3 - DigiPen. Institute of Technology. Europe, Bilbao.

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3 - DigiPen. Institute of Technology. Europe, Bilbao.
U N D E R G R A D U AT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M S O F F E R E D
AT T H E E U R O P E - B I L B AO A N D U S A C A M P U S E S
COM PUTER SCI ENCE I N RE AL-TI M E I NTER AC TIVE SI M UL ATION
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
ADDITIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS OFFERED
AT T H E D I G I P E N U S A C A M P U S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER SCI ENCE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
I N N O VAT E
COM PUTER SCI ENCE AN D GAM E DESIG N
DEVELOP
DIG ITA L ART AN D AN IMATION
C R E AT E
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER ENG I N EERI NG
ENG I N EERI NG AN D SOUN D DESIG N
GAM E DESIG N
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
INSPIRE
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
BUILD
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
M USIC AN D SOUN D DESIG N
COM PUTER SCI ENCE
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN
DIGIPEN.ES
VIRGEN DEL PUERTO 34, EDIFICIO A
4 8 5 0 8 Z I E R B E N A , B I Z K A I A , S PA I N
DESIGN
DIG ITAL ARTS
IMAGINE
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
+ D I G I P E N I N ST I T U T E O F T E C H N O LO GY E U R O P E-B I L B AO
EXPLORE
DIGIPEN
SEE FOR
YOURSELF
ATTEND AN
INFORMATION SESSION
ONE-ON-ONE
ADMISSIONS MEETINGS
At information sessions, prospective
students and their families can learn more
about DigiPen Institute of Technology
Europe-Bilbao, the game, animation, and
simulation industries, and life as a DigiPen
student. Attendees will also be able to
speak with Admissions representatives and
participate in a Question & Answer session.
For more information, visit:
www.digipen.es
We encourage visitors to DigiPen Institute
of Technology Europe-Bilbao’s campus
to take part in a one-on-one meeting
and campus tour with an Admissions
representative to learn more about
our degree programs, admissions
requirements, and application process.
Please contact the Admissions Office
at least a week before your arrival to
schedule an appointment.
Contact Our Admissions
Office Today
CONTACT US
To speak with an Admissions
representative, contact us by email at:
[email protected] or by phone at
+34 94 636 51 63
The Admissions Office is open Monday
through Friday from 9:00 a.m. until 5:30 p.m.
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
LIM WEI NING » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
DIGIPEN NEAR YOU
DigiPen’s Admissions representatives
travel to college fairs and industry events
across Europe and neighboring countries
to speak with prospective students and
answer their questions. If you are not able
to visit the campus, contact us to find out
when an Admissions representative will be
in your area.
APPLY ONLINE
To apply for one of DigiPen Institute
of Technology Europe-Bilbao’s degree
programs, students must fill out the online
application at:
https://management.digipen.edu/
es-srs-app/ApplicationMenu.aspx
Once the application is received, it is
processed by DigiPen Institute of
Technology Europe-Bilbao.
Through the creativity, passion, and hard work of its
students, faculty, and staff, DigiPen has helped shape
the digital entertainment and technology industries
F O R M O R E T H A N 25 Y E A RS .
DIGIPEN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY
OVE R O NE
T H OU SAND
GA ME T IT L E S
CRE D IT ING
DI G IP E N
G R AD UATES
007: Everything or Nothing, 007: Quantum of Solace, 1080° Avalanche,
Aeon Flux, After Burner: Black Falcon, Age of Empires III: The Asian
Alcatraz: Prison Escape, Alice: Madness Returns, Alien Swarm, Alien
America’s Army 3, American Civil War: Gettysburg, Amped 3, AND 1 Streetball,
Kings, Asheron’s Call: Throne of Destiny, Assassin’s Creed: Bloodlines,
Baldur’s Gate II: Shadows of Amn, Baldur’s Gate II: Throne of Bhaal, BanjoVideogame, Battlefield 3, BBC Olympics ‘Journey to the East’, Bee Movie
Destruction, Betty Bad, Bionicle Heroes, BioShock, BioShock: Infinite, Black
Legacy of Kain, BloodRayne, BloodRayne 2, Blur, Borderlands, Brothers in
Call of Duty 2: Big Red One, Call of Duty 3, Call of Duty: Black Ops, Call
Duty: Roads to Victory, Call of Duty: World at War, Carcassonne, Carpe
Caster, Castleville, Catan: Die Erste Insel, Champions Online, Character
City of Villians, City Of Wonder, CityVille Hometown, CivCity: Rome, Clive
V.I.D.E.O.G.A.M.E., Coke Zero ‘Happy Kingdom’, Colony Defense, Combat
Compound Fracture, Condemned 2: Bloodshot, Condemned: Criminal
To: Mindless Behavior, Counter-Strike: Condition Zero, Counter-Strike:
High Road to Revenge, Cruise Ship Tycoon, Crushed Baseball, Crystalis,
Cultures: Die Saga, D.N.A., Dance Central, Dark Age of Camelot, Dark
DC Universe Online, Dead Space, Dead Space 2, Deadliest Catch: Alaskan
Defense Grid: The Awakening, Delta Force: Task Force Dagger, Demigod,
Arcade, Diggers, Digimon Racing, Digimon Rumble Arena 2, Digimon World,
Pirates of the Caribbean: At World’s End, Disney’s Atlantis: The Lost Empire:
Cars: Race-O-Rama, Disney/Pixar Toy Story 3, Disney/Pixar Up, Disney/
Country Returns, DOOM II, DOOM³, DOOM³: Resurrection of Evil, Dota 2,
Drawn: Dark Flight, Drawn: The Painted Tower, Drawn: Trail of Shadows,
13 Ways to Save You Time, 1942: Joint Strike, A Year in the Sun With Mr. Persol, Advent Rising, Aegis Wing,
Dynasties, Age of Empires Online, Age of Empires Online: Persian Expansion, Age of Immortals, Alan Wake,
Syndrome, Aliens Versus Predator 2, Aliens Versus Predator 2: Primal Hunt, Allods Online, Alpha Protocol,
Antz, Arkadian Warriors, Army Men: Sarge’s War, Army of Two: The 40th Day, Asheron’s Call 2: Fallen
ASYNC Corp., Auto Assault, Avatar Drop, Backyard Baseball, Backyard Skateboarding, Baldur’s Gate,
