Student Catalog and Handbook

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Student Catalog and Handbook
Student
Catalog
and
Handbook
Setting the Educational Standard in
the Massage and Spa Industries
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Table of Contents
Locations............................................................................................................ iv
Mission, Philosophy, and Values.......................................................................1
A History of Excellence......................................................................................2
Accreditation, Licensing, and Approvals........................................................3
What’s So Special About Cortiva?..................................................................6
About Massage Therapy..................................................................................7
Admissions Requirements..................................................................................8
Programs........................................................................................................... 14
Boston Campus......................................................................................................................14
Chicago Campuses...............................................................................................................15
Tampa/St. Pete Campus.......................................................................................................16
King of Prussia Campus........................................................................................................ 18
Wall Campus.......................................................................................................................... 20
Scottsdale Campus............................................................................................................... 21
Tucson Campus..................................................................................................................... 22
Hoboken Campus................................................................................................................. 24
Washington Campuses........................................................................................................ 26
Course Descriptions.........................................................................................29
Student Handbook..........................................................................................38
Payment and Refund Policies........................................................................64
Student Services............................................................................................... 74
Additional Information....................................................................................84
Thank You!......................................................................................................... 87
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locations|
Scottsdale Campus
Tucson Campus
Tampa/St. Pete Campus
Chicago Loop Campus
Crystal Lake Campus
Woodridge Campus
Boston Campus
Hoboken Campus
Wall Campus
King of Prussia Campus
Seattle Campus
Federal Way Campus
8010 E. McDowell Rd., Ste. 214
Scottsdale, AZ 85257
480-945-9461
103 Morse Street
Watertown, MA 02472
617-612-6900
6390 East Broadway
Tucson, AZ 85710
520-407-5160
2 Hudson Place, 2nd Floor
Hoboken, NJ 07030
201-215-6440
4045 Park Boulevard
Pinellas Park, FL 33781
727-865-4940
1985 Highway 34
Wall Township, NJ 07719
732-359-1600
17 North State St., Suite 500
Chicago, IL 60602
312-253-3313
241 Commerce Drive
Crystal Lake, IL 60014
815-404-2700
211 South Gulph Road
King of Prussia, PA 19406
484-690-1400
425 Pontius Avenue North
Seattle, WA 98109
206-204-3175
1051 Internationale Pkwy
Woodridge, IL 60517
630-410-6160
2030 South 314th Street
Federal Way, WA 98003
253-237-5300
Steiner Education Group Corporate Offices • 2001 W. Sample Road, Suite #318, Pompano Beach, Florida 33064 • 954-969-9771 • 954-969-9747 fax
SEG Cort LLC Offices • 770 South Dixie Highway, Suite 200, Coral Gables, Florida 33146 • 305-358-9002
SEG Cort LLC is a Florida corporation. The members of the Board of Directors are Stephen Lazarus, Leonard Fluxman and Robert C. Boehm.
Mr. Stephen Lazarus is the Chief Operating Officer for SEG Cort LLC and Steiner Education Group, Inc.
All Cortiva Institute schools are accredited by one of the following accrediting agencies recognized by the United States Department of Education.
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Cortiva Institute is owned by SEG CORT LLC, which is a wholly owned subsidiary of Steiner Education Group, Inc. (SEG), a wholly-owned subsidiary of Steiner Leisure Limited.
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Student Catalog & Handbook • March 2013
Mission
The mission of Cortiva is to provide high-quality, comprehensive training programs that prepare graduates for successful careers in
massage therapy and related health and wellness fields.
Philosophy
Cortiva is committed to the success of its students and graduates. Cortiva offers practical and effective vocational training programs
that are designed to produce successful practitioners and support the learning and personal growth of students.
Cortiva is committed to fostering a caring community and creating a safe and challenging classroom environment. Experienced
and dedicated faculty provide hands-on training that focuses on the individual needs of each student.
Cortiva believes that students should graduate as experienced practitioners, ready to work. Our programs are both practical
and innovative and draw upon the rich history of knowledge and experience of our member schools, as well as
current industry trends.
Cortiva is committed to the growth and evolution of massage therapy and related fields.
Our curriculum is therefore designed not only to enable our students to master
established methods, but also to approach their work creatively so that they may
contribute to the development of the techniques of the future.
Values
Cortiva embraces the following values:
Integrity - we act honestly and ethically with one another, our students, and the
larger community.
Excellence - we consciously set high standards and take steps to achieve and
exceed them.
Respect - we create a kind, honest, and respectful environment that encourages people
to act responsibly and give their best.
Professionalism - we are committed to developing, following, and modeling the best
practices of our chosen professions with each other and our students.
Community - we foster open and constructive communication and interactions with one
another to support creative collaboration and opportunities for growth.
Diversity - we acknowledge that adult education is grounded and enriched by the wide variety of life experiences and
learning styles of our students and teachers.
Growth - we continuously seek to improve ourselves in an effort to become better people, teachers, learners, and professionals in our
chosen fields.
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A History of Excellence
Cortiva schools have been specializing in massage therapy training
for more than 30 years. Our campuses have diverse origins – many
were at the forefront of the development of modern massage
therapy education. Our collective history of experience and
innovation is a large part of what makes Cortiva an industry leader
today.
The Cortiva Institute Wall campus was founded in 1987 as the
Somerset School of Massage Therapy. In 2004, the school became
part of Cortiva, and is now a branch campus of the King of Prussia
campus.
The Cortiva Institute Washington campuses were founded as the
Brenneke School of Massage in 1974 and the Brian Utting Massage
School in 1982. In 2005 and 2006 respectively, the schools became
part of Cortiva and, in 2007, were combined to create one Seattle
campus. In 2011, the Federal Way campus opened.
In 2011, Cortiva was acquired by the Steiner Education Group,
with headquarters located at 2001 West Sample Road, Suite 318,
Pompano Beach, Florida 33064-1342. Steiner Education Group (SEG)
owns and operates 31 campuses in 14 states.
The Cortiva Institute Boston campus was founded in the late 1970’s
as the Muscular Therapy Institute. In 2005, the school became part of
Cortiva.
The Cortiva Institute Chicago campus was founded in 1981 as the
Chicago School of Massage Therapy. The school opened the Crystal
Lake campus in 2001. In 2005, the school became part of Cortiva
and, in 2009, opened the Woodridge campus.
The Cortiva Institute Scottsdale campus was founded in 1981 as the
Phoenix Therapeutic Massage College and Doctor’s Assistant School,
Inc. In 2006, the school became part of Cortiva.
The Cortiva Institute Tampa/St. Pete campus was founded in 1981 as
The Humanities Center. In 2005, the school became part of Cortiva.
The Cortiva Institute Hoboken campus was established in 2010 as a
branch campus of the Cortiva Institute Tucson campus.
In addition to the 12 Cortiva schools, SEG operates: Arizona School
of Massage Therapy and Steiner institute of Esthetics in Phoenix and
Tempe, AZ; Baltimore School of Massage and Baltimore School of
Massage’s Steiner Institute of Esthetics in Baltimore, MD; Baltimore
School of Massage York Campus in York, PA; Connecticut Center for
Massage Therapy in Groton, Newington, and Westport, CT; Denver
School of Massage Therapy in Aurora and Westminster, CO; Florida
College of Natural Health in Pompano Beach, Miami, Orlando,
and Sarasota, FL; Nevada School of Massage Therapy in Las Vegas,
NV; Texas Center for Massage Therapy in Dallas and Houston, TX;
Utah College of Massage Therapy in Salt Lake City and Lindon, UT;
Steiner Institute of Esthetics at UCMT in Salt Lake City, UT; and Virginia
School of Massage and Steiner Institute of Esthetics at VASOM in
Charlottesville, VA.
The Cortiva Institute King of Prussia campus was founded in 1982
as the Pennsylvania School of Muscle Therapy. In 2005, the school
became part of Cortiva.
The Cortiva Institute Tucson campus was founded in 1982 as the
Desert Institute of the Healing Arts. The school became part of
Cortiva in 2005.
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Accreditation, Licensing, and Approvals
Cortiva schools are approved/accredited by the
following agencies:
Illinois Board of Higher Education
Division of Private Business and Vocational Schools
431 East Adams Second Floor
Springfield, Illinois 62701-1404
217-782-2551
All Cortiva Campuses are authorized by the United States
Department of Education to participate in Student Financial
Assistance (SFA) programs and offer various federal financial aid
programs to eligible students.
King of Prussia
Accredited by:
Boston
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
Accredited by:
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
Licensed by:
Commonwealth of Pennsylvania
Department of Education
State Board of Private Licensed Schools
333 Market Street, 12th Floor
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17126-0333
717-783-8228
Licensed by:
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Division of Professional Licensure
Office of Private Occupational School Education
1000 Washington Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02118-6100
617-727-1747
Cortiva Institute King of Prussia campus is accredited with COMTA as
the main campus.
Approved for Section 30 and ITA of the Commonwealth of
Massachusetts Office of Labor and Workforce Development.
Wall
Accredited by:
Cortiva Institute Boston campus is accredited with COMTA as the
main campus.
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
Chicago, Crystal Lake & Woodridge
Accredited by:
Cortiva Institute King of Prussia campus is accredited with COMTA as
the main campus. Wall is accredited as a branch campus of the King
of Prussia campus.
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
Certificate of Approval to operate a private vocational school in
accordance with the New Jersey Administrative Code, Title 6A,
Chapter 18 (N.J.A.C. 6A: 18-1 et seq.) by the State of New Jersey,
Department of Education and Department of Labor and Workforce
Development.
Cortiva Institute Chicago campus is accredited with COMTA as the
main campus. Woodridge is accredited as a branch campus, and
Crystal Lake is accredited as an auxiliary classroom.
Certificate of Approval to operate is issued by:
Tampa/St. Pete
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Hoboken
Accredited by:
Accrediting Commission of Career Schools
and Colleges (ACCSC)
2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302, Arlington, Virginia 22201
703-247-4212
Accredited by:
Accrediting Commission of Career Schools
and Colleges (ACCSC)
2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302, Arlington, Virginia 22201
703-247-4212
Licensed by:
Commission for Independent Education,
Florida Department of Education
325 West Gaines Street, Suite 1414, Tallahassee, Florida 32399
850-245-3200
Cortiva Institute Tampa/St. Pete campus is accredited with ACCSC as
the main campus.
Tucson
Accredited by:
Accrediting Commission of Career Schools
and Colleges (ACCSC)
2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302, Arlington, Virginia 22201
703-247-4212
Cortiva Institute Tucson campus is accredited with ACCSC as the
main campus.
Cortiva Institute Tucson campus is accredited with ACCSC as the
main campus. Hoboken is accredited as a branch campus of the
Tucson campus.
Approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVIS)
through the Department of Homeland Security for foreign student’s
study.
Certificate of Approval to operate a private vocational school in
accordance with the New Jersey Administrative Code, Title 6A,
Chapter 18 (N.J.A.C. 6A: 18-1 et seq.) by the State of New Jersey,
Department of Education and Department of Labor and Workforce
Development.
Scottsdale
Accredited by:
Accrediting Council for Continuing Education
& Training (ACCET)
1722 “N” Street NW, Washington, DC 20036
202-955-1113
Licensed by:
Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education
1400 West Washington Street, Room 260, Phoenix, Arizona 85007
602-542-5709
602-542-1253 Fax
www.ppse.az.gov
Licensed by:
Arizona State Board for Private Postsecondary Education
1400 West Washington Street, Room 260, Phoenix, Arizona 85007
602-542-5709
602-542-1253 Fax
www.ppse.az.gov
Approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVIS)
through the Department of Homeland Security for foreign student’s
study.
Cortiva Institute Scottsdale campus is accredited with ACCET as the
main campus.
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Memberships and Other Affiliations
Seattle & Federal Way
Accredited by:
All Cortiva Campuses
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
Cortiva is a member of the American Massage Therapy Association
(AMTA) and is a member of the Associated Bodywork and Massage
Professionals (ABMP).
Cortiva Institute Seattle campus is accredited with COMTA as the
main campus. Federal Way is accredited as an auxiliary classroom.
Cortiva is also a member of the Association of Private Sector
Colleges and Universities (APSCU).
Licensed under Chapter 28.10. Inquiries or complaints regarding this
or any other private career school may be made to the school’s
state licensing agency. Send complaints to:
Tampa/St. Pete Only
Cortiva Tampa/St. Pete campus is a member of the Florida State
Massage Therapy Association (FSMTA).
Washington Workforce Training and
Education Coordinating Board
128 10th Avenue SW, Olympia, Washington 98504-3105
360-753-5673
Seattle & Federal Way Only
Cortiva Seattle & Federal Way is a member of the Northwest Career
College Federation (NWCCF).
Approved by:
Washington State Board of Massage, Department of Health
Health Professionals Quality Assurance
P.O. Box 47868, Olympia, Washington 98504-7868
Approved by the Student and Exchange Visitor Program (SEVIS)
through the Department of Homeland Security for foreign student’s
study.
These credentials are on display at each campus and are available
for review by any student during business hours.
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What’s So Special About Cortiva?
Experience
Career Services
The Cortiva schools have been training students for exciting and
rewarding careers in massage therapy for more than 30 years.
Dedicated exclusively to massage therapy training, many of our
schools are among the pioneers of massage therapy education.
Cortiva is also a member of the Steiner Education Group (SEG), which
offers massage therapy training at 31 campuses in 14 states. SEG
schools have a combined operating history of more than 500 years.
Cortiva is dedicated not only to providing the highest quality
education to its students, but also to helping those students find
the jobs of their dreams. Of course, career success is ultimately up
to the individual and Cortiva cannot guarantee employment or
salary, but our career services team begins working with students
when they start school and continues working with them long after
they graduate. From a student’s first job to his or her last job in the
industry, we’re here to help them succeed.
The Steiner Advantage
The Steiner Education Group is a subsidiary of Steiner Leisure Limited,
a global provider of spa services. Steiner Leisure Limited operates
more than 200 spas and salons on cruise ships and at locations
worldwide. Steiner’s land-based spas include resort spas, urban
hotel spas, and day spas operated under Steiner’s Elemis, Mandara,
Chavana, Bliss, and Remede brands.*
Steiner’s cruise ship operations include spas on Carnival Cruise
Lines, Celebrity Cruises, Crystal Cruises, Cunard Cruise Line,
Holland America Line, Norwegian Cruise Line, Princess Cruises,
Royal Caribbean Cruises, Seabourn Cruise Lines, and Windstar
Cruises. Steiner’s land-based operations include spas for Caesars
Entertainment, Hilton Hotels, InterContinental Hotels and Resorts,
Kerzner International, Loews Hotels, Marriott Hotels, Nikko Hotels,
Planet Hollywood, Sofitel Luxury Hotels, St. Regis Hotels, W Hotels and
Resorts, and Westin Hotels and Resorts.*
Steiner spas recruit from the Cortiva schools.
Real-World Experience
Students at all of the Steiner Education Group schools graduate as
experienced massage therapists. All of our schools have student
massage therapy centers that offer massages to the public at
discounted rates. In 2012, SEG students performed more than 220,000
massages in our student massage therapy centers!
Steiner Education Group’s National Career Services Department has
developed a worldwide network of thousands of employers, which
generates an average of more than 5,000 new job opportunities
nationwide for Steiner Education Group graduates each year.
Financial Aid
Cortiva schools offer federal financial aid (Pell Grants, Federal Direct
Loans, Federal Direct PLUS Loans, SEOG, and Federal Work Study) for
those who qualify, as well as personal installment plans. Private, nonfederal loans are available to those who meet lender qualifications.
We also offer an In-House Loan Program for students who qualify. In
all cases, loans must be paid back; scholarships and grants do not
necessarily have to be paid back.
Campus Facilities
All Cortiva facilities are between 4,350 and 28,000 square feet.
Professional products are used in all massage therapy clinical
training. All locations are equipped with industry standard
equipment, including professional massage therapy tables, bolsters,
massage chairs, wall charts, white boards, skeletons, and anatomy
models. Overhead projectors, LCD projectors, video, and audio
equipment are also available for use in the classrooms as needed.
Each school has a student breakroom, a library with Internet access,
a public clinic, and administrative offices.
Convenient Schedules
Cortiva offers both day and evening classes. Our schedules are
designed to fit the busy lives of our students.
*As of 12/18/2012
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About Massage Therapy
A Growing Profession
A World of Opportunity
Past Growth - According to the 2012 Massage Profession Research
Report from the American Massage Therapy Association, the
number of practicing massage therapists grew by approximately
67% over the previous decade.**
Massage therapists work in a broad range of positive and exciting
work environments:
Private Practice - Many massage therapists start their own private
practices and work on their own terms. 73% of all massage
therapists in 2011 reported that they were sole practitioners.**
Future Growth - The United States Department of Labor projects
that employment opportunities for massage therapists will grow
faster than average (by 20%) through 2020.*
Increasing Consumer Demand - Approximately 37.9 million
Americans received a total of about 170.5 million massages in 2011,
a 5% increase over the year before.**
Spas & Resorts - Massage therapists have the opportunity to work
at resort spas and destination spas in some of the most beautiful
places in the world. And day spas offer many employment
opportunities closer to home. The spa industry is flourishing,
generating revenues of 12.8 billion dollars in 2010.**
Increasing Consumer Awareness - 90% of Americans believe that
massage can be effective in reducing pain and 86% believe that
massage can be beneficial to health and wellness.**
Cruise Ships - Cruise ships operate world-class spas at sea and
employ many massage therapists - giving them the opportunity to
travel the world while they work.
Sports - Sports massage plays an important part in the life of any
athlete. Massage therapists have a variety of opportunities to work
with amateur and professional athletes - in health clubs, fitness
centers, sports clinics, and even directly for athletic teams.
Clinical Setting - Since many health problems can be treated with
massage therapy as an alternative to surgery or drugs, massage
therapists are becoming an increasingly important part of the
health care industry. Therapists can work in hospitals, rehab
facilities, doctor’s offices, and more. In 2011, 44% of massage
consumers received massages for medical reasons and 96% of
massage therapists reported receiving referrals from a hospital or
medical office.**
National Massage Clinic Chains - The number of massage clinics
operated by national massage clinic chains has been growing for
several years, increasing the demand for massage therapists all
across the country. Many of these chains offer membership and
subscription plans, building a large, steady, and loyal customer
base … and lots of employment opportunities for massage
therapists.
*Bureau of Labor Statistics, U.S. Department of Labor, Occupational Outlook
Handbook, 2012-2013 Edition
**2012 Massage Profession Research Report, American Massage Therapy Association
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Admissions Requirements
Prospective students should arrange to meet with an Admissions
Representative and complete an application in advance of the date
they have chosen to enter school to guarantee availability of space
in each class. Applications are accepted continuously throughout
the year. All applicants are encouraged to visit the campus for an
interview to learn about the different programs, to ask questions, and
to take a tour of the facility.
All applications for admissions are reviewed by the Campus
President/Director. Based upon entrance criteria, as well as any other
circumstances which may be applicable, approval for admission
is granted or denied at the discretion of the Campus President/
Director.
Cortiva does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color,
national or ethnic origin, age, sexual orientation, religion, marital
status, disability, political affiliation or belief, or any characteristic
protected by law. The operation of our student aid program is free
from discrimination as required by federal law.
Admissions Requirements
• Submit a completed application for admission. Applicants must
be 18 years of age by expected graduation date.
• Submit evidence of one of the following: a copy of a standard
high school diploma, GED equivalent, home-study certificate, or
transcript from a home study program that is equivalent to high
school level and is recognized by the student’s home state. Higher
education credentials earned, such as an AS, AA, BA, BS, MBA,
or PhD may be accepted. College transcripts that clearly identify
the high school attended and the graduation date may be
accepted as proof of high school graduation.
• A prospective student must display a genuine desire to become
a part of a learning atmosphere with the ability and aptitude to
succeed in the classroom.
• A student must be enrolled at least half-time as a regular student
in an eligible program.
• Non-United States high school documents must be translated into
English and equated to a US high school diploma by a certified
translator and submitted to the Admissions Department for
evaluation. Transcripts are subject to acceptance at the discretion
of the Campus President/Director.
Hoboken, Wall and King of Prussia Only:
• In order to become licensed to practice massage therapy in
the states of New Jersey and Pennsylvania, a person must be in
possession of a high school diploma or a GED.
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International Students
Disability Documentation Requirements
The Hoboken, Tucson and Seattle campuses are approved by the
Department of Homeland Security to enroll non-immigrant alien
students. A student who does not have a social security number may
not be able to obtain state licensure. The school will not endorse
optional practical training (OPT) requests. Please contact an
Admissions Representative for more information.
Students with disabilities who are requesting accommodations at
a Cortiva school must provide the appropriate documentation.
To ensure that the proper documentation is complete and the
necessary accommodations are implemented, please refer to the
following guidelines:
Requests for Reasonable Accommodation
Cortiva schools are adequately equipped to meet the needs of
handicapped students. Our facilities have designated parking
spaces and ramps. Restrooms are fitted with handicapped
equipment.
In accordance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of
1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act, Cortiva affirms its
commitment to insure equal educational opportunities to students
with disabilities. Cortiva will make its facilities and programs available
in a non-arbitrary, beneficial manner to the extent that practicality
and resources allow. Students with learning, physical and/or
psychological disabilities seeking accommodations must contact
and provide documentation to the ADA representative.
Elizabeth Hepler
Director of Accreditation and
Licensure/ADA Coordinator
170 Red Rock Road
York, Pennsylvania 17406
[email protected]
Voice: 717-268-1881
Fax: 717-268-1991
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Documentation Requirements for Students with Learning Disabilities
A psycho-educational evaluation by a licensed psychologist
or a Comprehensive Evaluation Report (CER) by a certified
school psychologist containing current information (usually not
more than three years old) must be provided. A comprehensive
assessment battery and the resulting diagnostic report should
include a diagnostic interview, assessment of aptitude, academic
achievement, information processing, and a diagnosis. This report
should also include specific recommendations for accommodations
as well as an explanation as to why each accommodation is being
recommended.
Documentation Requirements for Students with Attention Deficit
Disorders
An evaluation by a psychiatrist, neurologist, licensed psychologist,
or a Comprehensive Evaluation Report (CER) by a certified school
psychologist containing current information (usually not more than
three years old) must be provided. The documentation should state
the medical diagnosis and include recommendations for academic
accommodations as well as an explanation as to why each
accommodation is recommended.
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Documentation Requirements for Students with Psychological,
Neurological, Mobility or Sensory Impairments
An evaluation by a medical doctor, licensed psychologist, or a
Comprehensive Evaluation Report (CER) by a certified school
psychologist must be provided that clearly diagnoses and describes
the disability. The information should be current (usually not more
than three years old) and should include the recommended
accommodations appropriate for post-secondary students. Students
with mobility and sensory impairments may be required to provide
additional documentation, depending on the disability and
accommodations requested.
Accommodations for Hearing Impaired Students
Cortiva strives to provide equal access to all educational activities.
Services provided to deaf or hearing impaired students may include
ASL interpreters, text service providers, and other similar services
based on student needs. When an ASL interpreter is provided,
the school will utilize qualified individuals as service providers.
Qualification of service providers is determined by the school.
If a student is absent for two class periods and/or meetings without
notifying the Director of Education/Education Manager at least 48
hours in advance, the interpreting services will be suspended and
may be discontinued. The student must meet with the Campus
President/Director, Director of Education/Education Manager, and
ADA Coordinator to appeal suspension or discontinuation of services.
Students must give the Director of Education/Education Manager
advance written notice of teacher/administrative meetings, “brown
bag” events, and similar school-sponsored events. If students do not
give at least 48 hours advance notices, the school may be unable to
secure an interpreter. Interpreting services will only be provided for
school-sponsored activities.
Deadline for Submission of Documentation
It is the student’s responsibility to contact the Director of Education/
Education Manager and request accommodations. Documentation
must be provided in a timely manner to allow adequate time for
accommodations to be arranged.
Students who utilize sign language interpreters are responsible for
notifying the Director of Education/Education Manager as soon
as possible when they will be absent from a class or meeting. If a
student knows they will be absent from class, the student is required
to notify the school at least 48 hours before class begins. If the
student is sick or has an emergency, the student is required to call
the school as soon as possible.
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Auxiliary Aids/Academic Adjustments
Grievance Procedure/Conflict Resolution
A student that is in need of an academic adjustment that includes
an auxiliary aid, should work with the school to identify the most
appropriate and effective aid. An auxiliary aid might include
taped texts, interpreters or other effective methods of making orally
delivered materials available to students with hearing impairment,
readers for students with visual impairment, classroom equipment
adapted for use by students with manual impairments, and other
similar services. The request for the auxiliary aid should also be
accompanied by supporting diagnostic test results and the school
will work with each student to select the most appropriate aid
for their situation. Adjustments may also be made to academic
requirements as are necessary to ensure equal educational
opportunity, but the school will not lower or waive essential
requirements of the program.
If a student wishes to file a complaint regarding any disability
discrimination, the student should notify the ADA Coordinator within
ten days. A hearing will be scheduled within five business days of
the notification at which time the student has the right to present
further evidence and bring witnesses, if desired, to support their
position. If an amicable resolution is not able to be reached through
the grievance/conflict resolution process, then the student should
contact Melissa Wade, Steiner Education Group Vice President
of Compliance at 954-969-9771 ext. 306, via e-mail at [email protected]
SteinerEd.com or send a formal complaint to Steiner Education
Group - Cortiva at 2001 West Sample Road ext. 318, Pompano
Beach, FL 33064.
