misery,” “Everybody’s
MARCH 30
Continued from preceding page
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53 Bayard Lane 609
609--924
924--8120 lewisschool.org
Art
Art Exhibit, Nassau Club, 6 Mercer Street, Princeton, 609-9240580. “Coast to Country,” an exhibit of farm, water, and more by
Meg Michael and Betty Curtiss.
On view to May 31. 3 to 5 p.m.
Literati
Poets at the Library, Princeton
Public Library, 65 Witherspoon
Street, Princeton, 609-924-9529.
Launch party for U.S.1 Worksheets’ volume 59. Copies of the
journal will be available for sale.
1:15 p.m.
Classical Music
La Traviata, Boheme Opera NJ,
Kendall Theater, College of New
Jersey, 609-771-2885. Fullystaged production of Verdi’s opera
directed by Reegan McKenzie. Joseph Pucciatti conducts. Preshow talk at 7 p.m. English supertitles. $30 to $50. 3 p.m.
The Sonnet in Song, Westminster Choir College, Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609-921-2663. Eric
Rieger, tenor, performs sonnets
set to music by Schubert, Lizst,
and Britten accompanied by J.J.
Penna on piano. Free. 3 p.m.
Classical Series Concert: Nights
and Dreams, Princeton Symphony Orchestra, Richardson
Auditorium, Princeton University,
609-497-0020. Premiere of Julian
Grant’s “Dances in the Dark,” Benjamin Britten’s “Serenade for Tenor, Horn, and Strings” with tenor
Dominic Armstrong and French
horn player Eric Ruske. Rossen
Milanov directs. Pre-concert talk
at 3 p.m. $25 to $75. 4 p.m.
Robin Leigh Massie and Friends,
Westminster Choir College,
Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609921-2663. Concert of works by
Berlioz, Mozart, R. Strauss, Barber and Gilbert and Sullivan. Free.
7:30 p.m.
Trying To Be My Baby,” “Roll
Over Beethoven,” and “Tell
me Why.”
The Later Years set includes “Norwegian Wood,”
“I’m Looking Through You,”
“Lady Madonna,” “And Your
Bird Can Sing,” “Ballad of
John & Yoko,” “Taxman,”
“While My Guitar Gently
Weeps,” and “Golden Slumbers.”
There will be other guests
performing during the evening. John Mazzeo, a guitarist
and fellow Beatle-maniac will join
them. The show will possibly close
with “Get Back” or “Hey Jude.”
Says Apple: “It should be a great
night of music.”
— Lynn Miller
Westminster Jubilee Singers,
Westminster Choir College,
Bristol Chapel, Princeton, 609921-2663. www.rider.edu. “Embrace” features works by several
young African American composers and arrangers of sacred music
including Marques Garrett, Colin
Lett, Brittney Boykin and Brandon
Waddles. $20. 7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Thomas Johnston, Alchemist &
Barrister, 28 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-5555. www.
theaandb.com. 21 plus. 10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Wine Tasting, American Wine
Society, Cherry Valley Road,
Princeton, 609-575-1395. Wines
from Gigondas, France. Call or Email [email protected]
for location. 5 p.m.
History
Walking Tour, Historical Society
of Princeton, Bainbridge House,
158 Nassau Street, Princeton,
609-921-6748. Two-hour walking
tour around downtown Princeton
and Princeton University campus.
$7. 2 p.m.
For Families
Open House, Liberty Lake Day
Camp, 1195 Florence-Columbus
Road, Bordentown, 609-4990025. Tours of the camp. 11 a.m.
to 3 p.m.
Open House, Appel Farm Arts &
Music Center, 457 Shirley Road,
Elmer, 800-298-4200. www.appelfarm.org. Camp tours. 2 p.m.
Lectures
Princeton Chapter of the English
Speaking Union, Lawrenceville
School, Kirby Center, 2500 Main
Street, Lawrenceville, 732-4381315. “Early Settlers in the American Colonies Who Returned to
English to fight in the English Civil
War” presented by Adrian Tinniswood, a member of the Order of
the British Empire. He will talk
about the Ranborowes family. 3
p.m.
Beatles Fest, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor.
Saturday, March 22, 7:30 p.m. 609716-8771.
www.groversmillcoffee.com.
Monday
March 31
School Sports
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North Boys’ Lacrosse. At Notre
Dame. 4:30 p.m.
South Girls’ Lacrosse. Lawrence.
4:15 p.m.
Film
Second Chance Film Series,
Princeton Adult School, Friend
Center Auditorium, Computer Science Building, Princeton University, 609-683-1101. Screening of
“Sister.” $8. 7:30 p.m.
Art
Art Exhibit, Princeton Day
School, The Great Road, Princeton, 609-924-6700. First day for
“Art for Books” by Paul Zelinsky, a
visiting artist at the school who
studied with Maurice Sendak at
Yale University. On view to April
25. 12:30 p.m.
Faith
The Station Churches of Mercer
County, Church of Saint Ann, St.
David the King, 1 New Village
Road, West Windsor, 609-8826491. Celebrate evening mass
during Lent. Tour the church’s art
and architecture. 7 p.m.
Annual Warfield Lectures, Princeton Theological Seminary,
Theron Room, Library Place and
Mercer Street, 609-497-7963.
“Cosmological Emptiness and the
Presence of God: The Rediscovery of Pneumatology” presented
by Cornelis van der Kooi, professor of systemic theology and chair
of the department of dogmatics
and ecumenics at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. 7 p.m.
Continued on page 28
MARCH 21, 2014
In Town
New Jersey Audubon and
Plainsboro Preserve seek art for
its “Wild New Jersey” art show.
The juried competition is open to
New Jersey residents ages 18 and
older with works of art that feature
the state’s flora, fauna, and landscapes.
An individual entry must be
completed for each work. Entry
may be of any media, including
photography, oils, acrylics, watercolor, collage, or other mixed media. The artwork format must be
flat, appropriately framed, and
ready for hanging. $25 for up to
five individual pieces for consideration.
Each artwork must have a label
with the name and contact information of the artist securely attached
to the back. Registration and submission of the artwork(s) must be
done in person and will take place
at the Plainsboro Preserve Center,
80 Scotts Corner Road, Plainsboro,
on Friday and Saturday, March 21
and 22, from 10 a.m. to 4:30 p.m.
There will be cash prizes.
West Windsor Arts Council
seeks art from artists ages 13 to 33
for “WW33,” a juried exhibit for
young people. The theme is “community.” All work that can be hung
on the wall including drawing,
painting, mixed media, photography, printmaking, or fiber will be
considered. Applicants may submit
up to three images for jury review.
All works entered must be original.
The juror is Tricia Fagan, the
program development specialist at
Mercer County’s Division of Culture and Heritage office. Visit
www.westwindsorarts.org for prospectus. Deadline is Sunday, April
13.
Mercer Community College
invites area employers to set up a
recruitment table at its annual
spring job fair on Tuesday, April 1,
from 10 a.m. to 1 p.m. in the student center on the college’s West
Windsor Campus, 1200 Old Trenton Road. Contact Letrice Thomas
by E-mail [email protected]
Attitudes in Reverse seeks volunteers for Miki & Friends Walk/
Run for A.I.R. on Saturday, May
17, at Mercer County Park. Pets are
good for our mental health and Miki has inspired a mental health day
with our four-legged companions.
The day will begin with a 5K Run,
certified and timed. Visit attitudesinreverse.donorpages.com.
M&M Stage Productions has
auditions for “Li’l Abner” on Saturday and Sunday, May 17 and 18,
from noon to 5 p.m. at Mercer College in West Windsor. Wear clothing and shoes that you can dance
and move in. Sing a song in the
style of the show. Bring sheet music, an accompanist will be provided. Bring updated resume and
headshot. Visit mandmstage.com
for application. E-mail Mike DiIorio at [email protected]
or call 609-828-6567.