Kazooie: Nuts & Bolts, Batman Begins, Batman: Arkham City, Batman: The Brave and The Bold - The
Game, Bejeweled LIVE, Bejeweled Twist, Ben 10 Alien Force: Vilgax Attacks, Ben 10 Ultimate Alien: Cosmic
Water, Blackbird Pie, BlackHole, Blacklight: Retribution, Blacklight: Tango Down, Blade Battle, Blood Omen:
Arms: Hell’s Highway, Brütal Legend, Buck and the Coin of Destiny, Bulletstorm, Café World, Cake Mania 3,
of Duty: Finest Hour, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare – Mobilized, Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 3, Call of
Millennium, Cars 2: The Video Game, Cars Toon: Mater’s Tall Tales, Cartoon Network: Punch Time Explosion,
Animation for Games, Charlie and the Chocolate Factory, Charlotte’s Web, Chromehounds, City of Heroes,
Barker’s Undying, Club Drive, CLUE Classic, Codename: Eagle, Codename: Kids Next Door - Operation:
Elite: WWII Paratroopers, Combat: Task Force 121, Command & Conquer 3: Tiberium Wars, Commander Keen,
Origins, Conker: Live & Reloaded, Constantine, Contract J.A.C.K., Coraline, Cory in the House, Countdown
Source, Crackdown 2, Crash: Mind over Mutant, Crayola: Undersea Adventures, Crimson Skies, Crimson Skies:
CSI: Crime Scene Investigation - Deadly Intent, CSI: Crime Scene Investigation - Fatal Conspiracy, Cultures,
Age of Camelot: Darkness Rising, Dark Savior, Dark Side of the Moon, Dark Void, Darksiders, Darkwatch,
Storm, Deadliest Warrior: The Game, Death Jr., Death Jr. II: Root of Evil, Death Tank, Deer Hunter Tournament,
Deprived, Descent II, Destroy All Humans! Path of the Furon, Deus Ex, Devil May Cry HD Collection, Die Hard
Diner Dash, Dirt Track Racing, Dirt Track Racing: Sprint Cars, Disney Epic Mickey, Disney Friends, Disney
Search for the Journal, Disney’s Brother Bear, Disney/Pixar Cars: Mater-National Championship, Disney/Pixar
Pixar’s Finding Nemo, DJ Hero 2, Dogz Fashion, Dominion: Storm Over Gift 3, Donkey Kong 64, Donkey Kong
Dragon Age: Legends, Dragon Age: Origins, Dragon Warrior VII, Drawn to Life, Drawn to Life: The Next Chapter,
Dreamworks Super Star Kartz, Driver 2, Dungeon Siege II, Dungeon Siege II: Broken World, Dungeon Siege III,
Dungeon Siege: Legends of Aranna, Dungeons & Dragons: Dragonshard, Dungeons and Dragons Online:
ESPN NHL 2K5, Eve Online: Incursion Expansion, Evil Dead: Regeneration, Excision, Excitebike 64, Extra Fruity,
Encounter Assault Recon, F.E.A.R.: Perseus Mandate, Fable II, Fable III, Fallout 3, Fallout: New Vegas, Fantastic
Fiction Fixers: Adventures in Wonderland, Fiction Fixers: The Curse of Oz, FIFA Manager 12, FIFA Soccer 2004,
Fleck, Flower Paradise, Flushed Away, ForestVille, Forza Motorsport, Forza Motorsport 2, Forza Motorsport
Cove, Front Mission Evolved, Frontlines: Fuel of War, Fruits VS Bugs: Episode 1, Full Spectrum Warrior, G-Nome,
Gardens of Time, Gearheads, Gears of War, Gears of War 2, Gears of War 3, Geniu$: The Tech Tycoon Game,
War Fighter 2, Ghost Recon: Summit Strike, Ghost Rider, Ghostbusters: The Video Game, Giants: Citizen
GoldenEye 007, Gotham City Impostors, Grand Prix 3, Green Lantern, Green Lantern: Rise of the Manhunters,
Wars: Factions, Guild Wars: Nightfall, Guitar Hero: Warriors of Rock, Guitar Hero: World Tour, GUN, Gunman
Shift, Half-Life: Counter-Strike, Halo 2, Halo 2: Multiplayer Map Pack, Halo 3, Halo 3: ODST, Halo 4, Halo
Chamber of Secrets, Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, Head
Homefront, Horatio’s Travels, Hot Wheels Slot Car Racing, Hot Wheels Williams F1: Team Racer, Hover Strike,
the DVD Game, Icebreakers, Icebreakers mini, In Security, Incrediball: The Seven Sapphires, Indiana Jones
Blade II, Insanely Twisted Shadow Planet, Insecticide, Insecticide: Part 1, Inspector Gadget’s Mad Dash, Iron
Force Gemini, John Romero’s Daikatana, John Woo presents Stranglehold, Journey, Justice League Heroes,
Sports, Kinect Star Wars, Kinectimals, Kingdoms of Amalur: Reckoning, Kings and Castles, Kung Fu Panda,
Raider: Legend, Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Underworld, Last Bronx, Law & Order: Legacies, Lazarus: the Missing
Kain: Soul Reaver, Legendary, LEGO Star Wars II: The Original Trilogy, LEGO Star Wars: The Video Game,
Little Metal Ball, Lizzie McGuire 3: Homecoming Havoc, Lock’s Quest, Lode Runner, Lost in Blue 3, Lucy’s
Madden NFL 09, Madden NFL Arcade, MAG, Magic: The Gathering Online v3, Mahjongg Series for Windows,
Donkey Kong 2: March of the Minis, Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Mini-Land Mayhem!, Mario vs. Donkey Kong: Minis
Alliance (Special Edition), Marvel Ultimate Alliance 2, Marvin the Martian in the Third Dimension, Mass Effect,
4: Mercenaries, Medal of Honor: European Assault, Medal of Honor: Frontline, Medal of Honor: Vanguard,
2: Echoes, Metroid Prime 3: Corruption, Metroid Prime: Hunters, Microsoft Flight Simulator X, Midnight
Eberron Unlimited, Empire & State, Empire Earth, Empire Earth III, Empires: Dawn of the Modern World, Eragon,
Eye for Design, F.3.A.R., F.E.A.R. 2: Project Origin, F.E.A.R. 2: Reborn, F.E.A.R.: Extraction Point, F.E.A.R.: First
Four: Rise of the Silver Surfer, Farmville, FarmVille Mobile, Fate, Faunasphere, Ferrari Challenge Trofeo Pirelli,
Fight Club, Fighting Vipers, Final Fantasy XIV: Version 2.0, Fire Gods, Firefall, FireFly Studios’ Stronghold 2,
3, Forza Motorsport 4, Foster’s Home for Imaginary Friends, Freddi Fish 5: The Case of the Creature of Coral
G.I. Joe: The Rise of Cobra, Galactic Civilizations II: Dark Avatar, Galactic Civilizations II: Twilight of the Arnor,
Gex 3: Deep Cover Gecko, Ghost Harvest, Ghost Recon: Advanced War Fighter, Ghost Recon: Advanced
Kabuto, God of War III, Godzilla: Destroy All Monsters Melee, Godzilla: Save the Earth, Godzilla: Unleashed,
Greg Hastings Paintball 2, Guardian Saga, Guild Wars, Guild Wars 2, Guild Wars: Eye of the North, Guild
Chronicles, Gyrostarr, Half-Life, Half-Life 2, Half-Life 2: Episode One, Half-Life 2: Episode Two, Half-Life: Blue