If the problem cannot be resolved by Steiner Education Group, then
a student has the right to contact the U.S. Office for Civil Rights,
U.S. Department of Education in the region where the school is
located. The United States Office for Civil Rights (OCR) is the agency
responsible for addressing complaints related to discrimination on
the basis of disability. More information regarding the U.S. Office
for Civil Rights and the procedure that should be followed in filing a
complaint can be found at www.ed.gov.
If any questions or concerns arise, the student should contact the
Campus President/Director or the Cortiva ADA Coordinator at 717268-1881 or via email at [email protected] immediately so a
mutually agreeable resolution can be quickly reached.
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Drop/Add Policy
Credit for Previous Education Policy
Students withdrawing before the first Sunday in the first quarter of
attendance will not incur any tuition charges. This student will be
considered a “cancel” not a “withdrawal”. However, the student
will be obligated for the cost of any books, manuals, supplies, and/
or equipment received but not returned within 20 days following the
first day of the cancelled term. No Title IV funds can or will be used to
cover the above charges.
Prospective students and former Cortiva students who are
re-enrolling may apply for transfer credit. Transfer credit applications
must be submitted during the admissions process and prior to the
start of classes. A minimum of 25% of a student’s coursework must
be completed at the Cortiva school awarding the credentials.
All previous credit must meet the following criteria in order to be
considered for transfer:
Cancellation and/or Postponement
of Start Date
Cortiva reserves the right to postpone or cancel the start date due
to insufficient enrollment. If this occurs, the student may request: (1) a
guaranteed reservation in the next scheduled class for that program,
or (2) cancellation of enrollment with a full refund of all monies paid.
In the event of a postponement of a start date, a new enrollment
agreement is required to be signed by the student and the school.
The agreement must set forth a deadline for the new start date,
beyond which the start date will not be postponed.
If the course is not commenced, or if the student fails to attend by
the new start date set forth in the Student Enrollment Agreement,
the student will be entitled to a full refund of prepaid tuition and
fees within 30 days of the deadline of the new start date set forth in
the agreement, determined in accordance with the school’s refund
policy and all applicable laws and rules that govern the institution.
• A grade of “C” or better must have been achieved for the
course(s).
• The courses completed must have been taken at an institution
accredited by an agency recognized by the U.S. Department of
Education.
• An official transcript and attended hours per course must be
provided with the application for transfer credit. For transfer credit
from a non-Cortiva institution, an institutional catalog with course
descriptions must also be submitted.
• Exception—First Aid/CPR: a student may be granted transfer
credit for First Aid/CPR if he/she is currently certified in both
through a nationally recognized agency, and the certifications
are valid through the student’s scheduled graduation date
from Cortiva. Proof of certification must be provided for
transfer credit to be considered.
• Course(s) must have been completed within two years prior to
enrollment.
• All Cortiva graduate requests for transfer credit from Cortiva
schools will be considered regardless of completion date,
although due to program revisions, not all credit may be
transferable. In some cases, graduates may be required to take
and pass the current Cortiva written and/or hands on course
exams in order to be granted transfer credit.
12
C
O
R
T
I
V
A
• Prospective students must take and pass the Cortiva written and/
or hand’s on course exams in order to be granted transfer credit
for non-Cortiva courses, with the exception of First Aid/CPR.
Hoboken only: This does not apply to students who enroll into the
Extended Massage Therapy program who have transfer credit
equivalent to the Professional Massage Therapy program.
• Courses that are deemed to be the academic equivalent to
a Cortiva course, but have less attended clock hours, will be
granted full academic credit and actual clock hour credit.
Additional attendance will be required to meet the total clock
hours of the program.
• Tucson, Seattle, and Federal Way only: No transfer credit is
accepted from non-Cortiva institutions for the courses offered
in the final term of the Extended Professional Massage Therapy
program.
The administrative processing fees for all non-Cortiva transfer credit
are:
• $25 per course
• $150 per program (if submitting a full, graduated program for
evaluation)
There is no fee for transfer credit received from Cortiva institutions.
Students receiving transfer credit will receive tuition credit, clock
hour credit, and a grade of “T” for all courses that correspond to the
transfer credit. Transfer credit may affect eligibility for Financial Aid.
Transfer credit is used for satisfactory progress determinations only.
Students are not allowed to attend courses for which they received
transfer credit, unless additional clock hour attendance in those
subjects is required.
If transfer credit is denied, the student will be required to attend the
courses in the Cortiva program.
Cortiva does not guarantee the transferability of its credit to any
other educational institution. Transferability is determined by the
receiving institution.
I
N
S
T
I
T
U
T
E
13
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 32 weeks* (7.5 months)
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Course
APP 111A
APP 111B
APP 121A
APP 121B
APP 131A
APP 131B
BUS 119A
BUS 119B
MAK 111A
MAK 111B
MAK 121A
MAK 121B
MAS 117A
MAS 117B
MAS 119A
MAS 119B
MAS 120A
MAS 120B
MAS 127A
MAS 127B
MAS 135A
MAS 135B
MAS 139A
MAS 139B
MCL 111A
MCL 111B
MCL 121A
MCL 121B
MCL 131A
MCL 131B
PEC 111A
PEC 111B
PEC 121A
PEC 121B
RCR 151A
RCR 151B
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
Population Spectrum A
Population Spectrum B
Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
Student Clinic I-A
Student Clinic I-B
Student Clinic II-A
Student Clinic II-B
Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
30
30
15
15
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 30 weeks, Evening - 50 weeks
14
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 87%. Tuition and
fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $12,036.27 plus $834.32 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of the
Professional Massage Therapy Program is $8,761 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 81% of Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates
finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Day: 42 weeks* (10 months)
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Course
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
MAS 135A Population Spectrum A
MAS 135B Population Spectrum B
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics and Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics and Communication II-B
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
30
30
15
15
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 40 weeks, Evening/Day - 50 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 76%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program at the Chicago Loop campus are $14,030.45 plus $840.18 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program at the Crystal Lake and Woodridge campuses are $14,017.68 plus $847.53 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not
offered). The median debt for graduates of the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $12,264 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 77% of
Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
15
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 32 weeks* (7.5 months)
Course
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 135A Population Spectrum A
MAS 135B Population Spectrum B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
30
30
15
15
20
20
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
20
20
15
15
20
20
20
20
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 30 weeks, Evening - 50 weeks
16
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC, is 73%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $11,941.75 plus $831.06 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of the
Professional Massage Therapy Program is $9,244 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 91% of Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates
finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Course
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A1 Business Practices for Massage Therapists A-1
BUS 119A2 Business Practices for Massage Therapists A-2
BUS 119B1 Business Practices for Massage Therapists B-1
BUS 119B2 Business Practices for Massage Therapists B-2
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
MAS 127A1 Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A-1
MAS 127A2 Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A-2
MAS 127B1 Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B-1
MAS 127B2 Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B-2
MAS 139A1 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A-1
MAS 139B1 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A-2
MAS 139A2 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B-1
MAS 139B2 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B-2
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 135A Population Spectrum A
MAS 135B Population Spectrum B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
MCL 121A1 Student Clinic I-A1
MCL 121A2 Student Clinic I-A2
MCL 121B1 Student Clinic I-B1
MCL 121B2 Student Clinic I-B2
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
20
20
20
20
5
5
15
15
20
20
20
20
20
10
20
10
10
10
20
20
15
15
20
20
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
20
20
15
15
10
10
10
10
20
20
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Evening/Day - 50 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC, is 73%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $11,941.75 plus $831.06 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of the
Professional Massage Therapy Program is $9,244 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 91% of Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates
finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
17
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 27 weeks* (6 months)
650 clock hours
Course
Clock Hours
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
20
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
20
APP 132A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems A
30
APP 132B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems B 30
BUS 119
40
Business Practices for Massage Therapists
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
20
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
20
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
20
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
20
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
20
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
20
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
30
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
30
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
20
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
20
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
30
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
30
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
MAS 139 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques
60
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
20
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
20
MCL 115
Student Clinic Prep
25
MCL 116A Student Clinic A
30
MCL 116B Student Clinic B
35
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication A
20
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication B
20
Total650
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 25 weeks
18
Program Description
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 81%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $10,826.37 plus $848.37 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $6,861 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 98% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Evening: 42 weeks* (10 months) 650 clock hours
Course
Clock Hours
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
20
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
20
APP 132A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems A
30
APP 132B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems B 30
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
20
BUS 119B
Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
20
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
20
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
20
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
20
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
20
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
20
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
20
Program Objectives
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
30
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
30
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
20
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
20
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
30
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
30
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
30
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
30
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
20
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
20
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
MCL 115A Student Clinic Prep A
12
MCL 115B Student Clinic Prep B
13
MCL 116A Student Clinic A
32
MCL 116B Student Clinic B
33
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication A
20
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication B
20
Total650
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Evening/Day - 40 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 81%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $10,826.37 plus $848.37 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $6,861 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 98% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
19
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 27 weeks* (6 months)
Evening: 42 weeks* (10 months)
650 clock hours
Course
Clock Hours
APP111
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology
40
APP132
Anatomy Physiology and Pathology of Body Systems
60
BUS119
Business Practices for Massage Therapists (I & II in evening program)
40
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
MAK111U Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Upper Body
40
MAK121L Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Lower Body
40
MAS117R Massage Foundations
40
MAS119
Integrative Therapeutic Massage
60
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
MAS120
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques and Assessment
40
Program Objectives
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
MAS127W Sports Massage (I & II in evening program)
60
MAS139L Clinical Integration: Assessments and Techniques of the Lower Body
30
MAS139U Clinical Integration: Assessments and Techniques of the Upper Body
30
MCL115
25
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
MCL116WAStudent Clinic I
26
MCL116WBStudent Clinic II 26
MCL116WCStudent Clinic III
26
MCL116WDStudent Clinic IV
27
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
PEC111
40
Student Clinic Prep
Professional Ethics and Communication
Total650
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 25 weeks, Evening - 40 weeks
20
Program Description
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 87%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $10,216.96 plus $844.01 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $6,861 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 87% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
Day: 39 weeks* (9 months)
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
750 clock hours
Clock Hr. BreakdownClock
Course
Lecture LabInternshipHours
APP111 Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology
40
0
040
APP121 Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems A
40
0
040
APP131 Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems B
40
0
040
BUS119 Business Practices for Massage Therapists
40
0
040
MAK111 Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I
20
20
040
MAK121 Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II
20
20
040
MAS117 Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes
10
30
040
Program Objectives
MAS119 Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage
20
40
060
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
MAS120 Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment
10
30
040
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
MAS127 Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques and Sports Massage 20
40
060
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
MAS135 Population Spectrum
10
20
030
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
MAS139 Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques
20
40
060
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
MCL111 Clinic Foundations and Hydrotherapy
20
20
040
MCL121 Student Clinic I
0
0
4040
MCL131 Student Clinic II
0
0
4040
PEC111 Professional Ethics and Communication I
40
0
040
PEC121 Professional Ethics and Communication II
30
0
030
RCR151 Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy
30
0
030
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Total
41026080750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 30 weeks, Evening/Day - 50 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCET, is 89%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $12,048.50 plus $822.78 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $9,500 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 94% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
21
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 32 weeks* (7.5 months)
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Course
APP 111A
APP 111B
APP 121A
APP 121B
APP 131A
APP 131B
BUS 119A
BUS 119B
MAK 111A
MAK 111B
MAK 121A
MAK 121B
MAS 117A
MAS 117B
MAS 119A
MAS 119B
MAS 120A
MAS 120B
MAS 127A
MAS 127B
MAS 135A
MAS 135B
MAS 139A
MAS 139B
MCL 111A
MCL 111B
MCL 121A
MCL 121B
MCL 131A
MCL 131B
PEC 111A
PEC 111B
PEC 121A
PEC 121B
RCR 151A
RCR 151B
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
Population Spectrum A
Population Spectrum B
Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
Student Clinic I-A
Student Clinic I-B
Student Clinic II-A
Student Clinic II-B
Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
30
30
15
15
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 30 weeks, Evening - 50 weeks
22
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC, is 74%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $12,050.16 plus $822.16 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $8,536 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 88% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
Cortiva’s Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
offers a variety of additional opportunities for students to
explore as they broaden their experience, strengthen their skills,
and increase their confidence in the practice of massage.
The Extended program provides students an advantage that
distinguishes and sets them apart as they enter their chosen
profession. Specialty clinics, case reviews and research
applications, allied modalities and advanced bodywork courses
complement each other to provide students’ creative avenues
to refine and enhance the client centered care skills developed
through their core education in the Professional Massage
Therapy Program.
Program Objectives
Graduates of the Cortiva Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Programs are prepared to:
1. Demonstrate the skills, knowledge and attitude for a successful
career in massage therapy.
2. Apply their theoretical knowledge and practical skill to design
and implement competent therapeutic and wellness massage
treatment plans for a wide variety of clients.
3. Exhibit personal and professional ethics and conduct essential
to the practice of massage and bodywork.
4. Practice as professional massage therapists in their own
business or as employees.
5. Assume the role of a health care professional in serving the
community and promoting the massage profession.
6. Work professionally as part of an interdisciplinary team of
health and well care providers.
At the completion of the program, the graduate will be
prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Day: 42 weeks* (10 months)
1000 clock hours
Students must graduate from the Professional Massage Therapy Program before
starting the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
Course
Clock Hours
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
MAS 135A Population Spectrum A
MAS 135B Population Spectrum B
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
BUS 204A Career Decisions A
BUS 204B Career Decisions B
MAS 208A Clinical Integration: Injury Management A
MAS 208B Clinical Integration: Injury Management B
MAS 213A Complementary Therapies A
MAS 213B Complementary Therapies B
MAS 240A Introduction to Structural Bodywork A
MAS 240B Introduction to Structural Bodywork B
RCR 241A Research Application A
RCR 241B Research Application B
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
30
30
15
15
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
15
15
20
20
30
30
40
40
20
20
15
15
Total1000
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 40 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011)
at http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC,
is 94%. Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program are $15,320.50 plus $913.81 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median
debt for graduates of the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program is $12,803 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 71% of Extended
Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
23
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 22 weeks* (5 months)
Evening: 42 weeks* (10 months)
600 clock hours
Course
Clock Hours
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
20
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
20
APP 132A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems A
30
APP 132B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems B
30
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
20
BUS 119B
Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
20
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
20
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
20
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
20
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
20
MAS 117A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
20
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
MAS 117B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
20
Program Objectives
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
30
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
30
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
20
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
20
MAS 128A Clinical Foundations: Sports Massage & Clinic A
30
MAS 128B Clinical Foundations: Sports Massage & Clinic B
30
MAS 140A Clinical Integration: Assessments, Techniques & Clinic A
30
MAS 140B Clinical Integration: Assessments, Techniques & Clinic B
30
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
20
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
20
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
20
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
20
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
20
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
20
Total600
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 20 weeks, Evening - 40 weeks
24
Program Description
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC, is 78%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $10,291.96 plus $844.01 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $6,333 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 91% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
Cortiva’s Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
offers a variety of additional opportunities for students to
explore as they broaden their experience, strengthen their skills,
and increase their confidence in the practice of massage.
The Extended program provides students an advantage that
distinguishes and sets them apart as they enter their chosen
profession. Specialty clinics, case reviews and research
applications, allied modalities and advanced bodywork courses
complement each other to provide students’ creative avenues
to refine and enhance the client centered care skills developed
through their core education in the Professional Massage
Therapy Program.
Program Objectives
Graduates of the Cortiva Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Programs are prepared to:
1. Demonstrate the skills, knowledge and attitude for a successful
career in massage therapy.
2. Apply their theoretical knowledge and practical skill to design
and implement competent therapeutic and wellness massage
treatment plans for a wide variety of clients.
3. Exhibit personal and professional ethics and conduct essential
to the practice of massage and bodywork.
4. Practice as professional massage therapists in their own
business or as employees.
5. Assume the role of a health care professional in serving the
community and promoting the massage profession.
6. Work professionally as part of an interdisciplinary team of
health and well care providers.
At the completion of the program, the graduate will be
prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Day: 42 weeks* (10 months)
1080 clock hours
*
Evening: 72 weeks (17 months)
Course
APP 111A
APP 111B
APP 132A
APP 132B
APP240A
APP240B
APP250A
APP250B
APP260A
APP260B
BUS 119A
BUS 119B
HYG251A
HYG251B
MAK 111A
MAK 111B
MAK 121A
MAK 121B
MAK231A
MAK231B
MAK241A
MAK241B
MAK251A
MAK251B
MAS 117A
MAS 117B
MAS 119A
MAS 119B
MAS 120A
MAS 120B
MAS 128A
MAS 128B
MAS 140A
MAS 140B
MAS241A
MAS241B
MAS261A
MAS261B
MAS271A
MAS271B
MCL 111A
MCL 111B
MCL 121A
MCL 121B
MCL132A
MCL132B
MCL251A
MCL251B
PAT211A
PAT211B
PEC 111A
PEC 111B
Clock Hours
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems A
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems B
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology III-A
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology III-B
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology IV-A
Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology IV-B
Neurology A
Neurology B
Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
Hygiene and Infection Control Procedures A
Hygiene and Infection Control Procedures B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
Myology and Kinesiology I-A
Myology and Kinesiology I-B
Myology and Kinesiology II-A
Myology and Kinesiology II-B
Orthopedic Assessment Technique A
Orthopedic Assessment Technique B
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
Clinical Foundations: Sports Massage & Clinic A
Clinical Foundations: Sports Massage & Clinic B
Clinical Integration: Assessments, Techniques & Clinic A
Clinical Integration: Assessments, Techniques & Clinic B
The Eastern Approach A
The Eastern Approach B
Stone Massage Therapy Applications A
Stone Massage Therapy Applications B
Thai Massage A
Thai Massage B
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
Student Clinic I-A
Student Clinic I-B
Student Clinic II-A
Student Clinic II-B
Advanced Clinic A
Advanced Clinic B
Pathology A
Pathology B
Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
20
20
30
30
10
10
10
10
25
25
20
20
25
25
20
20
20
20
25
25
10
10
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
30
30
30
30
25
25
8
8
7
7
20
20
20
20
25
25
25
25
25
25
20
20
Total1080
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 40 weeks, Evening/Day - 70 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011)
at http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to ACCSC,
is 67%. Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program are $17,876.96 plus $1,019.01 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median
debt for graduates of the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program is $7,667 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 98% of Extended
Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
25
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 32 weeks* (7.5 months)
Course
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
Term I
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 123A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 123B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
Term II
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
Term III
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MAS 137A Population Spectrum A
MAS 137B Population Spectrum B
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
20
20
20
20
30
30
15
15
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
15
15
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
15
15
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 30 weeks
26
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 77%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $12,616.45 plus $840.18 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $8,347 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 73% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Diploma Program:
Professional Massage Therapy Program
Program Description
The Cortiva community of schools is passionate about massage
therapy and committed to thoroughly preparing students for
an exciting career as a professional massage therapist. The
Professional Massage Therapy Program provides a well-rounded
educational experience, focusing on both the art and science
of massage.
Client-centered care is at the heart of the curriculum which
provides a foundation of basic and advanced approaches,
including Swedish, sports, neuromuscular, myofascial, chair
massage, trigger point work and hydrotherapy. In the clinical
integration courses, the therapeutic benefits of massage are
explored as students learn to apply their skills to both relax clients
and address common clinical conditions. The faculty-supervised
student Massage Therapy Center provides the opportunity to put
theory into practice as the students work on the public.
In addition to technique classes, applied science courses are
offered to teach students about the structure and function of
the body so they can make sound clinical decisions to ensure a
safe practice.
The professional development courses further prepare students
for career success in the diverse employment opportunities
waiting for them in the health and wellness industries.
Program Objectives
Instill in students a client-centered approach to bodywork that
provides them with the knowledge and skill set necessary to
work with their clients utilizing the following steps:
1. Active listening to the client to clearly understand his/her
needs and goals for massage therapy
2. Assessing where the client’s body alignment is out of balance
3. Performing the massage therapy techniques that meet the
client’s needs.
4. Educating the client about self-care techniques and future
massage therapy recommendations
In addition to learning a client-centered approach to bodywork
students are taught how to enjoy a long and successful career
as a massage therapist. This is accomplished by emphasizing
proper body mechanics and therapist self-care techniques, as
well as teaching sound ethics and business strategies. Students
are also encouraged to engage in lifelong learning through
continuing education to expand their theoretical, hands-on, and
business skills.
A special focus is placed on licensing and placement within
the industry. Students are prepared to sit for an NCBTMB state
licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam
(MBLEx). At the completion of the program, the graduate will
be prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Course
750 clock hours
Clock Hours
Term I
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
MAS 123A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 123B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
Term II
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
Term III
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
Term IV
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MAS 137A Population Spectrum A
MAS 137B Population Spectrum B
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
Term V
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
20
20
30
30
15
15
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
15
15
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
20
30
30
20
20
15
15
Total750
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Evening/Day - 50 weeks
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011) at http://
www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA, is 77%. Tuition
and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy Program are $12,616.45 plus $840.18 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median debt for graduates of
the Professional Massage Therapy Program is $8,347 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 73% of Professional Massage Therapy Program
graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
27
Diploma Program:
Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
Day: 42 weeks* (10 months)
1000 clock hours
Students must graduate from the Professional Massage Therapy Program before
starting the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
Course
Clock Hours
Term I
APP 111A Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology A
20
20
APP 111B Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology B
MAK 111A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-A
20
MAK 111B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology I-B
20
MAS 119A Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage A
30
MAS 119B Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage B
30
15
MAS 123A Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes A
MAS 123B Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes B
15
20
MCL 111A Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy A
MCL 111B Clinic Foundations & Hydrotherapy B
20
PEC 111A Professional Ethics & Communication I-A
20
20
PEC 111B Professional Ethics & Communication I-B
Term II
APP 121A Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-A
20
APP 121B Anatomy Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I-B
20
MAK 121A Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-A
20
MAK 121B Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology II-B
20
MAS 120A Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment A
20
MAS 120B Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment B
20
MAS 127A Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage A 30
MAS 127B Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques & Sports Massage B 30
20
MCL 121A Student Clinic I-A
MCL 121B Student Clinic I-B
20
PEC 121A Professional Ethics & Communication II-A
15
PEC 121B Professional Ethics & Communication II-B
15
Term III
APP 131A Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-A
20
APP 131B Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II-B
20
BUS 119A Business Practices for Massage Therapists A
20
20
BUS 119B Business Practices for Massage Therapists B
MAS 137A Population Spectrum A
20
MAS 137B Population Spectrum B
20
MAS 139A Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques A
30
MAS 139B Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques B
30
MCL 131A Student Clinic II-A
20
MCL 131B Student Clinic II-B
20
RCR 151A Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy A
15
15
RCR 151B Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy B
Term IV
BUS 204A Career Decisions A
20
20
BUS 204B Career Decisions B
MAS 208A Clinical Integration: Injury Management A
30
MAS 208B Clinical Integration: Injury Management B
30
MAS 213A Complementary Therapies A
40
40
MAS 213B Complementary Therapies B
MAS 240A Introduction to Structural Bodywork A
20
20
MAS 240B Introduction to Structural Bodywork B
RCR 241A Research Applications A
15
RCR 241B Research Applications B
15
Program Description
Cortiva’s Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program
offers a variety of additional opportunities for students to
explore as they broaden their experience, strengthen their skills,
and increase their confidence in the practice of massage.
The Extended program provides students an advantage that
distinguishes and sets them apart as they enter their chosen
profession. Specialty clinics, case reviews and research
applications, allied modalities and advanced bodywork courses
complement each other to provide students’ creative avenues
to refine and enhance the client centered care skills developed
through their core education in the Professional Massage
Therapy Program.
Program Objectives
Graduates of the Cortiva Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Programs are prepared to:
1. Demonstrate the skills, knowledge and attitude for a successful
career in massage therapy.
2. Apply their theoretical knowledge and practical skill to design
and implement competent therapeutic and wellness massage
treatment plans for a wide variety of clients.
3. Exhibit personal and professional ethics and conduct essential
to the practice of massage and bodywork.
4. Practice as professional massage therapists in their own
business or as employees.
5. Assume the role of a health care professional in serving the
community and promoting the massage profession.
6. Work professionally as part of an interdisciplinary team of
health and well care providers.
At the completion of the program, the graduate will be
prepared to work as an entry-level massage therapist in a
variety of environments such as clinics, spas, hospitals, or in their
own private practice.
Total1000
See page 29 for course descriptions.
*Program lengths include possible holidays and breaks. Actual weeks of instruction for this program are as
follows: Day - 40 weeks
28
Gainful Employment Disclosures: Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates can get jobs as massage therapists – see summary report for massage therapists (SOC 31-9011)
at http://www.onetonline.org/link/summary/31-9011.00. The job placement rate for Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates, as reported in 2012 annual report to COMTA,
is 78%. Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program are $16,427.90 plus $929.07 for books and supplies (on-campus room and board is not offered). The median
debt for graduates of the Extended Professional Massage Therapy Program is $13,145 for Federal Loans ($0 for Private Educational Loans and Institutional Financing Plans). 86% of Extended
Professional Massage Therapy Program graduates finished on time. All statistics current as of March 7, 2013. For more information, visit our website at www.cortiva.com/programs.
