On behalf of our co-hosts, the Native American Journalists

Transcription

On behalf of our co-hosts, the Native American Journalists
TAG your tweets, Facebook posts and Instagram Photos:
#GoingTradigital #NAJA30 #NativeMedia14
Connect with the co-hosts online at:
Vision Maker Media
www.visionmakermedia.org
Twitter: @visionmakrmedia
Facebook: facebook.com/visionmakermedia
Native Public Media
www.nativepublicmedia.org
Twitter: @nativepublicmed
Facebook: facebook.com/nativepublicmedia
Native American Journalists Association
www.naja.com
Twitter: @najournalists
Facebook: facebook.com/nativejournalists
NAJAQuarterPage_Layout 1 6/17/14 8:34 AM Page 2
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Lilly salutes
the Native American
Journalists Association
for 30 years of empowering
Native American journalists.
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Table of Content
Connect...
Connect. Engage. Join the Conversation!
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Welcome!
A message from Native American Journalists Association President Mary Hudetz.
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Raising the Next Generation of Storytellers
NAJA introduces the new Native American Journalism Fellowship, and offers other important
resources.
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Strengthening & Expanding the Voice of Native America
Radio is often a lifeline for Native communities. Learn about the service Native Public Media
provides for Indian Country.
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Delivering Native Stories to the World
Vision Maker Media has facilitated the work of storytellers for decades. At the National Native
Media Conference, Vision Maker Media offers new programming to attendees and a film festival that is back this year by popular demand.
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Meet Our Featured Speakers
Wab Kinew (Ojibwe) is the 2014 National Native Media Conference keynote. He is joined by
other leading voices in our featured speaker lineup.
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Agenda at a Glance
Hotel Map
2014 Conference Agenda
Exhibit Hall & Career Fair
Internet: Stay Connected at the National Native Media Conference:
The Hyatt Regency Santa Clara offers free Wi-Fi in its public spaces.
Guests of the hotel also have free Wi-Fi access throughout the hotel—in both their guest room as well as in the meeting space.
Not staying at the Hyatt?
Attendees who are not guests of the hotel can access Wi-Fi in the public spaces or purchase daily Internet access.
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Charla Bear
Tanana Village Athabascan
KQED Public Radio
Terria Smith
Torres Martinez Desert Cahuilla Indians
First Nations Experience Television network
Lindsie Bear
Cherokee
News from Native California & Hey Day Books
Vernon Medicine Cloud
Assiniboine/Turtle Mountain Chippewa
Indian Health Center of Santa Clara Valley and President, American Indian Alliance
Ishmael Agnimitra Elias
Cherokee
Technical Writer for Life Science, Inc.
Meet NAJA’s Lifetime Members
We extend our gratitude to the following individuals for showing a long-term commitment toward NAJA and building a stronger voice for Indian Country.
Tom Arviso (Navajo) - Navajo Times
Dr. Cristina Azocar (Upper Mattaponi Tribe of the Powhatan Nation)
Lise Balk-King Susan Braine (Assinibione/Souix)
Paul DeMain (Oneida/Ojibwe)
Lori Edmo-Suppah (Shoshone Bannock)
Tim Giago (Lakota)
Mary Hudetz (Crow)
Matt Kelley (Bad River Chippewa)
Mike Kellogg (Navajo)
Frank J. King, III (Rosebud Sioux)
Rhonda LeValdo (Acoma Pueblo)
Daniel D. Lewerenz (Iowa Tribe of Kansas and Nebraska)
Daniel Littlefield
Jack Marsh
Sharon Murphy
Elizabeth Parent (Athabascan/Yupik)
Selene Phillips (Ojibwe Lac du Flambeau)
Benny Polacca (Colorado River Tribes)
Bryan Pollard (Cherokee)
Shannon Shaw-Duty (Osage)
Sheila Solomon
Chalene Toehay (Kiowa/Osage)
Patty Talahongva (Hopi)
Loris Taylor (Hopi)
Dorothy Tommie
Karen Tommie
Mark Trahant (Shoshone-Bannock)
Ronnie L. Washines (Yakama)
Al Neuharth (1924-2013)
For information on how to become a lifetime member of NAJA, visit www.naja.com.
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NHNA journalists focus on health news from the
ground up, featuring the voices of those most
affected and those at the forefront of health and
wellness.
Editors, reporters and communications professionals now have access to free NHNA downloads including print, web and multimedia news
packages as registered users at the website
www.nativehealthnews.com.
We know the communities. We get the interviews. We report the news that makes a difference. Let us be your virtual reporting assistant
for the most important and comprehensive news
reports about health and wellness for Native
Americans.
NHNA registration and downloads are free to all
those who think good journalism has a positive
impact in the lives of all of our readers, listeners,
and viewers.
Welcome
Thank You
Thank you, 2014 Conference Committee!
The Native Health News Alliance, a project
of the Native American Journalists Association,
serves news outlets with multimedia news and
feature stories specific to the health and wellness needs, issues and concerns of the American Indian and Alaskan Native communities.
Welcome!
It is my honor to present to you the 2014 National Native Media Conference,
an empowering professional and cultural event that this year also marks the
30th annual conference hosted by the Native American Journalists Association.
During this landmark anniversary year for NAJA, major news events in Indian
Country have showcased the outstanding reporting and work of our membership, but also proven that we must still push forward with the effort to
increase our ranks.
A historic presidential visit to the Standing Rock Sioux Indian Reservation,
the roll out of major legislation like the Violence Against Women and the
Indian Healthcare Improvement Acts, and a renewed push against the Washington NFL team name all represent major news stories for Indian Country
this year, and our journalists have covered all of them. Yet in 2014, major
moments also have proven that there are still not enough skilled journalists
dedicated to Indian Country to consistently ensure an accurate telling of our
stories.
I hope together—along with our partners Native Public Media and Vision
Maker Media—we can change that, and I am optimistic that this ongoing effort is one that will again gain momentum at this conference for the coming
year. We extend our deepest gratitude to our sponsors, speakers and media
members for supporting our mission.
We also thank all of you—the attendees of this conference—for investing
the time and resources to travel to this event out of a commitment to your
own careers as journalists, and a commitment to connect with and give back
to the next generation of storytellers. Your dedication to excellence and
Native Americans in journalism is what makes NAJA a powerful network and
resource for both our industry and Indian Country.
This year, we are gathered in Santa Clara, and NAJA is thrilled to co-host this
conference with NPM and Vision Maker Media. NPM is a leader in building a
cross-country Native radio network, and Vision Maker Media has an inspiring
mission of sharing Native stories with the world.
The area’s significance as the historic and present-day tribal homelands of
the Ohlone people and now also the center of Silicon Valley offers the perfect setting to celebrate our traditions as well as the next 30 years of Native
Americans making strides in the media. The theme of our 2014 conference is
Going Tra-Digital, a term we like because it helps us emphasize the idea that
there can be power in telling our traditional and contemporary Native stories
on the newest digital platforms.
It also complements the exciting training sessions, presentations and discussions that our 2014 conference offers. I could not be more excited about
taking part in the discussion and skill-building opportunities with all of you.
On behalf of the NAJA board of directors and staff, Native Public Media and
Vision Maker Media, I wish you an amazing conference experience!
Itchik Daaloom (it’s good you came)!