Mercer Community College
offers new, current, or visiting students an opportunity to catch up or
get ahead by earning college credits during the summer session.
General education courses include
English, mathematics, communications, history, psychology, and
foreign languages. Both onsite and
online classes are available. Visit
www.mccc.edu.
For Teens
Princeton Photo Workshop offers Teen Summer Photography
workshops for young photographers to have the opportunity to
practice the fundamentals of digital
photography while exploring their
Opportunities
creative expression and enjoyment
of photography. Working with their
own DSLR cameras, teens receive
personalized, field-based, and
classroom instruction on how to
improve their photography. In the
classroom, the instructors and professional photographers explain
the use of light, composition, and
camera settings. Week two is
hands-on work and learning to organize and enhance images using
Adobe Lightroom and Adobe Photoshop. Visit princetondigitalphotoworkshop.com.
Jewish Family & Children’s
Service of Greater Mercer County offers two college scholarship
opportunities available to Jewish
students who reside in the Princeton, Mercer, Bucks community.
The Jewish Community Foundation is offering book awards to
college bound Jewish students who
reside in the area. The Melvin
Kushner College Scholarship is
awarded to a college bound Jewish
high school senior who is an area
resident. The scholarships are
awarded based on financial need
and students must be accepted and
enrolled in a college or university
for the fall semester. Application
deadline is Sunday, June 15. Contact Lara Wellerstein at 609-9878100 or [email protected]
Lawrenceville Summer School
is for middle and high school students seeking to study this summer.
Courses are being offered in three
and six-week sessions, between
June 30 and August 8, in art, computer programming, film-making,
finance, mathematics, music, science, Spanish, and writing. All
courses at 2500 Main Street, Lawrenceville, in air conditioned classrooms, Monday through Friday.
Visit www.lawrenceville.org.
For Girls Only
Princeton Girlchoir is accepting audition appointments from
girls entering grades 3 to 12 next
fall. Concerts are planned throughout the east coast and the performing division choirs will embark on
a summer concert tour. Choristers
in all six ensembles receive a music
education.
A strong desire to learn, a musical ear, and an eagerness to share
music with others are key to a successful audition. Girls will be asked
to sing “Row, Row, Row Your
Boat,” along with some exercises
that demonstrate their vocal range,
and to complete a few musical
challenges.
Auditions for new choristers are
scheduled for Saturdays, March 29
and June 14, at Princeton Day
School. Visit www.princetongirlchoir.org, call 609-688-1888, or Email [email protected]
.org.
Sandy Victims
Mercer County residents who
were affected by Superstorm Sandy are asked to take a health and
well-being assessment survey. The
anonymous survey will focus on
major issues that residents dealt
with during and after the storm.
Questions will address medical and
mental health issues, preparedness
activities, and gaps in recovery services. The data will be compiled by
the Mercer County Division of
Public Health and used in conjunction with the New Jersey Department of Health. Visit www.
mercercounty.org. Deadline is Friday, March 21.
For the Young
For Women Only
New Jersey Festival of Ballooning invites New Jersey students in grades 2 through 12 to
write a short essay on “What the
American Flag Means to Me” for
the American Patriot essay contest.
This year’s grand prize winner will
receive a visit to his or her school
by a gigantic, 75-foot-tall hot air
balloon in June and a special VIP
package at this year’s festival including a hot air balloon ride for
two, four Blue Sky Club VIP tickets, and the opportunity to meet one
of this year’s concert headliners.
Second and third place prizes consisting of festival admission and
merchandise will be also awarded.
The winning student’s classmates will receive an admission
ticket to the festival and the winning student’s teacher and school
principal will each receive two
Blue Sky Club VIP tickets. Every
teacher who submits a group of 15
essays or more will receive two
free general admission tickets to
the festival.
The essays should be 100 words
or fewer. Deadline is Friday, May
2. Send to Essay Judges, Quick
Chek New Jersey Festival of Ballooning, 363 Route 46 West, Suite
200, Fairfield 07004. Entries may
also be submitted at www.
balloonfestival.com or to [email protected]
American Heart Association is
seeking nominations for its eighth
annual New Jersey Go Red For
Women “Woman of Distinction”
award. The award recognizes and
honors New Jersey women who
work towards promoting a healthy
lifestyle for or among women,
make a sustained, unique or extraordinary effort to improve the
community, support and advance
women issues, or serve as a role
model to other women. It will be
presented at the Go Red For Women Luncheon on Monday, May 12,
at the Palace in Somerset. Nominations are due March 21, by 5 p.m.
Visit gardenstategoredluncheon.
heart.org or call 609-223-3729.
Little League Challenger Division is a program for developmentally and physically challenged
youth, helping them to enjoy the
full benefits of Little League participation in an athletic environment structured to their abilities.
Open to boys and girls of all ages,
the program seeks to give participants the experience of teamwork,
sportsmanship, and fair play, while
playing with the same equipment
on the same fields as our other divisions of play.
Seeking boys and girls ages 4 to
18 (22 if enrolled in high school).
Contact Mark Roselli at [email protected]
roselligriegel.com or 609-5862257, or visit www.bordentownlittleleague.org.
Volunteer
The 2014 Special Olympics
USA Games seeks volunteers for
the upcoming event featuring close
to 3,500 athletes from throughout
the United States. Sports competitions will be held at Princeton University, Rider University, College
of New Jersey, Mercer County
Park, and several area private
schools. The games organizing
committee is recruiting more than
10,000 volunteers to assist with the
games, assist with sports, communications, special events, administration, and more.
Raise $2,014 to receive access to
hospitality tents, reserved opening
ceremony seating at Prudential
Center, and official commemorative 2014 USA Games gear. Attend
any or all of the sports competitions, which are free and open to
the public. Visit www.2014specialolympics.org.
National Alliance on Mental
Illness invites volunteers to serve
on programs, advocacy, finance,
and communications committees;
work on the annual walk, Harvest
of Hope conference, or Night Out
with NAMI; or volunteer in the office with administrative tasks,
computer expertise or not. E-mail
[email protected] or call
609-799-8994.
Call for Art
Arts Council of Princeton invites artists to set up an easel on
Sunday, April 27, from 12:30 to
5:30 p.m. in the midst of Communiversity Festival of the Arts to capture the moment, the mood, and the
magic. Register by E-mail and include your name and preferred designated location (Hinds Plaza,
Palmer Square Green, Tiger Park,
stage-side at Chamber Street, or
university campus) to [email protected]
artscouncilofprinceton.org by Friday, April 11, at 5 p.m.
All registered participants must
go to the Paul Robeson Center for
the Arts between noon and 1 p.m.
on Sunday, April 27 to have their
canvas stamped, sign a participation agreement, and receive their
location assignment.
Artists supply their own materials, canvas, and easel. All work
must be created on April 27, solely
by the registered artist, on site,
without any photographic or mechanical assistance. Artwork size
must be no larger than 16” x 20”.
Artwork may include oils, acrylics,
pastels, and water media. No photography or non-paint media.
Artists agree to allow the Arts
Council of Princeton to photograph
and reproduce their artwork as well
as well as images of him/her at
work for promotions in media including but not limited to newspapers, magazines, and digital media.
Artists who would like to exhibit their work must bring their work
ready to hang to the Robeson Center by 5:45 p.m. on Sunday, April
27. An exhibition will be on view
through the closing ceremony on
Saturday, May 10, from 3 to 5 p.m.
The ACP will take a 30 percent
commission on the sale price of all
artwork sold at the Robeson Center
for the Arts, the proceeds of which
support the exhibition program.