Course Descriptions
All programs and courses at Cortiva are taught and tested in English.
Course Numbering System:
APP: Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology
BUS: Business Practices
HYG: Hygiene & Infection Control Procedures
MAK: Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology or Myology and
Kinesiology
MAS: Massage Theory & Practice
MCL: Massage Clinic
PAT: Pathology
100 level courses are completed in the Professional Massage Therapy
programs.
Tucson, Seattle & Federal Way Only:
100 level courses are completed in the Professional Massage Therapy
programs.
200 level courses are completed in the Extended Professional
Massage Therapy program.
Hoboken Only:
100 level courses are completed in the Professional Massage Therapy
program.
PEC: Professional Ethics & Communication
100 & 200 level courses are completed in the Extended Professional
Massage Therapy program.
RCR: Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy
APP 111 (A&B) Introduction to Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology
This is the first of three courses that provide a strong foundation in the
structure, function and pathologies of the human body as they relate
to the practice of massage therapy. This knowledge will serve as a
foundation for the clinical thinking required of massage therapists
when making therapeutic decisions. In this course, students will
learn basic medical terminology, body organization, basic cytology
and histology, as well as the structure, function and pathologies of
the integumentary, skeletal and muscular systems as they relate to
massage therapy. Primarily a lecture and discussion course, students
are encouraged to develop self study and basic critical thinking skills
in an engaging educational environment.
29
APP 121 (A&B) Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I
APP 240 (A&B) Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology III
This course continues to present an integrated approach to the
teaching of anatomy, physiology and pathology. The systems
covered include the nervous, endocrine and cardiovascular systems.
Through increased understanding of both the normal and abnormal
structure and function of these systems, students further develop their
ability to relate anatomy, physiology and pathology to the practice
of massage therapy. Utilization of proper medical terminology and
critical thinking skills is actively reinforced in classroom experiences
and students are encouraged and supported in the development of
self study skills.
This course continues to present an integrated approach to the
teaching of anatomy, physiology and pathology and focuses on
the respiratory and digestive systems. Students further develop their
ability to relate anatomy, physiology and pathology to the practice
of massage therapy. Utilization of proper medical terminology and
critical thinking skills is actively reinforced in classroom experiences
and students are encouraged and supported in the development of
self study skills.
APP 131(A&B) Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II
This course continues to present an integrated approach to the
teaching of anatomy, physiology and pathology. The systems
covered include the lymphatic, respiratory, digestive, urinary and
reproductive systems. Discussion of common system pathologies
continues with specific emphasis on the inflammatory process
and the role that massage therapy can play in reducing edema.
Additionally, students study basic body metabolism and nutrition
while discussing the principles of healthy eating. Continued use and
development of self study skills and professional medical terminology
is encouraged.
APP 132 (A&B) Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology of Body Systems
This course continues to present an integrated approach to the
teaching of anatomy, physiology and pathology. The systems
covered include the nervous, endocrine, cardiovascular, lymphatic,
urinary, respiratory, digestive, and reproductive. Through increased
understanding of both the normal and abnormal structure and
function of these systems, students further develop their ability
to relate anatomy, physiology and pathology to the practice of
massage therapy. Utilization of proper medical terminology and
critical thinking skills is actively reinforced in classroom experiences
and students are encouraged and supported in the development of
self study skills.
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APP 250 (A&B) Anatomy, Physiology and Pathology IV
This course builds on the integrated approach to teaching physiology
of the human body. Discussions will include the chemical structures
and breakdown of carbohydrates, fats and proteins. An overview of
obesity and the prevention of disease and its relationship to nutrition
is introduced. Basic concepts of the physiology of exercise are
presented with discussions including heart rate, pulse, and cardiac
output. The course introduces relevant exercise physiology formulas.
Waste products that result from muscle work are also discussed.
APP 260 (A&B) Neurology
This course focuses on the spinal cord, spinal nerves and their
communication with the brain. Innervations of the muscles learned
in MAK111 and MAK121 will be introduced. Dermatomes and nerve
compression sites will also be discussed.
BUS 119 (A&B) Business Practices for Massage Therapists
In this course, students will begin to define their unique identities as
massage professionals. They will identify personal and professional
goals as well as clarify the vision and values for their massage
practice. Students will explore career options and concepts as
they enhance valuable client-centered customer service principles
and acquire an understanding of ethical business procedures and
employment structures. Students will also begin to create specific
plans to realize their goals within the massage therapy profession.
Students explore methods for achieving their personal and professional
goals as they outline either a business or employment plan. Students
will learn financial management strategies through discussions on
taxes, insurance, recordkeeping, marketing and client retention that
will help them achieve a successful career in massage therapy.
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BUS 204 (A&B) Career Decisions
This business course is designed to help students apply the skills and
knowledge learned in BUS 119 to develop business and employment
plans. Discussion and development of the skill sets and information
needed to establish a sustainable long-term career as a licensed
massage therapist will be emphasized. For business plans, students
address the features and benefits of becoming a preferred
provider for major medical insurance companies, developing
professional relationships for integrative care and referrals, trend
analysis, marketing and financial forecasting will all be discussed.
Employment plans focus on interviewing skills, working as a member
of a larger wellness team, customer service and soft sale of products.
HYG 251 (A&B) Hygiene & Infection Control Procedures
The course is designed to introduce students to the importance of
protecting themselves and their clients against infectious diseases,
care, client safety and education, decision making strategies, and
the importance of research in the field of massage. It also satisfies
the 4-hour HIV/AIDS awareness curriculum for licensure in various
states, and identifies the benefits of the chemical ingredients found
in massage therapy products. This course includes discussions
on abused and neglected patients. CPR and First Aid are also
requirements of this course.
In this course, students will continue to explore the structures,
terminology and concepts related to human movement. Students
will locate bones as well as identify and palpate specific bony
landmarks of the body. Joint structure and function will be reviewed
and both active and passive joint ranges of motion practiced.
Students will learn the major deep muscles of the body, including
their specific attachments and actions. Extensive hands-on work is
done in this course in order to give students practical experience
of the skeletal and muscular systems and how the systems work
together to create movement. This will provide a solid anatomical
foundation for the soft tissue techniques and assessments developed
in students’ massage theory and practice coursework.
In this course, students will explore the structures, terminology and
concepts related to human movement. Students will locate bones
as well as identify and palpate specific bony landmarks of the body.
Joint structure and function will also be discussed and both active
and passive joint ranges of motion practiced. Students will learn
the major superficial muscles of the body, including their specific
attachments and actions. Extensive hands-on work is done in this
course in order to give students practical experience of the skeletal
and muscular systems and how the two systems work together to
create movement. This will provide a solid anatomical foundation for
the soft tissue techniques and assessments developed in students’
massage theory and practice coursework.
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In this course, students will explore the structures, terminology and
concepts related to human movement of the upper body. Students
will locate bones as well as identify and palpate specific bony
landmarks of the upper body. Joint structure and function will also
be discussed and both active and passive joint ranges of motion
practiced. Students will learn the major muscles of the upper body,
including their specific attachments and actions. Extensive handson work is done in this course in order to give students practical
experience of the skeletal and muscular systems and how the two
systems work together to create movement. This will provide a solid
anatomical foundation for the soft tissue techniques and assessments
developed in students’ massage theory and practice coursework.
MAK 121 (A&B) Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology II
MAK 111 (A&B) Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology I
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MAK 111U Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Upper
Body
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MAK 121L Musculoskeletal Anatomy and Kinesiology of the Lower
Body
MAS 117 (A&B) Massage Foundations: Mechanics and Strokes
MAS 117R Massage Foundations
In this course, students will explore the structures, terminology and
concepts related to human movement of the lower body. Students
will locate bones as well as identify and palpate specific bony
landmarks of the lower body. Joint structure and function of the
lower body will be reviewed and both active and passive joint
ranges of motion practiced. Students will learn the major muscles of
the lower body, including their specific attachments and actions.
Extensive hands-on work is done in this course in order to give
students practical experience of the skeletal and muscular systems
and how the systems work together to create movement. This will
provide a solid anatomical foundation for the soft tissue techniques
and assessments developed in students’ massage theory and
practice coursework.
This course presents the foundations of massage history, theory and
practice. Students will acquire an in-depth understanding of the five
foundational massage strokes: this includes the purpose, effects,
indications and applications of each stroke. Students will also learn
proper body mechanics and self-care to support their longevity in
the field.
MAK 231 (A&B) Myology & Kinesiology I
This course will study how joint, muscle, tendon and ligament
pathology affects structure and function. Time is set aside to
demonstrate how to assess, document, and properly analyze the
detailed anatomy of each joint.
MAK 241 (A&B) Myology & Kinesiology II
This course continues to build on the knowledge of joint, muscle,
tendon and ligament pathology and the affects of structure and
function. Time is set aside to demonstrate how to adjust a treatment
in order to work effectively as a clinical massage therapist. The
theory and protocol of special tests is applied to specific regions of
the body.
MAK 251 (A&B) Orthopedic Massage Techniques
MAS 119 (A&B) Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic
Massage
In this course, students will learn to recognize and properly use the
equipment necessary to practice massage therapy. Students will
also learn to develop a smooth and flowing full-body therapeutic
massage by refining and building upon the strokes and mechanics
learned in MAS 117. This includes client positioning, proper movement
around the massage table, stroke combining, and a variety of stroke
applications, entries, exits and transitions. This course also includes
basic information needed to work safely and effectively with healthy
pregnant women.
MAS 120 (A&B) Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques and
Assessment
This course will introduce students to the integrated role of the fascial
and muscular systems in the creation and distortion of structural
balance in the human body. Students will learn to recognize and
evaluate common postural distortion patterns and their effect on
the structure of the entire body. Students will also learn a variety of
myofascial techniques for each of these postural distortion patterns
that will help bring the body back into structural balance.
This course introduces advanced massage therapy techniques that
are applied to the orthopedic conditions of the body. Time is set
aside to demonstrate how to adjust a treatment in order to work
effectively as a clinical massage therapist.
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MAS 123 (A&B) Massage Foundations: Mechanics and Strokes
MAS 135 (A&B) Population Spectrum
This course presents the foundations of massage theory and
practice. Students will be able to identify the equipment a massage
therapist needs in his/her practice and demonstrate how to utilize it
appropriately. Students will also acquire an in-depth understanding
of the five foundational massage strokes: what their effects are and
how to apply them to the body. Students will explore how to give
massage in a way that supports longevity in the field through use of
proper body mechanics, self-care, grounding and other tools. These
combined skills will support the student in providing a client centered
massage session.
In this course, the role of the massage practitioner when working with
a diverse client population will be examined. Students will identify
and discuss personal fears, biases and judgments that may impact
their ability to work with different clients. Clients who commonly
require special accommodations or sensitivity from the practitioner
in communication, positioning, equipment or technique will be
discussed. Students will identify the unique needs of these clients and
determine and practice appropriate adjustments. Students will also
learn to identify and address the unique positioning and massage
application requirements of women during a healthy pregnancy.
MAS 127 (A&B) Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques and
Sports Massage
MAS 127W Sports Massage
MAS 137 (A&B) Population Spectrum
In this course, the role of the massage practitioner when working
with a diverse client population will be examined. Students will
identify and discuss personal fears, biases and judgments that
may impact their ability to work with different clients. Clients who
commonly require special accommodations or sensitivity from the
practitioner in communication, positioning, equipment or technique
will be discussed. This will include but not be limited to clients such
as trauma survivors, elders and pregnant women, as well as obese,
physically disabled, chronically or terminally ill clients. Students
will identify the unique needs of these clients and determine and
practice appropriate adjustments.
This course will introduce students to the integrated role of the
nervous and muscular systems as these systems relate to the
practice of massage therapy. Students will learn to assess soft-tissue
tension, restricted range of motion, tender points and trigger points.
Students will learn a variety of neuromuscular techniques to address
these conditions. These techniques include cross fiber friction,
positional release, trigger point release, and PNF (proprioceptive
neuromuscular facilitation). Students will also be introduced to sports
massage techniques in this course to work effectively with athletes in
both pre and post event situations.
MAS 139 (A&B) Clinical Integration: Assessments and Techniques
MAS 128 (A&B) Sports Massage & Clinic
This course will introduce students to the integrated role of the
nervous and muscular systems as these systems relate to the practice
of massage therapy. Students will learn to assess soft-tissue tension
and restricted range of motion. Students will learn a variety of
techniques to address these conditions and apply them in a clinical
setting. These techniques include cross fiber friction, positional
release, and PNF (proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation).
Students will also be introduced to sports massage techniques in this
course to work effectively with athletes in both pre and post event
situations.
This course integrates the assessments and techniques learned in
other courses and develops the student’s ability to apply them to
specific clients and clinical situations. Students will combine intake
and client history information with postural, range of motion and
palpation assessments to develop an awareness of the clinical needs
of individual clients. Students will then use this integrated assessment
information to create customized client-centered massage therapy
sessions using foundation massage, neuromuscular and myofascial
techniques. Students will learn to identify when it is appropriate to
treat with massage therapy and when it is appropriate to refer to
another health care practitioner.
MAS 139L Clinical Integration: Assessments and Techniques of the
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Lower Body
MAS 208 (A&B) Clinical Integration: Injury Management
This course will introduce students to the integrated role of the fascial
and muscular systems in the creation and distortion of structural
balance in the human body. Students will learn to recognize and
evaluate common postural distortion patterns and their effect on
the structure of the lower body. Students will also learn a variety of
techniques for each of these postural distortion patterns that will help
bring the body back into structural balance.
In this advanced course, students will enhance their knowledge
of assessment and treatment of common orthopedic conditions.
Students will develop greater palpation skills by learning how
to treat a wide variety of ligament and tendon injuries in new
areas. The students will gain more detail and competence in the
conditions addressed in MAS 139 Clinical Integration: Assessment and
Techniques as well as additional conditions and treatments. Students
will continue to integrate previously learned techniques as well as
other techniques such as Muscle Energy Technique to generate
client centered treatment plans that address both the specific pain
or dysfunction and the whole client. The final emphasis will be on
creating appropriate rehabilitation plans, within massage therapy’s
scope of practice.
MAS 139U Clinical Integration: Assessments and Techniques of the
Upper Body
This course will introduce students to the integrated role of the fascial
and muscular systems in the creation and distortion of structural
balance in the human body. Students will learn to recognize and
evaluate common postural distortion patterns and their effect on
the structure of the upper body. Students will also learn a variety of
techniques for each of these postural distortion patterns that will help
bring the body back into structural balance.
MAS 140 (A&B) Clinical Integration: Assessments, Techniques and
Clinic
This course integrates the assessments and techniques learned in
other courses and develops the student’s ability to apply them to
specific clients and clinical situations. Students will combine intake
and client history information with postural, range of motion and
palpation assessments to develop an awareness of the clinical needs
of individual clients. Students will then use this integrated assessment
information to create customized client-centered massage
therapy sessions using foundation massage, sports and myofascial
techniques. Students will learn to identify when it is appropriate to
treat with massage therapy and when it is appropriate to refer to
another health care practitioner. Students will apply techniques
learned in this course in the student clinic.
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MAS 213 (A&B) Complementary Therapies
In this course, students will explore new techniques, approaches
and philosophies that are part of the rich and varied profession of
massage. This may include Asian modalities, alternate methods of
injury/illness treatment, energy modalities, spa therapies or additional
experience with specific populations or techniques. Students will
have the opportunity to expand their repertoire of skills as they
experience introductions to specialty areas they may wish to pursue
through continued training after graduation.
MAS 240 (A&B) Introduction to Structural Bodywork
This advanced bodywork course is designed to develop student
knowledge as well as enhance and refine their bodywork skills.
Topics may include a variety of deep tissue work, a broad range of
hydrotherapy treatments used in various spa and clinical settings,
or advanced assessments and treatment of soft tissue injuries or
structural abnormalities.
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MAS 241 (A&B) The Eastern Approach
MCL 111 (A&B) Clinic Foundations and Hydrotherapy
This course nurtures a shift in the student’s world-view towards a
holistic, contextualized Eastern perspective. It lays the philosophical
and experiential groundwork for the practice of Shiatsu.
Fundamental principles such as Five Element Theory and Qi are
introduced through lecture, discussion, and hands-on experience.
In this course, students will learn the skills needed to practice
massage therapy in a professional clinical setting. This includes
preparing to participate in student clinic. Students will explore the
therapeutic environment and learn how to put this into practice
with their clients. Client intakes, interviews, health histories and
SOAP charting will be discussed and practiced as tools to support
providing client centered massage. Safe practice considerations
will also be discussed to teach the student how to identify and
accommodate common conditions seen in a professional massage
clinic. Students will also explore the foundations and therapeutic
applications of hydrotherapy as those applications relate to the
practice of massage therapy.
MAS 261 (A&B) Stone Massage Therapy Applications
This course was developed to support the Eastern approach to body
work. The information provided expands on the knowledge gained
in MAS 241 The Eastern Approach. This course is also designed to
help graduates be more prepared to enter the job market making
them more valuable to employers. The student will be demonstrating
an increased knowledge of physiological effects of heat and
cold applications to the major meridians of the human body with
an emphasis on strong customer service and communication
skills modeled on real life situational settings. Students will learn
techniques using stones.
MCL 115 (A&B) Student Clinic Prep
This course will give students a hands-on experience of how the
Student Clinic operates. Students will learn about clinic policies and
procedures and become familiar with the layout of the massage
rooms and offices. Students in this course will also interview active
student massage therapists who are currently working in the Student
Clinic. They will accompany them in some of their massage sessions
and become familiar with how a massage session is conducted. This
course prepares students to be able to confidently participate in the
Student Clinic as active student massage therapists in course MCL
116.
MAS 271 (A&B) Thai Massage
This course serves as an introduction to Traditional Medical Massage
of Thailand, known as “Nuad Bo-Rarn.” This technique uses gentle
back and forth rocking and stretching throughout the session.
Students will learn the basics of Thai bodywork; protocols for prone,
supine, and side-lying clients; and explore the spiritual background
for this therapy. Students will also learn body mechanics for Thai
Massage that can also be used in their other modalities.
MCL 116 (A&B) Student Clinic
MCL 116W (A-D) Student Clinic I - IV
In this course, students will apply their developing skills with
members of the general public. Students will combine professional
communication skills with intake and client interview assessment skills
to develop an introductory awareness of their client’s needs. The
student will then apply the skills learned in their foundation massage
therapy courses to provide a smooth and flowing client-centered
therapeutic massage with proper client positioning and draping.
Following the massage, students will use their charting skills to create
professional SOAP notes in their client’s chart.
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MCL 121 (A&B) Student Clinic I
MCL 251 (A&B) Advanced Clinic
In this course, students will begin to apply their developing skills with
members of the general public. Students will combine professional
communication skills with intake and client interview assessment skills
to develop an introductory awareness of their client’s needs. The
student will then apply the skills learned in their foundation massage
therapy courses to provide a smooth and flowing client-centered
therapeutic massage with proper client positioning and draping.
Following the massage, students will use their charting skills to create
professional SOAP notes in their client’s chart.
Students continue to apply their developing skills with student clinic
clients. Students demonstrate the ability to combine professional
communication, intake, and client interview skills with their increasing
palpation and observational assessment skills arriving at a more
developed awareness of a client’s needs. The student applies the
skills learned in foundation massage therapy courses to provide
a smooth and flowing client-centered therapeutic massage with
proper client positioning and draping. Students begin to include
more specific regional massage techniques as their confidence
grows. Following the massage, students continue to use their charting
skills to create professional SOAP notes on their client’s chart. The
student demonstrates an increased knowledge of physiology with
an emphasis on strong customer service and communication skills
modeled on real life situational settings.
Crystal Lake Location only: students may be required to complete this course
at the Massage Therapy Center in Chicago located at 18 N. Wabash.
MCL 131 (A&B) Student Clinic II
In this course, students will continue to apply their developing
skills with members of the general public. Students will continue to
combine professional communication, intake and client interview
skills with their increasing palpation and observational assessment
skills to arrive at a more developed awareness of their client’s needs.
The student will then apply the skills learned in their foundation
massage therapy courses to provide a smooth and flowing clientcentered therapeutic massage with proper client positioning and
draping. Students will begin to include more specific regional
massage techniques as their abilities grow and client needs require.
Following the massage, students will continue to use their charting
skills to create professional SOAP notes in their client’s chart.
MCL 132 (A&B) Student Clinic II
In this course, students will begin to apply their developing skills with
members of the general public. Students will combine professional
communication skills with intake and client interview assessment skills
to develop an introductory awareness of their client’s needs. The
student will then apply the skills learned in their foundation massage
therapy courses to provide a smooth and flowing client-centered
therapeutic massage with proper client positioning and draping.
Following the massage, students will use their charting skills to create
professional SOAP notes in their client’s chart.
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PAT 211 (A&B) Pathology
This course is designed to cover osteo and neuromuscular
pathologies that are relevant to massage therapists. The orthopedic
pathologies listed support the content delivered in MAK131, MAK141,
MAK151 and APP260. There will be discussions on relevant systemic
and general pathologies in addition to a review of the scope of
practice for massage therapists.
PEC 111 (A&B) Professional Ethics & Communication I
This course prepares students to develop and maintain therapeutic
relationships with their clients. Students learn the foundations of
ethical practice and professionalism, including the significance
of personal and professional boundaries. Students develop selfawareness, empathy, compassion, and interpersonal communication
skills and learn how to use these in handling various situations in
massage practice. Students learn skills to build rapport with clients,
manage conflict, and develop clear awareness and boundaries
related to the difference between professional touch and sensual
or sexual touch. Students are also introduced to concepts and
applications of various learning styles to support their academic
success in school.
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PEC 121 (A&B) Professional Ethics & Communication II
Cortiva Institute – Tampa/St. Pete Only:
In this course, students continue to explore the therapeutic
relationship and boundaries introduced in PEC 111. This course gives
special attention to the unique dynamics and ethical dilemmas that
can arise in clinical practice. Students develop critical thinking skills
and use roll-play activities to improve their ability to manage client
relationships in a professional manner and respond effectively to
challenging client situations. Students will also explore professional
boundaries and communication skills as they relate to interacting
with other healthcare professionals.
Florida Licensure Requirements are found in the following courses:
150 hours of Anatomy & Physiology: APP111, APP121, APP131,
MAK111, MAK121
100 hours of Basic Massage Theory and History: MAS117, MAS119
125 hours of Clinical Practicum: MCL111, MCL121, MCL131, MAS135,
MAS139
10 hours of FL Laws & Rules (Chapter 456 and 480, F.S. and Chapter
64B7, F.A.C): PEC121
RCR 151 (A&B) Clinical Reasoning & Research Literacy
15 hours of Theory & Practice of Hydrotherapy: MC121
In this course, students are introduced to the clinical reasoning
process necessary to create client-centered massage therapy
treatment plans. These treatment plans include massage therapy
assessments and findings related to the location and nature of
the client’s soft tissue dysfunction, appropriate massage therapy
techniques, and the length of massage therapy sessions. Treatment
plans also address the duration and frequency of massage
treatment over time and how this is affected by client interest,
degree of soft tissue dysfunction, and the differing needs of acute
and chronic injuries. In addition to treatment planning, students will
learn basic pharmacology concepts as they relate to the practice
of massage therapy and develop skills in obtaining and reviewing
research articles. Students will then discuss the impact that scientific
research has on the massage profession.
76 hours of Allied Modalities: MAS120, MAS127, MAS139
3 hours of HIV/AIDS Education: APP131
2 hours of Prevention of Medical Errors: RCR151
15 hours of Business: BUS119
RCR 241(A&B) Research Applications
In this course, students will apply their combined treatment, record
keeping and scientific literacy skills to develop, conduct, and write
an independent research study in the form of a case report. The case
report will meet or exceed expectations outlined in the Massage
Therapy Foundations Student Case Report Contest guidelines.
At the conclusion of the course students will choose up to three
student reports to be considered by a Faculty Review Committee for
submission to the foundation contest.
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Student Handbook
Introduction
Education Policies
Cortiva has compiled the following information, policies, and
procedures in order to provide you with answers to questions
you may have during the course of your study. Each student is
responsible for knowing and adhering to all policies and procedures.
New Student Orientation
Each new student is required to attend the New Student Orientation,
which is held prior to the first day of classes. At Orientation, students
have the opportunity to meet faculty, staff, and/or classmates.
Policies and procedures are reviewed and students will be required
to complete any outstanding paperwork, including financial aid
documents. During the orientation, students who are participating
in federal financial aid programs will undergo the required Federal
Financial Aid Entrance Loan Counseling, if not otherwise completed.
Professional Decorum
The following policies support Cortiva’s commitment to train
students to be successful and professional. Students are expected
to contribute to a classroom and campus environment that is
compassionate and healing. It is important for students to conduct
themselves in a professional manner and promote a positive image
of their profession at all times.
Professional Conduct
Students are expected to present themselves professionally at all
times.
• Swearing, sexual innuendoes and other unprofessional behaviors
are not permitted in the schools.
• Students can expect to be treated in a professional manner by
fellow students, faculty and staff. Students are also expected to
treat fellow students, faculty and staff in the same professional
manner.
• Running and horseplay are not permitted in the buildings.
• Only hands-on techniques presented in the curriculum at Cortiva
may be practiced in class or clinic.
• Student-clients must exercise care and consideration while
preparing to receive bodywork or treatments so as not to expose
themselves to others.