Wars, Halo: Combat Evolved Anniversary, Halo: Reach, Hang-On GP, Happy Cooking, Harry Potter and the
Case, Helix, Hexic 2, Hidden & Dangerous, Hidden Expedition: Amazon, High School Musical 3: Senior Year,
Hover Strike: Unconquered Lands, How to Train Your Dragon, Hunted: The Demon’s Forge, Hybrid, Ice Age
and the Staff of Kings, infamous, inFAMOUS 2, inFamous: Festival of Blood, Infected, Infinity Blade, Infinity
Man, iTorque 2D, Jacked, Jade Empire, Jak and Daxter: The Lost Frontier, Jaws: Unleashed, Jeopardy!, Jet
Kappa Mikey, Kasumi: Stolen Memory, Kelly Slater’s Pro Surfer, Killzone 2, KILO, Kinect Adventures!, Kinect
Kuros, Kurulin Fusion, Lair, Lair of the Shadow Broker, Lara Croft Tomb Raider: Anniversary, Lara Croft Tomb
Memory, Leadfoot: Stadium Off-Road Racing, League of Legends, Left 4 Dead, Left 4 Dead 2, Legacy of
LEGO Universe, Lemony Snicket’s A Series of Unfortunate Events, Light’s End, Liight, Line Rider 2: Unbound,
Legacy: The Hidden Treasures Of Ethiopia, Madagascar, Madagascar: Escape 2 Africa, Madden NFL 08,
Mall Tycoon 3, Marble Mayhem, Mario Kart 7, Mario Strikers Charged, Mario vs. Donkey Kong, Mario vs.
March Again!, Marvel Avengers Alliance, Marvel Heroes, Marvel Super Hero Squad Online, Marvel Ultimate
Mass Effect 2, Mass Effect 2 – Arrival, Match Defense: Toy Soldiers, MDK 2, MechAssault, MechWarrior
Medieval Conquest, Mercenaries 2: World in Flames, Mercenaries: Playground of Destruction, Metroid Prime
Club 3: DUB Edition, Midnight Club II, Midnight Violin, Miegakure, Million Dollar Password: 2009 Edition,
Minesweeper Series for Windows, Minority Report: Everybody Runs, MLB SlugFest 20-04, Monday Night
Nutso, MX Superfly Featuring Ricky Carmichael, MX vs. ATV Alive, MX vs. ATV Reflex, MX vs. ATV Untamed,
Nancy Drew Dossier: Resorting to Danger!, Nanosaur 2, Nanovor, Narbacular Drop, NBA Ballers: Phenom,
Neverwinter Nights 2, Neverwinter Nights 2: Gold, Neverwinter Nights 2: Mask of the Betrayer, Neverwinter
at the Museum: Battle of the Smithsonian, Oasis, Oasis Ostinato Odd Manor, OLIVIA the Great, One Moon,
Pac-Man World Rally, Pac-Man: Adventures in Time, Pac-Match Party, Pajama Sam 3: You Are What You Eat From
Pandemonium!, Panzer General: Allied Assault, Paper Cuts, Paranorman, Parkan II, PCR, Peabody & Sherman,
New Leash on Life, PGA Tour Simulator, Phantom Dust, Pierre: Insanity Inspired, Pikmin, Pirates of the Burning
Portal, Portal 2, Postal², Postal²: Share the Pain, Power Defense, Prince of Persia: Revelations, Prince of
Prototype, Prototype 2, Prototype 2, Punch-Out!!, Puzzle Agent 2, Quake III: Revolution, Quake III: Team Arena,
Total Destruction, Ratchet & Clank Future: A Crack in Time, Ratchet & Clank Future: Quest for Booty, Ratchet
& Clank: Up Your Arsenal, Ratchet: Deadlocked, Ready, Set, HOOK!, Red Dead Redemption, Red Faction
Resistance 3, Resistance: Fall of Man, Resistance: Retribution, Retail Rush, Ridge Racer 64, Ridge Racer DS,
Risk: Factions, RNA interference, RoadKill, Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Conspiracy, RoboBlitz, Rock Band,
Paris, Rugrats Munchin Land, Rugrats Totally Angelica Boredom Buster, Run Like Hell, Saints Row, Saints Row
& Max 303: They Stole Max’s Brain!, Sam & Max 304: Beyond the Alley of the Dolls, Sam & Max 305: The
Box Office Smash!, Scene It? Bright Lights! Big Screen!, Scene It? Comedy Movies, Scene It? Disney Magical
Scene It? Horror Movies 2, Scene It? Movies, Scene It? Movies 2.0, Scene It? Pixel Flix, Scene It? The Simpsons,
Scribblenauts Unlimited, SeaBlade, Season of Death: Chasing the American Dream, Secret Agent Clank,
Shanti Ambassadors : Crisis In Darfur, Shrek, Shrek Forever After: The Video Game, Shrek SuperSlam, Shrek
Tsuppashire - The Arashi no Drift Rally, Singularity, Six Flags Fun Park, Six Gun Galaxy, Ski Resort Extreme,
the Red Baron, Snoopy: The Flying Ace, SOCOM 3: U.S. Navy SEALs, SOCOM 4: U.S. Navy SEALs, SOCOM
Navy SEALs - Fireteam Bravo 2, SOCOM: U.S. Navy SEALs: Combined Assault, Solar Flare, Soldier of Fortune
DVD Trivia Game!, Space Siege, SpaceChem, Spare, Spelunker HD, Spider-Man 2, Spider-Man 3, Spider-Man:
SquarePants Featuring Nicktoons: Globs of Doom, SpongeBob’s Truth or Square, Spore Creatures, Sports
Combat, Monster Lab, Monsters vs. Aliens, Mortal Kombat, Mortal Kombat vs. DC Universe, Mr. Smoozles Goes
Mystery Case Files: Dire Grove, Mystery Case Files: MillionHeir, Nancy Drew Dossier: Lights, Camera, Curses!,
Need for Speed: Carbon, Need for Speed: Hot Pursuit 2, Nelson Tethers: Puzzle Agent, Neverwinter Nights,
Nights 2: Mysteries of Westgate, Neverwinter Nights 2: Storm of Zehir, NFL Street 3, NHL 2K6, NHL 2K9, Night
Operation Flashpoint: Dragon Rising, Orbz, Over the Hedge, Over the Hedge: Hammy Goes Nuts!, Overlord,
Your Head To Your Feet, Pajama Sam: Life is Rough When You Lose Your Stuff, Pandemica, Pandemonium 2,
Peggle, Penguin Palooza, Percy Jackson & The Olympians: The Lightning Thief, Perfect Dark Zero, Pet Pals:
Sea, Pirates of the Caribbean: Aegir’s Fire, Pirates of the Caribbean: Dead Man’s Chest, Plants vs. Zombies,
Persia: The Two Thrones, Progenitor, Project Gotham Racing 3, Project Gotham Racing 4, Project: Snowblind,
Quantum Conundrum, Quarters, Quest for Glory V: Dragon Fire, Racing Aces, Rails Across America, Rampage:
& Clank Future: Tools of Destruction, Ratchet & Clank: Going Mobile!, Ratchet & Clank: Size Matters, Ratchet
II, Red Faction: Armageddon, Red Faction: Guerrilla, Red Orchestra 2: Heroes of Stalingrad, Resistance 2,
RIFT, Rise and Fall: Civilizations at War, Rise of Nations: Rise of Legends, Rise of Nations: Thrones & Patriots,
Rockstar Games presents Table Tennis, Rogue Ops, Roogoo, Rudolph The Red-Nosed Reindeer, Rugrats in
2, Saints Row: The Third, Sam & Max 301: The Penal Zone, Sam & Max 302: The Tomb of Sammun-Mak, Sam
City That Dares Not Sleep, Samurai Jack: The Shadow of Aku, Sandhill Boys, Scene It? 30Rock, Scene It?