Sincerely,
Mary Hudetz (Crow)
NAJA Board President
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Jourdan Bennett-Begaye
Brittney Michelle Bennett
Pauly Denetclaw
Carina Nicole Dominguez
Amanda Frank
Brandon Michael Frye
Sarah Kate Jones
Charles H Perry
Erin Taylor Tapahe
2014 High School
Dylan Rose Graham
Cheyanne Lee Hodge
Joshua B. Pulliam
New this year: The Native American Journalism Fellowship (NAJF)
This new NAJA-Newseum Institute pilot project provides up to 10 qualified
Native American college juniors and seniors with a yearlong experience that
features multimedia training, hands-on journalism experience, an internship
in mainstream or tribal media and mentoring in a way that recognizes and
appreciates their cultural heritage.
The program has its genesis in two established programs: the former American Indian Journalism Institute, managed and funded by the Diversity Institute
of the Freedom Forum (now the Newseum Institute); and NAJA’s Native Voices.
The best components of both initiatives are melded into a single program
designed to give students a range of journalism experiences during a oneyear period. The University of Montana has also joined as a partner, bringing
additional cirriculum expertise and accredidation for students who successfully complete the fellowship.
The first meeting of the Native American Journalists Association took place
over 30 years ago, in 1983 when more than 24 journalists invited by Tim Giago
(Lakota) met to form the organization. One of NAJA’s unique strengths remains its membership continues to be participation of the many tribal media
organizations from across the U.S.
NAJA provides important member resources:
• Building and keeping professional skills relevant in a rapidly changing media landscape
• Providing a powerful network to support the increase in and improvement
of media coverage of Native American issues and communities
• Championing and supporting freedom of the press
• Promoting the diversification of the field of media
• Supporting and encouraging students, the next generation of journalists
• Serving as a national leader and resource for the field, encouraging all journalists and media professionals to engage in the highest standards of excellence and ethics
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Dion Jordan Tapahe
Monica Webster
About NAJA
Student Fellowship
2014 College Students
NAJA Staff
Pamala Silas
Menominee/Oneida
Executive Director
The media landscape has undergone a seismic shift in recent years as technological advances continue to disrupt the news industry. With consumers
having more access to news and information today than anyone could have
imagined a generation ago, trusted journalists and news organizations must
continue to serve new and diverse audiences through multiple devices. This is
no different in Indian Country and in fact offers tribal media organizations the
opportunity to reach a broader circulation and bring in younger audiences.
While all news outlets in print, television and radio attempt to adjust and, in
some cases, reinvent themselves, the demographic makeup of news organizations news staffs in mainstream remain woefully out of sync with the percentage of minorities in the U.S. population. When looking at Native American
representation in those newsrooms, the percentage is shockingly low.
Even after 31 years, NAJA’s mission and role continue to be paramount in addressing these challenges and others. As an important resource, our members
can count on NAJA to deliver opportunities in the digital evolution of news
creation and distribution, inspire and foster the development of new talent
in the journalism and media field and mobilize its powerful membership network towards the critical and relevant issues of our time.
With a membership of over 350, spanning high school students to senior level
journalists at print, broadcast and digital news organizations, freelancers and
tribal communicators, NAJA is committed to providing important member
resources and being a strong leader in the journalism field.
History
In 1983, a group of 30 Native American journalists met at Penn State, pursuant
to a call from columnist Tim Giago and Adrian C. Louis, with the assistance of
the university’s Professor William Dulaney. The conferees agreed a national organization was needed reinvigorate the Native media, address the widespread
barriers and challenges facing Native journalists and to build on the strengths
of Native communications.
The journalists met again in early 1984 at the Choctaw Nation of Oklahoma. At
the meeting, they created a constitution and by-laws thereby establishing the
foundation for a national organization they called the Native American Press
Association. The name was changed in 1990 to the Native American Journalists Association to better reflect the organization’s broader goals and the
inclusion of radio and television professionals among its membership.
HELP NAJA by providing Session Evaluations
Please take 2-3 minutes to complete a session evaluation at the conclusion of each concurrent session and
film by scanning the QR code with the app on your
smartphone or copying the following link into your
browser: http://www.naja.com/conference/agenda/
session-evaluation/
Rebecca Landsberry
Muskogee Creek
Membership and Communications
Manager
Board of Directors
Mary Hudetz, President
Apsaalooke Crow
Editor
Native Peoples Magazine
Jason Begay, Vice President
Navajo
Journalism Professor
University of Montana
Tristan Ahtone, Treasurer
Kiowa
Independent Journalist
Tetona Dunlap, Secretary
Eastern Shoshone
Features Reporter
Times-News (Idaho)
Mark Dreadfulwater
Cherokee
Multimedia Editor
Cherokee Phoenix
Robert Oritz
Southern Ute/Taos Pueblo
Reporter
Southern Ute Drum
Shannon Shaw-Duty
Osage
Editor
Osage News
Eugene Tapahe
Navajo
Managing Partner/Creative Director
Tapahe Inventive Design
Dalton Walker
Ojibwe
Columnist/Web Editor
Colorado Springs Gazette
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Advocating for Native American Media Rights
NPM understands that progressive policies and regulations that encourage the expansion
and strengthening of Native public service media through community-based platforms are
critical to Indian Country. Once a year, NPM Board and Staff make visits to Capital Hill to educate congressional members on the importance of public media funding and the essential
services Native stations provide across Indian Country.
In 2014, NPM became the first certified Native American organization to join the International Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN). NPM’s engagement with
ICANN through the North American Regional At-Large Organization (NARALO) supports
Tribal goals to strengthen democratic values, promote international cooperation and advance digital achievement by giving voice to Native Americans at the ICANN policy table.
Representing Native Media Interests
Chairing NCAI Technology & Telecommunications Subcommittee
Without broadband and access to the Internet, Indian Country continues to lag behind in
all sectors: the economy, communications, public safety, education, electoral participation
etc. Held during the NCAI Mid Year and Annual Conferences, NPM engages in policy work to
bring Internet access to tribal communities that remain dark and un-served. NPM’s advocacy
work is local, national and international in scope because the Internet is the world’s platform
for all types of communication.
Native Public Media Excellence Program
Native Public Media Policy Program
Tribal Priority for Broadcasting
In an unprecedented effort to open new opportunities in the broadcasting field for American Indian Tribes and Alaska Native Villages, the FCC adopted an order establishing a “Tribal
Priority” in the broadcast licensing regulatory process that will promote the allocation and
licensing of new Tribal and Tribally controlled radio stations.
Special orders (Photo)
Maria Priscilla Romero- Cochiti Pueblo, Specializing in Storyteller and Animal Storytellers
(Photo)
Melinda Toya Fragua- Jemez Potter- Specializing in Storytellers, Nativity, Friendship pots,
Ornaments and Special orders (photo)
Reaching out to local tribal communities
Our Digital Journalism and Storytelling Intensive trained 12 Native storytellers and they in
turn trained an additional 80 plus persons, in 12 Tribal communities, in 8 states resulting in
the production of over 50 original multimedia works.
Station Services
NPM works with station personnel and licensees to address compliance related challenges
including financial compliance, FCC requirements, accounting principles, and maintaining relationships with tribal governments. This allows station managers to focus on local
programming and develop an expertise in Federal compliance and to produce content that
results in cultural survival and local empowerment.
Communication Scholarship
NPM is raising funds for a scholarship that will support Native American students with a
demonstrated commitment to utilizing technology in innovative ways that will help advance Native American communities. Funds may also be used to support specific research
projects exploring innovative uses of technology to promote healthy, engaged, independent Native communities.