• Nudity or exposing genitals or women’s breasts at any time during
a session is strictly prohibited.
• Student therapists must be fully dressed in their school uniform
while practicing techniques.
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Classroom Community
Communicable Diseases
Cortiva provides students with a safe and nurturing educational
environment in which the knowledge and skills that students learn
and the personal growth they experience have the potential to
change lives. Each class at Cortiva is a community of learners
that will become a community of professionals. Students should
expect educational support and professional demeanor from their
classmates and faculty and should be prepared to offer the same.
Students who have or are suspected of having a disease that is
communicable by direct or indirect contact or by close proximity, will
not be permitted to attend school until they can provide a doctor’s
note clearing them of the disease and allowing them to return to
school.
Compensation
• Disruptive behaviors that interfere with learning, such as cell
phone activity, sleeping, disruptive talking, and refusal to
participate will not be tolerated.
School policy prohibits all students from accepting compensation for
services performed at the school, and prohibits unlicensed students
from accepting compensation for any bodywork.
• Arguing, threats of violence to others or self, and acts of violence
will not be tolerated.
Misrepresentation
• Weapons of any kind are not allowed on school property.
Academic Freedom
Cortiva values the right to free speech as demonstrated in the
instruction provided by its faculty members. Cortiva assures
academic freedom in the classroom, within the stated mission of the
School and in compliance with the established academic policies
and procedures. In the classroom, faculty members may express
their professional points of view and conclusions supported by
relevant evidence. Faculty members have the professional obligation
to present the learning objectives in a manner that supports diverse
learning styles in the classroom.
Class Participation
Professional skills are acquired through repetition and demonstrated
in their practical application. Students must participate in class.
Students unwilling or unable to participate will not receive credit for
that session.
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It is illegal for unlicensed students to represent themselves as a
licensed practitioner. Students are required to accurately represent
their skill level, education, training, and experience to the client by
using a title such as “Student Practitioner”.
Treatment of Disease
Students are not to diagnose or treat disease.
Guests or Children in Classrooms
Guests are not permitted in the classroom without prior permission
from the Director of Education/Education Manager or Campus
President/Director. Guests are only allowed to attend lecture classes
or hands-on classes in which students remain fully clothed. Children
are not permitted in the classroom or to be left unattended in the
school at any time.
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Non-Fraternization Policy
School Phones, Computers and Other Electronic Equipment
Due to the possibility of favoritism and the unequal status that
exists between faculty and students, personal friendships, dating
and/ or sexual relationships between faculty and active students
are strictly prohibited. In addition, relationships between students
and administrative staff are also strictly prohibited. Faculty and
staff members are prohibited from working on students outside of
regularly scheduled class.
Student use of school phones, computers and other electronic
equipment is restricted to only those specifically identified and
marked for student use.
Electronic Devices
Anti-Hazing Policy
Use of cellular phones, cameras, and video recorders in the
classroom is prohibited. Laptops and tablets may be used during
lecture only.
Cortiva prohibits any and all forms of mental and physical hazing of
potential and current students.
All Cortiva campuses are smoke-free. Smoking is permitted only in
the designated areas provided at each campus.
Professional Dress Standard
Personal Property
Students should keep their valuables with them at all times. Check
classrooms before leaving to make sure that no jewelry or watches
have been left behind. Cortiva is not responsible for any lost or stolen
property.
Students are required to adhere to the following professional dress
and grooming standards when attending classes, clinic, and all
school sponsored events.
Eating and Drinking Guidelines
Standard issue Cortiva school shirt:
In order to provide a clean, comfortable, and sanitary learning
environment, food and drink are limited to the student breakroom
at each campus. Chewing gum is not permitted in the classroom
under any circumstances. Water is allowed in the classroom in clear,
closable containers only.
In order to assist instructors in communicating with students, it is
required that students wear a nametag while in class.
Office Areas
Student records and files are confidential; therefore students are not
allowed in areas where student records are stored without a staff
member present. Students must receive permission from staff before
walking into office areas.
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Dress Standards
• Shirts must be clean and in good repair, and may not be altered.
Solid black professional style pants or shorts:
• Pants or shorts must allow for non-restrictive movement.
• Shorts must be at least mid-thigh in length while sitting.
• No denim, scrubs, or sweats may be worn.
Nametags
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Smoke-Free Environment
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Solid black closed-toed, closed heel professional shoes:
• Shoes and socks and/or nylons must be worn at all times.
• Shoes should offer support to the feet and be appropriate for the
technique being practiced.
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Code of Ethics
Other Attire:
• Hats are not permitted – head covers are permitted if they are
required for religious reasons.
In an effort to establish ethical standards for students, the following
Code of Ethics has been adopted:
• Sweatbands are acceptable while practicing bodywork in the
classroom or in the clinic only.
Competency
• During cold weather, logo-free long-sleeve shirts and sweaters are
acceptable in addition to the Cortiva shirt.
Grooming Standards
It is expected that students will be clean and practice good hygiene.
• Clothing must be clean, in good condition, and odor free.
Professional Representation
• Hair must be clean and styled so that it does not come in contact
with the client while working.
Students are responsible for the possible impact of their public
behavior upon the credibility and image of their colleagues and
their profession. Public statements, advertisements, and media
exposure must be accurate, professional, and ethical.
• Facial hair must be neatly trimmed.
Informed Consent
• Fingernails must be clean and trimmed to working length.
Students must present all of the information that is reasonably
necessary for a client to make an intelligent decision concerning a
proposed treatment.
• Skin must be clean and free of offensive odors.
• Fingernail polish is not allowed.
• Hands must be washed prior to every session.
• Perfumes, colognes, heavily scented lotions, and body sprays
should be avoided.
Confidentiality
All information that is obtained from a client is confidential, including
names, addresses, and phone numbers. Client information may only
be given out with the consent of the client.
• Breath should be odor free.
• Students who smoke prior to a session must take extra precautions
to remove the odor prior to giving or receiving bodywork or
treatments.
Dual Relationships
It is recommended that students do not enter into dual relationships
with clients. If a dual relationship exists between a student and a
client, the relationship should be acknowledged and boundaries
clearly defined by both parties, separating the personal from the
professional relationship.
• Jewelry must be removed for all hands-on classes. Students
may be asked to remove body or facial piercings during certain
treatments.
NOTE: Failure to comply with the above policies may result in the student being
denied admission to class or clinic, thereby losing attendance and academic
credit.
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Students must accurately represent their competence, education,
training and experience to clients. Students must honestly evaluate
the factors that bring a client to them and then decide whether it is
in the client’s best interest to treat or refer.
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Professional Responsibilities
Students are responsible for knowing municipal and state laws
regarding the practice of their vocation. Students should keep up-todate on the latest research and information about the techniques
used in their practice, as well as establish a referral network of
competent healthcare practitioners.
Standards of Practice
The following guidelines are in place in order to maintain a safe
learning environment:
Draping
Draping is required during all therapy sessions. Draping is
communication to the client that his/her modesty and privacy are
respected. It is a process that creates a non-threatening environment
and space of trust for the client. It should be done with intention,
care, and awareness allowing the client to feel safe, secure and well
cared for.
Boundaries
Cortiva is committed to creating a space of healing, trust and
support. Therefore, it is required that client boundaries be respected
at all times. It is the responsibility of the practitioner to be aware
of and not offend another person’s boundaries. It is also the
responsibility of the client to communicate their personal boundaries
to the practitioner.
Ethical Standards and Responsibility
Touching of genitals or women’s breasts is strictly prohibited.
Genitals or women’s breasts should not be exposed at any time.
Sexual touching and/or sexual innuendos in school, clinic or during
hands-on class is forbidden. Students must monitor their speaking,
physical presentation, actions, and attitudes in order to eliminate any
association between sex and therapeutic touch in the perception of
the public.
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Practitioners must acknowledge the vulnerability of clients while
receiving a service and the high degree of trust clients place in their
hands. A student is responsible for what occurs during a session and
must be very clear that the only intention and purpose of the session
is professional, healing, and caring.
The Crime of Battery
The crime of battery is “un-consented touching of another”. When
a person consents to intentional touch, it is implied that he/she is
consenting only to what is required by the service. If a practitioner
touches a client in any other manner, it is battery and therefore
unlawful.
Student Liability
Students practice skills and techniques on one another during handson classes and are responsible for the comfort and safety of their
partner during exchanges.
• Student-clients have a responsibility to communicate their
experiences throughout the session.
• Student-therapists have a responsibility to listen and respond to
the client’s needs/requests.
• It is important for students to provide honest yet compassionate
feedback to each other regarding depth and comfort of touch,
as students are liable for injuries they may inflict.
Cortiva has an excellent safety record, and students have no reason
to be concerned that they will be hurt during their training. However,
in the unlikely event a student is hurt while receiving hands-on work:
• The student-client should immediately inform his/her student
therapist (the student giving the hands-on work) of the injury.
• The student must also inform the Instructor, who will file an
incident report and notify the Director of Education/Education
Manager or Campus President/Director.
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Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy
SAP Appeal/Financial Aid Probation
Federal Regulations (34 CFR 668.34) require Steiner Education Group
(SEG) to establish a Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) policy for
determining that eligible students are making satisfactory academic
progress in their chosen program and are maintaining their eligibility
to receive Title IV funds.
Students can appeal their suspension by completing a Financial
Aid Appeal Form and submitting it, with documentation, to their
campus Financial Aid Department. The student must also meet
with an Education Department staff member (who must sign off
on the appeal form) to devise a program plan that will ensure their
successful completion of their program. If the appeal is granted, the
student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation and the student
will be permitted to maintain financial aid eligibility and will be
assessed at the next evaluation period.
Cortiva will apply the SAP policy to all its students equally, regardless
of program or enrollment status (e.g. degree or certificate, full-time
or part-time). To maintain Title IV eligibility and be in good standing,
a student must, at the end of each evaluation period, which is
at the end of each term or payment period, meet the following
requirements:
If a student does not successfully appeal his/her financial aid
suspension he/she will:
• Maintain at least a “C” average or 2.0 GPA;
• Lose his/her financial aid eligibility;
• Successfully complete at least 67% of attempted credit hours or
clock hours; and
• Be placed on a cash payment plan for the remainder of his/her
educational costs; and
• Be on track to complete their program within 150% of the
standard timeframe required to complete their degree or
certificate.
• May be dropped from the program.
If the student is dropped from the program the school’s refund
calculations will apply.
A student will be placed on Financial Aid Warning if at the first
evaluation point he/she:
Academic Monitoring Policy
• Has an overall GPA that is less than 2.0; and/or
Cortiva is committed to supporting students in completion of their
program. In order to graduate, students must have a passing grade
in every course in the program, complete all required clinic hours,
and meet the minimum course and cumulative program attendance
requirements for the program in which they are enrolled. Therefore,
students are expected to maintain a cumulative grade point
average (GPA) of 2.0 or better while matriculating.
• Has not successfully completed (passed) 67% of all attempted
credit or clock hours.
A student on Financial Aid Warning will be one term, semester,
quarter, or payment period away from losing his/her financial aid
eligibility.
A student will have his/her financial aid eligibility suspended,
pending an appeal, if at the second evaluation period he/she;
• Is still not meeting the SAP standard of a 2.0 GPA; and/or
• Has not completed 67% of attempted credit or clock hours.
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Maximum Time Frame
Reporting Academic Standing to Students
(excluding Scottsdale & Wall)
Students’ GPA is monitored during the second and seventh weeks
of each 10-week term. Students receive a copy of their Academic
Monitoring Report during each of these weeks so that they are
aware of their academic standing while in school. New students
receive this report for the first time during the seventh week of their
first 10-week term. Education staff will have regular follow up with
these students to review progress toward program completion. Once
a student has achieved a 2.0 GPA or above, he/she will be removed
from academic monitoring status at the next assessment point.
Wall Only
Students’ GPA is monitored during the second week of each
5-week term. Students receive a copy of their Academic Monitoring
Report during each of these weeks so that they are aware of their
academic standing while in school. New students receive this report
for the first time during the second week of their second 5-week
term. Education staff will have regular follow up with these students
to review progress toward program completion. Once a student
has achieved a 2.0 GPA or above, he/she will be removed from
academic monitoring status at the next assessment point.
Scottsdale Only
Students’ GPAs are monitored at the end of each term, during the
second week of the following term. Students whose GPA is below a
2.0 at the end of a term are notified of their GPA standing.
Students who have a GPA below 2.0 should meet with Student
Services to review what coursework needs to be made-up, and then
complete incomplete work or courses, attend make-up classes,
repeat failed courses, and complete currently scheduled courses.
Education staff will have regular follow up with these students to
review progress toward program completion.
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Cortiva students are expected to complete the program by their
scheduled graduation date. However, occasionally extenuating
circumstances may arise that prevent a student from graduating
on time. In those situations, Cortiva has established the following
timelines for students who need additional time to complete the
program:
• Students enrolled in full-time programs should complete the
program no later than 10-weeks after their scheduled graduation.
• Students enrolled in part-time programs should complete the
program no later than 20-weeks after their scheduled graduation.
Scottsdale Only
• Students enrolled in full-time programs should complete the
program no later than 11 weeks after their scheduled graduation.
• Students enrolled in part-time programs should complete the
program no later than 24 weeks after their scheduled graduation.
In rare circumstances, a student may need additional time beyond
the timeframes established above to complete the program. In
those cases, a student can request in writing an extension of time to
complete his/her program. This request should be submitted to the
Director of Education/Education Manager, and should include the
following:
• What the circumstances are preventing completion of the
program within the established time allotment
• What the expected graduation date is if the extension is granted
• A complete make up schedule (including specific dates and
any required clinic hours) for the remainder of the program
requirements
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The Director of Education/Education Manager will give written
approval or denial of the extension request to the student within
5 business days. When a time extension to complete the program
is granted, the maximum timeframe allowed for the student to
complete the program is 150% of the total program length listed in
the catalog. This time length cannot be exceeded. If a student does
not complete the program within the maximum timeframe, he/she
will be withdrawn from the program with no option for appeal.
Grading
NOTE: Scheduled graduation date is subject to change due to leave of absences, class
availability, and class schedule changes.
Course grading is based on the following scale:
Grade
G.P.A. Class Grading
Equivalent
Percentage
Prerequisites for Program Enrollment
Students are required to enroll in and graduate from a prerequisite
program(s) before starting one of the programs listed below. Transfer
credit will be granted for the completed prerequisites. Students may
enroll into these programs prior to graduating with the prerequisites,
but will be considered a cancel if they have not graduated from
the prerequisite program before the start date listed on the longer
program’s enrollment agreement.
Program:Prerequisite:
Professional Massage Therapy program
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3.0 80% to 89%
C
2.0 70% to 79%
F
0.069% and below
P
PassNot calculated
W
WithdrawalNot calculated
T
Transfer CreditNot calculated
I
IncompleteNot calculated
R
RepeatedNot calculated
Course Requirements
Cortiva Tucson, Seattle & Federal Way locations only
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Students must meet course requirements as outlined on individual
course syllabi in order to receive a passing grade.
Programs with Prerequisites
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4.0 90% to 100%
Transfer grades are not used in the computation of grade point
average but are used in the determination of satisfactory progress
and fulfillment of graduation requirements. Cortiva does not
guarantee the transferability of its credit to any other educational
institution. Transferability is determined by the receiving institution.
Prospective students who have transfer credit that is equivalent in
content and length to a prerequisite program will be considered
to have met the prerequisite requirement, pursuant to the Cortiva
Transfer Credit policy.
Extended Massage Therapy
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Requirements for each course are included in the course syllabus,
which is distributed by the course instructor at the beginning of each
course.
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Practical Examinations
D. Appearance is neat and clean
• Complies with Cortiva dress code.
Practical examinations are to be taken as scheduled for the course.
Students should refer to the course syllabus for instructions on makeup examinations.
Grades - Professionalism and Participation
• Wears closed toed shoes for lab classes and Clinic.
• Practices good personal hygiene.
• Keeps fingernails clean and short.
• Avoids use of perfumes or scented personal care products.
2. Active participation in all aspects of class, as demonstrated by:
In addition to demonstrating the acquisition of technical massage
skills, each Cortiva student will be graded on professionalism and
participation in the classroom. The components of this grade are as
follows:
Listens attentively to lecture material, questions and answers.
Participates in class discussions.
Observes instructor demonstrations.
Asks thoughtful questions on material that is not clear.
1. Professional demeanor and behavior, as demonstrated by:
Participates in hands on activities.
A. Attendance and Preparation
Applies the techniques as demonstrated by the instructor.
• Arrives to class with all necessary supplies and ready to begin on time.
Adjusts and responds to instructor, student, and client feedback.
• Prepares properly for class.
• Returns from breaks on time.
Gives appropriate and constructive feedback during massage exchange
sessions.
• Engages in proactive communication regarding absences, make-up work,
and re-takes with instructor.
Properly prepares for class (i.e., completes reading and prepares
assignments).
• Stays for the duration of class.
B. Exhibits respectful classroom behavior
Keeps up with course content and seeks instructor assistance if necessary.
• Any talking is limited to class topics.
• No cross-talk or side conversations during instructor lecture or demonstrations.
• All activities during class are to be directly related to class.
• Cell phones and other electronic devices are turned off. Exceptions must be
approved by the instructor.
• Student models communication skills learned in the classroom, including
constructive feedback.
C. Practices professional interactions
Respects professional boundaries.
Please see the course syllabus for the percentage of the final grade
that will be assessed for Professionalism and Participation in that
particular course.
Academic Year
Cortiva’s academic year is 900 clock hours.
• Adheres to Cortiva student conduct policy.
• Conduct is consistent with a professional environment.
• Interacts with classmates, instructors, clients and the public in a courteous
and cooperative manner.
• Refrains from any and all conversation or contact of a sexual nature.
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Academic Clock Hour Definition
Chicago, Crystal Lake, Woodridge Only:
During the hands-on portion of classes, Cortiva maintains a 10:1
student-to-instructor/teaching assistant ratio. The hands-on studentto-instructor/teaching assistant ratio is calculated by dividing
the number of students doing hands-on work by the number of
instructors and teaching assistants in the classroom. Lecture-only
classes maintain a 56:1 student-to-faculty/teaching assistant ratio.
A clock hour consists of 50 minutes of classroom instruction.
Cortiva does not offer students non-credit remedial courses in any of
the programs.
Student/Faculty Ratio and Class Maximums
During the hands-on portion of classes, Cortiva maintains a 15:1
student-to-instructor/teaching assistant ratio. The hands-on studentto-instructor/teaching assistant ratio is calculated by dividing
the number of students doing hands-on work by the number of
instructors and teaching assistants in the classroom. Lecture-only
classes maintain a 56:1 student-to-faculty/teaching assistant ratio.
Clinic maintains a maximum student to instructor/teaching assistant
ratio of 24:1.
The maximum number in a classroom is as follows for each Illinois
location:
The maximum number in a classroom is as follows for each location:
It is very important that students attend all courses for which they
are registered and complete them successfully. Should a compelling
reason arise to cease attending, it is the student’s responsibility to
immediately contact the student services department to discuss the
options available to the student.
Chicago campus: 48
Crystal Lake campus: 28
Woodridge campus: 28
Attendance
Boston campus: 70
Tampa/St. Pete campus: 32
King of Prussia campus: 52
Hoboken campus: 34
Although we expect students to attend all classes in all courses, we
realize there are extenuating circumstances where a student, due to
illness or personal matters, cannot be in class. To ensure students are
receiving the course information and supervised practice necessary
to become competent practitioners, we have established and
require a minimum attendance percentage of 75% in each course.
Students with attendance below 75% at the end of a course will be
required to attend make up classes. For further information on make
up, please refer to the Incomplete Grades, Make Up Attendance
and Coursework policy.
Wall campus: 70
Scottsdale campus: 40
Tucson campus: 40
Seattle campus: 50
Federal Way campus: 40
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Students must complete 90% of the total program hours to graduate.
Students with below 90% cumulative attendance in the program
must attend make up hours in order to graduate. Make up hours
for graduation requirements can be completed in clinic, or in any
course in which the student has less than 100% attendance.
Absences that fall within a maximum of 10% of the program hours
are considered excused absences and students are not required to
make up the hours. No documentation for these absences is required
for them to be considered excused. Excused absences do not apply
to courses or programs requiring 100% attendance.
Attendance is tracked in every class period by the Instructor.
Accumulated absenteeism in any one course will affect
performance and grades. Students will be docked attendance
credit for actual time absent, rounded-up to the nearest fiveminute increment. For example, a student who arrives 18 minutes
late to class will be docked 20 minutes of class time. Students will
lose attendance credit for being absent or tardy, leaving early, or
returning to class late from break.
Class attendance is recorded daily in our school’s electronic data
management system and the absences become part of the
student’s academic record.
If a student misses one or more classes, he/she will need to make up
any required class work that was missed in addition to the possible
attendance make up. A student may also incur additional charges
for instructor time to administer hands-on/lab make-up work or
exams.
Federal regulations state that the school may not release any
academic or attendance information over the phone. Students who
need information regarding their attendance or grades must request
it in person, from either their Instructor or the Registrar’s Office. It is
the student’s responsibility to remain current on their attendance
status.
Students are responsible for contacting the instructor for work missed,
and they are responsible for all assigned work and demonstrated
skills.
Student Clinic Courses
The Student Clinic Courses require 100% student attendance for all
scheduled clock hours. If a student is absent from one or more Clinic
classes, he/she is responsible for notifying the instructor and is also
responsible for rescheduling the missed hours.
Tardiness Policy
Any student who enters a class after the attendance has been taken
is considered tardy. Attendance records will reflect this accurately
and will affect overall attendance as noted above.
Early Departures from Class
Attendance records will reflect the time missed by any student who
leaves a class prior to the scheduled conclusion of the class. Early
departure from class will also affect overall attendance, as noted
above.
Students who are absent for more than 14 consecutive calendar
days will be withdrawn. The withdrawal process will begin on the 15th
day of absence, and the drop will be completed within five business
days. Breaks between terms are not included in the 14 consecutive
calendar days calculation.
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Determination of Satisfactory Attendance
Students can improve their cumulative attendance percentage by
attending needed make-up and/or repeat courses, and attending
currently scheduled courses. Students who achieve a minimum 80%
cumulative attendance by the next official assessment are removed
from attendance probation status. Students who have 79% or below
cumulative attendance for two consecutive official attendance
assessments are withdrawn from school.
(excluding Scottsdale & Wall)
Students must maintain at least 90% cumulative attendance to have
satisfactory attendance. Satisfactory attendance will be evaluated
as follows:
Satisfactory attendance is evaluated unofficially during the seventh
week and officially during the second week of each 10-week term.
Determination of Satisfactory Attendance
Students are officially assessed for the first time during the second
week of their second 10-week term. Students receive a Satisfactory
(Wall Only)
Attendance Report (SAR) during both the second and seventh weeks
Students must maintain at least 90% cumulative attendance to have
of each 10-week term.
satisfactory attendance. Satisfactory attendance will be evaluated
as follows:
Attendance Monitoring
Students with 80-89% cumulative attendance at an assessment point
are placed on attendance monitoring status. Students placed on
attendance monitoring are notified in writing of their status, and
documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students placed on
attendance monitoring will meet with the Education staff to review
what courses need to be made up. Education staff will have regular
follow up with these students to review progress toward program
completion. Once a student has achieved 90% or above cumulative
attendance, he/she will be removed from attendance monitoring
status at the next assessment point.
Satisfactory attendance is evaluated during the second week
of each 5-week term. Students are officially assessed for the first
time during the second week of their 3rd 5-week term. Official
assessments will continue every ten weeks (week 2 of every other
5-week term) throughout the remainder of their program. Students
will receive unofficial assessments during the second week for each
term that is not an official assessment. Students receive a Satisfactory
Attendance Progress Report (SAR) at each official and unofficial
assessment point.
Attendance Probation
Students with 80-89% cumulative attendance at an assessment point
are placed on attendance monitoring status. Students placed on
attendance monitoring are notified in writing of their status, and
documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students placed on
attendance monitoring will meet with the Education staff to review
what courses need to be made up. Education staff will have regular
follow up with these students to review progress toward program
completion. Once a student has achieved 90% or above cumulative
attendance, he/she will be removed from attendance monitoring
status at the next assessment point.
Attendance Monitoring
Students at 79% or below cumulative attendance at an official
assessment point are placed on attendance probation. Students
placed on attendance probation are notified in writing of their
status, and documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students
placed on attendance probation have ten weeks to achieve at
least 80% cumulative attendance. Education staff will have regular
follow up with these students to review progress toward program
completion.
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Attendance Probation
Attendance Probation
Students at 79% or below cumulative attendance at an official
assessment point are placed on attendance probation. Students
placed on attendance probation are notified in writing of their
status, and documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students
placed on attendance probation have ten weeks to achieve at
least 80% cumulative attendance. Education staff will have regular
follow up with these students to review progress toward program
completion.
Students at 79% or below cumulative attendance at an assessment
point end are placed on attendance probation. Students placed
on attendance probation are notified in writing of their status, and
documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students placed
on attendance probation have one term to achieve at least 80%
cumulative attendance. Education staff will have regular follow up
with these students to review progress toward program completion.
Students can improve their cumulative attendance percentage by
attending needed make-up and/or repeat courses, and attending
currently scheduled courses. Students who achieve a minimum 80%
cumulative attendance by the next official assessment are removed
from attendance probation status. Students who have 79% or below
cumulative attendance for two consecutive official attendance
assessments are withdrawn from school.