Moments, Scene It? Glee, Scene It? Harry Potter, Scene It? Harry Potter: The Complete Cinematic Journey,
Scene It? The Twilight Saga, School Tycoon, Scramble With Friends, Scribblenauts, Scribblenauts Remix,
Section 8, Sega Worldwide Soccer ‘97, Shadow Complex, Shadow Ops: Red Mercury, Shadowrun, Shank 2,
the Third, Shrek-N-Roll, Silent Hill Homecoming, Silent Hill: Origins, Simple DS Series Vol. 13 - Ijoukishou wo
Ski Resort Tycoon, SkyNET, Skyscraper City, Sly 2: Band of Thieves, Sly 3: Honor Among Thieves, Snoopy vs.
II: U.S. Navy SEALs, SOCOM: U.S. Navy SEALs, SOCOM: U.S. Navy SEALs - Fireteam Bravo, SOCOM: U.S.
II: Double Helix, Solitaire Series for Windows, Sonic Classic Collection, Sonic R, South Park: The Totally Sweet
Friend or Foe, Spider-Man: The Movie, Spider-Man: Web of Shadows - Amazing Allies Edition, SpongeBob
Illustrated for Kids: Football, Sprung, Spy Fox: Operation Ozone, SpyHunter 2, Spyro 2: Season of Flame,
Spyro: Enter the Dragonfly, Spyro: Season of Ice, Spyro: Shadow Legacy, Stacked with Daniel Negreanu,
Star Trek: Starfleet Command Volume II - Empires at War, Star Wars : Imperial Academy, Star Wars: Battlefront,
Star Wars: Jedi Knight II - Jedi Outcast, Star Wars: Knights of the Old Republic, Star Wars: Knights of the
StarCraft II: Wings of Liberty, Start Trek Online, Steel Horizon, Stormrise, Strangeways, Street Hoops, Stuart
4, Super Granny 4, Super Mario Strikers, Super Scribblenauts, Super Sketcher, Super Smash Bros.: Brawl,
Supreme Commander: Forged Alliance, SWAT 3: Close Quarters Battle: Elite Edition, Sym-Bionic Titan, Syphon
Island: Chapter 1 - Launch of the Screaming Narwhal, Tales of Monkey Island: Chapter 2 - The Siege of Spinner
Execution of Guybrush Threepwood, Tales of Monkey Island: Chapter 5 - Rise of the Pirate God, Tales of the
So Raven: Psychic on the Scene, The Amazing Adventures of Kid Cole & Klay, The Arrival, The Big Secret of
The Dark Knight, The Darkness, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim, The Employer. The Godfather II, The Haunting
The Lord of the Rings Online: Mines of Moria, The Lord of the Rings Online: Shadows of Angmar, The Lord of
Lord of the Rings: The Third Age, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Lord of the Rings: War in the
The Orange Box, The Political Machine 2008, The Powerpuff Girls: Bad Mojo Jojo, The Powerpuff Girls: Battle
and the Frog, The Saboteur, The Science of Milk, The Simpsons Game, The Simpsons: Treehouse of Horror VI,
Ties That Bind, The Tomb Raider Trilogy, The Urbz: Sims in the City, The Walking Dead, The World of Cars
Tiger Woods PGA Tour 08, Tiger Woods PGA Tour Online, Titan Quest, Titan Quest: Immortal Throne, Tom
Raider: Legend, Tomb Raider: Underworld, Tony Hawk's Pro Skater 4, Tony Hawk's Project 8, Tony Hawk's
Remix, Top Gear Hyperbike, Top Spin, Top Spin 2, Top Spin 3, Torchlight, Torchlight II, Torque 2D, Torque 3D,
– Decepticons, Trivial Pursuit: Bet You Know It, Tropix 2! Quest for the Golden Banana, Tuning, Turning Point:
Thieves, Uncharted 3: Drake's Deception, Uncharted: Drake's Fortune, Unit 13, Universal Monsters Online,
Troopers, Viva Piñata, Viva Piñata: Party Animals, Voodoo Vince, Wallace & Gromit in Fright of the Bumblebees,
Wanted, War of the Worlds, Warheads, Warlords, Warmonger: Operation: Downtown Destruction, Warp, Wave
Aboard, Wheelman, Where the Wild Things Are, Wild Woody, Wildfire, Williams Arcade Classics, Winter Wars,
Mosaics 3: Fairy Tales, World of Warcraft: The Burning Crusade, World of Warcraft: Wrath of the Lich King,
X-Men: Legends, X-Men: Legends II - Rise of Apocalypse, Xenosaga: Episode III - Also Sprach Zarathustra,
Star Trek Online, Star Trek: D-A-C, Star Trek: Elite Force II, Star Trek: Starfleet Command - Orion Pirates,
Star Wars: Empire at War, Star Wars: Empire at War - Forces of Corruption, Star Wars: Jedi Knight - Jedi Academy,
Old Republic II - The Sith Lords, Star Wars: The Force Unleashed II, Star Wars: The Old Republic, StarCraft,
Little 2, Stunt Bugs, Sudeki, Summoner 2, Super Duper Sumos, Super Granny 3, Super Granny 3, Super Granny
Super Street Fighter II Turbo HD Remix, Superman Returns, Supreme Commander, Supreme Commander 2,
Filter, Syphon Filter: Combat Ops, Syphon Filter: Dark Mirror, Syphon Filter: Logan’s Shadow, Tales of Monkey
Cay, Tales of Monkey Island: Chapter 3 - Lair of the Leviathan, Tales of Monkey Island: Chapter 4 - The Trial and
Abyss, Team Fortress 2, Teen Titans, Terminator 3: Rise of the Machines, Tetris Worlds, Thanks Mom, That’s
Hidden Pines, The Chronicles of Narnia: The Lion, the Witch and the Wardrobe, The Conduit, The Croods,
of Castle Malloy, The Key 1: Flight From Arcadia, The Last of Us, The Legend of Zelda, The Lighthouse Girl,
the Rings: Conquest, The Lord of the Rings: Tactics, The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The
North, The Magician’s Handbook II: BlackLore, The Matrix Online, The Misadventures of P.B. Winterbottom,