Cultivating the next generation of Native Media Makers
The Andy Harvey Native American Broadcast Workshop 2014
News stories about Native Americans must be told by Native Americans. That is a vision that
Andy Harvey had for Native America. In memory of this accomplished individual, the Native
American Broadcast Workshop has been named after Harvey to encourage the growth of
Native Americans in television, radio and digital broadcasting. The purpose of the Andy
Harvey Native American Broadcast Workshop is to open doors to media careers for Native
American high school students. Native Americans have historically been underrepresented
in the media.
We would like to thank the following potters for their generous contribution:
Marie R. Toya: Jemez Potter specializing in Storytellers Friendship pots, Ornaments and
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About Vision Maker Media
Located at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln, Vision Maker Media’s mission is to share
Native stories with the world that represent the cultures, experiences, and values of
American Indians and Alaska Natives. We take pride in nurturing creativity for the
development of new projects, partnerships, and funding. Founded in 1977 as a nonprofit
501(c)(3) with major funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting, we also secure
funding through grants, work-for-hire, and individual and corporate donors.
Thursday, July 10 at 9:00 p.m.
THE WAYS: LADY THUNDERHAWKS *PBS Online Film Festival Selection
Finn Ryan, 3 min.
Jessica House (Oneida) began her basketball career at the age of eight. Her mother and
other parents of home-school students began a physical education class that quickly turned
into a full-blown basketball program. (theways.org)
Public Media Internships
Providing experience for Native students in Public Media is vitally important to ensure that
we continue a strong tradition of digital storytelling. With support from local PBS stations
nationwide, Vision Maker Media is proud to offer both summer and semester-long Public
Media internships to undergraduate or graduate students—so that they may become
the next generation of storytellers. With major funding from the Corporation for Public
Broadcasting (CPB), the purpose of these paid internships is to increase the opportunities
for American Indian and Alaska Native youth in Public Broadcasting. Applications are
available at www.visionmakermedia.org/intern.
DRUNKTOWN’S FINEST
Sydney Freeland (Navajo), Chad Burris (Chickasaw), Mateo Frazier, 85 min., 2014
2014 Sundance Film Festival Premiere: Three young Native Americans—a rebellious fatherto-be, a devout Christian woman, and a promiscuous transsexual—come of age on an
Indian reservation.
Saturday, July 12 at 1:30 p.m.
Drunktown’s Finest
HEALING THE WARRIOR’S HEART (Filmmakers present for Q&A)
Taki Telonidis, Gary Robinson (Choctaw/Cherokee), 57 min., 2014
The film sheds light on an affliction as old as war itself—something we now call PostTraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The emotional trauma of war is explored through the
prism of Native American tradition and ceremony. The program reveals the central role that
military service plays in Native life—exploring the spiritual traditions that help returning
American Indian soldiers reintegrate into society.
Saturday, July 12 at 3:00 p.m.
THE CALIFORNIA TRIBAL JUSTICE PROJECT
Anne Makepeace, 10 min., Work-In-Progress
A one-hour documentary about the innovative work of two tribal judges, both remarkable
women leaders who are using traditional forms of restorative justice to help heal their
communities.
TRIBAL SOVEREIGNTY: THE RIGHT TO SELF-RULE (Filmmakers present for Q&A)
Gary Robinson (Choctaw/Cherokee), 14 min., 2007
This program answers the most-asked questions concerning the origin, history and legal
development of tribal sovereignty and the basis for the existence of American Indian tribal
governments.
Saturday, July 12 at 4:15 p.m.
OUR FIRES STILL BURN
Audrey Geyer, 57 min., 2013
This exciting and compelling one-hour documentary invites viewers into the lives of
contemporary Native American role models living in the Midwest. It dispels the myth
that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon, and reveals how
they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their
culture alive, and make great contributions to society. Their experiences will deeply touch
both Natives and non-Natives and help build bridges of understanding, respect, and
communication.
Saturday, July 12 at 9:30 p.m.
WINTER IN THE BLOOD
Alex Smith, Andrew Smith, 98 min., 2013
A young, self-destructive Montana Blackfoot Indian, his mind groggy with alcohol and
tormented by childhood memories, discovers that his wife has left him, taking with her his
prized rifle. He sets out to find her, but what he’s really searching for is his own uncertain
identity and a glimpse of salvation.
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Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media is Honored to Present the National Native Film Festival
Winter in the Blood
Public Media Content Fund
With funding from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting (CPB), the Vision Maker Media
Public Media Content Fund awards support to projects with a Native American theme
and significant Native involvement that ultimately benefits the entire public media
community—increasing the diversity of Native American voices in Public Media. Programs
should be accessible to a broad audience, have the potential for a national broadcast,
and can be used for effective outreach and engagement activities to reach audiences
beyond the Public Television broadcast. Applications for 2015 will be available at www.
visionmakermedia.org/fund in January.
Educational Resources
Vision Maker Media is the premier source for quality Native American and Pacific Islander
educational and home videos. A majority of our films have additional resources to support
classroom use. Viewer discussion guides and lesson plans are available, at no charge, on
www.visionmakermedia.org/education and www.pbs.org. Features include: searchable
database, various grade-level offerings including higher education, film clips, interactive
media, viewer discussion guides and supplemental materials to accompany the lesson
plans. www.shopvisionmaker.org.
Vision Maker Media Staff:
• Shirley K. Sneve (Rosebud Sioux), Executive Director
• Georgiana Lee (Navajo), Assistant Director
• Jessica Kinser, Marketing Director
• Eric Martin, Interactive Media Specialist
• Mary Ann Koehler, Business & Projects Manager
• Rebecca Fauver, Contract/Accounting Assistant
• Rachel Danay, Department Assistant
• Khloe Keeler (Northern Ponca/Dakota/Lakota) Public Media Intern
• Student Workers: Larry Brown, Garett Ordway,
Gretchen Pille, and Alana Stone (Rosebud Sioux)
Board of Directors:
• Brian Bull (Nez Perce), Chairman | Ideastream
• Robin Butterfield (Winnebago/Chippewa), Vice Chair | Office of
Native Education, Washington State
• Dan Schiedel, Secretary | OETA – The Oklahoma Network
• Randal P. Hansen, Treasurer | NET – Nebraska Educational
Telecommunications
• Gavin Clarkson (Choctaw) | New Mexico State University
• Rosemary Morillo (Soboba) | Soboba Band of Luiseňo Indians
• Mary Kathryn Nagle (Cherokee) | Quinn Emanuel Attorneys
• Mark Van Norman (Cheyenne River Sioux) | VN Consulting, LLC
• Jim Pagliarini | TPT – Twin Cities Public Television
• Maya Solis (Pascua Yaqui/Blackfeet) | Sundance Institute
• Mark Trahant (Shoshone-Bannock) | University of Alaska –
Anchorage
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Kinew is a correspondent for Al Jazeera America’s Fault Lines and a one-of-a-kind talent,
named by Postmedia News as one of “9 Aboriginal movers and shakers you should know.”
He is the current Director of Indigenous Inclusion at the University of Winnipeg.
Kinew will offer the 2014 National Native Media Conference keynote address during the
media awards banquet at the Hyatt Regency Santa Clara in Santa Clara, Calif., July 12 beginning at 7 p.m.
In 2012, he hosted the acclaimed CBC Television series “8th Fire.” His hip-hop has won an
Aboriginal Peoples Choice Music Award and his journalism -- an Adrienne Clarkson RTNDA
Award, a Gabriel Award and a nomination for a Gemini Award. He has a BA in Economics
and is a member of the Midewin.