(Artworks do not have to be for
sale.) All artwork must be removed
by the artist or buyer on May 10, by
5 p.m.
Friendship Circle of Greater
Mercer County invites talented
adults with special needs to “Art of
the Heart” fair at Expo:Friendship
on Sunday, May 4. Show off artwork and sell works. Visit
ExpoFriendship.org or call 609683-7240 for information.
For Composers
New Jersey Symphony Orchestra presents the Edward T.
Cone Composition Institute, a
multi-faceted program that promotes new music and emerging
composers, presented in collaboration with the Princeton University
Department of Music. The institute
will select up to four composers to
THE NEWS
27
participate in five days of intense
compositional evaluations and
consultations July 15 to 19 on the
university campus. The program
will culminate in a live concert performance of the participants’ works
by the NJSO and music director
Jacques Lacombe on Saturday, July 19, in Richardson Auditorium.
Participating composers will
have their work rehearsed and performed by the NJSO and will participate in master classes with institute director Steven Mackey, as
well as receive feedback from Lacombe and NJSO musicians.
The free program includes housing at Princeton University and
meals. Visit www.njsymphony.
org/institute for an application.
Emerging composers, university
composition students, or composers in the early stages of their professional careers, must submit
completed applications by Friday,
April 4.
Volunteer Please
Mercer County Wildlife Center, a facility of the Mercer County
Park Commission, has scheduled
orientations for volunteers on Saturday and Sunday, March 22 and
23, from 10 a.m to noon at the center. Register to attend one. Volunteers must be able to commit to one
four-hour shift, once per week,
from April until September.
Volunteers must be at least 18
years of age and have had a current
tetanus vaccine. Volunteer activities are varied and include cage
cleaning, diet preparation, laundry,
and other behind-the-scenes opportunities. The center is Route 29,
three miles south of Lambertville
and 12 miles north of Trenton.
Contact Jane Rakos-Yates at [email protected] or call
609-303-0552, ext. 103.
Villagers Theater is seeking
volunteers to be ticket booth attendees on weekends. Visit www.
villagerstheatre. com/volunteer/
house for information. Training is
Saturday March 22, at 3 p.m. Email [email protected] to
register.
Volunteers are needed to help
assemble and serve meals for the
Lord’s Table, an annual community outreach meal hosted by Har Sinai Temple on Sunday, March 23.
Meals will be assembled at Union
Fire and Rescue Squad on River
Road in Titusville between 9 and
11:30 a.m. More volunteers are
needed to help prepare and serve
the meal at Sacred Heart, 343 South
Broad Street, Trenton, from 11:30
a..m. to 1:30 p.m. Additional help
is needed both to serve and clean up
between 12:30 and 2:30 p.m. Donors also are invited to sponsor
meals at a cost of $3 for an individual meal up to a contribution of $72
for 24 meals. Call 609-730-8100 or
E-mail [email protected]
Film Interns
Rutgers Film Co-op/New Jersey Media Arts Center, presenters
of the New Jersey Film festivals
and the U.S. Super 8 Film + Digital
Video Festival, is looking for individuals, who are passionate about
film exhibition and production to
participate in its intern program.
Interns receive on-the-job training
and networking in the film, video,
media arts field, while assisting
with the development and implementation of programs. Interns can
receive college credit and free admission to screenings and discounts on film and video workshops. Interns put in between 5 to
10 hours a week and need not be
enrolled at Rutgers University. Call
848-932-8482 or E-mail njfilmfest.
com.
28
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
Art of Many Forms
P
lainsboro Library presents a
collection of mixed media
works by Plainsboro resident and
artist Liz Adams beginning
Wednesday, April 2. “Media Relations” is an exploration of the way
in which similar concepts can be
rendered in different media, such
as embroidery, drawing, and weavings. The reception will be held
Sunday, April 13, from 2 to 4 p.m.,
with the artist on hand to discuss
her work. The show is on view to
Monday, April 28.
“Media Relations” pairs works
of art that vary in medium, but are
similar in concept or visuals. In a
trio of work called “Four Sisters,” a
charcoal drawing, a film photograph, and a weaving on a large upright loom, all share the same gesture. The impact of color and the
meaning it conveys become evident in a pairing of a pastel painting
and a weaving of the artist’s handspun and dyed fiber. The pen in a
drawing and the thread in a blackwork stitching express a similar
emotion through the fineness of
their line.
“Cable Boxes” features a weaving made from embroidery floss
overtaken by beads; this is teamed
with a film overtaken by image
transferred collage. Each shows a
juxtaposition of odd angles creating color shadows. “The Cellist,”
two linear abstractions, are pre-
MARCH 31
Continued from page 26
Public Lectures
Institute for Advanced Study,
West Building, Einstein Drive,
Princeton, 609-734-8228. “Maiden Voyage: The Senzalmaru and
the Creation of Modern Sino-Japanese Relations” presented by
Joshua A. Fogel, professor at York
University. Free. 6 p.m.
Princeton University, McCosh 50,
609-258-3000. l “The Brain: Towards a Theory of How the Brain
Works” presented by Gary Marcus, a professor at NYU. 6 p.m.
Singles
Singles Night, Grover’s Mill Coffee House, 335 Princeton Hightstown Road, West Windsor, 609716-8771. Drop in. Register at
www.meetup.com/Princeton-Singles 6:30 to 8 p.m.
sented as both an embroidery and
as a line drawing. Another “related” pair is an iPod-generated painting partnered with an embroidery.
The show will also include goldwork stitched images, an ancient
needleart form, alongside modern
line and wash drawings. The artist
makes no attempt to create duplicates, but lets the varying mediums
guide the execution of each piece.
The differing textures, colors, and
lights somehow become analogous, and create an exciting visual
adventure.
An accomplished artist who has
moved among many mediums, Adams has lived in Plainsboro for
more than 30 years, and has devoted time and talents to the community through numerous workshops
and arts groups. Named “2013 Artist of the Year,” she was an initial
founder of the Gallery at Plainsboro Library, and was key in establishing the library’s fall arts festival
and summer arts and science programs.
Adams has created two awardwinning blogs that combine writing, art, and photography. Visit
www.fieldfen.blogspot.com and
www.beautifulmetaphor.blogspot.
com for information. She has
taught art to adults and children
through organizations such as
Princeton Adult School, Homefront, and Princeton YWCA.
As a tie-in to the exhibit, Adams
will create the large weaving,
Socials
Create Your Own Bulb Garden,
Monday Morning Flowers, 111
Main Street, Princeton, 609-5202005. Create your own garden to
take home. Wine and snacks. $75
includes $10 of Monday Morning
money. Register. 6 p.m.
Tuesday
April 1
School Sports
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North vs. South Baseball. At
South. 4 p.m.
North Boys’ Golf. South at Mercer
Oaks. 3 p.m.
North Boys’ Tennis. Nottingham.
4 p.m.
Education • Enlightenment • Excellence
“Four Sisters,” at the library in the
third floor story time room. The
public is invited to observe the
work in progress and to ask questions on Fridays through midApril, from 2 to 4 p.m.
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Public
Library, 9 Van Doren Street,
Plainsboro. 609-275-2897. www.
lmxac.org/plainsboro.
Wednesday, April 2. First day
for “Media Relations,” an exhibit
of mixed media works by Liz Adams of Plainsboro. It is an exploration of the way in which similar
concepts can be rendered in embroidery, drawing, and weaving.
Fridays, April 4 and 11, 2 to 4
North vs. South Boys’ Volleyball.
At South. 4 p.m.
North Girls’ Golf. At Edison High
School. 3:45 p.m.
North Girls’ Lacrosse. At Allentown. 4 p.m.
North vs. South Softball. At
South. 4 p.m.
North Track and Field. Hightstown/Steinert at Hightstown. 4
p.m.