Him!, The Powerpuff Girls: Mojo Jojo A-Go-Go, The Powerpuff Girls: Paint the Townsville Green, The Princess
“Homer3”, The Sims 2, The Sims: Bustin’ Out, The Sopranos: Road to Respect, The Suffering, The Suffering:
Online, The X-Files: Resist or Serve, Things I Never Did, ThinkTanks, Tiger Eye Part I: Curse of the Riddle Box,
Clancy's Ghost Recon 2, Tom Clancy's Rainbow Six: Lockdown, Tom Clancy’s Ghost Recon Commander, Tomb
Proving Ground, Tony Hawk's Underground, Tony Hawk's Underground 2, Tony Hawk's Underground 2:
Toy Soldiers, Toy Soldiers: Cold War, Toy Story Mania, Traditional Sales Aid, Transformers: War for Cybertron
Fall of Liberty, Twisted Metal, Ultimate Spider-Man, Ultimate Spider-Man (Limited Edition), Uncharted 2: Among
Universe at War: Earth Assault, Unreal Championship 2: The Liandri Conflict, Unwell Mel, Virtual On: Cyber
Wallace & Gromit in Muzzled!, Wallace & Gromit in The Bogey Man, Wallace & Gromit in The Last Resort,
Race: Blue Storm, Westward, Westward II: Heroes of the Frontier, Westward III: Gold Rush, Westward IV: All
WipEout, Wolf of the Battlefield: Commando 3, Wolf Toss, Wolfenstein, Wolfenstein 3D, World Mosaics 2, World
Wrap Time, WWE All Stars, WWE SmackDown vs. Raw 2008, X-COM: Apocalypse, X-Men Origins: Wolverine,
Zaxxon's Motherbase 2000, Zirus Antivirotics, Zombies & Me, Zoo Tycoon 2, Zoo Tycoon 2: Marine Mania
A N D M A N Y, M A N Y M O R E . . .
U N D E R G R A D U AT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M S O F F E R E D
AT T H E E U R O P E - B I L B AO A N D U S A C A M P U S E S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER SCI ENCE I N RE AL-TI M E I NTER AC TIVE SI M UL ATION
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
DIG ITA L ART A N D AN IMATION
ADDITIONAL DEGREE PROGRAMS OFFERED
AT T H E D I G I P E N U S A C A M P U S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER SCI ENCE AN D GAM E DESIG N
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER SCI ENCE
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER ENG I N EERI NG
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
ENG I N EERI NG AN D SOUN D DESIG N
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
GAM E DESIG N
BACHELOR OF ARTS IN
M USIC AN D SOUN D DESIG N
MASTER OF SCIENCE IN
COM PUTER SCI ENCE
MASTER OF FINE ARTS IN
DIG ITAL ARTS
DigiPen Institute of Technology Europe - Bilbao
DigiPen Europe-Bilbao
Virgen del Puerto 34, Edificio A
48508 Zierbena, Bizkaia
www.digipen.es
Welcome to DigiPen 12
DigiPen Institute of Technology is... 14
Founder and President 16
Our History: Timeline 18
DigiPen in Spain 20
DigiPen By The Numbers 22
24
OUR STUDENTS
36
ACADEMICS
BS in Computer Science in
Real-Time Interactive Simulation 42
BFA in Digital Art and Animation 54
Non-Game Careers 66
Continuing Education and Training 68
Department of:
Fine Arts 72
Animation and Production 74
Computer Science 76
Digital Arts 79
Game Software Design and Production 79
Humanities and Social Sciences 80
Life Sciences 82
Mathematics 83
Physics 85
88
ADMISSIONS
Applying to DigiPen 88
Contact Us 90
COURSES
Award-Winning Students 24
Award-Winning Student Games 26
Award-Winning Student Papers 28
Our Alumni: From Tag to Portal 2 30
Our Alumni: Breaking New Ground in
Journey and The Last of Us 32
COURSES
U N D ER GR AD UATE
EXPLORE DIGIPEN
WELCOME TO DIGIPEN
72
OUR STUDENTS
12
11
DIGIPEN CAMPUS, EUROPE-BILBAO
13
WELCOME
TO DIGIPEN
DIGIPEN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY EUROPE-BILBAO
For over 25 years, DigiPen Institute of Technology has helped advance the video
game, simulation, and animation industries by empowering students to become
exceptional game developers, engineers, programmers, and digital artists.
DigiPen Institute of Technology is a pioneer in game development education. In 1996,
it became the first school in the world to offer a bachelor’s degree in video game
programming — the Bachelor of Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation. Since
then, DigiPen’s programs have continually evolved to ensure graduates are ready to
create, innovate, and collaborate at some of the world’s top companies.
DigiPen’s students are among the most respected in their fields, consistently winning
top honors at international competitions such as the Independent Games Festival. Its
faculty draws from years of academic and industry experience, allowing instructors
to teach both the theory and practices necessary to succeed in a professional studio
environment. And its alumni have gone on to produce work that has captivated
audiences by the millions.
DIGIPEN CAMPUS, EUROPE-BILBAO
15
DIGIPEN INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY IS...
FOCUSED
By declaring their major when they apply, freshman students at DigiPen jump
right into the coursework most relevant to their chosen field. Some take the
equivalent of graduate-level courses by their senior year.