Determination of Satisfactory Attendance
(Scottsdale Only)
Attendance Monitoring
Students with 80-89% cumulative attendance at a term end are
placed on attendance monitoring status. Students placed on
attendance monitoring are notified in writing of their status, and
documentation is placed in the students’ files. Students placed on
attendance monitoring will meet with the Education staff to review
what courses need to be made up. Education staff will have regular
follow up with these students to review progress toward program
completion. Once a student has achieved 90% or above cumulative
attendance, he/she will be removed from attendance monitoring
status at the next assessment point.
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Incomplete Grades, Make Up Attendance &
Coursework
Incomplete grades may be given for the following reasons:
Students must maintain at least 90% cumulative attendance in the
program to have satisfactory attendance. Satisfactory attendance
is evaluated at the end of each term during the second week of the
following term.
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Students can improve their cumulative attendance percentage by
attending needed make-up and/or repeat courses, and attending
currently scheduled courses. Students who achieve a minimum 80%
cumulative attendance by the next assessment point are removed
from attendance probation status. Students who have 79% or
below cumulative attendance for two consecutive term ends are
withdrawn from school.
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• Required coursework is not complete; and/or
• Attendance for the course is below 75%
Make-up coursework must be completed by the end of the
subsequent term in which the course was offered. If the required
coursework is not received by that time, the Incomplete will convert
to an “F” and the student will be required to repeat the course.
Make-up attendance to meet the required 75% in a course must be
completed by the end of the subsequent term in which the course
was offered. If the required attendance is not made up by that time,
the Incomplete will convert to an “F” and the student will be required
to repeat the course.
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Retaking A Failed Course
Student Non-Harassment Policy
If a student fails a course, he/she must repeat the course in its
entirety. A student may repeat a course only twice, and must receive
a final grade of “C” or above. The requirements outlined in the
Grading and the Attendance policies apply to the repeated courses.
If a student fails the course on the third attempt, the student will be
withdrawn from the school. Only the grade of the repeated course is
considered in the computation of grade point average.
Cortiva reaffirms the principle that its students, faculty, and staff
have a right to be free from sex discrimination in the form of sexual
harassment by any member of the academic community. Sexual
harassment is a form of employee or student misconduct which
undermines employment and instructional or peer relationships,
debilitates morale, and interferes with the productivity and wellbeing of its victims. Sexual harassment is banned by Title VII of the
1964 Civil Rights Act (concerning employees) and Title IX of the
Education Amendments of 1972. In addition, various other statutes,
constitutional provisions and common law causes of action prohibit
sexually harassing conduct. Cortiva enforces these laws among its
employees and students.
Tuition is charged for repeated courses. The tuition cost for repeated
courses is half of the student’s original per hour tuition cost. The
tuition charge is calculated based on the student’s original tuition
charge, divided by the program clock hours and then multiplied by
the clock hours in the repeated course, then divided by two. This is
added to the total tuition charges for the student. In addition, the
student is responsible for purchasing any new books or manuals
required for the repeated course. New books or manuals must
be paid for at the time of purchase. If new books or manuals
are needed, the student can order them through the Director of
Education/Education Manager at his/her campus.
Definitions – Sexual harassment is a form of sex discrimination. It is
defined as an attempt to coerce an unwilling person into a sexual
relationship, to subject a person to unwanted sexual attention, to
punish a refusal to comply, or to create a sexually intimidating, hostile
or offensive working or educational environment. Sexual harassment
is understood to include a wide range of behaviors from the actual
coercing of sexual relations to unequal, demeaning treatment of
students or employees based on gender.
If a student does not attend the scheduled repeat course, it is
considered a course cancel and no tuition charges are accrued for
the course. The cancelled course is not considered an attempted
course.
Some examples that may constitute sexual harassment are (this list is
not intended to be all-inclusive):
• subtle pressure for sexual activity
Statement of Non-discrimination
• demands for sexual favors accompanied by threats
Cortiva is in compliance with Title VI of the Civil Rights Act of 1964,
Title IX of the Educational Amendments of 1972, Section 504 of
the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities
Act. Cortiva is committed to providing equal opportunity in its
recruitment, admission, educational programs and employment
without discrimination on the basis of race, creed, color, national
origin, ancestry, gender, sexual orientation, age, religion, or disability.
• requests for sexual favors accompanied by promises
• unnecessary brushes or touches
• offensive sexual graffiti
• disparaging remarks about gender
• physical aggression such as pinching and patting
• sexual innuendoes
• verbal sexual abuse disguised as humor
• whistling
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Boston location:
• obscene gestures
• leering at or ogling a person’s body
Campus Director
103 Morse Street
Watertown, Massachusetts 02472
617-668-1000
• questions about a person’s personal sexual activity
• sexual remarks about a person’s body or clothing
• spreading stories about a person’s sexual conduct
Chicago, Crystal Lake, & Woodridge locations:
• sexual stereotyping
Sexual harassment in any situation is reprehensible. It is particularly
damaging when it exploits the educational dependence and
trust between students and faculty. When the authority and power
inherent in faculty relationships to students, whether overtly, implicitly
or through misinterpretation, is abused in this way, there is potential
for great damage to individual students, to the person complained
of, and to the educational climate of the institution. While a
particular interaction must be offensive and un-consented to, in
order to be defined as harassment, faculty and other individuals in
positions of authority should be sensitive to questions about mutuality
of consent and to conflicts of interest that are inherent in personal
relationships where professional and educational relationships are
also involved.
Procedure
Campus President
17 N. State Street, 5th Floor
Chicago, Illinois 60602
312-253-3313
Tampa/St. Pete location:
Campus Director
4045 Park Boulevard
Pinellas Park, Florida 33781
727-865-4940
King of Prussia location:
Campus Director
211 South Gulph Road, Suite 100
King of Prussia, Pennsylvania 19406
484-690-1400
Hoboken location:
Discrimination and Sexual Harassment Complaint Procedure
Individuals who believe they have been discriminated against
or sexually harassed may obtain redress through the following
established procedures of the school.
3. Submit a written account of the incident to the campus Title
VI, Title IX, Age Discrimination Act (ADA) and 504 Coordinator
(Coordinator). Following is a list of the Coordinators at each Cortiva
campus location:
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Campus President
2 Hudson Place, 2nd Floor
Hoboken, New Jersey 07030
201-215-6440
Wall location:
Campus Director
1985 Highway 34
Wall Township, New Jersey 07719
732-282-0100
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Scottsdale location:
If an employee, student or third party at any Cortiva campus has
a complaint or grievance against a Manager/Director or wishes to
appeal the Campus President/Director’s decision, he/she may do so
by contacting:
Campus President
8010 East McDowell Road, Suite 214
Scottsdale, Arizona 85257
480-945-9461
SEG Corporate Offices:
Tucson location:
Vice President of Compliance
2001 West Sample Road, Suite #318
Pompano Beach, Florida 33064
954.969.9771 ext. 306
[email protected]
Campus Director
6390 East Broadway Boulevard
Tucson, Arizona 85710
520-407-5160
Retaliation against individuals for submitting complaints of
discrimination, including sexual harassment, is explicitly prohibited.
Seattle location:
Campus Director
425 Pontius Avenue North #100
Seattle, Washington 98109
206-204-3166
Discipline
Students are to follow all policies and procedures as outlined in the
Cortiva catalog. A student found by a faculty member, the Director
of Education/Education Manager, or the Campus President/Director
to be in violation of policy and procedure may be subject to the
following consequences:
Federal Way location:
Campus Director
2030 South 314th Street
Federal Way, Washington 98003
253-237-5300
• Receive a disciplinary notice with a copy placed in the student’s
file.
4. The Campus President/Director will review the complaint and
proceed to conduct an impartial investigation of the complaint.
The investigation will include speaking with the individual
submitting the complaint, the individual the complaint has been
submitted against, and any other individual/s related to the
incident.
• Dismissal from class and/or suspension from school for repeated
violations of policy (suspensions longer than 14 calendar days
are considered to be forced leave of absences, and cannot be
longer than the maximum allowable Leave of Absence).
• Withdrawal from school for the accumulation of three dismissals
from class and/or suspensions.
Additionally, any persons involved in the complaint will have the
opportunity to present witnesses and any relevant evidence to
support their claim. The Campus President/Director will investigate
and respond to the complaint within ten business days.
• The Director of Education/Education Manager and/or Campus
President/Director may immediately and permanently dismiss a
student from school without any prior disciplinary notice being
issued for violations of the Student Conduct policy. This includes,
but is not limited to, cheating, vandalizing, or threatening physical
harm to students, faculty and/or staff.
5. In the event the allegations are found to be true, immediate
disciplinary action will be taken appropriate to the severity of the
offense, up to and including dismissal/termination.
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• A student may also be suspended or permanently dismissed if
charged with violent or sexual misconduct, even if the alleged
conduct occurs outside of school. In such cases, the student
will not be allowed to attend a Cortiva school until the charges
are cleared. If the charges are not cleared, the student may be
dismissed.
The following steps will be taken if a student is in violation of a
policy or procedure outlined in the Cortiva Catalog and Student
Handbook.
Disciplinary Notice
The student in violation of a policy or procedure outlined in
the Cortiva catalog may be given a verbal warning with an
accompanying disciplinary notice. Actions taken may include:
• Informing the student of the policy violated.
• Providing a rationale for adhering to the policy.
• Requiring the student to acknowledge understanding of and
intention to comply with the policy in the future.
• Placing documentation of the violation and subsequent
conversation in the student’s file.
Suspension from Class
A student may be dismissed from class and suspended for egregious
and/or repeated violations of policy and procedure outlined in the
Cortiva catalog.
Upon suspension from school, the student must set an appointment
to meet with the Director of Education/Education Manager or
Campus President/Director prior to returning to school at the
completion of the suspension.
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When the student meets with the Director of Education/Education
Manager and/or Campus President/Director, a written warning
documenting the violation will be issued to the student with a copy
placed in the student’s file.
This process is repeated for each dismissal/suspension. At the third
suspension meeting, the student will be permanently withdrawn from
school.
A dismissal from class is to be considered a suspension from school
and no attendance or academic credit will be awarded during the
time of suspension.
Withdrawal – Dismissal
Cortiva reserves the right to withdraw or dismiss a student for any of
the reasons outlined below.
Withdrawal
A student’s enrollment status record is changed to withdrawal when
a student chooses to drop from the program, or is automatically
dropped from the school for attendance, academic-related, or
financial reasons.
Withdrawal Reasons
• Self-Withdrawal – A student who wishes to withdraw from a
program must submit a written, signed, and dated letter informing
the school of his/her intentions. This can be done by meeting
with the Registrar and completing a Status Change Form or by
submitting a letter via mail, e-mail, or fax. The date the school
receives the withdrawal request is the date of determination for
the withdrawal.
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• Failed Course Three Times – A student who fails any course in
the program three times during one enrollment period will be
withdrawn. The day the student is determined to have failed the
course a third time is the date of the determination (this is after
the retake test has been failed, if applicable). (See Retaking a
Failed Course Policy & Procedure)
• 14-Days Absent – A student enrolled at least half-time who fails
to attend school for 14 consecutive calendar days, during which
time school is scheduled, will be withdrawn from the program.
Holiday breaks that occur between scheduled terms are not
included in the 14-day withdrawal calculation. The 14th day of
absence is the date of determination for the withdrawal.
NOTE: Students attending school less-than-half-time will not be dropped when
absent for 14 calendar days if they are not scheduled to be in attendance during
that period of time.
• Unsatisfactory Attendance – A student who fails to maintain
satisfactory cumulative attendance in accordance with the
Attendance Requirements and Credit policy. The day Satisfactory
Attendance Reports are distributed to classes for the official
attendance assessment is the date of determination for the
withdrawal. (see Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy)
• Absences for Less-Than-Half-Time Students – A student enrolled
less-than-half-time who fails to adhere to his/her class schedule
will be withdrawn. Students may be less-than-half-time for three
reasons:
• Program Change – A student who decides after the cancel
period to transfer to a program that is shorter in clock hours will be
considered a drop from the original program.
1. Student enrolled with enough transfer credit that their schedule of remaining
classes is less-than-half-time.
2. Student took a leave of absence (LOA), has returned and is completing only
incomplete courses from their time on LOA.
• Maximum Time Frame End – A student who fails to complete
the program by the maximum time frame end date will be
withdrawn. The day the maximum time frame ends is the date
of determination for the withdrawal. (See Maximum Time Frame
Policy)
3. Student has attempted all credits in the program and only has make-up
work remaining to complete during their maximum time frame in order to
graduate.
If a less-than-half-time student is absent for more than two
scheduled classes without communication with the school and
rescheduling of the classes, the student will be withdrawn. The
day of the second absence from the class schedule is the date of
determination for the withdrawal.
• Financial Obligations — A student who fails to fulfill financial
agreements with Cortiva will be withdrawn. The date that the
Registrar receives drop notification from Accounting or Financial
Aid is the date of determination for the withdrawal.
NOTE: This only applies to less-than-half-time students who are not scheduled to be
in class for periods of time that exceed 14 calendar days.
• Appeal Committee Terms for Reinstatement — A student who
fails to abide by terms set by the Appeals Committee upon
reinstatement into the program, without communication with
and approval by the Director of Education/Education Manager
or Campus President/Director, will be withdrawn. The day the
student is determined to have deviated from the terms of the
reinstatement, without approval, is the day of determination for
the withdrawal.
• Non-Return from Leave of Absence – A student who fails to return
from an approved leave of absence on the scheduled return
date will be withdrawn. The day of the scheduled return date
is the date of determination for the withdrawal. (See Leave of
Absence Policy & Procedure)
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Dismissal
Withdrawal appeals are not accepted for students who are:
A student’s enrollment status record is changed to dismissal when a
student is dropped from the program for any of the following:
• Violation of the Code of Ethics, Standards of Practice, or
Professional Decorum policies.
• Withdrawn for not completing the program within 150% of the
program length
• Dismissed for violating the Code of Ethics, Standards of Practice,
or Professional Decorum policies
• Cheating, stealing, or vandalizing.
Submitting an Appeal Letter
• Threatening physical harm to students, faculty, and/or staff.
The student must submit a written appeal to the Registrar within five
business days of receiving notification of the withdrawal. The written
appeal must include the following:
• Unprofessional conduct at school or at a school sponsored
activity.
• Being charged with violent and/or sexual misconduct, even if the
alleged conduct occurs outside of school.
Students who are dismissed from a Cortiva school will not be allowed
to re-enroll at any Cortiva campus. Students who are dismissed for
alleged violent and/or sexual misconduct will not be allowed to
re-enroll unless cleared of the charges brought against them.
The day the student is notified of his/her dismissal is the date of
determination for the drop.
NOTE: Any student who is withdrawn or dismissed will receive a tuition adjustment in
accordance with the refund policy and return stated on his/her Enrollment Agreement.
• An explanation of the extenuating circumstances that led to the
withdrawal, including any supporting documentation.
• A description of what has changed in the student’s circumstances
that will allow him/her to attend school and successfully complete
the program.
• A complete class schedule with specific dates for all make-up,
repeat and currently scheduled course and clinic attendance.
Specific due dates for make up assignments, quizzes, or tests
should be included. Students can request assistance in creating
this schedule from the student services department.
The Appeal Review
Appealing A Withdrawal
A student who has been withdrawn from the program may appeal
his/her withdrawal and be considered for reinstatement into the
program. Withdrawn students are not allowed to attend school
during the appeals process.
The Appeals Committee, consisting of the Registrar, Director of
Education/Education Manager, Campus President/Director, and one
Instructor, reviews the appeal letter, supporting documentation, class
schedule, and relevant student records to determine if reinstatement
is warranted.
The Appeals Committee sends a written response either granting or
denying the appeal to the student within five business days of receipt
of the appeal request.
NOTE: If one of the specified Appeal Committee members is unavailable, another
education staff or faculty member may substitute on the committee.
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Granted Appeals
Students accepted for re-enrollment will receive 100% tuition credit,
as well as transfer academic and attendance credit for any courses
successfully completed and passed during the first enrollment and
which meet the following criteria:
When an appeal is granted, the student is reinstated and the
student is returned to the student status he/she was on prior to
the withdrawal. The reinstated student must adhere to the terms
established in the Appeal Committee’s response letter. If the terms
are not met, the student will be withdrawn again, with no further
opportunity for appeal.
• The credit was earned no more than two years from the last day
of attendance of the first enrollment
• The credit is equivalent to the current programs offered at the
Cortiva schools
Denied Appeals
No tuition or academic credit is given after two years from the
last day of attendance of the first enrollment period. Please refer
to the Credit for Previous Education policy in the catalog for more
information.
A student whose appeal is denied remains withdrawn and refund
calculations are based on the student’s last date of attendance.
Readmission Procedure
Procedure:
Students who have withdrawn from a Cortiva school may apply
for re-enrollment. Applications are reviewed by the Campus
President/Director and Director of Education/Education Manager
and are accepted on a case-by-case basis. Students applying
for re-enrollment must show extenuating circumstances for not
completing the program on the first attempt, and document
changes that have occurred that will allow them to complete the
program. The student’s previous enrollment records are reviewed and
considered with the application for re-enrollment. Cortiva considers
re-enrollment a privilege that is only granted to applicants who show
clear intent and capability of completing the program and pursuing
a career in their chosen field.
Students who wish to re-enroll must submit a letter of application and
a completed Application to Re-Enroll to the Registrar. The letter of
application must include the following:
• Why the student wants to re-enroll at a Cortiva school.
• What extenuating circumstances occurred during the student’s
previous enrollment to prevent completion of the program.
• What has changed in the student’s circumstances to allow for
successful completion of the program on the second attempt.
• What are the student’s career goals upon completion of the
program.
Students are only allowed to re-enroll once at a Cortiva school. In
rare cases, exceptions can be made to allow a student to re-enroll
more than once. Students who have been dismissed for violating
the conduct policies in the school catalog are not eligible for
re-enrollment.
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The Registrar compiles the student’s previous enrollment records and
submits the records, letter and application to the Campus President/
Director. The Campus President/Director and Director of Education/
Education Manager review the student’s file, and decide whether or
not to re-admit the student. In some cases, the Campus President/
Director and Director of Education/Education Manager may request
an in-person interview with the applicant. The student is notified in
writing of the acceptance or denial of his/her application within
15 business days of receipt of the application letter and necessary
documents.
If the student is approved for re-enrollment, the Education and
Financial Aid Departments must complete the procedure for transfer
credit determination and create a class schedule for the student.
Then the student must meet with an Admissions Representative to
complete an Enrollment Agreement; pay a $50.00 re-enrollment
registration fee and meet with Financial Aid to determine how the
tuition and fees will be paid.
Prior balances will be reviewed prior to re-enrolling. Prior balances
must be paid via a payment plan or other approved arrangements.
The student may be required to make a good faith payment prior to
returning to school.
Students re-enrolling 180 days after their prior last date of
attendance will be subject to any increases in tuition, books, fees,
and supplies that have occurred since the student’s last enrollment
period. Students re-enrolling within 180 days of their last enrollment
will be held to the tuition rates of their prior enrollment.
Graduation Requirements
In order to graduate and be awarded a diploma, a student must:
• Have a passing grade (“C” or “Pass” minimum) in all courses.
• Complete all required clinic hours.
• Have 90% minimum cumulative attendance in the program.
Seattle, Federal Way and King of Prussia Only: provide
documentation indicating up-to-date certification in CPR, First Aid,
and HIV training.
Students who wish to participate in graduation ceremonies must
meet all the criteria outlined above.
Additionally, in order to receive graduate paperwork, students must:
• Pay all tuition and fees.
• Complete all financial aid exit forms, if applicable.
• Attend a Career Services exit meeting.
• Return all library books and/or pay all library fines.
Leave of Absence Policy
(excluding Scottsdale)
Cortiva students can qualify for an approved leave of absence from
school under specific circumstances. Leave of absences fall into the
three categories described below.
Leave of Absence Categories
Student Leave of Absence
Students enrolled at least half-time who have certain emergency
situations are eligible to take an approved leave of absence for up
to 90 calendar days. Student Leave of Absences may be approved
for the following reasons:
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• Circumstances that are covered under the Family and Medical
Leave Act of 1993, which are:
1. Serious health condition of the student
2. Care of an immediate family member with a serious health
condition
3. Birth/adoption of a child and care for that child
International students requesting a leave of absence are subject
to the laws, limits, regulations, and restrictions of the various
government agencies that regulate their status.
Costs & Funding Associated with a Leave of Absence
A student does not incur additional charges while on a leave of
absence. Financial aid disbursements cannot be made to a student
on a leave of absence.
• Death of an immediate family member
• Jury duty
• Military service
Administrative Leave of Absence
In rare cases, a student may be put on leave of absence by the
institution due to conflict resolution or disciplinary actions. In these
circumstances, a leave of absence can be given for a maximum of
180 calendar days.
If any changes to the curriculum occurred during the student’s leave,
the student is responsible for purchasing any new books, manuals or
supplies needed to complete the program.
Students on a monthly payment plan with the school are still required
to make their monthly payments while on leave of absence.
Schedule Leave of Absence
Applying for a Leave of Absence
Occasionally, gaps in a student’s program schedule may occur
due to course availability. When this happens, a student may be
placed on a leave of absence by the institution until the required
courses are offered. In these circumstances, a leave of absence
can be given for a maximum of 180 calendar days.
Student Leave of Absence
To apply for a leave of absence a student must:
1. Provide appropriate documentation of the situation (i.e. doctor’s
note, etc.).
2. Complete a Leave of Absence Request Form with the Registrar
prior to taking the leave of absence.
All leave of absences are measured in calendar days and include
school breaks in the total days allowed. Only one leave of absence
will be approved in any twelve-month period.
3. Meet with the Financial Aid Department prior to taking a leave of
absence to discuss the effects that failure to return from a leave
may have on a student’s loan repayment terms, including the use
of some or all of the student’s grace period.
In extenuating circumstances, a student can appeal to the Campus
President/Director and Director of Education/Education Manager
to have an additional leave approved. The combined total number
of days of all leave of absences for a student cannot exceed 180
calendar days.
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Administrative or Schedule Leave of Absence
Leave of Absence Policy
When an administrative or schedule leave of absence is required, a
student must:
(Scottsdale only)
1. Meet with the Director of Education/Education Manager, Registrar
and/or Campus President/Director to discuss the leave of absence
prior to its start and complete a Leave of Absence request form.
2. Provide any documentation requested for the leave. The school
provides the necessary documentation for a schedule leave of
absence.
Cortiva Institute Scottsdale campus students can qualify for
an approved leave of absence from school under specific
circumstances. Leave of absences fall into the three categories
described below.
Leave of Absence Categories
Student Leave of Absence
3. Meet with the Financial Aid Department prior to taking a leave of
absence to discuss the effects that failure to return from a leave
may have on a student’s loan repayment terms, including the use
of some or all of the student’s grace period.
Students enrolled at least half-time who have certain emergency
situations are eligible to take an approved leave of absence for
up to 90 calendar days, or half the scheduled program length,
whichever is less. Student Leave of Absences may be approved for
the following reasons:
Appealing a Denial, or Requesting an Extended or
Additional Leave of Absence
• Circumstances that are covered under the Family and Medical
Leave Act of 1993, which are:
If a student receives a denial of a leave of absence, needs to request
an additional leave of absence or an extension of his/her current
leave of absence, he/she can submit a written appeal or request to
the Campus President/Director. A letter explaining the emergency
situation and supporting documentation should be submitted. The
student will receive approval or denial of his/her request within five
business days.
1. Serious health condition of the student
2. Care of an immediate family member with a serious health
condition
3. Birth/adoption of a child and care for that child
• Death of an immediate family member
• Jury duty
Failure to Return from Leave of Absence
• Military service
Students who do not return to school on their scheduled leave of
absence return date will be withdrawn from school. In order to return
to school, the student would have to re-enroll and pay all applicable
fees and tuition increases.
Administrative Leave of Absence
In rare cases, a student may be put on leave of absence by the
institution due to conflict resolution or disciplinary actions. In these
circumstances, a leave of absence can be given for a maximum
of 180 calendar days or half the scheduled program length,
whichever is less.
Returning From a Leave of Absence
A student must return to school on their scheduled return date.
Students should work with the Student Services office before returning
to create a class schedule to complete their program.
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Schedule Leave of Absence
Applying for a Leave of Absence
Occasionally, gaps in a student’s program schedule may occur
due to course availability. When this happens, a student may be
placed on a leave of absence by the institution until the required
courses are offered. In these circumstances, a leave of absence
can be given for a maximum of 180 calendar days, or half the
scheduled program length, whichever is less.
Student Leave of Absence
To apply for a leave of absence a student must:
1. Provide appropriate documentation of the situation (i.e. doctor’s
note, etc.).
2. Complete a Leave of Absence Request Form with the Registrar
prior to taking the leave of absence.
All leave of absences are measured in calendar days and include
school breaks in the total days allowed. Only one leave of absence
will be approved in any twelve-month period.
3. Meet with the Financial Aid Department prior to taking a leave of
absence to discuss the effects that failure to return from a leave
may have on a student’s loan repayment terms, including the use
of some or all of the student’s grace period.
In extenuating circumstances, a student can appeal to the Campus
President/Director and Director of Education/Education Manager
to have an additional leave approved. The combined total number
of days of all leave of absences for a student cannot exceed 180
calendar days, or half the scheduled program length, whichever is
less.