South Boys’ Lacrosse. Rancocas
Valley. 4:15 p.m.
South Boys’ Tennis. At Robbinsville. 4 p.m.
South Girls’ Golf. East Brunswick
at Tamarac Golf Club. 3 p.m.
South Girls’ Lacrosse. At Hightstown. 7 p.m.
On Stage
The Figaro Plays: The Barber of
Seville, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, 609-258-2787. A
French play with music. In rep with
“The Marriage of Figaro,” the sequel. 7:30 p.m.
Dancing
International Folk Dance, Princeton Folk Dance, Riverside
School, 58 Riverside Drive, Princeton, 609-921-9340. Ethnic dances of many countries using original
music. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance. No partner
needed. $3. 7 to 9 p.m.
Literati
Quakerbridge Learning Center
Summer Academic Camp 2014
6 weeks summer study from June 30 to August 8
Open Houses:
3/22/14 & 3/29/14
10am to 4pm
Early Bird Discount Registration
Redeem by 4/20/2014
Reading • Writing
Credit Math Courses
Science • Gifted A&E Math
Public Speaking
High School:
Biology • Chemistry
Physics • SAT I II and more
609-588-4442 • 609-933-8806
Email: [email protected]
4044 Quakerbridge Rd. • Lawrenceville, NJ 08619
www.quaker-bridge.com
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. Bob Mankoff, author of “How About Never — Is
Never Good Enough for You? My
Life in Cartoons” and the cartoon
editor of “The New Yorker.” The
book traces his love for the craft
back to his childhood, through his
years as a high school basketball
star, a draft-dodger, and a psychology graduate student. “The
New Yorker” published his first
cartoon in 1977 — after more than
500 submissions. More than 250
cartoons are included in the book.
6 p.m.
Poetry Workshop, Delaware Valley Poets, Lawrence Public Library, Darrah Lane, 609-8829246. www.delawarevalleypoets.
com. Visitors welcome. Bring 10
copies of your poem. Free. 7:30
p.m.
p.m. Watch Liz Adams of Plainsboro weave tapestry from yarns she
has processed, spun, and dyed, as
well as from other fibers, and her
handmade paper beads.
Sunday, April 13, 2 p.m. Reception and artist talk in conjunction
Pop Music
Rehearsal, Princeton Garden
Statesmen, Plainsboro Library, 9
Van Doren Street, Plainsboro,
888-636-4449 Men of all ages and
experience levels are invited to
sing in four-part harmony. Free.
7:30 to 10 p.m.
Faith
Lenten Services, Princeton United Methodist Church, Nassau
Street at Vandeventer Avenue,
Princeton, 609-924-2613. www.
princetonumc.org. Meditation followed by a light lunch. Noon.
Annual Warfield Lectures, Princeton Theological Seminary,
Theron Room, Library Place and
Mercer Street, 609-497-7963.
www.ptsem.edu. “Christ and the
Spirit: Towards a Sustainable Spirit-Christology” at 1 p.m. “Word and
Spirit as Force Field: The Contribution of the Reformed Tradition”
at 7 p.m. Presented by Cornelis
van der Kooi, professor of systemic theology and chair of the department of dogmatics and ecumenics
at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. 1
and 7 p.m.
Mental Health
Jewish Bereavement Group,
Jewish Family and Children’s
Services of Greater Mercer
County,
Congregation
Beth
Chaim, 329 Village Road East,
West Windsor, 609-987-8100.
www.jfcsonline.org. Open to any
Jewish adult, regardless of affiliation, who has lost a loved one within the past 18 months. Facilitated
by Beverly Rubman, chaplain.
Register by E-mail to [email protected]
jfconline.org. Donations invited. 7
to 8:30 p.m.
For Families
Line Drawing: ‘Cel­
list,’ by Liz Adams.
with “Media Relations,” an exhibit
of mixed media works by Liz Adams of Plainsboro.
Parenting
Workshop,
West
Windsor Library, 333 North Post
Road, 609-799-0462. Coping with
challenges, abuse and domestic
violence, symptoms of mental
health disorders, common pitfalls,
and more presented by Parantap
Pandya, a mental health clinician.
Register. 7 p.m.
Lectures
Networking, ACG New Jersey,
Marriott at Forrestal, Plainsboro,
203-260-0223. “What Will Private
Equity Deals Look Like in 2014
and Beyond?” presented by Brian
Buchert, Church & Dwight; Steven
Higgins, Janney Montgomery
Scott; Mitchell Hollin, LLR Partners; and Michael Thompson, the
Riverside Company. Michael
Weiner of Fox Rothschild moderates. Cocktails, hors d’oeuvres,
networking, and presentation.
Register. $110. 6 p.m.
Finance Talk, West Windsor Library, 333 North Post Road, 609799-0462. Estate planning strategies workshop. Register. 7 p.m.
Wednesday
April 2
School Sports
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North Baseball. At Hopewell. 4
p.m.
North Boys’ Golf. Notre Dame at
Mercer Oaks. 3 p.m.
North vs. South Boys’ Tennis. At
South. 4 p.m.
Read and Explore Program, Terhune Orchards, 330 Cold Soil
Road, Lawrenceville, 609-9242310. www.terhuneorchards.com.
“Birds, Nesting, and Birdhouses.”
Register. $5. 10 a.m.
South Baseball. At Nottingham. 4
p.m.
For Parents
South Track and Field. Trenton. 4
p.m.
Inside a Child’s Mind Series,
Princeton Public Library, 65
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-9529. “Debunking Traditional Methods of Measuring intelligence” presented by Scott Barry
Kaufman, an author and cognitive
psychologist. 7 p.m.
South Boys’ Golf. Steinert at Mercer Oaks. 3 p.m.
South Softball. At Nottingham. 4
p.m.
On Stage
The Figaro Plays: The Barber of
Seville, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, 609-258-2787. A
French play with music. In rep with
“The Marriage of Figaro,” the sequel. 7:30 p.m.
MARCH 21, 2014
From the Police Blotter
Plainsboro
Warrant Arrest. An officer investigating a parking complaint at
the municipal center on Wednesday, March 5, discovered that the
owner of the car had an outstanding
warrant from Edison for $89. Frederick Williams, 30, of Newark
posted bail at the scene and also
received summonses for driving on
a suspended license and improper
parking.
Zakeyia Short, 31, of Plainsboro
was found to have an outstanding
traffic warrant from Cranbury for
$300 during a stop on Monday,
March 10, for failure to maintain a
lane. She was also found to have a
suspended driver’s license. She
was arrested and received summonses for driving while suspended and failure to maintain a lane.
A Lawrenceville resident was
stopped for having an expired registration on Thursday, March 13,
and was found to have multiple active arrest warrants from Trenton
and Lawrence. Cynthia Evans, 46,
received summonses for driving
while suspended and expired registration and was turned over to Lawrence police on a $1,000 traffic
warrant.
DWI. Chetan Patel, 39, of
Princeton was arrested for DWI on
Friday, March 14. He was stopped
after police observed him swerving
and eventually running a red light
before pulling over. He was found
to be intoxicated and was charged
with DWI, reckless driving, failure
to maintain a lane, and failure to
signal a turn.
A driver who was swerving and
made an improper left turn was
found to be intoxicated on Sunday,
March 16. Victor Garces, 27, of
East Windsor was arrested and
charged with DWI, reckless driv-
ing, failure to maintain a lane, and
improper turn.
Stolen Vehicle. A Chevy Tahoe
was stolen from the lot at 27 Pheasant Hollow Drive at around 6 a.m.
on Thursday, March 6. The owner
had left it running unattended
while it warmed up. The car was
recovered on East State Street in
Trenton.