Patty Talahongva: Mistress of Ceremonies
Patty is a past president of NAJA. She joined the organization in 1994 and led the Student
TV Project, NAJA News 4, for nearly a decade. Her background includes producing, reporting and anchoring TV & Radio newscasts and writing for several print publications. She is a
freelance journalist based in Arizona and produces for the CBS Evening News, NPR and she
writes for a hyper-local paper in Phoenix, North Central News. She is a Lifetime Member of
NAJA. Patty is Hopi from First Mesa, Arizona.
Wes Studi: Student Celebration; Disney Storytelling Panel
From small-town Oklahoma native to internationally acclaimed actor and musician, actor
Wes Studi credits his passion and multi-faceted background for his powerful character portrayals that forever changed a Hollywood stereotype.
Drawing from his rich life experience, Wes moved audiences with performances in “Dances
with Wolves,” “The Last of the Mohicans,” “Geronimo: An American Legend,” and “Heat,” as
well as James Cameron’s “Avatar” and Paul Weitz’s “Being Flynn.” Breaking new ground, he
brought fully-developed Native American characters to the screen, and then took his craft a
step further highlighting the success of Native Americans in non-traditional roles.
In 2013, he was inducted in to the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum’s Hall
of Great Western Performers. Throughout his 30-year career he’s won numerous awards,
including several First Americans in the Arts awards and the 2009 Santa Fe Film Festival Lifetime Achievement Award. Interestingly, acting was never a goal in Wes’ youth. Unlike many
actors who dive into performing at an early age, he discovered acting later in life.
He is the voice of Wind Lifter in the upcoming Pixar film “Planes 2: Fire & Rescue” from Disney.
Gene Policinski: Anniversary Luncheon
Gene is chief operating officer of Newseum Institute and senior vice president of the First
Amendment Center, one of the initiatives of the Institute. A veteran journalist, Gene has held
news leadership positions at a variety of companies that include USA Today, where he was
the founding Washington editor, and later Page One editor and Managing Editor/Sports. In
addition to expertise on First Amendment issues, Gene is a long-time proponent of diversity
as an essential component of a free press.
Gene co-writes the weekly, nationally distributed column, “Inside the First Amendment,” and
host and producer of the Newseum’s new online program “Journalism/Works.”He was executive producer of the public television program “Speaking Freely,” recognized in 2011 with
a special Emmy award; and continues as occasional host of the First Amendment Center’s
unique “Freedom Sings” live performance program featuring music that has been censored
or served as social anthems.
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Featured Speakers
Featured Speakers
Wab Kinew: Conference Keynote
Shannon Shaw Duty: Anniversary Luncheon
Shannon is the editor of the Osage News, the tribal newspaper of the Osage Nation in
Pawhuska, Okla. She is also a former assignment editor for reznetnews.org, a Native American news, information and entertainment website that trained and mentored Native college
journalism students around the country.
A former reporter at The Santa Fe New Mexican, Shannon is a graduate of the American Indian Journalism Institute. She is also a Chips Quinn Scholar and a graduate of the University of
Oklahoma with a bachelor’s degree in Journalism and Mass Communication. Shannon has
held internships at the Associated Press in Sioux Falls, S.D., a copy editing internship at The
Forum in Fargo, N.D.
Bryan Pollard: Anniversary Luncheon
Bryan is the executive editor of the Cherokee Phoenix, the oldest Native American newspaper and the first bilingual newspaper (Cherokee and English) in North America. Bryan was
born in Oklahoma and grew up in New Orleans. He graduated from LSU with a degree in
anthropology and moved to Portland, Ore., to take a stab at being a professional photographer. Along the way he served short stints as a social worker, activist, bike messenger, photo
lab technician and community organizer.
Bryan turned to journalism after several unrewarding years as a commercial photographer,
and as fate would have it, his activist nature and journalism skills conspired to make him a
founder of Street Roots, a newspaper dedicated to covering issues concerning homeless
and low-income people. He has served on the board of directors for the North American
Street Newspaper Association and the Native American Journalists Association, the Society
of Professional Journalists and the Journalism Education Association.
Tom Arviso Jr.: Anniversary Luncheon
Tom Arviso is the CEO of the Navajo Times Publishing Company, Inc. and the Publisher of
the Navajo Times newspaper in Window Rock, Arizona. He is an honorary lifetime member
of NAJA, where he served as the board vice president and treasurer.
In 2012, the Associated Press Managing Editors Association presented The Robert
G.
McGruder Award for Diversity Leadership to Arviso at its annual convention. Arviso’s other
honors include the NAJA Wassaja Award for “extraordinary service to Native journalism.” In
2000, Arviso became the first Native American to be selected for John S. Knight Fellowship
in Journalism at Stanford University, where he studied newspaper management.
A staunch advocate for the First Amendment, Arviso for years fought many battles with
tribal government leaders and officials over editorial control and censorship of the Navajo
Times. To seek independence from tribal government ownership, Arviso convinced the
Navajo Nation Council to approve the for-profit, incorporation of the Navajo Times.
Mark Trahant: #NAJATalks
Mark teaches at the University of Alaska Anchorage, where he serves as the Atwood Journalism Chair. He also blogs, posts often on Twitter (including daily news poems). Mark was
recently a Kaiser Media Fellow and is the former editor of the editorial page for the Seattle
Post-Intelligencer. He is a member of Idaho’s Shoshone-Bannock Tribe and a former president of the Native American Journalists Association. Mark serves on the Vision Maker Media
board. He is the author of The Last Great Battle of the Indian Wars, about Henry Jackson,
Forrest Gerard and the campaign for American Indian self-determination.
Karen Lincoln Michel: #NAJATalks
Karen is an experienced editor and newsroom leader, who serves on the boards of the
Wisconsin Center for Investigative Journalism and American Indian Science & Engineering
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Previously, she was executive editor of the Daily Advertiser in Lafayette, Louisiana, and
oversaw news operations at the Opelousas (La.) Daily World. She also was an assistant managing editor at the Green Bay Press-Gazette. Karen served as president of UNITY: Journalists
of Color from 2007 to 2008. She is a longtime member of the Native American Journalists
Association and former president of the NAJA Board of Directors. She also leads the UNITY
Legacy Council of past UNITY board members.
Duncan McCue: #NAJATalks
Duncan has been a reporter for CBC News in Vancouver for over 15 years. His news and
current affairs pieces are featured on CBC’s flagship news show, The National. He’s also an
adjunct professor at the UBC School of Journalism, and has taught journalism to Indigenous
students at First Nations University and Capilano College.
Duncan was awarded a Knight Fellowship at Stanford University in 2011, where he created
an online guide for journalists called Reporting in Indigenous Communities (www.riic.ca).
Before becoming a journalist, Duncan studied English at the University of King’s College,
then Law at UBC. He was called to the bar in British Columbia in 1998. Duncan is Anishinaabe, a member of the Chippewas of Georgina Island First Nation in southern Ontario. He
lives with his wife and two children in Vancouver.
Journalism for
the Digital Age
www.mcclatchy.com
FIND US ON
13
Agenda at a Glance
Speakers
Society Publishing.
Thursday, July 10
8 a.m. – 5 p.m. 9 a.m. – 10 a.m.
10 a.m. – 12 p.m.
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m.
6 p.m. – 8 p.m. 8 p.m. – 10 p.m.
9:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Concurrent Sessions
Radio Station Compliance & InformationAlameda
NPR’s Audio Storytelling Workshop (pre-registration required) Central
Your Mobile Newsroom
Bayshore East
Mobile Pro
Bayshore East
Art of Feature Writing
Bayshore West
High-Quality, Low-Cost Video
Bayshore East
Tracking Tribal Cash (pre-registration required)
Bayshore West
Opening Ceremony:
Santa Clara Ballroom
Google for Media
Opening Reception: Terra Courtyard
Poolside refreshments in the Terra Courtyard
Film Festival: The Ways: Lady Thunderhawks & Drunktown’s Finest Santa Clara Ballroom
Friday, July 11
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m. 11 a.m. – 12 p.m. 12 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. 3 p.m. – 5 p.m. 6:00 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. 7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
8:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m.
YouTube Hands-on TrainingAlameda
Career Fair/Expo
Mezzanine & Cypress
Opening Plenary Session: #NAJATalks
Santa Clara Ballroom
Coffee Break: Exhibitors’ ExclusiveCypress
NAJA 30th Anniversary Luncheon (ticketed event) Santa Clara Ballroom
Pitch PerfectAlameda
Cultural and Language Programming in Today’s High Tech World
Bayshore West
Spring Forward: How Journalism Fellowships Advance CareersCentral
Show Me the Money: Things to Know Before You Sign
Bayshore East
Building a Brand: How to Get Traction on Social Media
Bayshore East
Live Broadcasting From Almost Anywhere in the World
Bayshore West
Decolonizing Journalism EducationAlameda
How to Use Data to Engage Your AudienceCentral
Student Celebration
Santa Clara Ballroom
Screening of Planes: Fire & Rescue
Santa Clara Ballroom
Storytelling Panel Santa Clara Ballroom
Saturday, July 12
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. 12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. 2:30 p.m. - 3 p.m. 3 p.m. – 4 p.m. 4:15 p.m. – 5 p.m. 5:30 p.m. – 7 p.m. 7 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. 9:30 p.m. – 11 p.m.
#NAJA30 Fun Run
Career Fair/Expo
Mezzanine & Cypress
Plenary Session – Media, Mascots and Racism in Sports Santa Clara Ballroom
Lunch on Own
Social Storm
Bayshore West
Transformative Service of Public Service Media with an Intro to Streaming Alameda
& App Development
At Your Service: A New Source for Native Health
Bayshore East
Free Tools for Measuring ImpactCentral
Film Festival: Healing the Warrior’s HeartNapa
Coffee Break: Exhibitors’ ExclusiveCypress
Concurrent Sessions
60 Minutes – 60 Seconds
Bayshore East
FNX: Building Native-Focused TV News
Central
Fund Your Next Project
Bayshore West
Important Opportunities for Extending the Native Broadcasting
Network with Tribal Radio Licensing at the FCCAlameda
Film Festival: The California Tribal Justice Project
and Tribal Sovereignty: The Right to Self-RuleNapa
Copyright and Fair Use
Bayshore West
Fundraising for Public BroadcastingAlameda
Film Festival: Our Fires Still BurnNapa
Silent Auction Santa Clara Foyer
2014 National Native Media Awards Banquet
Santa Clara Ballroom
Film Festival: Winter in the BloodNapa
Sunday, July 13
10:30 a.m. – 12 p.m.
NAJA Membership Breakfast & Annual MeetingCypress
14
DIReCTIonS
From San Francisco International Airport
Hyatt
Regency
Santa
Clara
Take Highway
101 South to Great
America Parkway
and turn left. The hotel is
located on the right at the corner of Tasman and Great America Parkway.
DIReCTIonS
From San Francisco International Airport
From Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport
Take Highway 101 South to Great America Parkway and turn left. The hotel is
Turn left onto Airport Boulevard, and then turn left again onto Guadalupe Parkway.
located on the right at the corner of Tasman and Great America Parkway.
Follow the signs to Highway 101 North. Guadalupe Parkway will put you onto
Highway 101 North. Take Great America Parkway and turn right.
From Norman Y. Mineta San Jose International Airport
Turn left onto Airport Boulevard, and then turn left again onto Guadalupe Parkway.
From north
Follow the signs to Highway 101 North. Guadalupe Parkway will put you onto
Take I-880 South and exit to Highway 237 West toward Mountain View. Turn left
Highway 101 North. Take Great America Parkway and turn right.
onto Great America Parkway, and then turn left into the hotel entrance. The hotel is
located at the corner of Tasman and Great America Parkway.
From north
Take I-880 South and exit to Highway 237 West toward Mountain View. Turn left
From South
onto Great America Parkway, and then turn left into the hotel entrance. The hotel is
Take I-880 North to Highway 101 North and exit at Great America Parkway. Turn
located at the corner of Tasman and Great America Parkway.
right onto Great America Parkway. The hotel is located on the corner of Tasman and
Great America Parkway.
From South
Take I-880 North to Highway 101 North and exit at Great America Parkway. Turn
right onto Great America Parkway. The hotel is located on the corner of Tasman and
Great America Parkway.
SECOND LEVEL
SECOND LEVEL
LOBBY LEVEL
LOBBY LEVEL
2014 Conference Agenda
Hyatt Regency Santa Clara
Thursday, July 10
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
NPR‘s Audio Storytelling Workshop
What makes a good audio story? Whether your goal is to do a full-blown radio story, use
audio clips in your blog, accompany photos on the web, or create a podcast, this one-day
workshop will show you how to understand audio’s storytelling strengths, select the best
sound, write for the ear, and write to sound. You’ll also get an opportunity to use audio
recording equipment and to do digital audio editing. You will need to bring your own
laptop and to download audio editing software in advance (We will advise you on the
process.)
The session is limited to pre-registered attendees. Instructor Jason DeRose and Angie
Hamilton-Lowe.
Room: Central
8:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Radio Station Compliance & Information Session
Native Public Media will provide a full day session on radio issues including station compliance with the Corporation for Public Broadcasting community service grant requirements and Federal Communications Commission requirements for radio stations and the
consequence of non-compliance. This workshop will help community and public radio
stations.
Instructors and presenters
• John Crigler, Garvey, Shubert & Barer
• Loris Taylor, Native Public Media
• Deborah Carr, Director, CPB Radio Administration
• Joseph Begay, Native Public Media
• Earl Johnson, Public Radio Satellite System
• Andrew Haden, Public Radio Satellite System
• Shyanne Beatty, Native Voice One (invited)
Room: Alameda
9 a.m. – 10 a.m. Your Mobile Newsroom
Learn about apps for journalists who work and publish in the field.
This workshop will focus on helping reporters work and publish in the field with smart
phones and tablets. During the workshop we will explore some of the best apps on the
market to write, edit and send stories, photos, audio interviews and documents. We will
also look at equipment that will help make the most of your mobile technology.
Val Hoeppner is a digital journalist, teacher, trainer and media strategist. Hoeppner spent
20 years in newsrooms as a photojournalist, newsroom leader and multimedia director.
She also spent five years working with journalism professionals, educators and students in
her role as director of education for the Freedom Forum Diversity Institute. As CEO of Val
Hoeppner Media and Consulting, LLC, Hoeppner travels to newsrooms, universities and
media conferences to train journalists in mobile, social, video and multi-platform storytelling. She is also director of the Center for Innovation in Media at Middle Tennessee State
University.