HANDS- ON
DigiPen teaches students to be problem solvers and innovators through realworld projects. By applying academic principles to concrete year-long team
projects, students gain the practical knowledge to become creators – not just
users – of technology.
EXPERIENCED
DigiPen has been educating students for over 25 years and is the first school
in the world to offer a bachelor’s degree in game development (the Bachelor
of Science in Computer Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation).
DigiPen faculty members are made up of academic experts as well as
veterans of the game and animation industries.
CO N N E C TE D
DigiPen’s Program Advisory Committees – comprised of DigiPen faculty members
and director-level employees from studios like Microsoft, Nintendo, Bungie,
PopCap, and ArenaNet – meet every six months to ensure DigiPen’s education
and curricula continue to evolve alongside the game and animation industries.
R E N OW N E D
DigiPen students have won 46 awards at the Independent Games
Festival – more than any other school in the world. And for five years
running, The Princeton Review has ranked DigiPen among the top five
schools in North America for game design for the past five years.
DIGIPEN STUDENT GAME » CHRONO DISFUNGLEMENT
TEAM WAKK A9 » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
17
CLAUDE COMAIR
PRESIDENT AND FOUNDER
“Twenty-five years ago, when DigiPen first opened
its doors, the world of real-time 3D simulation was
just at its beginning stages. Today, a quarter of
a century later, the industry has made leaps and
bounds in discovery, design, and development, as
demonstrated by the quality of today’s simulations,
video games, animations, software, and hardware.
It is both exciting and challenging to continuously
be on the cutting-edge of these industries. Our
graduates have gone on to make a huge impact
in their fields and have made us proud that they
continue to push technology to the limits. They
have proven to be innovators, creators, and leaders
in their fields. I cannot wait to see what we, as a
whole, will achieve in the next 25 years.”
Mr. Claude Comair earned a degree in Architecture and became a Professional
Engineer in 1984. He was then invited by the Japanese Ministry of Education
to become a government researcher positioned at Osaka University, Faculty
of Engineering in Osaka, Japan. Later, he earned his master’s degree in
Environmental Engineering from Osaka University. He completed five more
years of doctorate studies at Osaka University, Faculty of Engineering, and is
currently working on his doctorate thesis, which he will present to the École
Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne in Switzerland. While in Japan in the
1980s, Mr. Comair helped to develop 3D visualization software, which was
utilized to simulate different events (e.g. earthquakes, etc.) in various cities.
In 1988, Mr. Comair applied his experience and passion for the game and
simulation industries to address its need for innovation and a skilled workforce
by founding DigiPen in Vancouver, B.C., Canada. In 1998, he co-founded
Nintendo Software Technology in Redmond, WA, a subsidiary of Nintendo
Co. Ltd. As Chairman and Chief Technology Officer of Nintendo Software he
oversaw the production of such game titles as Mario vs. Donkey Kong 1 and 2
(2004 and 2006), Ridge Racer 64 and DS (2000 and 2004), The Legend of
Zelda (2003), 1080° Avalanche (2003), Wave Race: Blue Storm (2001), Pokémon
Puzzle League (2000), Bionic Commando (2000), and many others. He has also
created and registered numerous patents for Nintendo and Boeing.
Mr. Comair taught at DigiPen for more than two decades, and his expertise and
passion for the industry and innovation continue to guide the curriculum and
culture of DigiPen Institute of Technology today.
HISTORY: DIGIPEN TIMELINE
96
88
1988
Mr. Claude Comair
starts DigiPen in
Vancouver, Canada.
1993
DigiPen establishes the
DigiPen Applied Computer
Graphics School.
88
1996
The Washington State Higher
Education Coordinating Board (HECB)
authorizes DigiPen to offer a four-year
Bachelor of Science degree program.
89
90
90
91
92
1999
The last cohort of DigiPen’s
students in Canada graduates.
DigiPen permanently relocates
to its Redmond campus.
93
93
1990
DigiPen introduces its training program
in 3D animation. DigiPen begins working
with Nintendo of America to establish
a video game programming diploma
program in Canada.
94
94
95
96
1994
DigiPen accepts the first group
of students to its video game
programming diploma program.
97
98
98
99
99
00
1998
DigiPen opens its campus in
Redmond, Washington.
The inaugural class of DigiPen’s Bachelor of
Science in Computer Science in Real-Time
Interactive Simulation program begins.
19
2011
2006
DigiPen’s Master of Science in
Computer Science degree is
approved by the ACCSC.
02
DigiPen opens its second
international campus in Bilbao, Spain*.
06
*The campus in Bilbao, Spain does not fall
within the scope of ACCSC accreditation.
2008
2002
DigiPen opens its
first international
branch campus in
Singapore.
DigiPen is accredited by the
Accrediting Commission of
Career Schools and Colleges
(ACCSC).
11
08
DigiPen Singapore is
accredited by the ACCSC.
DigiPen adds two new degree
programs: the Bachelor of Arts
in Game Design and Bachelor of
Science in Computer Science and
Game Design.
01
02
03
04
05
06
07
08
09
2010
2004
DigiPen begins offering two new
degree programs: the Bachelor of
Science in Computer Engineering
and the Bachelor of Fine Arts in
Digital Art and Animation.
04
2007
DigiPen starts an educational
partnership with Keimyung
University in Daegu, South Korea.
07
DigiPen moves to a new
campus in Redmond and
begins offering a part-time
option for the Master of
Science program.
10
11
10
12
12
2012
DigiPen introduces three new degree
programs: the Bachelor of Arts in Music
and Sound Design, Bachelor of Science
in Engineering and Sound Design, and
Master of Fine Arts in Digital Arts.
13
DI G I PEN CA M PUS LO CAT I O N S
DIGIPEN IN
EUROPE-BILBAO
DigiPen Institute of Technology EuropeBilbao is located in the village of Zierbena
near Bilbao, Spain. It is DigiPen’s third
campus and its first European campus.
DigiPen’s other campuses are located in
Redmond, Washington, and Singapore.
Bilbao, the capital of the province of Biscay,
is the largest city in the Basque Country
of northern Spain. The greater Bilbao area
has a population of approximately one
million inhabitants. Situated on the Atlantic
coastline along both sides of the Nervión
River, Bilbao is an industrial and economic
center, an important seaport, and a major
transit hub connecting Spain and Portugal
with the rest of Europe.
REDMOND, WA, USA
In addition to its vital role in Spain’s
economy, Bilbao is also a center for culture,
art, and architecture. The Guggenheim
Museum is an internationally recognized
architectural masterpiece, and together with
the Bilbao Fine Arts Museum, they display
formidable collections of Spanish and
international works of art. The city also has
several theaters and concert halls that host
cultural events, including performances by
the Bilbao Symphony Orchestra.