Fraud. An 80-year-old resident
of Franklin Drive was the victim of
fraud on Monday, March 10. An
unknown person posing as an IRS
employee informed the victim that
they would be arrested if they did
not pay an outstanding debt. The
victim transferred $1,000 using a
cash card from CVS.
West Windsor
Acquitted. Darren Maglione,
the Robbinsville man accused of
sexually assaulting a West Windsor
girl in 2009, was acquitted on
Thursday, March 13, of all charges
except that of endangering the welfare of a child. The jury reached no
decision on that charge.
He still faces an additional trial
on contempt charges for allegedly
seeing the girl after authorities ordered him not to.
DWI. Park rangers reported to
police on Saturday, March 8, that a
man and woman in a vehicle in the
boathouse parking lot appeared to
be intoxicated. Officers, who detected the odor of alcohol, asked
how the car came to be there and
learned that the male, Jeffrey Stewart, 24, of Robbinsville, had driven
his pickup truck across Mercer
Lake, which was frozen. After failing several field sobriety tests,
Stewart was arrested and charged
with DWI, reckless driving, and
unregistered vehicle. The female
passenger was not charged.
Art
Good Causes
Art Exhibit, Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van Doren Street, Plainsboro, 609-275-2897. www.lmxac.
org/plainsboro. First day for “Media Relations,” an exhibit of mixed
media works by Liz Adams of
Plainsboro. It is an exploration of
the way in which similar concepts
can be rendered in embroidery,
drawing, and weaving. Reception
on Sunday, April 13, from 2 to 4
p.m. On view to April 28. 10 a.m.
Annual Blintze Brunch, Jewish
Women International of Princeton, Private Home, 609-497-1921.
Sheila Kurtzer shares her experiences traveling to different countries with her husband, Daniel,
while he was a U.S. ambassador
to Israel. Benefit for Princeton University Center for Jewish Life.
Register. $20 and $25. 11:30 a.m.
Art Exhibit, Chapin School, 4101
Princeton Pike, Princeton, 609924-7206.
www.chapinschool.
org. Reception for “Curators
Show” featuring works by Dolores
Evangelista Eaton, Jody Erdman,
Jamie Greenfield, Dallas Piotrowski, and Phyllis Wright. On
view to April 30. 5 to 7 p.m.
Dancing
Contra Dance, Princeton Country Dancers, Suzanne Patterson
Center, 1 Monument Drive, Princeton,
609-924-6763.
www.
princetoncountrydancers.org. Instruction followed by dance. $8.
7:30 to 10:30 p.m.
Meeting, West Windsor Lions
Club, Bog Restaurant, Cranbury
Golf Club, Southfield Road, West
Windsor, 609-275-0363. 7 p.m.
Faith
Annual Warfield Lectures, Princeton Theological Seminary,
Theron Room, Library Place and
Mercer Street, 609-497-7963.
www.ptsem.edu. “Transformative
Spirituality: F.D. Schleiermacher,
J.H. Scholten, R. Rothe, A Kuyper.”
Presented by Cornelis van der
Kooi, professor of systemic theology and chair of the department of
dogmatics and ecumenics at Vrije
Universiteit Amsterdam. 7 p.m.
Burglary. Unknown persons
gained entry to 14 Washington
Road between February 12 and 27
and stole copper piping valued at
$500.
On Friday, March 7, and unknown person broke into the rear of
a Glenview Drive residence and
stole jewelry valued at $5,000.
Hindering. Police stopped a car
being driven erratically with several equipment violations on Saturday, March 15, and observed all
four occupants drinking from a
bottle of Remy Martin. All four
were also found to have outstanding criminal and traffic warrants
and were taken into custody for
transfer to the jurisdictions from
which the warrants originated. The
vehicle was impounded.
While officers were processing
the arrest Jakeem Gibbs, 19, of
Trenton approached them and began asking about one of the vehicle’s occupants. He subsequently
gave officers false information
about his identity to conceal an active warrant for his arrest. He was
arrested for hindering apprehension.
Open Mic, Alchemist & Barrister,
28 Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-5555. Hosted by Eric Puliti. Registration begins at 9 p.m.
21 plus. 10 p.m.
Food & Dining
Wellness
Cornerstone Community Kitchen, Princeton United Methodist
Church, Nassau at Vandeventer
Street, Princeton, 609-924-2613.
Hot meals served, prepared by
TASK. Free. 5 to 6:30 p.m.
Community Hatha Yoga Class,
St. David’s Episcopal Church,
90 South Main Street, Cranbury,
609-655-4731. $5. 3 to 4 p.m.
Continued on following page
29
NOW
Accepting
Registrations
Ages 2 through
teen
The Community Music School of Westminster College of the Arts of Rider University
101 Walnut Lane • Princeton, New Jersey 08540
609-921-7104 • www.rider.edu/conservatory
Open Container. Officers investigating a suspicious vehicle at
Princeton Country Club found Eli
Wilson, 39, of West Windsor to be
consuming alcohol in his car. He
received a summons for consuming an alcoholic beverage in a motor vehicle.
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or info: 609-8028162,
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Gardens
Meeting, Central Jersey Orchid
Society, D&R Greenway Land
Trust, Johnson Education Center,
1 Preservation Place, Princeton,
609-924-1380. Annual potting party, plant raffle, and refreshments.
7:30 p.m.
Live Music
Police stopped a driver swerving along Route 1 on Saturday,
March 8, and found her to be intoxicated. Irie Claudio, 49, of
South Bound Brook was arrested
and charged with DWI refusal, unregistered vehicle, unsafe lane
change, reckless driving, and driving while suspended.
Summer
Music
Camps
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THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
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Looking Back
uring the first months after
our 1957 arrival in West
Windsor, one of the things
we noticed about our area was a
strange noise coming from the direction of Plainsboro, just a mile or
two away. The noise went on during daylight hours but only on
weekdays. We had never heard a
noise like that before — a sort of
chugging sound, something like a
railroad locomotive. Since we had
not visited Plainsboro before, finding the source of the noise was our
first “adventure” away from Grovers Mill, our home neighborhood.
I first drove up Millstone Road
in the direction of the noise and
crossed the Millstone River into
Plainsboro. Turning left on Maple
Avenue I soon came upon Plainsboro Pond, which, I found out later,
had been formed by damming up
Cranbury Brook, which flowed in
from the east and which soon
joined the Millstone River near the
railroad main line. Maple Avenue
went along the top of the dam.
Plainsboro Pond was typical of
many such ponds in the flatter, agricultural areas of New Jersey.
They had been formed by damming
up small streams so as to turn water
wheels that powered machinery to
grind grain into flour and saw lumber from felled trees. Later, when
pumps were available, the ponds
were also a source of irrigation water for local farms.
Nearby Grovers Mill Pond was
another. It was formed in the 18th
century by damming up Big Bear
Brook where the mill is today. As in
Plainsboro, the pond served the
dual purposes of providing the water power for grinding grain and
sawing lumber. Its wheel and
by Dick Snedeker
grinding machinery were in operation until 1942.
The first thing I saw at Plainsboro Pond were the remains of a
house that had once stood next to
the mill that provided the ground
grain and lumber for the Plainsboro
area. It stood on the west side of the
road where the stream passed under
it. The mill was built before the
American Revolution and was
once known as Stockton’s Mill. It
was torn down in 1930. Today
there’s a parking lot where the mill
and the house once stood.
On the east side of Maple Avenue was Plainsboro Pond, and in it
was the source of the noise. It was a
large, old-fashioned steam shovel
What was that noise? It
was the Plainsboro
steam shovel, moving
silt in Plainsboro Pond
to form two islands.
sitting on a barge floating in the
water. It made a lot of noise as it
chugged away and scooped up mud
from the bottom. I soon learned
from a nearby resident that what
was going on was the dredging of
silt from the pond so it could be
used once again for fishing and recreational boating.