Administrative or Schedule Leave of Absence
When an administrative or schedule leave of absence is required, a
student must:
1. Meet with the Director of Education/Education Manager, Registrar
and/or Campus President/Director to discuss the leave of absence
prior to its start and complete a Leave of Absence request form.
Costs & Funding Associated with a Leave of Absence
A student does not incur additional charges while on a leave of
absence. Financial aid disbursements cannot be made to a student
on a leave of absence.
2. Provide any documentation requested for the leave. The school
provides the necessary documentation for a schedule leave of
absence.
If any changes to the curriculum occurred during the student’s leave,
the student is responsible for purchasing any new books, manuals or
3. Meet with the Financial Aid Department prior to taking a leave of
supplies needed to complete the program.
absence to discuss the effects that failure to return from a leave
Students on a monthly payment plan with the school are still required
to make their monthly payments while on leave of absence.
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may have on a student’s loan repayment terms, including the use
of some or all of the student’s grace period.
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Appealing a Denial, or Requesting an Extended or
Additional Leave of Absence
If a student receives a denial of a leave of absence, needs to request
an additional leave of absence or an extension of his/her current
leave of absence, he/she can submit a written appeal or request to
the Campus President/Director. A letter explaining the emergency
situation and supporting documentation should be submitted. The
student will receive approval or denial of his/her request within five
business days.
Failure to Return from Leave of Absence
Students who do not return to school on their scheduled leave of
absence return date will be withdrawn from school. In order to return
to school, the student would have to re-enroll and pay all applicable
fees and tuition increases.
Returning From a Leave of Absence
A student must return to school on their scheduled return date.
Students should work with the Student Services office before returning
to create a class schedule to complete their program.
Students wishing to transfer must complete a transfer request form,
available from the Student Services office. The completed form must
be submitted to the Registrar at the campus the student is currently
attending at least one week before the beginning of the term of
which the transfer is being requested.
Students must be at least half-time status, have a 2.0+ GPA, and
have at least 80% cumulative attendance to be eligible to transfer
between campuses. Incomplete grades will not transfer. Education
personnel from both campuses will determine how and when such
transfers will be processed.
Campus transfers are only allowed within each of the school groups
listed below.
Cortiva Illinois School Group
Cortiva Chicago, Crystal Lake and Woodridge campuses
Cortiva Washington School Group
Cortiva Seattle and Federal Way campuses
Student Transfers
Cortiva Pennsylvania/New Jersey School Group
Cortiva students are allowed to transfer between program schedules
(i.e. day to eve) and between campuses that are part of the same
school group. All transfer requests must be submitted at least one
week prior to the next term start. Transfers are allowed only at the
beginning of a term and depend on space availability. Students
must meet with the Financial Aid Department to discuss how a
program schedule or campus transfer would affect their financial aid
and/or repayment status.
Cortiva King of Prussia and Wall campuses
Students are not permitted to transfer between programs, or
between classes with the identical schedule at a campus.
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Steiner Education Group Western Region
Utah College of Massage Therapy – Salt Lake City and Lindon
campuses; Nevada School of Massage Therapy – Las Vegas campus;
Arizona School of Massage Therapy – Tempe and Phoenix campuses;
Denver School of Massage Therapy – Westminster and Aurora
campuses; and Texas Center for Massage Therapy – Dallas and
Houston campuses
NOTE: Students who want to transfer to the Texas Center for Massage Therapy need to
apply for transfer credit through the Texas Department of State Health Services. The
Department will evaluate the transfer credit and inform the student what transfer credit
will be granted.
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Baltimore School of Massage School Group
Holiday Schedule 2013-2014
Baltimore School of Massage Therapy – Baltimore and York campuses
Martin Luther King Jr. Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/21/2013
Florida College of Natural Health School Group
President’s Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/18/2013
Florida College of Natural Health – Miami, Pompano, Orlando and
Sarasota campuses
Good Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/29/2013
Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy School Group
Memorial Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5/27/2013
Connecticut Center for Massage Therapy – Newington, Westport,
and Groton campuses
Independence Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7/4/2013
Easter Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3/31/2013
Labor Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/2/2013
Columbus Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/14/2013
Veteran’s Attendance Policy
Thanksgiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11/28-11/29/2013
Excused absences will be granted for extenuating circumstances
only. Excused absences must be substantiated by entries in the
student’s file. Early departures, absences, tardiness, etc., for any
portion of a class period will be counted as one quarter (1/4)
absence. Students exceeding three (3) days in a month of unexcused
absences will be terminated from their VA benefits for unsatisfactory
attendance. The student’s attendance record will be retained in the
veteran’s file for USDVA and SAA audit purposes.
Holiday Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12/20/2013 – 1/5/2014
(Includes Christmas & New Years)
Martin Luther King Jr. Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1/20/2014
President’s Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2/17/2014
Good Friday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4/18/2014
Easter Sunday . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4/20/2014
Memorial Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5/26/2014
Independence Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7/4/2014
Labor Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9/1/2014
Columbus Day . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10/13/2014
Thanksgiving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11/27/2014 – 11/28/2014
Holiday Break . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12/22/2014 – 1/4/2015
(Includes Christmas & New Years)
* Not all holiday breaks are applicable to all programs.
Please refer to your program schedule.
** Classes not held on holidays will occasionally be held on
another day of the week outside of regular class days.
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Payment and Refund Policies
Cortiva participates in the Federal Title IV financial aid program
which includes; Pell Grants, FSEOG (grant), Federal Direct Stafford
Loans (subsidized/unsubsidized), PLUS Loans (for parents) and Federal
Work-Study (FWS).
Additional information about Title IV financial aid programs can
be obtained at www.finaid.org. Applicants wishing to apply for
Title IV funding must submit a Free Application for Federal Student
Aid (FAFSA) in either a paper or an electronic format. A link to the
electronic FAFSA application is available through the Cortiva website
(www.cortiva.com) or directly at the FAFSA website (www.fafsa.
ed.gov). Detailed instructions are available to assist applicants in
completing the FAFSA application. A Personal Identification Number
(PIN) is required to sign the FAFSA form electronically; applicants can
apply for a PIN at www.pin.ed.gov.
Supplemental Assistance Programs
The following supplemental assistance programs may be available
to Cortiva students, if qualified:
• Interest Free student payment plans
• In House Loan program
• Alternative loan programs
(not available at all campuses, credit-based)
• State programs
• Veterans Benefits
• Scholarships
Interest Free Student Payment Plans
Interest free student payment plan options are available. Students
choosing to make cash payments can spread the remaining
balance over the length of the program to be paid in equal monthly
installments. All balances must be paid in full prior to graduation.
In House Loan program (IHL)
The In House Loan program (IHL) is available to qualified students
who have balances not covered by financial aid or other means.
Please see the Financial Aid Representative at the campus for
details.
Alternative Loans
Mountain America Credit Union offers an alternative loan to
qualified students attending the Scottsdale and Tucson campus
locations.
Sallie Mae offers an alternative loan to qualified students at all
campus locations.
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State Programs
Boston - three (3) President’s Scholarships are offered to students
each term.
Seattle/Federal Way
Chicago - two (2) Founder’s Scholarships, four (4) President’s
Scholarships are offered to students each term and one (1) David
Kawaters Memorial Scholarship awarded to a student enrolled in
MCL 131.
Selected programs of study at Cortiva Seattle campus are approved
by the Workforce Training and Education Coordinating Board’s State
Approving Agency (WTECB/SAA) for enrollment of those eligible to
receive benefits under Title 38 and Title 10, USC. Students must apply
for these benefits prior to admission and must submit the application
to Cortiva certifying official.
Crystal Lake - two (2) Founder’s Scholarships and two (2) President’s
Scholarships are offered to students each term.
Tampa/St. Pete - two (2) Founder’s Scholarships and four (4)
President’s Scholarships are offered to students each term.
Tampa/St. Pete
The Tampa/St. Pete campus is eligible to receive funds from the
Florida Prepaid College Programs.
Pennsylvania – offers a scholarship award valued at 25% of the cost
of tuition, and is awarded four times a year based on an essay and
interview.
Veterans’ Benefits
Scottsdale - two (2) Founder’s Scholarships and two (2) President’s
Scholarships are offered to new students each term.
Veterans’ benefits are offered at all campus locations for qualified
individuals:
Seattle/Federal Way - three (3) Founder’s Scholarships and three (3)
President’s Scholarships are offered to students each term at each
campus location.
Scholarships
Tucson/Hoboken – two (2) Founder’s Scholarships and four (4)
President’s Scholarships are offered to students each term.
Cortiva offers two scholarship programs to incoming students; the
Founder’s Scholarship ($1,000) (not offered at the Boston, Wall or
King of Prussia campuses) and the President’s Scholarship ($500) (not
offered at the King of Prussia or Wall campuses). The David Kawaters
Memorial Scholarship ($500) is offered at the Chicago downtown
campus only.
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Woodridge - two (2) Founder’s Scholarships and two (2) President’s
Scholarships are offered to students each term.
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The selection criterion for the Founder’s and President’s Scholarships
are as follows:
• Students must successfully complete all admissions requirements
of the program and be accepted for enrollment.
• Students may apply for this scholarship at the time of enrollment;
re-entry students are not eligible for this scholarship.
• Students who receive a scholarship must maintain satisfactory
academic (SAP) progress, as defined in this catalog. Failure to
maintain satisfactory academic progress (SAP) will result in the
forfeiture of any future funds.
• Recipients are selected by the scholarship committee appointed
by the Campus President/Director.
• The selection committee evaluates essays based upon the
following criteria; sincerity of message, concise writing style,
clarity of message and accuracy of grammar and spelling.
• By submitting a scholarship application, applicants release
all rights to SEG Cort, LLC and its subsidiaries for the use of
applicant’s essay, student’s name, and image or photograph,
which may be used in advertising, news releases, websites, or
other public relations activities, if desired.
Please contact your Financial Aid Administrator for an application
or for additional information. Scholarship programs are subject to
change.
Miscellaneous Fees
Change of Start Date: Each start date change initiated by the
student will be subject to a $50 fee. Start date changes initiated by
the school will not be subject to the fee. Changing start dates is not
recommended due to the limited number of spaces available in
each class.
Re-enrollment: Re-enrolling students will be subject to a
re-enrollment fee of $50. In unusual circumstances, the Campus
President/Director may waive this fee.
Transfer Fee: The administrative, non-refundable processing fees for
all non-Cortiva transfer credit are: $25 per course/$150 per program
section. There is no fee for transfer credit received from Cortiva
institutions.
Refund Policies
In addition to the Return to Title IV Policy the school will apply the
appropriate institutional or state refund calculation to determine
if there is an outstanding balance due to the school. Examples
of Return to Title IV, institutional, and/or state refund calculations
may be obtained from the campus Financial Aid Department. A
student who wishes to withdraw is encouraged to do so in writing to
a campus official. Students are also encouraged to attend an exit
counseling session.
Cortiva will make all refunds within 30 days of the date of the
student’s official or unofficial withdrawal/dismissal date. All refunds
will be returned according to the Refund Priority Method outlined in
this catalog.
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State Refund Policies
Minimum Cancellation and Settlement Policy
Maximum days for cancellation request:
Tampa/St. Pete, Seattle
3 business days – Tampa/St. Pete, Tucson, Scottsdale, Hoboken, Wall
Township
After entering class, refunds of tuition, whether the student withdraws
or is dismissed, are prorated based on duration of a student’s
enrollment within the current payment period (as measured in the
total hours offered within the payment period divided by the total
hours in the payment period). Calculated through the last date
of attendance, the school is entitled to retain tuition and fees in
increments as follows:
5 business days – Seattle, Federal Way, King of Prussia, Chicago,
Crystal Lake, Woodridge, Boston
• All applicants not accepted by the school are entitled to a full
refund of any monies paid.
• After signing an enrollment agreement, individuals requesting
cancellation within the above stated days will receive a refund of
any monies paid within 30 days.
• If a student’s enrollment is terminated within the first 10% of
the program, the school retains 10% of the tuition cost for the
payment period plus the registration fee and any accrued
finance charges.
• Students who have not visited the school facility prior to signing
an enrollment agreement have the opportunity to withdraw
without penalty in accordance with the above stated days,
following either attendance at a scheduled orientation or a tour
of the school facilities and inspection of the equipment.
• If a student’s enrollment is terminated between 11% and 25% of
the payment period, the school retains 25% of the tuition cost for
the payment period plus the registration fee and any accrued
finance charges.
• Cancellation requests should be made in writing, signed by the
student, and mailed or delivered to the campus of enrollment.
• The school will retain the $25 application fee of students who do
not request cancellation in accordance with the above stated
days.
• If a student’s enrollment is terminated between 26% and 50% of
the payment period, the school retains 50% of the tuition cost for
the payment period plus the registration fee and any accrued
finance charges.
• If the school closes or discontinues a course or program, the
school will refund all monies paid by the student for tuition and
fees if the school does not allow the student to complete the
discontinued program.
• If a student’s enrollment is terminated after 50% of the payment
period, the school retains 100% of the tuition cost for the payment
period plus the registration fee and any accrued finance
charges.
Students are responsible for all fees incurred while enrolled in the
program. Outstanding fees are due at the time of withdrawal
from the program and will be withheld from any refund due to the
student.
Institutional Refund Calculations
Institutional Refund Policies are based upon the portion of the
program or term attended by the date of withdrawal or dismissal.
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Tucson
A student withdrawing prior to the beginning of class is entitled to
a refund of 100% of the tuition minus the $25 application fee. After
the commencement of classes, the tuition refund (minus the $25
application fee) is as follows:
% of hours attempted . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Tuition refund amount
10% or less . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 90%
• Seventy percent (70%) of the total tuition, for the payment period,
if the withdrawal or dismissal occurs after the third week of the
payment period but prior to 50% of the payment period hours
being completed.
• One hundred percent of the total tuition, for the payment period,
if the withdrawal or dismissal occurs after completion of more
than fifty percent (50%) of the payment period hours.
Greater than 10% but less than or equal to 20% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 80%
Scottsdale
Greater than 20% but less than or equal to 30% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 70%
Calculated through the last date of attendance, the school is
entitled to retain tuition and fees from the first day of the program
through 60% of the total program, the school will refund tuition
by pro-rating the portion of the enrollment period that was not
completed by the student and refunding the remaining amount less
10% of the unearned tuition as a penalty. After 50%, the school has
earned 100% of the tuition and fees.
Greater than 30% but less than or equal to 40% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60%
Greater than 40% but less than or equal to 50% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50%
Greater than 50% . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . No Refund
The percentage of hours is determined by dividing the total number
of hours completed from the student’s start date to the student’s last
date of attendance, by the total number of hours in the program.
Refund example:
750 hour program/attended 250 hours
Wall Township, Hoboken, King of Prussia
Students withdrawing before the first Sunday in the first quarter
of attendance will not incur any tuition charges. In the event of
withdrawal or dismissal by the school after the first quarter of
attendance the school will retain the $25 registration fee, plus;
Program Cost $12,965
Hours remaining in program/total program hours x program cost –
minus 10% of the unearned tuition cost = refund due
(500/750) x $12,965 = $8,643
• Ten percent (10%) of the total tuition, for the payment period,
if the withdrawal or dismissal occurs within the first week of the
payment period.
$8,643 x 10% = $864
$8,643 - $864 = $7,779
Student obligation $12,965 - $7,779 = $5,186
• Twenty percent (20%) of the total tuition, for the payment period, if
the withdrawal or dismissal occurs within the second week of the
payment period.
• Forty-Five percent (45%) of the total tuition, for the payment
period, if the withdrawal or dismissal occurs within the third week
of the payment period.
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Boston
Chicago Campuses
• The agreement may be terminated at any time.
When notice of cancellation is given after the student’s completion
of the first day of class attendance, but prior to the student’s
completion of 5% of the course of instruction, Cortiva may retain the
application-registration fee, and amount not to exceed 10% of the
tuition and other instructional charges or $300, whichever is less.
• If the student terminates the agreement within five days all
monies paid will be refunded, provided that the student has not
commenced the program.
• If the student subsequently terminates the agreement prior to the
commencement of the program, they will receive a refund of all
monies paid, less the actual reasonable administrative costs.
• If the agreement is terminated between the 1st and 75th hour of
the students scheduled hours, the student will receive a refund of
ninety percent (90%) of the total tuition, less the actual reasonable
administrative costs.
• If the agreement is terminated between the 76th and 187th hour
of the students scheduled hours, the student will receive a refund
of seventy-five percent (75%) of the total tuition, less the actual
reasonable administrative costs.
When a student has completed in excess of 5% of the course of
instruction, Cortiva may retain the application-registration fee but
shall refund a part of the tuition and other instructional charges in
accordance with whichever of the following applies:
• After 5% of course instruction, but within the first four weeks of
class the refund will be 80% of tuition charged for the payment
period.
• During the first 25% of the course instruction, the school will refund
55% of tuition charged for the payment period.
• If the agreement is terminated between the 188th and 375th hour
of the students scheduled hours, the student will receive a refund
of fifty percent (50%) of the total tuition, less the actual reasonable
administrative costs.
• During the second 25% of the course instruction, the school will
refund 30% of the tuition charged for the payment period.
• After 50% of the course instruction, for the payment period, the
school retains all tuition for the payment period.
• If the agreement is terminated between the 376th and 562nd hour
of the students scheduled hours, the student will receive a refund
of twenty-five percent (25%) of the total tuition, less the actual
reasonable administrative costs.
• If the agreement is terminated between the 563rd and 750th hour
of the students scheduled hours, the student will not be eligible for
any refund.
• The student must inform the school in writing and specify the date
on which he/she wishes to terminate the agreement.
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Returning Materials
The Return to Title IV Policy
Students are able to return items within 20 days of their withdrawal.
Cortiva does not repurchase equipment, books, or supplies from
students who have completed in excess of 60% of the quarter.
The Higher Education Amendments of 1998 changed the formula
for calculating the amount of aid a student and the school can
retain when a student withdraws from all classes. Students who
officially withdraw or are unofficially withdrawn from all classes prior
to completing more than 60% of a payment period will have their
eligibility for aid recalculated based on the percent of the payment
period completed. Students are encouraged to review and have an
understanding of this policy. All students who consider withdrawing
should contact their campus Financial Aid Department to determine
the effect that the withdrawal will have on their financial aid
package.
• Books and manuals are returnable if they are in new condition
and students will receive a 100% refund for the cost of each book
or manual. There will be no refund on books or manuals that
contain writing or have been obviously damaged.
• Clinic uniforms are returnable if never washed or worn. The
student will receive a 100% refund of the clinic uniform cost.
• If a massage table and/or bolster is returned new and un-used,
the student will receive a 100% refund of the cost. If the table
and/or bolster have been used, no refund will be made.
• Massage cream is returnable if never opened and the student will
receive a 100% refund. If opened, no refund will be made.
This policy will apply to all students who withdraw, drop out, or are
dismissed from Cortiva schools, and have received Title IV funds.
• “Title IV Funds” refers to the Federal Financial Aid Programs
authorized by the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended)
and includes the following programs:
• Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan
• Federal Direct Subsidized Loan
• Federal Direct PLUS Loan (for parents)
• Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
• A student’s withdrawal date is defined as:
• The date the student began the institution’s withdrawal process
or officially notified the institution of the intent to withdraw; or
• The date the school determines to drop the student according
to the policy under which the student is being dropped.
Refunds on all institutional charges, including tuition and fees, will be
calculated using the Institutional Refund Policies published herein.
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Post Withdrawal Disbursements
Title IV aid is earned in a prorated manner up to and including the
60% point of the payment period. Title IV aid is considered earned
after a student has completed 60% or more of the payment period.
If a student was eligible to receive Title IV funds but for some
reason did not receive those funds prior to their official/unofficial
withdrawal, this aid is considered aid that “could have been
disbursed” and is considered a post withdrawal disbursement. The
following criteria must be met in order to receive a post withdrawal
disbursement from the following Title IV fund sources:
• The percentage of Title IV aid earned shall be calculated as
follows:
Hours scheduled to complete
Total hours in the payment period
Pell Grant - the school must have received a valid ISIR (selected ISIRs
must be verified).
The percent of the hours completed shall be the percentage of the
Title IV aid earned by the student.
Federal Direct Loan - the school must have a valid ISIR (selected
ISIRs must be verified). First-time or first-year borrowers must have
completed the first 30 days of attendance and the school must
have certified the loan application prior to the student’s last day of
attendance.
• The percentage of Title IV aid that is unearned will be returned to
the appropriate program.
• Unearned aid shall be returned by Cortiva schools from the
student’s account to the following program(s) as follows:
• Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan
Federal Direct PLUS Loan - the school must certify the loan
application prior to the student’s last day of attendance.
• Federal Direct Subsidized Loan
• Federal Direct PLUS Loan (for parents)
In the event of a post withdrawal disbursement, the school will
provide written notification of an offer for the student/parent to
receive any post withdrawal funds within 30 days of the student’s
date of determination of withdrawal. The student/parent must
respond within 14 days to the written request in order to receive all
or some of the funds, at which time the school will disburse the funds
requested within 180 days of the student’s last day of attendance. If
the school receives no response, a disbursement will not be made. If
the response is received after the 14 day deadline, the school may
choose whether or not to make the disbursement. Borrowers will
receive written notification if a disbursement is not made.
• Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
• When the total amount of unearned aid is greater than the
amount returned by Cortiva schools from the student’s account
the student is responsible for returning unearned aid to the
appropriate programs(s) as follows:
• Federal Direct Unsubsidized Loan
• Federal Direct Subsidized Loan
• Federal Direct PLUS Loan (for parents)
Refunds will be sent to the student’s home address on file with the
institution following the student’s withdrawal. Students are responsible
for any portion of their institutional charges that are left outstanding
after Title IV funds are returned.
• Pell Grant
• Federal Supplemental Education Opportunity Grant (FSEOG)
*Loan amounts are returned with the terms of the promissory note.
**Amounts to be returned by the student to federal grant programs will receive a 50%
discount.
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Institutional and Student Responsibilities in Regard to the
Return to Title IV Funds.
• Cortiva’s responsibilities in regard to the return of Title IV funds
include:
• Providing each student with the information given in this policy;
• Identifying students who are affected by this policy and
completing the Return to Title IV funds calculation on their
account.
• The student’s responsibilities in regard to the return of Title IV funds
include:
• Becoming familiar with the Return to Title IV policy and how
complete withdrawal affects eligibility for Title IV aid; and
• Returning to the Title IV programs any funds that were
disbursed directly to the student and which the student was
determined to be ineligible for via the Return of Title IV funds
calculation.
Renewal Applications
Some students may be required to submit an additional FAFSA and
verification documents if they cross from one award year to another
and are eligible for funding out of the new award year. The Financial
Aid Department will notify students in this situation that they are
required to submit additional paperwork.
Students required to submit additional paperwork must do so in a
timely manner or risk being required to make cash payments for the
remainder of their program costs or being dismissed from school.
Default Prevention
Students are responsible to repay, in full, all loans used to pay for their
education. Repayment of student loans helps ensure the availability
of loan funds for the future. Borrowers are encouraged to take the
responsibility of loan repayment seriously.
Students can avoid delinquency by following these steps:
The fees, procedures, and policies listed above supersede those
published previously and are subject to change at any time.
• Submit a monthly payment each month even if you haven’t
received a bill.
Financial Aid Disbursements
• Sign up to have your student loan payment automatically debited
from your checking or savings account.
Please refer to Satisfactory Academic Progress policy.
• Submit larger or additional payments to reduce the amount of
interest you pay on your loan. Be sure to indicate to the lender
what you want done with larger or extra payment – reduction of
principal or applied to future payments.
• Remember that overpaying one month does not mean that you
can skip or reduce the next month’s payment.
• Call your lender/servicer immediately if you are unable to make a
payment on time or if you have a financial hardship. The lender/
servicer may be able to assist you with an alternative plan,
deferment, or forbearance.
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Selective Service Policy
• Be aware of your deferment/forbearance rights. After submitting
deferment or forbearance forms to your lender/servicer followup to confirm that your loan(s) have been deferred or are in
forbearance.
A male student must be registered with Selective Service in
accordance with applicable law. A student who has applied for
financial aid and has not registered with Selective Service will not be
able to receive federal aid until the issue is resolved. During this time,
the student will be required to make other payment arrangements
with the school or cease attending.
• Understand your rights and responsibilities as a student loan
borrower. Keep all loan paperwork such as promissory notes,
lender correspondence, cancelled checks/auto-debit records,
etc.
• Always communicate with your lender/servicer. Never ignore
correspondence or requests for payment.
• Frequently check the National Student Loan Data Service (NSLDS)
at www.nslds.ed.gov to ensure that you are current on your loans.
• If you default on your loan(s) some of the following may occur
along with other actions determined by your lender(s) and/or
servicer(s):
• Your defaulted status may be reported to national credit
bureaus and may have a negative impact on your overall
credit score.
• You may lose the ability to defer current and new student
loans.
• Your lender may garnish your wages to obtain payment.
• Your federal and state income tax refunds may be withheld to
obtain payment.
• You may become ineligible to receive any additional federal
or state financial aid, including grants.
Students may obtain additional information about loan repayment
and default prevention guidance from the campus Financial Aid
Office.