Room: Bayshore East
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. Mobile Pro
The smartphone in your pocket is more powerful than you know. Learn how to shoot
professional quality photos and video with your iPhone or Android. This is a hands-on
workshop, so come ready to learn and to shoot. Objective: To teach attendees how to
shoot good photos and video on their smartphone -- hitting on best practices, the apps
and gear needed, and the limitations of smartphone photo and video journalism.
Speakers: Nathan Olivarez-Giles, tech reporter at The Wall Street Journal; Eugene Tapahe,
photojournalist and entrepreneur.
15
Conference Registration
Santa Clara Foyer
Room: Bayshore East
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Art of Feature Writing
Story structure. Outline. Feature writing. Narrative forms. Pacing.
In this workshop you’ll learn how to turn out fantastic stories for print, or learn new tricks
for crafting features. Whether you’re writing breaking news or a long-form features, this
workshop will break down the process so you get the right information, communicate the
right ideas, and teach you how to distill everything you’ve gathered into a story that grabs
your audiences attention and keeps them engaged.
Instructor: Katherine Lanpher, Al Jazeera planning editor
Room: Bayshore West
12:15—1:30 p.m. Lunch on own
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Tracking Tribal Cash
Hosted by the Donald W. Reynolds National Center for Business Journalism
This afternoon workshop will teach Native American journalists and others how to tap
into the world of money and influence in Washington, and better understand how decisions affecting tribes and Native communities are being influenced — and who is trying
to influence them.
Instructor: Russ Choma, money-in-politics reporter for the Center for Responsive Politics.
The session is limited to pre-registered attendees.
Room: Bayshore West
1:30 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. High-Quality, Low-Cost Video
You’re on deadline and a budget, but want to produce compelling videos for the Web.
Learn best practices and techniques for producing videos that tell stories. From the BBC
five-shot method, to shooting sequences and fast production techniques, this workshop
is geared toward journalists working as one-man bands, and newsrooms looking to add
additional content to their websites.
Speaker: Lam Thuy Vo, Al Jazeera and Joann Kao, Al Jazeera
Room: Bayshore East
2014 Conference Agenda
Agenda
17
10:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m. 6:00 p.m. – 8:00 p.m. Opening Ceremony and TechWOW
Gather for both a cultural presentation and an energizing, fast-paced discussion on the
future of Natives in media, with leaders from host organizations Native American Journalists Association, Native Public Media and Vision Maker Media. Then get ready for part two
of our opening general session with Google.
Google for Media: Indian Country has a deep tradition of storytelling, and today’s Native
Media carry on that tradition. Google offers a range of ways to visually and socially improve the way people consume news, through digital interaction. Hear how a few of these
tools are being used in the media today, and start to imagine how they’ll be used in the
future, as tradition goes digital!
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
8:00 p.m. – 10:00 p.m.
Opening Reception in the Terra Courtyard
Join us poolside for light refreshments.
9:00 p.m. – 10:30 p.m.
Film Festival
Presented by Vision Maker Media
The Ways: Lady Thunderhawks (PBS Online Film Festival Selection)
Finn Ryan, 3 min, 2013
Jessica House (Oneida) began her basketball career at the age of eight. Her mother and
other parents of home-school students began a physical education class that quickly
turned into a full-blown basketball program.
Drunktown’s Finest (2014 Sundance Film Festival Premiere)
Sydney Freeland (Navajo), Chad Burris (Chickasaw), Mateo Frazier, 85 min., 2014
Three young Native Americans—a father-to-be, a Christian woman, and a transgender
woman—come of age near the Navajo Nation.
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
Friday, July 11
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Conference Registration Santa Clara Foyer
8:30 a. m. – 9:30 a.m.
YouTube Hands-on Training
With YouTube, newsrooms can attract their share of a 1B-unique monthly audience and
bring interactive storytelling to life. In this session, we’ll cover top strategies to attract
and engage audiences on YouTube and highlight best practices from news organizations
around the world. You’ll walk away with the tools and next steps to successfully launch
and ramp up your YouTube channel.
Room: Alameda
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Career Fair/Expo
Room: Cypress and Mezzanine
9:30 a.m. – 11 a.m. #NAJATalks
Presented in partnership with FNX
How have social media and powerful stories pushed Native issues to the forefront? Why
aren’t Native Americans a part of the picture in important surveys that also offer benchmark snapshots of our country? What does it take to build a path for a new generation of
journalists?
NAJA presents an exciting series of talks in one powerful session that explores each of
these questions and others. Don’t miss hearing from veteran journalists and engaging in a
discussion that is sure to continue into the next year.
Speakers: Karen Lincoln Michel (NAJA), Patty Talahongva (Independent Journalist), Mark
Trahant (University of Alaska-Anchorage) and Duncan McCue (CBC)
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
11 a.m. – 12 p.m. Coffee Break: Exhibitors’ Exclusive
Room: Cypress
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NAJA Anniversary Luncheon (ticketed event).
Freedom of the press in Indian Country is central to NAJA’s mission, in part, because it’s
essential for building stronger tribal nations. Our celebration spotlights the NAJA members and newspapers behind major First Amendment victories in Indian Country. Join us
in celebrating NAJA’s work for freedom of the press.
Speakers: Shannon Shaw Duty, Osage News; Bryan Pollard, Cherokee Phoenix; Tom Arviso,
Navajo Times
Moderator: Gene Policinski, First Amendment Center and the Newseum Institute
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Cultural and Language Programming in Today’s High Tech World
Presented by Native Public Media
This session will provide “sound bites” and insight into how stations are providing cultural
and language programming for their communities. What are the opportunities, challenges and concerns about cultural and language programming at the local and national
levels? What cultural programs are the most important to Native communities and how is
technology aiding stations in reaching audiences around the globe?
Panel: Monica Nuvamsa, KUYI; Ruby Herrera, KABR Program Director; Dina Zempsky,
StoryCorps, Director, Mobile Tour; Darlene Yazzie, Elliot Christensen, Feather Note Music,
KTNN Commercial (Tentative)
Room: Bayshore West
41310American Native.pdf
1
6/18/14
2:09 PM
Cheers
No artificial flavors, no added preservatives. Since 1886.
TM & © 2014 Cable News Network. A Time Warner Company. All rights reserved.
Proud supporter of the
Native American
Journalists Association’s
2014 National Native
Media Conference
2014 Conference Agenda
Agenda
12:00 p.m. – 1:30 p.m. 1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Pitch Perfect
Learn how to hone your story pitch. During this workshop, editors from top news outlets
will talk to you about what they look for in a story, and the dos and don’ts of pitching. At
the end of the session, sit down and discuss your story ideas one-on-one with session
speakers.
Panel: Jason DeRose, Katherine Lanpher
Moderator: Tristan Ahtone
Room: Alameda
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Spring Forward: How Journalism Fellowships Advance Careers
The three fellowship programs at Michigan, Stanford and Harvard offer mid-career
journalists a chance to step away from the newsroom and the deadlines to follow their
individual study plans for an academic year. Journalists interested in studying a certain
topic (history, law, business, science etc.), can use the time to become more proficient in
digital story telling, using social media or take writing classes. Fellows will leave the program with a renewed commitment to journalism and with new skills that can propel their
career forward.
Presenter: Birgit Reich; Tom Arviso, CEO and Publisher, The Navajo Times, former Knight
Fellow, Stanford University; Joshua Benton, Director, Nieman Journalism Lab, former
Nieman Fellow, Harvard University; Ilja Herb, photographer, former Knight-Wallace Fellow,
University of Michigan
Room: Central
1:45 p.m. – 2:45 p.m. Show Me the Money: Things to Know Before You Sign
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Vision Maker Media walks you through key things every filmmaker should understand
about contract requirements and their rights as they negotiate their next project.