Over the years, the pond had become so filled by silt washed in
from its surroundings that it had become very shallow and clogged by
weeds. As a result, it was a poor
habitat for fish and almost useless
for canoes and rowboats. So the decision was made to excavate the silt.
In this case, the excavation was
really just a “rearranging” operation, since the silt actually remained in Plainsboro Pond instead
of being taken away. That is why
there are two “islands” in Plainsboro Pond today. The steam shovel
scooped up a load of silt from the
bottom on one side of the barge,
pivoted around and deposited it on
the other side. Little by little, as the
barge was moved along the length
of the pond, two islands of silt were
formed, one of which nearly
reached from one end of the pond
to the other. Today there is a wellused path down the center of that
longer “island,” and few people realize they are walking on what was
once the silt that nearly filled the
pond 60 years ago. The pond itself
was effectively split into three parallel sections.
After the dredging — for a
while, at least — the pond was used
once again for recreational boating
and fishing. Today, however, as in
West Windsor, although the population has increased many-fold,
there is little or no interest in these
activities, and it is a rarity to see a
boat or canoe on the water, and
rarer still to see anyone fishing.
That’s too bad, since one of the
highlights of the restoration of
Grovers Mill Pond in 2008 was the
visit the following spring by New
Jersey Governor Jon Corzine, during which he supervised the pond’s
restocking with fish. There must be
some pretty big ones by now, but
most of them will probably still be
there a year from now.
It was many months before we
stopped hearing the Plainsboro
steam shovel just a mile away.
al
ov
30
elr y b
y Ana toly
Si g
ƒ
MAR. 21, 22, 23, 2014
Garden State Exhibit Center
Somerset, NJ • EXIT 10 OFF I-287
Admission $8 online, $10 at the door - good all 3 days
Children under 12 and parking are FREE
Fri. & Sat. 10-6, Sun. 10-5
DISCOUNT TICKETS, show info,
exhibitor lists, directions and more at:
SugarloafCrafts.com
SUGARLOAF MOUNTAIN WORKS, INC. • 800-210-9900
APRIL 2
Continued from preceding page
Mental Health
Parenting Workshop, NAMI New
Jersey, South Brunswick Library,
110 Kingston Lane, Monmouth
Junction, 908-720-5055. www.
naminj.org. “Coping After Divorce”
presented by Priya Gopalan, program coordinator at McSilver Institute for Poverty Policy and Research. Register. 7 p.m.
History
Walks for Strollers and Seniors,
Historical Society of Princeton,
Bainbridge House, 158 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-921-6748.
www.princetonhistory.org.
One
hour stroll through Princeton. $7.
10 a.m.
Guided Tour, Drumthwacket
Foundation, 354 Stockton Street,
Princeton, 609-683-0057. www.
drumthwacket.org. New Jersey
governor’s official residence.
Group tours are available. Registration required. $5 donation. 1
p.m.
Schools
Open House, Quakerbridge
Learning Center., 4044 Quakerbridge Road, Lawrenceville, 609933-8806.
www.quaker-bridge.
com. Information about summer
academic camp. 10 a.m. to 4 p.m.
Open House, The Lewis School,
53 Bayard Lane, Princeton, 609924-8120. www.lewisschool.org.
Information about alternative education program for learning different students with language-based
learning difficulties related to dyslexia, attention deficit, and auditory processing. Pre-K to college
preparatory levels. 1 p.m.
level class at 8:30 p.m. Open
dance, socializing, and refreshments from 9:30 to 11:45 p.m. No
partner necessary. $15. 8 p.m.
Thursday
April 3
Literati
School Sports
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North Boys’ Volleyball.
Brunswick. 4 p.m.
East
North Girls’ Golf. Notre Dame at
Cranbury. 3 p.m.
North Girls’ Lacrosse. At Peddie.
4 p.m.
North Softball. At Hopewell. 4
p.m.
South Boys’ Golf. Hamilton West
at Mercer Oaks. 3 p.m.
South Boys’ Volleyball. Piscataway. 5:30 p.m.
South Girls’ Golf. Edison at Princeton Country Club. 3 p.m.
South Girls’ Lacrosse. At Bridgewater-Raritan. 4:30 p.m.
On Stage
The Figaro Plays: The Barber of
Seville, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, 609-258-2787.
www.mccarter.org. A French play
with music. In rep with “The Marriage of Figaro,” the sequel. Audio
described performance. 7:30 p.m.
Lewis Center for the Arts, Princeton University, 185 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-258-1500.
Workshop reading of Euripides’
“Hippolytus” with vvocal score by
senior Chris Beard. Free. 8 p.m.
Dancing
Argentine Tango, Viva Tango,
Suzanne Patterson Center, 45
Stockton Street, Princeton, 609948-4448. vivatango.org. All levels class at 8 p.m. Intermediate
Author Event, Stuart Country
Day School, 1200 Stuart Road,
Princeton, 609-921-2330, ext.
262. Jane Hirshfield, author of
seven collections of poetry including “Come, Thief,” “After,” and
“Given Sugar, Given Salt.”Her first
poem was published in 1973,
shortly after she graduated from
Princeton University as a member
of the first graduating class to admit women as freshmen. Booksigning and reception follow her
talk. Free. 4:30 p.m.
Author Event, Labyrinth Books,
122 Nassau Street Princeton,
609-497-1600. “War from the Inside,” a reading with Hassan Blasim, author of “The Corpse Exhibition;” Joydeep Roy-Bhattacharya,
author of “The Watch;” Roy Scranton, author of “Fire and Forget;”
and Chris Hedges, a senior fellow
at the Nation Institute. 6 p.m.
Classical Music
The Nash Ensemble of London,
Princeton University Concerts,
Richardson Auditorium, 609-2582800. Charles S. Robinson Memorial Concert features Ian Brown
on piano, Philippa Davies on flute,
Richard Hosford on clarinet,
Stephanie Gonley and Laura
Samuel on violin, Lawrence power
on viola, and Rebecca Gilliver on
cello. The concerts includes Dvorak’s piano quintet and the premiere of works by Princeton composers. $20 to $45. 8 p.m.
Iolanta, Westminster Choir College, Playhouse, 201 Walnut
Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663.
Westminster Opera Theater presents Tchaikovsky’s opera in Russian with English supertitles. The
Westminster Festival Chamber
Orchestra performs. $25. 8 p.m.
MARCH 21, 2014
THE NEWS
31
WW-P News Classifieds
HOW
howTO
to ORDER
order
Mail, E-Mail, or Fax: That’s all it takes
to order a classified in the West Windsor-Plainsboro News. Mail your ad to 12
Roszel Road, Princeton 08540. Fax it to
609-243-9020, or e-mail [email protected] We will confirm your insertion
and the price, which is sure to be reasonable: Classifieds are just 50 cents a
word, with a $7.00 minimum. Repeats in
succeeding issues are just 40 cents per
word, and if your ad runs for 12 consecutive issues, it’s only 30 cents per word.
HOUSING FOR RENT
One-bedroom apartment available
in Princeton area. Professional preferred. Looking for someone clean, quiet, non-smoker, no pets or drinking.
$850/month. Available April 1. If interested contact 609-937-1895 or 609737-6967.
WANTED TO RENT
Wanted: Housing for our summer interns! We are a local research company
with plans to host a number of interns
this summer. Our interns are mature,
responsible PhD candidates, most of
whom are single but also a few whose
spouse joins them. Their intern periods
are customized but are typically about 3
months starting in the May-June timeframe. If you have an apartment to sublet in the Princeton area or an extra
room you are interested in renting,
please contact Carla at 609-951-2560.