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Student Services
Career Services
Resources
Cortiva is dedicated not only to providing the highest quality
education to its students, but also to helping those students find the
jobs of their dreams. Of course, your success ultimately depends on
you. Cortiva cannot guarantee employment or salary. But our career
services assistance starts when you are a student and does not stop
even after you graduate. From your first job to your last in the industry
– whether you need help tomorrow or ten years from now – we’re
here to help you succeed!
• Tools to help build a private practice
• Marketing ideas
• Insurance information and where to get coverage
• Budgeting worksheets
• Sample business plans and contract agreements
• SEG graduates have been recruited by many of the top-rated
employers in the industry.
• Links to useful websites
Online Job Hunting, Support, & Resources
A comprehensive listing of current job opportunities is available
online at www.segcareerservices.com or via the Cortiva job portal,
located at: www.cortiva.com/MyAccountSignin.aspx. Through the
use of a simple login and step-by-step menu, students can pinpoint
specific locations or categories of opportunities such as full-time
work, part-time work, spa work, chiropractic work, etc. Students can
post their résumés and apply directly for jobs online with 24-hour a
day availability.
The job listings are made available to all current students and
graduates. These listings also include a private practice list, which
contains space rentals, business opportunities, and independent
contractor positions, as well as information regarding associations,
research information, and various job-hunting sources.
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• Résumé and cover letter tips
• SEG has a worldwide network of thousands of employers.
• Career Services makes career planning fast, focused, and easy.
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Through www.segcareerservices.com, students can find the
resources and the information they need to succeed.
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Licensing Requirements
A license is required in most states to practice massage therapy. In
the absence of state laws, local municipal ordinances may apply. In
most cases, in addition to completing the training program, students
must pass a state and/or national exam and pay application fees
to obtain a license. Information regarding various state licensure
requirements may be obtained through the Admissions or Career
Services Departments. Fees for licensure and/or state examinations
are established by various state boards or state agencies and are
subject to change.
In order to help our new graduates enter their profession, Cortiva
will pay for the first exam and licensing fees in the state in which the
student graduated. This does not apply to students attending the
Cortiva Institute Boston Campus.
Depending on individual state processes, this will be done either
by paying the costs directly to the licensing or exam agencies, or
through reimbursement to the graduate for submitted and approved
exam and licensing costs.
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In order to qualify for this benefit, the following criteria apply:
1. The state must require an exam and/or license in order to work as a
massage therapist.
2. The application to take the exam or obtain licensure must be
submitted within 30 days of the actual date of graduation.
3. The student or graduate must be in good financial standing with
the school.
• Licensed graduates from the Professional Massage Therapy
program who re-enroll into the Extended Massage Therapy
program at the Hoboken campus can also choose licensure
coverage in one state with their Extended Massage Therapy
program enrollment; either in New Jersey or New York.
If you need additional information regarding state requirements,
licensing details, and names and addresses of regulatory agencies,
please visit our website at: http://www.cortiva. com/Massagetherapy-careerservices/state-licensing-info.aspx. or https://www.
segcareerservices.com/resources.asp. Additionally, a listing of each
respective state agency and website is listed at the end of this policy.
Tucson, Seattle & Federal Way locations only:
• Exam and licensure costs for students in the Extended Massage
Therapy program are not covered.
Hoboken location only:
• New York licensure fee coverage is available for students who
graduate from the Extended Massage Therapy program at the
Hoboken campus only. Graduates from the Extended Massage
Therapy program can choose licensure coverage in one state;
either New Jersey or New York.
The following table indicates which specific licensing costs are
eligible to be paid by Cortiva, for the state in which you are
attending school.
License
required?
NCBTMB
Exam Fee**
MBLEx
Fees**
State
Background
Check Fee
State
Application
Fee
State
License
Fee
Arizona
Yes
N/A
N/A
N/A
Yes
N/A
N/A
Yes
Florida
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
N/A
N/A
Yes
Yes
Illinois
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
Massachusetts
Yes
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
N/A
No***
No***
New Jersey
Yes
N/A
N/A
N/A
Yes
Yes
Yes
Yes
New York*
Yes
N/A
N/A
Yes
N/A
N/A
Yes
N/A
Pennsylvania
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
N/A
Yes
N/A
Yes
Washington
Yes
Yes
Yes
N/A
N/A
N/A
Yes
N/A
State
State
State
Exam Fee/
Fingerprinting
Jurisprudence
Fee
* New York licensure fee coverage is available for students who graduate from the Extended Massage Therapy Program at the Cortiva – Institute Hoboken campus only.
** Cortiva will pay for one of the following: an NCBTMB state licensing exam or the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Exam (MBLEx).
*** “No” in the table above means ineligible for reimbursement.
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Licensure laws vary by state and Cortiva does not guarantee that the
credentials earned at Cortiva schools will transfer outside the state
in which training is offered. It is the student’s responsibility to contact
other states in which he or she may wish to practice to determine if
the credits are applicable to that state’s requirements.
Criminal conviction(s) may affect a student’s ability to become
licensed. Students should contact the campus they wish to attend for
additional information.
Information regarding specific massage licensing requirements is
available to students from the Associated Bodywork and Massage
Professionals (ABMP) at www.abmp.com.
Students should review the following websites for additional
information:
Arizona
Arizona State Board of Massage Therapy
www.massageboard.az.gov
Washington
Washington State Department of Health
www.doh.wa.gov/massage
Pennsylvania
State Board of Massage
www.recovery.pa.gov/portal/server.pt/community/state_board_of_
massage_therapy/12529
Massachusetts
Student Resources
Board of Registration of Massage Therapy
Each school maintains a list of agencies that may be able to provide
counseling or support services. This list is not all-inclusive and the
school makes no specific recommendations on the quality of
services offered by these agencies. Any additional costs for service
provided by outside agencies are the responsibility of the student.
www.mass.gov/dpl/boards/mt
Illinois
Department of Professional Regulation
www.idfpr.com/dpr/who/masst.asp
Tutoring and Academic Advising
Florida
Students who are experiencing difficulty with a program are
encouraged to request a meeting with the Instructor or Director of
Education/Education Manager for support.
Florida Board of Massage Therapy
www.doh.state.fl.us/mqa/massage
New Jersey
New Jersey Board of Massage and Bodywork Therapy
www.njconsumeraffairs.gov/mbt/individual.htm
New York
School Massage Therapy Center
Cortiva is committed to providing opportunities to enhance student
learning by offering massage therapy to the general public in a
supervised setting.
State Board for Massage Therapy
www.op.nysed.gov/prof/mt/
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Learning Resource Center
Records and Confidentiality
Cortiva’s Learning Resource Center contains a collection of books,
professional trade journals, audiotapes, videotapes/DVDs, computers
and audiovisual equipment for student use while on campus. For
hours of operation, please see the posted schedule outside the
Center.
Public Notice Regarding Directory Information
Continuing Education
Cortiva is a member of the Steiner Education Group, which is
approved by the National Certification Board for Therapeutic
Massage and Bodywork (NCBTMB) as a provider of continuing
education (#451248-10).
Directory Information
Directory information, which is information that is generally not
considered harmful or an invasion of privacy if released, can also
be disclosed to outside organizations without your prior written
consent.
The Steiner Education Group Continuing Education Program offers
innovative and exciting continuing education seminars. Continuing
education courses are not recognized or approved by the school’s
accrediting agencies. A schedule of Continuing Education courses
can be found at www.SteinerCE.com and www.Cortiva.com.
Cortiva has designated the following information as directory
information:
• Student’s name
Transcripts & Diplomas
• Address
Upon graduation, each graduate will receive two transcripts and a
diploma. A student or graduate may request a copy of an official
transcript or a replacement diploma by submitting the appropriate
form, which must include the student or graduate’s signature to the
Registrar. The fee for additional transcripts or a replacement diploma
is $5.00. Requests may take up to two weeks to process.
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The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA), a Federal law,
requires that Cortiva, with certain exceptions, obtain your written
consent prior to the disclosure of personally identifiable information
from your education records. However, Cortiva may disclose
appropriately designated “directory information” without consent,
unless you have advised Cortiva to the contrary in accordance with
the “Right to Refuse” section below.
• Telephone listing
• Electronic e-mail address
• Photograph
• Degrees, honors, and awards received
• Date and place of birth
Cortiva reserves the right to deny transcript requests to any student or
graduate who is not in good financial standing with the school.
• Major field of study
NOTE: Express mail, certified mail, etc. are available upon request. Any additional costs
for these services will be charged to the student/graduate.
• Dates of attendance
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• Most recent educational agency or program of study
• Institution attended
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Right to Refuse
A. The right to request a record amendment does not include:
If you do not want Cortiva to disclose directory information from
your education records without your prior written consent, you
must notify Cortiva in writing within one month of your enrollment.
This notification should reference “directory information” and must
be delivered to:
SEG Corporate Offices
Vice President of Compliance
2001 West Sample Road, Suite #318
Pompano Beach, Florida 33064
1. Changes to grades or disciplinary decisions; and/or
2. Opinions or reflections of a school official or other person that is reflected in
the educational record.
3. The student’s right to consent to disclosures of personally
identifiable information contained in his/her education records,
except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without
consent. These exceptions include:
A. School officials with legitimate educational interest;
B. Other schools to which the student may be transferring;
C. Auditors, accrediting organizations, and appropriate parties in
connection with the student’s financial aid;
Student Rights Regarding Education Records
FERPA also affords students certain rights with respect to their
education records. These rights include:
D. To comply with a judicial order or lawfully issued subpoena;
E. Appropriate officials in cases of health and safety emergencies; and
1. The student’s right to inspect and review his/her education records
within 45 days of the day Cortiva receives a written request for
access.
• The student must submit the written request to the Registrar,
Campus President/Director, or other appropriate campus
official, and the written request must identify the record(s) the
student wishes to inspect. Cortiva will arrange for access and
notify the student of the time and place where the records
may be inspected.
F. State and local authorities, within a juvenile justice system, pursuant to
specific State law.
4. The student’s right to file a complaint with the U.S. Department of
Education concerning alleged failures by Cortiva to comply with
the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office
that administers FERPA is:
Family Policy Compliance Office
U.S. Department of Education
400 Maryland Avenue, SW
Washington, DC 20202-4605
2. The student’s right to request an amendment of his/her education
records that he/she believes to be inaccurate.
• The student may request Cortiva to amend a record that he/
she believes to be inaccurate. The student must request any
amendments in writing to the Campus President/Director, must
clearly identify the part of the record he/she wants changed,
and specify why he/she believes it is inaccurate. If Cortiva
decides not to amend the record, Cortiva will notify the
student of the decision and advise the student of his/her rights
to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional
information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided
to the student when he/she is notified of the right to a hearing.
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Student Complaints & Grievances
All signed, legible, written complaints will receive a written response
from the corporate office within 10 business days.
Cortiva is committed to open, ongoing communication between
students, staff and faculty members. If a student has a concern
or complaint regarding the program, school, or a staff or faculty
member, the student should follow the procedure outlined below.
For campuses in Ilinois:
The first step is to address the issue directly with the appropriate
staff or faculty member. If the student is unable to resolve the issue
directly with the staff or faculty member, he/she may discuss the
concern with the Director of Education/Education Manager.
If a satisfactory resolution is not obtained, the student may initiate a
formal complaint by writing a letter to the Campus President/Director
containing the following information:
• The approximate date(s) that the problem occurred
If a student complaint still cannot be resolved after exhausting
Cortiva’s complaint procedure, the student may contact the
following accrediting and/or state agencies:
• The name(s) of the individual(s) involved in the problem and/or
other students involved, if applicable
Accrediting Agencies
• Important factual information, such dates of meetings with staff
and/or faculty members, and outcome of meeting(s)
For Boston, Chicago, Crystal Lake, Woodridge, King of Prussia, Wall,
Seattle & Federal Way:
• The nature of the complaint
The Campus President/Director will review the complaint, investigate
as needed, and in most cases will respond to the student within 10
business days. In cases where complaint resolution may take longer
than 10 business days, the Campus President/Director will keep
the student informed of the progress being made to address the
complaint.
Commission on Massage Therapy Accreditation (COMTA)
5335 Wisconsin Avenue NW, Suite 440
Washington, DC 20015
202-895-1518
All complaints directed to COMTA must be submitted in writing.
For Tampa/St. Pete, Tucson, and Hoboken:
If the concern cannot be resolved by the campus, the student may
contact the SEG - Cortiva corporate office. All complaints should be
submitted in writing to:
Accrediting Commission of Career
Schools and Colleges (ACCSC)
2101 Wilson Boulevard, Suite 302
Arlington, Virginia 22201
703-247-4212
Steiner Education Group
Director of Accreditation and Licensure
170 Red Rock Road
York, Pennsylvania 17406
717-268-1881
[email protected]
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Any student or employee of Cortiva approved by this Act who
believes he has been aggrieved by a violation of this Act shall
have the right to file a written complaint within one year of the
alleged violation. Cortiva shall acknowledge within 20 days receipt
of such written complaint. Cortiva shall issue a written finding as
to whether there is good cause to initiate disciplinary proceedings
in accordance with the provisions of this Act. Cortiva shall furnish
such findings to the person who filed the complaint and to the
chief operating officer of the school cited in the complaint.
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For Scottsdale:
Accrediting Council for Continuing
Education and Training (ACCET)
1722 N Street NW
Washington, DC 20036
202-955-1113
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State Agencies
For campuses in Arizona:
For campuses in Massachusetts:
Commonwealth of Massachusetts
Division of Professional Licensure
Office of Private Occupational School Education
1000 Washington Street
Boston, Massachusetts 02118-6100
617-727-1747
617-727-1944 Fax
617-727-7406 Consumer Line
Arizona State Board for Private
Postsecondary Education
1400 West Washington, Room 260
Phoenix, Arizona 85007
602-542-5709
For campuses in Washington:
Washington Workforce Training and
Education Coordinating Board
128 10th Avenue SW
Olympia, Washington 98504-3105
360-753-5673
Illinois Board of Higher Education
Division of Private Business and Vocational Schools
431 East Adams Second Floor
Springfield, Illinois 62701-1404
217-782-2551
217-557-7359 Institutional Complaint Hotline
For campuses in New Jersey:
New Jersey Department of Education
School Complaints
P.O. Box 055
Trenton, New Jersey 08625-0055
For campuses in Pennsylvania:
The Pennsylvania Board of Education
State Board of Private Licensed Schools
333 Market Street, 12th Floor
Harrisburg, Pennsylvania 17126-0333
For campuses in Florida:
Commission for Independent Education
Florida Department of Education
325 W. Gaines Street, Suite 1414
Tallahassee, Florida 32399-0400
888-224-6684
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Additional Information
School Closures/Inclement Weather
Crystal Lake:
To ensure the safety of students and staff, the school may close or
cancel classes due to inclement weather or other emergencies and/
or unforeseen events. Students should check with their individual
campus for updates regarding school closures during inclement
weather. The cancelled classes will be rescheduled following the
school closure. Cortiva reserves the right to reschedule classes at its
discretion.
The Crystal Lake location follows the McHenry County Community
College closure decisions, which can be found on www.mchenry.
edu web.
Woodridge:
The Woodridge location follows the College of Dupage closure
decisions, which is announced on their web site homepage www.
cod.edu.
Boston:
Tampa/St. Pete:
The decision to cancel or delay morning and weekend classes will
be made by 6:00 a.m. The decision to cancel evening classes will be
made by 3:00pm. Cortiva announces class cancellations via:
In the event that a severe weather or emergency situation results in
the school closing, including the Massage Therapy Center, Cortiva
will record an outgoing message on the school voice mail system
indicating the cancellation decision no later than 6 a.m. Students
should call the school closing hotline 727-541-5200.
1. Internet: Visit the Channel 7 website www.whdh.com, look
under Private Schools or visit the Channel 5. website www.
thebostonchannel.com.
King of Prussia:
2. Cell Phone Message: To receive a message on your cell phone,
register for “Snow Day Alerts” on the Channel 7 website http://
www1.whdh.com/stormforce/ - Click on “Sign up for Snow Day
Alerts” on the right hand side and follow the prompts. Remember,
when looking for Cortiva to register, we are under the Private
Schools category.
3. Telephone: Call the school 617-668-1000 and press option 7 to listen
to the message – Please do not leave a message as the system
can get overloaded.
Chicago:
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Wall:
In the event that a severe weather or emergency situation results in
the school closing, Cortiva will record an outgoing message on the
school voice mail system indicating the cancellation decision no
later than 6:00 a.m. for morning classes and 3:00 p.m. for evening
classes.
The Chicago campus follows the lead of the Chicago Public Schools
Districts. Students can call the school directly where a recording
will be placed on the school number. Or they may go to www.
emergencyclosings.com web site and type in Cortiva or the school
number 312-753- 7900 to determine the school open/close status.
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The King of Prussia location follows closures for the Upper Meridian
School District #307. In the event that a severe weather or
emergency situation results in the school closing, including the
Massage Therapy Center, Cortiva will record an outgoing message
on the school voice mail system indicating the cancellation decision
no later than 6 a.m. Students should call the school closing hotline
484-690-1433.
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Hoboken, Scottsdale & Tucson:
Incident Reports
In the event that a severe weather or emergency situation results in
the school closing, Cortiva will record an outgoing message on the
school voice mail system indicating the cancellation decision no
later than 6:00 a.m. for morning classes and 3:00 p.m. for evening
classes.
Incident Report Forms are available at the front desk for students
who wish to document a situation and bring it to the attention
of the school’s administration. Completed Incident Report Forms
are forwarded to the Director of Education/Education Manager
for review. Please note that Incident Report Forms are used for
documentation purposes only; they are not used to file formal
complaints.
Seattle & Federal Way:
Emergency closures will be listed on our outgoing voice mail and
posted to www.schoolreport.org no later than 6:00 a.m. for morning
classes and no later than 3:00 p.m. for evening classes.
bodyworkmall.com
The bodyworkmall.com website contains products that will serve
students and graduates, as well as other massage therapists and
skin care professionals. Items include DVDs, books and charts, music,
massage and skin care tables, bolsters, skin care tools and machines,
seated massage chairs, and professional lines of massage and
skin care products and supplies. Graduates receive a 10% career
discount.
Suggestion Forms are available at the front desk for students who
wish to make comments about any aspect of the school. Students
are not required to sign the Suggestion Form; however, it is necessary
if a response is expected. Signed suggestions will be responded to in
a timely manner.
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It is essential that students notify the Registrar immediately of any
changes to their name, address, telephone number or email
address. For Cortiva to effectively communicate with its students,
each student is recommended to have an email address.
Upon graduation, it is mandatory that students who have Federal
Family Education Loans through Title IV funding notify Cortiva of any
changes to their address and phone number.
Voter Registration Forms
Cortiva campuses have Voter Registration Forms available from the
Registrar for students who wish to register to vote.
Student Suggestions
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Professional Associations
Students and alumni of Cortiva are able to apply for membership in
a professional massage therapy association or organization of their
choice. These memberships support and advance the profession
of massage therapy and their members’ professional career
choices. Information about various massage therapy associations or
organizations is available in the Career Services Department.
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Drug Free Workplace and Campus
The Drug-Free Schools and Communities Act Amendments of 1989,
Public Law 101-226, require that, as a condition of receiving funds
or any form of financial assistance under any federal program, an
institution of higher education must certify that it has adopted and
implemented a program to prevent the unlawful possession, use or
distribution of illicit drugs and alcohol by students and employees.
The following information outlines Cortiva’s regulations to help ensure
that the schools are drug-free. All students and employees of Cortiva
are required to comply with the following standards of conduct
related to alcohol and controlled substances.
• Students and employees may not possess, use or distribute illegal
drugs on any school property or as part of any school activity.
• The use of illegal drugs or abuse of legal drugs on school premises
is expressly prohibited.
• Students and employees may not be on school property in
a drunken or inebriated condition, or under the influence of
controlled substances.
• Students and employees are encouraged to assist other students
or employees in seeking treatment if a drug or alcohol-related
problem is apparent.
• Students and employees are required to inform the Campus
President/Director if they become aware of another student or
employee distributing or selling illegal drugs on campus or at any
school-sponsored activity.
Students or employees who are found to be selling or distributing
illegal or prescription drugs on school property or at schoolsponsored activities (including those held off campus) will be
dismissed or terminated.
Any person who is believed to be selling or distributing illegal
or prescription drugs or alcohol on any Cortiva campus will be
immediately reported to the appropriate law enforcement agency.
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Any student found to be under the influence of alcohol or illegal
drugs during school hours will be suspended or permanently
dismissed.
The following hotlines are available for drug or alcohol abuse
counseling:
National Institute on Drug Abuse Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-662-HELP
Alcohol 24 Abuse Hotline . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 800-276-6818
The local campus staff will also assist students in finding contact
information for local drug and alcohol abuse organizations.
Please note that “illegal drugs” are those identified in federal law,
regardless of local or state laws that may not prohibit them.
Campus Crime & Security Policy
Any emergencies or criminal actions should be immediately
reported to the Campus President/Director and/or the local law
enforcement authorities. The school staff must be notified in addition
to the law enforcement agency. To ensure prompt and accurate
record keeping, criminal activity should be documented in a timely
manner by students and/or employees. If a crime occurs, the victim
should obtain a Crime Report Form from the front office staff and fill
it out. This report will be kept on file at the school by administrative
personnel. The school is not liable for any crime that may occur
on campus, but it is required to report criminal activity. In order to
do this, it is necessary to obtain documentation for any incident.
Cortiva promotes safety and it recommends that students, staff, and
faculty use precautionary measures. If you are concerned for the
safety of your belongings, we recommend that you either do not
bring them to school or that you obtain a renter’s insurance policy or
homeowner’s insurance policy to cover your personal property while
in school. In compliance with the Jeanne Clery Disclosure of Campus
Security Policy and Campus Crime Statistics Act, a copy of Annual
Crime Statistics for each campus can be found posted in the student
lounge of the school.
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Catalog Content, Changes, and
Course Cancellations
This Student Catalog and Handbook and its contents are subject
to change without notice. Cortiva retains the right to change
requirements, regulations, and fees at any time. Please see the
Admissions Department for any catalog addenda that might
contain updates or changes. Cortiva makes every effort to offer all
scheduled courses. In the event of a cancelled course, every effort
will be made to ensure students are notified. All cancelled courses
will be rescheduled to ensure program requirements are offered
in their entirety. Provisions contained herein supersede all of those
previously published and do not constitute an irrevocable contract
between the student and the school. The photographs used in this
publication are representative of one or more of our campuses and/
or the industry, and represent the kinds and types of equipment
typically found in the industry.
Copyright Infringement
Steiner Education Group, in compliance with the United States
Department of Education, prohibits the unauthorized distribution
of copyrighted materials by users of the institution’s network. This
includes the unauthorized distribution of copyrighted materials
through illegal downloading or peer-to-peer distribution of
intellectual property. Students who are found to be in violation of
this policy will be subject to disciplinary action and may also be
subject to civil and criminal penalties. If you are unclear about this
policy or what constitutes copyrighted materials, please contact the
administrative offices for further guidance.
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Summary of Civil and Criminal Penalties for Violation of
Federal Copyright Laws
Copyright infringement is the act of exercising, without permission
or legal authority, one or more of the exclusive rights granted to the
copyright owner under section 106 of the Copyright Act (Title 17 of
the United States Code). These rights include the right to reproduce
or distribute a copyrighted work. In the file-sharing context,
downloading or uploading substantial parts of a copyrighted work
without authority constitutes an infringement. Penalties for copyright
infringement include civil and criminal penalties. In general, anyone
found liable for civil copyright infringement may be ordered to pay
either actual damages or “statutory” damages affixed at not less
than $750 and not more than $30,000 per work infringed. For “willful”
infringement, a court may award up to $150,000 per work infringed.
A court can, in its discretion, also assess costs and attorneys’ fees.
For details, see Title 17, United States Code, Section 504, 505. Willful
copyright infringement can also result in criminal penalties, including
imprisonment of up to five years and fines of up to $250,000 per
offense. For more information, please see the website of the U.S.
Copyright Office at www.copyright.gov, especially their FAQ’s at
www.copyright.gov/help/faq.
Use of Technology Deterrents
All student web traffic is filtered through the use of 3rd party tools
by which IT is able to specify which websites users are able to view
as well as what type of content they are allowed to download.
IT reviews web traffic on the student network to ensure that no
loopholes have been found and exploited.
Cortiva’s computers do not offer any anti-piracy software, nor do
they offer alternatives to legal downloading. Downloading of music
and any type of media streaming is prohibited on any Cortiva
computer.