Presenter: Georgiana Lee, Vision Maker Media
Room: Bayshore East
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Live Broadcasting From Almost Anywhere In the World
Presented by Native Public Media
As technology evolves, so does media in its delivery. In this session, the presenters will
provide current examples of how they use technology to broadcast from Tribal reservations, ball fields, conferences, and from their hotel rooms. This forum will also host a
discussion on what stations are doing to reach Native Americans who are receiving information on mobile handhelds.
Presenters: Hector Youtsey, KPYT; Will Robbins, KWSO; Thomas Humeyestewa, KUYI Production Assistant; Jaclyn Sallee, KNBA
Room: Bayshore West
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Building a Brand: How to Get Traction on Social Media
Where are your readers? Most are probably talking to their friends on Facebook and
Twitter looking for interesting content, and on LinkedIn searching for new opportunities.
Are your stories there? How are you branding your site or yourself as a distinctive news
source? Join the conversation on how to get the most traction from Twitter, Facebook,
LinkedIn and other social sites. This session looks at the promise and pitfalls of these new
communication tools. Presenters will share tips on how to separate yourself from the pack
in terms of marketing your brand, and engage the audience in a question-and-answer
session.
Panelists: Mark Trahant, University of Alaska/independent journalist; Karen Lincoln Michel,
independent journalist; Yumi Wilson, LinkedIn
Room: Bayshore East
©2014 The Coca-Cola Company. “Coca-Cola,” “open happiness” and the Contour Bottle
are registered trademarks of The Coca-Cola Company.
19
20
Decolonizing Journalism Education
Get an overview of three programs on both sides of the U.S.-Canada border that are training journalists for better Native coverage.
In Canada, the UBC Graduate School of Journalism’s course Reporting in Indigenous
Communities has “embedded” students in First Nations communities in Vancover, B.C.,
under a three-year pilot project, (www.indigenousreporting.com). Another program aims
to attract, retain, train and mentor First Nation students for journalism careers through
hands-on learning under the guidance of Aboriginal/Native American instructors who
are working journalists. In Montana, the Native News Honors Project pairs an in-depth
feature-writing syllabus with real-word reporting experience. The University of Montana
program sends seven teams of journalists each year to reservations to produce stories for
a spring publication.
Learn about approaches to journalism training that have been successful, how media organizations can more involved in post-secondary journalism programs and how journalists can mentor successful journalists.
Panelists: Duncan McCue, CBC; Jason Begay, University of Montana; Shannon Avison, First
Nations University
Room: Alameda
3:00 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. How To Use Data to Engage Your Audience
Data-driven storytelling and engagement is part of a cycle — data is collected, presented
to an audience, then more data collected from the audience and fed back into a new story. In this workshop, you’ll learn how and where to collect data and the tools that make it
easier. You’ll also learn how to connect better with and creatively solicit content from your
audience. This data and community engagement workshop will last two hours. Learn best
practices for data collection and presentation.
Instructor: Joanna S. Kao, Al Jazeera Interactive Developer and Lam Thuy Vo
Room: Central
4:30 p.m. – 6:00 p.m. Dinner Break
Get exciting details about our 2014 student event and Disney’s Planes: Fire & Rescue
screening at the #GoingTradigital registration table or online at www.naja.com.
6:00 p.m. – 6:45 p.m. Student Celebration
Meet the outstanding student journalists selected to participate in NAJA’s 2013 Native
Voices and Project Phoenix programs, and see their work. This event celebrates the
achievements of the program, highlights NAJA’s new Native American Journalism Fellowship and includes an announcement of 2014-2015 scholarship winners.
7:00 p.m. – 8:30 p.m.
Screening of Planes: Fire & Rescue
The storytellers and artists of Disneytoon Studios spent four years creating “Planes: Fire &
Rescue,” the story of a crop duster turned passionate racer who discovers he can no longer
race. Join three storytellers behind “Planes: Fire & Rescue”—screenwriter Jeffrey M. Howard, art director Toby Wilson and the voice of Windlifter Wes Studi for an imagination-fueled panel about the art of storytelling—and how the best details come from the coolest
places. Presented by Disney
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
8:30 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. Storytelling Panel
Presenters: Wes Studi; Disney Executives
Saturday, July 12
8:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Conference Registration Santa Clara Foyer
8:30 a.m. – 9:30 a.m.
21
#NAJA30 Fun Run Don’t forget your personal wellness while you’re busy developing new skills. Meet in the
foyer for this event.
2014 Conference Agenda
2014 Conference Agenda
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. Santa Clara Foyer
9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Career Fair/Expo
Room: Cypress and Mezzanine
10:30 a.m. – 11:45 a.m. Mascots, Media and Racism in Sports
Just weeks ago, the United States Patent and Trademark Office canceled six trademark
registrations for the Washington NFL team, marking a major moment in a renewed national debate over the football team’s mascot. Where is the discussion headed next on this
major issue? Who have been the leaders both in the media and in Indian Country on this
topic? And where has news coverage succeeded and where has it fallen short? Join this
discussion and take part in a question-and-answer session.
Panelists: Suzan Harjo; Yocha Dehe Wintun Nation (invited); Audrey Cooper, San Francisco
Chronical; and Mary Hudetz, NAJA.
Moderator: Charla Bear, 2014-2015 John S. Knight Fellow/KQUED reporter and anchor.
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
12 p.m. – 1:15 p.m. Lunch on Your Own 1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Social Storm
From #NotYourMascot to #RockYourMocs, we look at the top 10 Twitter trends from Indian Country, why they went viral and what their impact has been. Get ready to countdown
and get ahead of the next trend.
Presenters: Tate Walker (Freelance Journalist); Mark Trahant (University of Alaska, Anchorage), Russell Contreras (Associated Press)
Room: Bayshore West
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. Transformative Service of Public Service Media with an Intro to Streaming &
App Development
Presented by Native Public Media
This session delves into the nature of public service media and why community media is
an essential service. Across Indian Country, Native radio serves as a lifeline for community members by connecting them to information about education, health, public safety,
economy and Tribal culture and language. As the population of urban Indians grows,
more and more Tribal members are using streaming radio services and smart phones to
connect to their homelands. This session will touch on how to set up a stream for your
station and explore the possibly of creating a streaming app.
Presenters: Candice Mendez, Native Public Media; Thomas Humeyestewa, KUYI Production Assistant; Paul Beccio, Isleta Technologies; KCNP (Invited)
Room: Alameda
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m. At Your Service: A News Source for Native Health
News outlets gained free access this year to a new Native health news outlet. Find out
how you — as an editor, reporter, or health advocate—can join the Native Health News
Alliance and use its wire-service site to advance the news coverage of Native health. Also,
be the first to view data about how tribal media covers health news. Also covered in this
session: strategies and techniques for increasing reader/viewer engagement and framing
news for policy impact.
Speakers: Shannon Shaw Duty, Teresa Lamsam, Rebecca Blatt
Room: Bayshore East
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Free Tools for Measuring Impact
Presented by Vision Maker Media
What are the demographics of people following your company or organization on
Facebook, YouTube and twitter? At what point do people stop watching your YouTube
videos, and how do they compare to other YouTube videos? How many people click on
22
Presenter: Eric Martin
Room: Central
1:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.