HOME
MAINTENANCE
A Quick Response Handyman: will
give you a free estimate for electrical,
plumbing, painting, repair or other project around your house. Please call 609275-6631.
CLASSIFIED BY E-MAIL
[email protected]
HOME
housingMAINTENANCE
for rent
Charlie Wagner’s Lawn & Garden
Service, quality European style. Landscaping, Grass Cutting, Seasonal
Cleanups. 609-915-3581, or E-mail
[email protected]
Generator and Electrical Service
Panel setup and instructions. Free estimate. Call 609-275-6631.
robthehandyman- licensed, insured, all work guaranteed. Free Estimates. We do it all - electric, plumbing,
paint, wallpaper, powerwashing, tile,
see website for more: robthehandyman.
vpweb.com [email protected],
609-269-5919.
HEALTH
instruction
Every Wednesday we deliver 19,000
copies of U.S. 1 newspaper to 4,500
business locations
in the greater Princeton area. Every
other Friday we deliver the West
Windsor & Plainsboro News to homes
Every Wednesday we deliver 19,000
in those towns. We welcome people
copies of U.S. 1 newspaper to 4,500
with common sense, curiosity, and a
business locations
reliable
car
to
help
us
do
the
job.
the4,500
greater Princeton
area. Every
Every Wednesday we deliver
19,000 Wednesday we deliver U.S.1 Newspaper into
Every
business
other Friday we deliver the West
copies
of
U.S.
1
newspaper
to
4,500
H’andrea’s Massage Therapy: Prolocations
in the
Princeton
area.
Earn $100
pergreater
day! Plus
Mileage!
Windsor & Plainsboro News to homes
business locations
viding N.J. residents mobileinmassage
Plus Bonuses for information you provide our editors!
in those towns. We welcome people
the greater Princeton area. Every
Every
Friday
we
& common
Plainsboro
News
Mail or faxother
us a note.
We hope to
heardeliver
from you. the West Windsorwith
services in the local area forother
a Friday
happy
sense, curiosity,
and a
we deliver the West
reliable
car to helpwith
us do common
the job.
to
in
those
towns.
We
welcome
people
sense,
& Plainsboro News
tohomes
homes
mind and body.’ To make anWindsor
appointTell us about yourself and why you
in those towns. We welcome people
curiosity,
and aonreliable
car to help us
do the
job.
ment — contact: [email protected]
are free to deliver
Wednesdays.
Earn
$100
per day! Plus Mileage!
with common sense, curiosity, and a
Mail to U.S. 1 Delivery Team, 12 Roszel Road,
Plus Bonuses for information you provide our editors!
com or by phone
609-902-1910.
reliable car
to help us do the job. For
Princeton
or fax toper
609-452-0033
Earn
up08540;
to $100
day plus bonuses
forfaxinformation
Mail or
us a note. We hopeyou
to hearprovide
from you.
more information visit: handreasmasEarn $100 per day! Plus Mileage!
our editors! Mail or fax us a note. We hope to hear from you.
sagetherapyllc.abmp.com.
Tell us about yourself and why you
Plus Bonuses for information you provide our editors!
Mail or fax us a note. We hope to hear from you.
Tell us about yourself and why you
INSTRUCTION
are free to deliver on Wednesdays.
Computer problem? Or need a
used computer in good condition $80? Call 609-275-6631.
FINANCIAL
SERVICES
Roy S Chereath, CPA, CISA Certified Public Accountant. 195 Nassau
Street, Princeton, NJ 08542. Phone:
609-333-1218/973-668-2432.
1670
Route 130 N. North Brunswick, NJ
08902. Phone: 732-422-4214/973-6682432. Individual & Business Tax Service
for Foreign nationals/Self Employed/
Consultants/LLC/Partnerships/
Corporations/S-Corp. Free E-File for
fast refund. Reasonable fees. Free initial consultation. Evening and weekend
appointments.
TRANSPORTATION
A Personal Driver seeking to transport commuters, shopping trips, etc.
Modern, attractive car. References provided. 20 to 30% less than commercial
taxi services. E-mail to [email protected]
gmail.com or call 609-331-3370.
Chemistry Lessons: AP, Honors,
Regular, College. 24 years classroom
teaching experience. Call Matt 609919-1280.
Music Lessons: Piano, guitar, drum,
sax, clarinet, F. horn, oboe, t-bone,
voice, flute, trumpet, violin, cello, banjo,
mandolin, harmonica, uke, and more.
$32 half hour. School of Rock. Adults
or kids. Join the band! Montgomery 609924-8282. West Windsor 609-8970032. Hightstown 609-448-7170. www.
farringtonsmusic.com.
Tutor — SAT, ACT, SSAT — Reading, Writing, Essays: Boost your
scores with outstanding private instruction from college English professor.
Many excellent references throughout
West Windsor-Plainsboro. My former
students are attending top universities.
Reasonable rates. 609-658-6914.
MERCHANDISE MART
Piano For Sale: Hardman upright piano w/bench walnut finish. Requires retrieval from basement. Best offer accepted. Call Marilyn @ 609-275-0736 or
[email protected]
On Stage
Open Mic Night, Grover’s Mill
Coffee House, 335 Princeton
Hightstown Road, West Windsor,
609-716-8771. 7 p.m.
West Windsor Library, 333 North
Post Road, 609-799-0462. “Peace
Corps.” Register. 6:30 p.m.
Pygmalion, Off-Broadstreet Theater, 5 South Greenwood Avenue,
Hopewell, 609-466-2766. Drama
by George Bernard Shaw was
adapted into “My Fair Lady.”
$29.50 to $31.50 includes dessert.
Through May 3. 7 p.m.
Faith
Annual Warfield Lectures, Princeton Theological Seminary,
Theron Room, Library Place and
Mercer Street, 609-497-7963.
“Partaking in His Anointing: The
Threefold Office as GPS for the
Theology” at 3 p.m. “Eyes and
Ears Open to the World: Discernment and Hope” at 7 p.m. Presented by Cornelis van der Kooi, professor of systemic theology and
chair of the department of dogmatics and ecumenics at Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam. 3 and 7 p.m.
Labyrinth Meditation Walk, St.
David’s Episcopal Church, 90
South Main Street, Cranbury, 609897-9769. www.stdavidscranbury.
com. Taize prayer service followed
by a walking through the circular
path of the labyrinth. A wood finger
labyrinth is available for those unsteady on their feet. 6:30 to 8 p.m.
Lectures
Meeting, 55-Plus, Jewish Center
of Princeton, 435 Nassau Street,
609-896-2923. www.princetonol.
com. “Princeton University’s Experiments with Online Learning”
presented by Jeffrey Himpele, acting director at the McGraw Center
for Teaching and Learning at
Princeton University. 10 a.m.
Schools
Preschool and Kindergarten
Fair, Princeton Public Library,
65 Witherspoon Street, 609-9248822. Representatives from area
schools, summer camps, and enrichment programs. 10:30 a.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Arm & Hammer
Park, Route 29, Trenton, 609-3943300. www.trentonthunder.com.
New Hampshire. $11 to $27. 7:05
p.m.
Friday
April 4
For WW­P school sports infor­
mation, call the hotline: 609­716­
5000, ext. 5134, www.ww­p.org.
North Baseball. Allentown. 4 p.m.
North Boys’ Lacrosse. Hightstown. 4 p.m.
North Boys’ Tennis. At Hopewell.
4 p.m.
Volleyball.
Les Miserables, Kelsey Theater,
Mercer Community College,
1200 Old Trenton Road, West
Windsor, 609-570-3333. www.
kelseytheater.net. Musical based
on Victor Hugo’s novel set in 1815
France. $20. 8 p.m.