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Plagiarism
Arbitration Agreement
Plagiarism is the uncredited use (both intentional and unintentional)
of somebody else’s words or ideas. All of the following are
considered plagiarism:
The following is part of each student’s Enrollment Agreement: You,
the student, and Steiner Education Group (“SEG”) agree that any
dispute or claim between you and SEG (or any company affiliated
with SEG or any of its or SEG’s officers, directors, employees or
agents) arising out of or relating to (i) this Enrollment Agreement,
or the Student’s recruitment, enrollment or attendance at SEG,
(2) the education provided by SEG, (3) SEG’s billing, financial
aid, financing options, disbursement of funds or career service
assistance, (4) the enforceability, existence, scope or validity of
this Arbitration Agreement, or (5) any claim relating in any manner,
to any act or omission regarding Student’s relationship with SEG
or SEG’s employees, whether such dispute arises before, during
or after Student’s attendance at SEG, and whether the dispute
is based on contract, statute, tort, or otherwise, shall be resolved
through binding arbitration pursuant to this Section (the “Arbitration
Agreement”). Arbitration shall be conducted in accordance with the
Commercial Rules of the American Arbitration Association applying
federal law to the fullest extent possible, and the substantive and
procedural provisions of the Federal Arbitration Act (9 U.S.C. §§116) shall govern this Arbitration Agreement and any and all issues
relating to the enforcement of the Arbitration Agreement and the
arbitrability of claims between the parties. Judgment upon the
award rendered by the Arbitrator may be entered in any court
having competent jurisdiction. There shall be no right or authority
for any claims within the scope of this Arbitration Agreement to be
arbitrated or litigated on a class basis, or for the claims of more than
one Student to be arbitrated or litigated jointly or consolidated with
any other Student’s claims. Each party shall bear the expense of its
own counsel, experts, witnesses, and preparation and presentation
of proofs. THIS ARBITRATION AGREEMENT LIMITS CERTAIN RIGHTS,
INCLUDING THE RIGHT TO MAINTAIN A COURT ACTION, THE RIGHT
TO A JURY TRIAL, THE RIGHT TO PARTICIPATE IN ANY FORM OF CLASS
OR JOINT CLAIM, THE RIGHT TO ENGAGE IN DISCOVERY (EXCEPT AS
PROVIDED IN THE APPLICABLE ARBITRATION RULES), AND THE RIGHT
TO CERTAIN REMEDIES AND FORMS OF RELIEF. OTHER RIGHTS THAT
YOU OR SEG WOULD HAVE IN COURT ALSO MAY NOT BE AVAILABLE
• Turning in someone else’s work as your own
• Quoting someone and leaving out the quotation marks
• Copying someone else’s ideas and using them as your own.
• Failing to give credit for the use of someone’s work
Academic honesty is very important to Cortiva, therefore anyone
suspected of plagiarizing in any form, may be subject to dismissal.
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IN ARBITRATION. RIGHT TO REJECT: I may reject this Arbitration
Agreement by mailing a signed rejection notice to: Attention: Steiner
Education Group Corporate Office, Compliance Department, 2001W
Sample Road, Ste. 318, Pompano Beach, FL 33064 within 30 days
after the date I sign this Enrollment Agreement. Any rejection notice
must include my name, address, telephone number.
Reservation of Rights
Cortiva reserves the right to:
• Modify existing or new programs by addition, deletion, or
variation.
• Reschedule or consolidate classes.
• Change faculty members by replacement or substitution.
Confidential Information
• Relocate the facility, within a reasonable distance.
The following is part of each student’s Enrollment Agreement: I
understand that, during my attendance at the school and thereafter,
I will have access to Confidential Information belonging to the
school including, but not limited to, course syllabi, tests, handouts,
educational processes, and other proprietary instructional collateral.
Except as required by law, I agree not to reproduce, distribute, or
disclose any such Confidential Information to anybody outside the
school during or after my attendance at the school. I agree that
any violation by me of the agreement in this paragraph may cause
the school irreparable harm and so the school shall be entitled to
injunctive relief in addition to any other relief it might seek for such a
violation.
• Cancel advanced classes when sufficient enrollment is not
obtained.
Any changes to the policies or the calendar will be published in an
addendum to this catalog.
Transferability of Credits
If a student plans to transfer coursework completed at Cortiva to
another postsecondary institution, it is the student’s responsibility to
determine if that institution will accept the completed coursework.
Cortiva does not imply, promise, or guarantee transferability of its
coursework or hours to any other higher education institution.
Criminal Background Check
Cortiva reserves the right to perform criminal history background
check. State licensing or employment sites may require a criminal
background check for licensure or employment.
86
C
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Thank You!
On behalf of every faculty and staff member
at Cortiva, we welcome you to our unique
community of learning, congratulate you
on taking the first steps toward changing
your life, and look forward to you becoming
successful in your chosen profession.
Thank you for allowing us to make a
difference in your life. We are honored that
you chose Cortiva for your education.
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#13-03
www.cortiva.com
866-CORTIVA
(866-267-8482)
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addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Programs
Professional
Massage Therapy
Program
Extended
Massage Therapy
Program
Professional
Massage Therapy
Program
Extended
Massage Therapy
Program
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Tuition
$11,174.00
–
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Tuition
$11,457.00
Student Fee
$505.00
–
–
Student Fee
$505.00
Books
–
$368.44
–
Books
$368.44
–
Table Package
$454.34
–
Table Package
$465.88
–
Tax
$102.50
–
Tax
$49.27
–
$12,629.28
–
$12,870.59
–
Scottsdale - page 53
Boston - page 51
Total
Total
Hoboken - page 56
Tucson - page 56
Application Fee
$25.00
$25.00
Application Fee
$25.00
$25.00
Tuition
$11,174.00
$14,436.00
Tuition
$9,434.00
$16,934.00
Student Fee
$505.00
$505.00
Student Fee
$505.00
$505.00
Books
$368.44
$460.09
Books
$381.39
$556.39
Table Package
$453.72
$453.72
Table Package
$462.62
$462.62
Tax
$104.16
$112.50
Tax
$54.96
$54.96
$12,630.32
$15,992.31
$10,862.97
$18,537.97
Total
Total
Wall - page 51
Tampa - page 53
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Tuition
$10,981.00
–
Tuition
$9,339.00
–
Student Fee
$505.00
–
Student Fee
$525.00
–
Books
$368.44
–
Books
$381.39
–
Table Package
$462.62
–
Table Package
$462.62
–
Tax
$80.75
–
Tax
$54.96
–
$12,422.81
–
$10,787.97
–
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Tuition
$12,965.00
–
Tuition
$9,959.00
–
Student Fee
$505.00
–
Student Fee
$525.00
–
Books
$388.13
–
Books
$381.39
–
Table Package
$452.05
–
Table Package
$466.98
–
Tax
$110.45
–
Tax
$47.37
–
$14,445.63
–
$11,404.74
–
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Application Fee
$25.00
$25.00
Tuition
$12,972.00
–
Tuition
$11,665.00
$15,468.00
Student Fee
$505.00
–
Student Fee
$505.00
$505.00
Books
$388.13
–
Books
$388.13
$477.02
Table Package
$459.40
–
Table Package
$452.05
$452.05
Tax
$90.68
–
Tax
$110.45
$118.90
$14,440.21
–
$13,145.63
$17,045.97
Application Fee
$25.00
–
Application Fee
$25.00
$25.00
Tuition
$12,972.00
–
Tuition
$11,665.00
$15,468.00
Student Fee
$505.00
–
Student Fee
$505.00
$505.00
Books
$388.13
–
Books
$388.13
$477.02
Table Package
$459.40
–
Table Package
$452.05
$452.05
Tax
$90.68
–
Tax
$110.45
$118.90
$14,440.21
–
$13,145.63
$17,045.97
Total
King of Prussia - page 51
Chicago Loop - page 52
Total
revised: 07.16.13
Total
Federal Way - page 52
Woodridge - page 52
Total
Total
Seattle - page 54
Crystal Lake - page 52
Total
Total
Total
1 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Staff
Boston Campus Staff
Administrative Staff
Dianne Polseno, LPN, LMT
Wendy Stone, MS, LMT
Jason Johnson
Amy Stone
Sue Mapel, LICSW
Martha Cooke
Saskia Cote
Robert Luke Bill Ramsay
Katie McCarren
Michelle Falanga
Mike Griffin
Susan Coffey, LMT
Jackie DeVoe
Michelle Sheehan
Suzanne DeVoe
Ashley Devance
Holly Fitch
President
Director of Education
Financial Planning Director
Director of Career Services
Director of Student Services
Assistant Director of Student Services
Director of Continuing Education
Business Office Manager
Registrar
Senior Admissions Associate
Office Manager
Facilities Assistant
Massage Therapy Center Manager
Financial Aid
Welcome Center Coordinator
Welcome Center
Welcome Center
Admissions Representative
Program Advisory Committee
Kristin Angeli, LMT
Lydie Coleman, DC
Mitzi Johnson, MD
Ryan Holohan, LMT
Sandy Mayer
Susan McIntosh
Owner Main Street
Massage and Wellness
Owner Newton Whole Health
Owner Whole Person Health
Director of Massage Therapy
Joint Ventures Physical Therapy
Owner Elements Therapeutic Massage
Owner Massage Envy
Faculty
Susan Coffey, LMT
Martha Cooke
Saskia Coté, LMT
Jeff Forrest, LMT
Cynthia A. Gillan, LMT
Kathy Hood, LMT
Kerry Jordan, LMT
Tom Karis, LMT
Mitzie Ladd, LMT
Janice Pearson, LMT
Todd Rivers, LMT
Cindy L Rush, LCMT
Ralph Whitehouse, LMT
Crystal Lake
Earl Conner
Janez Kutzke
Campus Director
Assistant Director of Admissions
Woodridge
Lauren Abele, LMT
Jen Byrd
Samantha Smith
Campus Director
Student Services Coordinator
Front Desk Coordinator
Faculty
Lauren Abele, LMT
Jean Beckley, LMT
Bobbe Bermann, LMT
Earl Conner, LMT
Maria Durbin Cooper, LMT
Kristin Hovious, LMT
Wayne Hussey, LMT
Bob King, LMT
Connie Love, LMT
John Magruder, LMT
Mark McNeill, LMT
Linda Miller
Carol Porter, LMT
Frances Salvato, LMT
Holly Tomal, LMT
Patricia Vater, LMT
Terri Visovatti, LMT
Gail Willert, LMT
Administrative Staff
Deanna Sylvester
Eva Carey
Denise Mendoza
Sara Clasp
Colleen Parker
President
Campus President
Financial Aid Coordinator
Registrar
Career Services Director
Faculty
Administrative Staff
revised: 07.16.13
Career Services and
Continuing Education Coordinator
Massage Therapy Center Director
Director of Student Services & Registrar
Assistant Registrar
Student Service Coordinator
Student Service Coordinator
Front Desk Manager
Hoboken Campus Staff
Chicago Loop, Crystal Lake, & Woodridge
Campuses Staff
Paul J. Myer
Bobbe Bermann
Shaun McFarland
Alexandra Vera
Sean Hogan
Nubia Castillo
Susan Barney
Kristie Reiprich
Laura Leff
Sharon Northern
Pam Hines
Kris Grove
Meghan O’Donnell
Nia Fields
President
Director of Education
Director of Admissions
Director of Financial Aid
Assistant Director of Financial Aid
Director of Finance
Director of Career Services and
Continuing Education
Eva Carey
Kathy Antler
Simone Carbonel, MS
Daniel Dugan
Michael Dworkin, DC
Brianne Prior, DC
Michael Schwartz
Nina Skowronski
2 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
King of Prussia Campus Staff
Seattle & Federal Way Campuses Staff
Administrative Staff
Administrative Staff
Paula Baxter
Tina Bergstrom
Jean Dalesio
Colleen M. Daley, CMT
Scott Dugan, NCTMB
William Ensminger, NCTMB
Margie Fedorka, PDMT, NCBTMB
Mary Fix
Jennifer Gerhart, PDMT, NCTMB
Dakota Heinemeyer, MA, NCTMB
Christine Holefelder, BS, PDMT, NCBTMB
Peg Kerr, PDMT, CMT, RMT
Tim Koert, PDMT
Amie Kraft, NCTMB
Theresa Tobin Macy, PDMT
Jeff Mann, PDMT, NCBTMB
Elizabeth Minker, PDMT, NCTMB
Alex Mykietiuch, NCBTMB
Jennifer Smith, RN, BSN, NCBTMB
Dina Bennett, LMP
Matthew Sorlie, LMP
Leanne Dowd, LMP
Laura Ruuska, LMP
Nichole Croteau, LMP
Danielle Miles, LMP
Maggie Micek
Sarah Patt
Nicola Ross, LMP
Leslie Jensen, LMP
Dylan Jones, LMP
Megan Tucker, LMP
Catherine North, LMP
Siouxie Jeter-Koch, LMP
Jennifer Panara, LMP
Janice Laursen
Dennis Glumm, LMP
Colleen Rosenquist, LMP
Ken Pfaff
Carolyn Strand, LMP
Tim Bugler
Program Advisory Committee
Jeff Mann
Alex Mykietiuch
Judy Fehr, CMT, PDMT
Pam Kennedy, CMT
Jamie Stien, DC
President
Director of Education
Faculty
Lifeline Chiropractic
Scottsdale Campus Staff
Administrative Staff
Sophia Perkovich
Sophia Perkovich
Sterling Lombard
Kallie Gough
Kara Tucker
Jaime Law Joan Ishaya
Blaire Wilkins
Jonathan Broda
Shelley Byrnes, BA
Kelly Miller
Campus President
Director of Education
Director of Financial Aid
Director of Career Services and
Continuing Education
Registrar
Administrative Support
Administrative Support
Admissions Representative
Admissions Representative
Massage Therapy Center Supervisor
Office Manager
Faculty
Angela Brei, LMT
Shelley Byrnes, LMT, BA
Stacey M. Davis, DC
Patrick Davis, LMT, AAS
David Katz, DPM
Laura Lambert, BS, NMD
Grant Lessard, RMT
Don Miller, LMT, MA
Donna Partenio, MA, LMT
Sophia Perkovich, LMT
Brooke Ryan, LMT, CIMT
Joseph Sale, NMD
Nicholas Warner, DC, CMT
Patrick Ward, MS, LMT, NMT, FWS
Brian Watt, LMT
revised: 07.16.13
President
Director of Education
Campus Director - Fed Way
Director of Admissions
Admissions Representative
Admissions Representative
Admissions Representative
Senior Financial Aid Administrator
Financial Aid Administrator
Finance Manager
Student Services Manager
Registrar
Marketing and Continuing
Education Manager
Career Services Manager
Student Massage Therapy
Center Manager
Receptionist
Receptionist
Receptionist
Office Manager/Librarian
Education Specialist
Facilities Manager
Benjamin Lee, LMP
Bethany Jorgenson, LMP
Leanne Dowd, LMP, BA
Chris Kagen, LMP
Crystal Fritz, LMP
De’Anna Dean, LMP
John Stickel, LMP/CSMS, NSCA-CPT
Jon Okami, LMP
Kolleen Kohlrus, LMP
Matthew Sorlie, LMP
Sarah Ruth Gomes, LMP
Roy Vermillion, LMP
Jonathan Vogel, LMP
Lara Sopchak, LMP
Tampa/St. Pete Campus Staff
Administrative Staff
Greg Fears
Paulette O’Shaughnessy
Nyssa Raymond
Bonnie Clark
Donna Williams
Paulette Beaudoin
Ashley Quiepo
Caterina Caravello
President
Director of Education
Bursar
Registrar
Director of Financial Aid
Director of Career Services and
Continuing Education
Admissions Representative
Admissions Representative
Faculty
Lee Buderus, LMT
Terri Carvey, LMT
Robert Chambers, LMT
Jan Lundberg, DC
Christine Gordon, LMT
DeidraMishel Nicoletto, LMT
Jeremy Couture, LMT
Laura Brown, LMT
Betsy Minott, LMT
3 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Tucson Campus Staff
Administrative Staff
Deanna Sylvester
Erin Bjornson
Jennette Crum
Patricia Holland
Chris Pichereau
Kathy Lee
Carrie Sanders
Victoria Schneider
Wayne Sodawasser
Sara Thompson
Riley Wojner
President
Financial Aid Director
Admissions Representative
Dean of Students
Education Director
Director of Career Services and
Continuing Education
Front Desk
Registrar
Admissions Representative
Bursar
Financial Aid
Faculty
Tonya Aiossa
Wayne Blankenship
David Blum
Ginger Castle
Lori Cole
Julie Goodwin
Jean’e Freeman
Patricia Holland
Eric Mackey
Ann Mihina
Tomi Murphey
Kim Schaefer
Melanie Stumpf
Laura Yates
Program Advisory Committee
April Amstutz, LMT
Director of Massage, Canyon Ranch
Sandra K. Anderson*, NCTMB, LMT
co-owner Tucson Touch
Therapies
Debra Henrickson, LMT
Sonoran Spa Director, Westward Look
Victoria Maizes, MD
University Arizona, Executive Director,
Program of Integrative Medicine
Jan Phibbons, LMT
Owner, A Touch of Distinction
Shelene Taylor*
Owner, RUBS Studio Massage
Rondie Yancey
Franchise Owner, Massage Envy
*Graduates of Desert Institute of Healing Arts, now Cortiva Institute
Tucson Campus.
Wall Campus Staff
Administrative Staff
Annette Ippolito
Adrienne Asta, BA
Gambel Clark
Nicole Redmann
Denise Lombardi, BA
Donna Rickards
Bonnie L. Smith, AS
Director of Wall Campus
Student Accounts Manager
Director of Education
Director of Career Services
Financial Aid Administrator
Student Massage Therapy
Center Manager
Admissions Representative
Registrar
Faculty
Adrienne F. Asta
Kristen Curnan
Edwin Doe, DC
Jon DeGeorge
Michael Magera
Denise Lombardi
Karen Roche
revised: 07.16.13
4 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Catalog Changes
Gainful Employment disclosures - pages 14-28.
Update the costs on the Gainful Employment
disclosures for the programs on pages 14-28:
Page 14 - Boston Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $12,036.27 plus $834.32 for books and
supplies
Page 15 - Chicago Loop Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $13,605.45 plus $840.18 for books and
supplies
Woodridge Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $13,592.68 plus $847.53 for books and
supplies
Crystal Lake Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $13,592.68 plus $847.53 for books and
supplies
Page 16-17 - Tampa/St. Pete Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $11,591.75 plus $831.06 for books and
supplies
Page 18-19 - King of Prussia Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $10,556.37 plus $848.37 for books and
supplies
Page 23 - Tucson Campus
Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Program are $15,078.50 plus $913.81 for books
and supplies
Page 24 - Hoboken Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $10,018.96 plus $844.01 for books and
supplies
Page 25 - Hoboken Campus
Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Program are $17,518.96 plus $1,019.01 for books
and supplies
Page 26-27 - Seattle and Federal Way Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $12,305.45 plus $840.18 for books and
supplies
Page 28 - Seattle and Federal Way Campus
Tuition and fees for the Extended Professional Massage
Therapy Program are $16,116.90 plus $929.07 for books
and supplies
Course Descriptions - pages 29-37.
Add the following to the Course Descriptions on
pages 29-37:
Add APP 112: Essential Anatomy, Physiology and
Pathology to the course name listing for the course
description for APP 111 (A&B): Introduction to Anatomy,
Physiology & Pathology
Page 20 - Wall Campus
Add APP 122: AP&P of Control Systems to the course
name listing for the course description for APP 121 (A&B):
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems I
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $9,943.96 plus $844.01 for books and
supplies
Add APP 133: AP&P of Exchange Systems to the course
name listing for the course description for APP 131 (A&B):
Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology of Body Systems II
Page 21 - Scottsdale Campus
Add BUS 119G: BPMT – Goals, Visions & Laws, BUS 119R:
BPMT – Resumes, Interviews, Policies & Records, and BUS
199M: BPMT – Marketing, Licensure & Business Structure
to the course name listing for the course description for
BUS 119 (A&B): Business Practices for Massage Therapists
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $11,806.50 plus $822.78 for books and
supplies
Page 22 - Tucson Campus
Tuition and fees for the Professional Massage Therapy
Program are $11,808.16 plus $822.16 for books and
supplies
revised: 07.16.13
5 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Add MAS 119S: Massage Foundations - Integrative
Therapeutic Massage to the course name listing for
the course description for MAS 119 (A&B): Massage
Foundations - Integrative Therapeutic Massage. The
final sentence in this course description “This course
also includes basic information needed to work safely
and effectively with healthy pregnant women” does not
apply to MAS 119S.
Add MAS 120U: Clinical Foundations - Myofacial
Techniques & Assessment – Upper Body and MAS 120L:
Myofacial Techniques & Assessment – Lower Body to the
course name listing for the course description for MAS
120 (A&B): Clinical Foundations -Myofacial Techniques &
Assessment
Add MAS 127N: Clinical Foundations - Neuromuscular
Techniques, and MAS 127S: Clinical Foundations - Sports
Massage to the course name listing for the course
description for MAS 127 (A&B): Clinical Foundations:
Neuromuscular Techniques and Sports Massage
Add MCL 111CF: Clinic Foundations, and MCL 111CH:
Chair Massage & Hydrotherapy to the course name
listings for the course descriptions for MCL111 (A&B):
Clinic Foundations and Hydrotherapy
Add PE 111: Professional Ethics, and PC 111: Professional
Communication to the course name listing for the
course description for PEC 111 (A&B): Professional Ethics
& Communication I
Add RCR 151S: Clinical Reasoning & Research Literacy
to the course name listings for the course descriptions
for RCR 151 (A&B) Clinical Reasoning & Research
Literacy
Add MCL 101, MCL 102, MCL 103, MCL 104, MCL 105,
MCLH 101, MCLH 102, MCLH 103, MCLH 104, MCLH 105,
and MCLH 106: Student Clinic to the course name
listings for the course descriptions for MCL 116 (A&B)
Student Clinic
Satisfactory Academic Progress - page 43.
Add the following to the Satisfactory Academic
Progress Policy on page 43:
Each student will be assessed at the end of each
payment period; transfer credits and successfully
completed repeats will count as both attempted and
completed hours and will positively count toward the
overall pace. Incompletes count as attempted but not
completed and has a negative impact on overall pace.
Incomplete Grades, Make-Up Attendance &
Coursework - page 50.
Replace the first two paragraphs of the
Incomplete Grades, Make-Up Attendance &
Coursework section on page 50 with the following:
Students have the opportunity to submit missing
coursework. Work submitted after the original due date
listed on the course syllabi will receive a 10% point
deduction if turned in before the course end. Passed
coursework cannot be resubmitted for a better score.
Students can also resubmit corrected coursework if the
original work was failed. Retakes and resubmissions
will be accepted for a period of time after a course
completes. For courses that complete within the first
five weeks of the term, coursework must be turned in
by the end of week seven. Retakes and resubmissions
for courses that complete in weeks 6-10 of a term must
be turned in by the end of week two of the subsequent
term. All retakes and resubmissions are graded as pass/
fail only. For failed retake attempts, the higher score
of the two attempts will be used in the final grade
calculation for the course.
Students must achieve a minimum grade of “C” (70%)
on the written and hands-on finals in practical courses
in order to pass. See individual course syllabi for
specifics.
NOTE: First Aid/CPR exams that are made-up or retaken are pass/fail
only; 80% must be achieved for a passing score.
Students can turn in missing homework to the Instructor
or to the Student Services department. Students should
schedule make up of missed quizzes and exams
with their Instructor or through the Student Services
department.
revised: 07.16.13
6 of 7
addendum to cortiva catalog • March 2013
Program Changes
Addendum to
Scottsdale Campus - page 21.
Replace the program grid for the Professional
Massage Therapy Program with following on page
21:
Student Catalog & Handbook
March 2013
Day: 32 weeks* (7.5 months)
720 clock hours
Evening: 52 weeks* (12 months)
Clock Hr. BreakdownClock
Course
LectureLabInternshipHours
APP122 AP&P of Control Systems
40
0
040
APP133 AP&P of Exchange Systems
30
0
030
BUS119G BPMT – Goals, Visions, & Laws
10
0
010
BUS119M BPMT – Marketing, Licensure, & Business Structure
10
0
010
BUS119R BPMT – Resumes, Interviews, Policies & Records
10
0
010
MCL111CHChair Massage & Hydrotherapy
5
15
020
MCL111CF
Clinic Foundations
515020
MAS120L Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment – Lower Body 5
15
020
MAS120U Clinical Foundations: Myofascial Techniques & Assessment – Upper Body 5
15
020
MAS127N Clinical Foundations: Neuromuscular Techniques
10
20
030
MAS127S Clinical Foundations: Sports Massage
10
20
030
MAS139L Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques – Lower Body
10
20
030
MAS139U Clinical Integration: Assessments & Techniques – Upper Body
10
20
030
RCR151S Clinical Reasoning and Research Literacy
20
0
020
APP112
40
0
040
Essential Anatomy, Physiology & Pathology
MAS119S Massage Foundations: Integrative Therapeutic Massage
15
35
050
MAS117 Massage Foundations: Mechanics & Strokes
10
30
040
MAK121L Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology – Lower Body
20
20
040
MAK111U Musculoskeletal Anatomy & Kinesiology – Upper Body
20
20
040
MAS135 Population Spectrum
10
20
030
PC111
Professional Communication
20
0
020
PE 111
Professional Ethics
20
0
020
MCL I-V (Day), MCL I - VI (Eve)Student Clinic I - V (Day), Student Clinic I -VI (Evening)
Total
revised: 07.16.13
Acknowledgement and Agreement
I have received the addendum to the 2012 Cortiva
Student Catalog/Handbook with the effective date
of March 2013. I have read, understand, and agree
to abide by the policies and procedures contained
therein. I accept that failure to abide by these policies
can be grounds for dismissal. Additionally, I understand
that SEG copyrighted materials may not be reproduced
or distributed, in any form or by any means, electronic,
mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise,
without prior written permission of SEG. Any violation of
SEG copyright will result in legal action to the full extent
of the law and/or dismissal from SEG schools.
Date ________/________/________
Signature ______________________________________
Print Name _____________________________________
0 0120 120
335265120720
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