LEARN MORE ABOUT BILBAO AT:
https://www.digipen.es/about/history-ofbilbao/
= DI G I PEN CA M PUS LO CAT I O N S
= DI G I PEN EDUCAT I O N A L PA RT N ER S HI PS
21
B I L B AO, S PA I N
SOUTH KOREA
SINGAPORE
#3
D IGIP E N ’ S RA N K IN T HE
DIGIPEN BY
THE NUMBERS
SCHOOL I N THE WOR L D
PR I NCE TO N R E V I E W ’ S
TO O FFE R A
LI S T O F TO P
BACHELOR’S DEGREE IN
GA M E D E SIGN
SCH O O L S
V I D E O GA M E
P R O GR A M M I N G
IN NORTH AMERICA
DIGIPEN
IGF
STUDENTS
H AV E WO N
AWARDS WON BY
DIGIPEN STUDENT GAMES
M O R E TH A N A N Y OTH E R
SC H OO L I N TH E WO R LD
INCLUDING THOSE RECOGNIZING
GAME PROJECTS & ACADEMIC PAPERS
23
MORE THAN
300
GAME STUDIOS ATTENDED
GA M E C OM PA N IES H AVE H IR ED
DIG IPE N’S
2 0 13 CA R E E R FA IR
D IG I P E N
G R AD UAT ES
2.9
T I M E S V I S I T O R S H AV E
DOWNLOADED
OUR
GRADUATES
HAVE S H I P P E D MO R E T H A N
750,000
V I E WS O F DI GI P E N ST UDE NT
STUDENT GAME
FROM DIGIPEN’S WEBSITE
G A M E TR A I LE R S O N
1,000
COMMERCIAL GAMES
YouTube
youtube.com/WatchDigiPen
games.digipen.edu
INDEPENDENT GAMES FESTIVAL
AWARD-WINNING
STUDENTS
IGF
AWARDS
won by
DIGIPEN
D IGIPE N STUDEN TS
HAV E WO N 1 3 7
AWA RD S IN N AT I ON A L
AND IN TE RN AT I O N A L
C OMPE TITIO N S.
DigiPen students don’t just distinguish
themselves in the classroom – they create
work that stands out in international
competitions at both the student and
professional levels. For more information
about our students’ work, including games,
animations, and other projects, head to
digipen.es/gallery.
IGF is the original proving ground for both independent and
student game developers (and is still the largest festival
celebrating indie games). DIGIPEN HAS RECEIVED MORE
IGF AWARDS FOR ITS STUDENT GAMES THAN ANY OTHER
SCHOOL IN THE WORLD. Since the IGF began its Student
Showcase in 2001, it has granted 46 awards to 36 DigiPen
student projects.
STUDENT GAMES
PAX 10
A highlight of the annual Penny Arcade Expo in Seattle, WA,
the PAX 10 is a showcase of the best independent games from
around the world. Selected each year by a panel of industry
experts from a field of over a hundred submissions, the PAX
10 celebrates innovative gameplay across a broad spectrum
of platforms and genres. THE PAX 10 HAS FEATURED
A DIGIPEN STUDENT GAME EACH YEAR FROM 2008–2012.
25
INDIE GAME CHALLENGE
$100,000
GRAND PRIZE
The Indie Game Challenge is a collaboration between
the Academy of Interactive Arts and Sciences, GameStop
Corp., and the Guildhall at Southern Methodist University.
Four DigiPen student games have been featured as
finalists in the competition, and THE 2010 DIGIPEN
AWARD-WINNING
MASTER’S PAPERS
STUDENT GAME, GEAR, TOOK HOME THE $100,000
GRAND PRIZE.
BEST PAPER AWARD AT THE 2010
ASIA CONFERENCE ON SIMULATION
AND AI IN COMPUTER GAMES.
■
GDC GAME NARRATIVE
REVIEW COMPETITION
Part of the annual Game Developers Conference’s Game
Narrative Summit, this competition challenges students to
analyze the narrative structure of a video game and submit
a paper on their findings. SEVEN DIGIPEN STUDENTS
HAVE WON THE COMPETITION’S PLATINUM PRIZE,
AND 44 DIGIPEN STUDENTS HAVE BEEN NAMED
GOLD WINNERS.
Abi Chakra, Antoine. “PriorityBased Level of Detail Approach
for Interpolated Animations of
Articulated Models.”
BEST PAPER AWARD AT THE
2008 GAME-ON NORTH AMERICA
CONFERENCE.
■
Gist, Kelson. “Dynamic Motion
Patches in Configurable
Environments for Character
Animation and Path Planning.”
BEST PAPER AWARD AT
THE 2007 GAME-ON NORTH
AMERICA CONFERENCE.
■
Shahine, Guy. “Player Modeling
Using Knowledge Transfer.”
2013
2012
Finalist, Technical Excellence (Professional Category),
IGF 2013
Finalist, Best Gameplay Award, Brazilian International Game
Festival 2012
Finalist, Playability Award, hóPlay 2012
Finalist, Best Original Idea Award, hóPlay 2012
Winner, Excellence in Technology (Professional Category),
IGF China 2011
Winner, Best Student Game, IGF China 2011
PERSPECTIVE
2013
SUPER SPACE _____
Finalist, Excellence in Design (Professional Category), IGF 2013
Finalist, IndieCade 2012
D IGIPE N STUDEN T
GA M E S HAVE WON 9 0
AWA RD S IN N AT I ON A L
AND IN TE RN AT I O N A L
C OMPE TITIO N S.
To download and play these games and
more, visit games.digipen.edu.