The Figaro Plays: The Barber of
Seville, McCarter Theater, 91
University Place, 609-258-2787. A
French play with music. In rep with
“The Marriage of Figaro,” the sequel. Opening night. 8 p.m.
Five Women Wearing the Same
Dress, Playhouse 22, 721 Cranbury Road, East Brunswick, 732254-3939. Comedy focusing on
the five bridesmaids. $15. 8 p.m.
School Sports
North Boys’
Bridge. 4 p.m.
Can You Deliver?
Old
North Softball. Allentown. 4 p.m.
South Baseball. Hopewell. 4 p.m.
South Boys’ Lacrosse. Hopewell.
4:15 p.m.
South Boys’ Tennis. Nottingham
at Vets Park. 4 p.m.
South Boys’ Volleyball. At East
Brunswick. 5:30 p.m.
South Softball. Hopewell. 4 p.m.
Earn up to $100 per day! Plus Mileage!
Can You Deliver?
Travel Talk
Annual Benefit, Family Guidance
Center, Janssen Pharmaceutica,
Titusville, 609-586-0668. Chris
Lokhammer, PNC wealth management team of Princeton, receives the Mary Jo Codey Award.
Buffet dinner, wine, and silent auction. Music by the Blue Meanies, a
Beatles tribute band. Register.
$90. 6:30 to 9:30 p.m.
Can You Deliver?
Mail to U.S. 1 Delivery Team, 12 Roszel Road,
Princeton 08540; or fax to 609-452-0033
COMPUTER
SERVICES
HELP
help WANTED
wanted
Can You Deliver?
Grand Opening - Magic Acupressure
Center, located in East Windsor. We
provide professional Acupressure treatment for both men and women. Relieve
stress and pain. Call us for an appointment at 609-490-0120.
Live Music
Good Causes
HELP
help WANTED
wanted
Lewis Center for the Arts, Princeton University, 185 Nassau
Street, Princeton, 609-258-1500.
www.princeton.edu/arts.
Workshop reading of Euripides’ “Hippolytus” with an original vocal
score by senior Chris Beard. Free.
8 p.m.
Film
International Film Series, Princeton Public Library, 65 Witherspoon Street, Princeton, 609-9249529. www.princetonlibrary.org.
Screening of “Jiro Dreams of Sushi.” 6:30 p.m.
Art
Gallery Talk, Princeton University Art Museum, Princeton campus, 609-258-3788. artmuseum.
princeton.edu. “Odilon Redon:
Symbolism: Flight from Reality in
Early 20th Century Paris” presented by David Newton-Dunn. Free.
12:30 p.m.
are free to deliver on Wednesdays.
Tell us about yourself andMail
why
you are free to deliver
to U.S. 1 Delivery Team, 12 Roszel Road,
Mail to U.S. 1 DeliveryPrinceton
Team,08540;
12 Roszel
Road
or fax to 609-452-0033
Princeton 08540; or fax to 609-452-0033
WANTED TO BUY
HELP WANTED
Antique Military Items: And war relics wanted from all wars and countries.
Top prices paid. “Armies of the Past
LTD”. 2038 Greenwood Ave., Hamilton
Twp., 609-890-0142. Our retail outlet is
open Saturdays 10 to 4:00, or by appointment.
Property Inspectors: Part-time
$30k, full-time $80k. No experience, will
train. Call Tom, 609-731-3333.
HELP WANTED
Part-Time Receptionist Needed to
answer phone in a professional and
courteous manner for small engineering
company located in Plainsboro, NJ for
afternoons only approximately 3 hours a
day, five days a week. Please contact
me by email at [email protected] to
arrange an interview.
SALES - REAL ESTATE Need a
Change? Looking to get a RE License?
We take you by the hand to ensure your
success and income! FREE Coaching!
Unlimited Income! No Experience needed! Contact Weidel Today! Hamilton:
Judy 609-586-1400, [email protected]
com; Princeton: Mike 609-921-2700,
[email protected]
Weaving in Progress, Plainsboro
Public Library, 9 Van Doren
Street, Plainsboro, 609-275-2897.
Watch Liz Adams of Plainsboro
weave tapestry from yarns she
has processed, spun, and dyed,
as well as from other fibers, and
her handmade paper beads. Also
Friday, April 11. 2 to 4 p.m.
Art Show, Small World Coffee, 14
Witherspoon Street, Princeton,
609-924-4377. Opening reception
for “A Collage Retrospective,” a
solo exhibition of more than 25 collage works by Meredith Remz, a
sculptor and carpenter. One of her
iconic images is seen in “The Tigers at Nassau Hall.” On view to
May 6. 7 to 9 p.m.
Transcriptionist - work from home
and learn digital court transcription. Income to $30/hr. Paid 3 month training
program. Work 6 hrs./day and 30 hrs./
week, during business hours. Some
overnight and weekend assignments.
This isn’t for part-timers. Must have 4
year college degree, be a quick study,
have digital audio (unzipping) experience, and have great grammar and
proofreading skills. No exceptions.
Send resume to [email protected]
Wanted: high energy black belt to
teach martial arts. Must be enthusiastic
and able to work well with and manage
children 6 to 18 years old. Evenings 4 to
9:30 p.m. and Saturday mornings. Call
Master Steven at 609-799-0088 or
email [email protected]
CLASSIFIED BY FAX
609-243-9119
Benefit Galas
Gala, Princeton Festival, Greenacres Country Club, 2170 Lawrence Road, Lawrenceville, 609759-0379. “Rise Up Singing’” tribute to the festival’s 10 years.
Cocktails, dinner, silent auction,
and dancing. Piano music by Doug
Miller. Courtney Colletti Band provides dinner and dance music.
Singing by Leona Mitchell. Register. $250 to $1,000. 6 p.m.
Comedy
Catch a Rising Star, Hyatt Regency, 102 Carnegie Center, West
Windsor, 609-987-8018. Register.
$19.50. 8 p.m.
Dancing
Lectures
Dance Jam, Dance Improv Live,
Princeton Center for Yoga Health,
88 Orchard Road, Skillman, 609924-7294. Lightly guided dance
improvisation with live music and
refreshments. $18. 8 p.m. to 10
p.m.
Singles
Folk Dance, Princeton Folk
Dance, Suzanne Patterson Center, 45 Stockton Street, Princeton,
609-912-1272. Beginners welcome. Lesson followed by dance.
No partner needed. Free. 8 to 11
p.m.
Classical Music
Iolanta, Westminster Choir College, Playhouse, 201 Walnut
Lane, Princeton, 609-921-2663.
www.rider.edu. Westminster Opera Theater presents Tchaikovsky’s opera in Russian with
English supertitles. The Westminster Festival Chamber Orchestra
performs. $25. 8 p.m.
Live Music
Open Mic, West Windsor Arts
Council, 952 Alexander Road,
West Windsor, 609-716-1931.
www.westwindsorarts.org. $5. 7
to 9 p.m.
Job Seekers, Princeton Public
Library, 65 Witherspoon Street,
Princeton, 609-924-9529. For professionals seeking new employment. 10 a.m.
Divorce Recovery Program,
Princeton Church of Christ, 33
River Road, Princeton, 609-5813889. “Forgiving: The Final Step”
seminar. Free. 7:30 p.m.
Tax Assistance
Plainsboro Public Library, 9 Van
Doren Street, 609-275-2897. Register. Free. 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.
For Seniors
Men in Retirement, Princeton Senior Resource Center, Suzanne
Patterson Building, 45 Stockton
Street, 609-924-7108. Social
group for men who are making or
who have made the transition into
retirement. Free. 2 p.m.
Sports
Trenton Thunder, Arm & Hammer
Park, Route 29, Trenton, 609-3943300. New Hampshire. $11 to $27.
7:05 p.m.
32
THE NEWS
MARCH 21, 2014
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