Film Festival
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Healing the Warrior’s Heart (Filmmakers present for Q&A)
Taki Telonidis, Gary Robinson (Choctaw/Cherokee), 57 min., 2014
The film sheds light on an affliction as old as war itself—something we now call Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). The emotional trauma of war is explored through the prism
of Native American tradition and ceremony. The program reveals the central role that
military service plays in Native life—exploring the spiritual traditions that help returning
American Indian soldiers reintegrate into society.
Presenters: Taki Telonidis, Filmmaker; Gary Robinson, Filmmaker
Room: Napa 1/2
2:30 p.m. - 3:00 p.m. Coffee Break: Exhibitors’ Exclusive Room: Cypress
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. 60 minutes ---> 60 Seconds
Produce 60 seconds of news in 60 minutes or less. In this session, you will come up with a
story idea, identify a source, and then edit, write and get it on the air all within an hour’s
time. This workshop provides participants with the technological tools necessary to meet
short deadlines and an easy-to -understand method for finishing stories.
Recommendation: Participants can bring a digital recorder, mic and laptop with audio
editing software. Not required.
Speaker: William Robbins; Marge Kalama, on air talent and program producer
Room: Bayshore East
3:00 p.m. – 4:30 p.m. FNX: Building Native-Focused TV News
Hear from the crew that produces the news, events and cultural segment series “FNX
NOW” as they discuss what it takes to create video spots for the show. You’ll get an overview of the tools needed to create your own video stories that meet television broadcast
quality standards and can air on the national public television channel FNX | First Nations
Experience. Also covered in this session: image recording quality, vox pop interviews,
audio recording quality and narration.
FNX | First Nations Experience is the first national public television network to focus its
programming on Native American and Indigenous Peoples.
Speakers: Frank Blanquet, FNX Producer/Director; Terria Smith, FNX Tribal Liaison/Producer.
Room: Central
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. Fund Your Next Project
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Learn what it takes to secure a grant and make the most of crowd-source funding sites to
raise money for your next doc or endeavor.
Presenters: Georgiana Lee, Vision Maker Media, Assistant Director; Jen Gilomen, Programming Manager for Independent Television Service (ITVS)
Room: Bayshore West
3:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.
Film Festival
2014 Conference Agenda
2014 Conference Agenda
23
your company’s Facebook links? When are the people that “like” your page on Facebook?
Find answers to these and other questions by using free tools available online. Bonus for
Non-Profits: Find out how you can get free services from YouTube and Google through the
Google Non-Profits program.
Presented by Vision Maker Media
The California Tribal Justice Project
Anne Makepeace, 10 min., Work-In-Progress
A one-hour documentary about the innovative work of two tribal judges, both remarkable women leaders who are using traditional forms of restorative justice to help heal
their communities.
Tribal Sovereignty: The Right to Self-Rule (Filmmaker present for Q&A)
Gary Robinson (Choctaw/Cherokee), 14 min., 2007
This program answers the most-asked questions concerning the origin, history and legal
development of tribal sovereignty and the basis for the existence of American Indian
tribal governments.
Presenters: Gary Robinson, Filmmaker
Room: Napa 1/2
3:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Important Opportunities for Extending the Native Broadcasting Network with Tribal Radio Licensing at the FCC
Presented by Native Public Media
As the communications needs or the socio-economic conditions of Tribes change, new
opportunities in radio become possible. The FCC Tribal Priority for Broadcast resulted
in the granting of the first two full powered commercial FM allotments to the Hualapai
Tribe at Peach Springs, AZ and to Navajo Technical College at Crownpoint NM. Learn how
some non-commercial stations are being changed over to commercial stations and why
such a change may be good for your Tribe.
Presenters: Geoffrey Blackwell, Chief, Office of Native Affairs and Policy; Terri Hutchens,
Hualapai Commercial Station
Room: Alameda
4:15 p.m. – 5:15 p.m. Film Festival
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Our Fires Still Burn
Audrey Geyer, 57 min., 2013
This exciting and compelling one-hour documentary invites viewers into the lives of
contemporary Native American role models living in the Midwest. It dispels the myth
that American Indians have disappeared from the American horizon, and reveals how
they continue to persist, heal from the past, confront the challenges of today, keep their
culture alive, and make great contributions to society. Their experiences will deeply touch
both Natives and non-Natives and help build bridges of understanding, respect, and communication.
Room: Napa ½
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Fundraising for Public Radio
Presented by Native Public Media
This session will take a look at trends, opportunities and challenges for meeting your
station’s revenue goals and provide an insight into how some stations are developing
multiple streams of income. KUYI Hopi Radio launched its Arizona Gives Campaign while
KEYA benefits from donations and contributions to sustain its stations operations. Come
learn more.
Presenters: Monica Nuvamsa, KUYI; Jaclyn Sallee, KNBA; Kim Thomas, KEYA
Room: Alameda
4:15 p.m. – 5:00 p.m. Copyright and Fair Use
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Join Attorney Isaac Hager, Director of Business Affairs at Independent Television Service
(ITVS) for a spirited conversation about production finance agreements and chain of title
issues for underlying rights, such as characters, music, underlying literary works, and
24
Presenters: Isaac Hager, Director of Business Affairs at Independent
Television Service (ITVS)
Room: Bayshore West
5:30 p.m. – 9:00 p.m. 2014 Silent Auction—Benefit for the NAJA Scholarship Fund
Room: Santa Clara Foyer
7:00 p.m. – 9:30 p.m. 2014 National Native Media Awards Banquet
Join the Native American Journalists Association, Native Pubic Media and Vision Maker Media in celebrating the outstanding work of journalists and media professionals. Wab Kinew,
a correspondent for Al Jazeera and the director of Indigenous Inclusion at the University of
Winnipeg, is the 2014 keynote.
Room: Santa Clara Ballroom
9:30 p.m. – 11 p.m. Film Festival
Presented by Vision Maker Media
Winter in the Blood
Alex Smith, Andrew Smith, 98 min., 2013
A young, self-destructive Montana Blackfoot Indian, his mind groggy with alcohol and
tormented by childhood memories, discovers that his wife has left him, taking with her his
prize rifle. He sets out to find her, but what he’s really searching for is his own uncertain identity and a glimpse of salvation.
Sunday, July 13
10:30 a.m. – 12:00 p.m
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Room: Napa
NAJA Member Breakfast and Annual Meeting
Room: Cypress
Conferene Exhibitors
Agenda
archival material.
Conference Exhibitors
American Indian, Alaska Native and Native Hawaiian Program, Stanford University
Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism
Cherokee Nation Businesses
CNN
Columbia Journalism School
CUNY Graduate School of Journalism
Eli Lilly and Company
FCC Learning Lab
FNX - First Nations Experience
Gannett
Heyday/News from Native California
The McClatchy Company
Medill, Northwestern University
Mvskoke Media
Native American Journalists Association (NAJA)
Office of Minority Health Resource Center
OPB (Oregon Public Broadcasting)
UC Berkeley, American Indian Graduate Program
University of Oklahoma, Gaylord College of Journalism and Mass Communication
Arts and Crafts Exhibitors
Alejandro’s Trade
Redgear & Cece’s Jewelry
Red Willow Medicine Wheel
26
On behalf of our co-hosts, the Native American Journalists
Association thanks our sponsors for their generous support of the
2014 National Native Media Conference.
FEATURE SPONSOR
ROUND UP SPONSORS
BRIGHT SPONSORS
ADDITIONAL SPONSORS
Tapahe Inventive Design
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Bay Area News Group, a Digital First Company
Tribal Print Source

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