2012
DOUSE
Presenter at the Sense of Wonder Night, Tokyo Game
Show 2012
2012
LESHY
Honorable Mention, Student Showcase, IGF 2013
Finalist (Technical Excellence), Independent Propeller
Awards 2012
Finalist (Best Design), Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Finalist (Best Audio), Independent Propeller Awards 2012
2012
2012
2013
AWARD-WINNING
STUDENT GAMES
VOID
CHRONO DISFUNGLEMENT
BLOCKHEAD
Finalist, Student Competition, IGF China 2012
2012
FLIP’S ADVENTURE
THE FOURTH WALL
Finalist, Indie Game Challenge 2012
Honorable Mention, Independent Propeller Awards 2012
2012
Finalist, Student Competition, IGF China 2012
PIXI
2012
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2012
Winner, Excellent Student Game, IGF China 2011
Finalist, Student Competition, IGF China 2012
2012
POTAWATOMI
2012
BE GOOD
Honorable Mention, Student Showcase, IGF 2012
DEITY
PAX 10 Selection, Penny Arcade Expo 2012
Grand Prize Winner, Independent Propeller Awards 2012
2012
2012
NITRONIC RUSH
Honorable Mention, Technical Excellence
(Professional Category), IGF 2012
Honorable Mention, Student Showcase, IGF 2012
Gamer’s Choice Award, Indie Game Challenge 2012
Technical Excellence Winner, Independent Propeller
Awards 2012
Finalist (Grand Prize), Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Finalist (Best Audio), Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Winner (Playability Award), hóPlay 2012
Finalist (Best Sound/Music Award), hóPlay 2012
Finalist (Best Design Award), hóPlay 2012
Winner, Best Independent Game, Fun & Serious Game
Festival 2012
NOUS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2012
Finalist, Best Narrative Award, Brazilian International
Game Festival
2011
TERRA: THE LEGEND OF THE GEOCHINE
Finalist, Student Competition, IGF China 2011
2011
SOLSTICE
Winner, Kinect Award, hóPlay 2012
Honorable Mention, Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Presenter at the Sense of Wonder Night, Tokyo Game
Show 2011
27
2011
2008
2005
Honorable Mention, Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2011
Non-Professional Finalist, Indie Game Challenge 2011
PAX 10 Selection, Penny Arcade Expo 2010
Finalist, IndieCade 2010
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2008
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2005
Audience Award, Slamdance 2005
Finalist, Slamdance 2005
SOLACE
2011
SUBSONIC
Non-Professional Finalist, Indie Game Challenge 2011
EMPYREAL NOCTURNE
2007
TOBLO
Winner, Best Student Game, IGF 2007
Finalist, Design Innovation Award (Professional Category),
IGF 2007
Finalist, Slamdance 2007
Best Game on the Go Winner, Intel Games Demo 2006
Audience Award, Northwest Games Festival 2006
2011
A FLIPPING GOOD TIME
2007
Official Selection, Extra Credits Innovation Award,
LOGIN 2011
PAX 10 Selection, Penny Arcade Expo 2011
BASE INVADERS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2007
Finalist, Slamdance 2007
2010
2007
Honorable Mention, Independent Propeller Awards 2012
Non-Professional Grand Prize Winner, Indie Game
Challenge 2010
Honorable Mention, Student Showcase, IGF 2010
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2007
SCAVENGER HUNT
2004
ICE WARS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2004
2004
BONTAGO
Winner, Innovation in Game Design (Professional
Category), IGF 2004
2004
SCRAPPED
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2004
GEAR
2010
DREAMSIDE MAROON
Finalist, Indie Game Challenge 2010
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2010
GELATIN JOE
2003
CRAZY CROSS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2003
2006
NARBACULAR DROP
2003
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2006
Finalist, Slamdance 2006
VEKTOR SPACE
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2003
2006
2003
ORBLITZ
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2006
MALL MONSTER
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2003
2010
IGNEOUS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2010
2006
SEA OF CHAOS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2006
2003
VALENCE
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2003
2009
SOWLAR
Finalist, IndieCade 2009
2009
TAG: THE POWER OF PAINT
PAX 10 Selection, Penny Arcade Expo 2009
Winner, Best Student Game, IGF 2009
2006
RUMBLE BOX
Finalist, Innovation in Game Design (Professional
Category), IGF 2006
Physics Award, Slamdance 2006
Finalist, Slamdance 2006
2002
COMMANDO ATTACK SUB
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2002
2002
THUGS
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2002
2005
2008
SYNAESTHETE
Winner, Best Student Game, IGF 2008
Finalist, Excellence in Visual Arts (Professional Category),
IGF 2008
KISSES
Finalist, Open Category Competition, IGF 2005
2001
GENJOX
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2001
2005
ROCK STATION
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2005
2001
MATRIX ATTACK
Student Showcase Winner, IGF 2001
2012
2010
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2012
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2012
2010
MOUTRIE, KHALIL
CASSELL, RYAN
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2012
2012
DASSLER, SAMUEL
AWARD-WINNING
STUDENT PAPERS
D IGIPE N STUDEN T
PAP E R S HAV E WON 47
AWA RD S IN N AT I ON A L
AND IN TE RN AT I O N A L
C OMPE TITIO N S.
In addition to our Master’s students winning
various awards for their research papers, our
undergraduate students have won 44 Gold
and Platinum awards at the Game Narrative
Review Competition, a part of the Game
Narrative Summit at the annual Austin Game
Developers Conference (AGDC).
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2012
2011
KANIGAL, DAVID
Honorable Mention, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2011
2011
FOSS, ERIK
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2011
2010
VANDERGRIFT, BEN
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
BARTH, ZACHARY
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
DURAND, RYAN
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
HAYES, PATRICK
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
HOGUE, ZABIR
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
HUNTER, SEAN
KWAN, PERNG
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
LOBATO, MICHAEL
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
McCRAIN, EVAN
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
McWILLIAMS, ANDREW
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
PARSELL, JAY
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
ROTONDO, NICHOLAS
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
RYAN, ALLAN
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2010
TALLMAN, CHRIS
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2010
2009
IRELAND, TALON
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
29
2009
2009
2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2009
2009
2008
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2008
2009
2009
2008
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2008
2009
2009
2008
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Platinum winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2008
2009
2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2009
2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2009
2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2009
2009
SEXTON, KIRK
Software Engineer, DigiPen R&D
Best Paper Award, Asia Conference on Simulation and AI
in Computer Games, 2010
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2008
2009
2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
2009
2009
SHAHINE, GUY
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Gold winner, Game Narrative Review Competition,
AGDC 2009
Software Engineer, Microsoft
Best Paper Award, GAME-ON North America Conference,
2007
AUSTRIA, PAUL
BACON, LAURA
CAMERON, PATRICK
CHEN, ALEX
CLARK, CHRISTOPHER
DAVIDSON, RAYMOND
DURAND, RYAN
GOGA, ADAM
HUTCHINSON, HAMZA
LIDDELL, EVAN
LOPES, TOM
MCELROY, CULLEN
McELROY, MICHAEL
WALKER, WAYNE
GUBELMAN, SEAN
KAMM, ALEX
OSABEN, ERIK
O’LEARY, PATRICK
PARSELL, JAY
GRADUATE STUDENT
RESEARCH PAPERS
PENG, KWAN
SUSETYO, MICHAEL
2010
ABI CHAKRA, ANTOINE
GIST, KELSON
Software Engineer, Total Immersion Software
Best Paper Award, GAME-ON North America Conference,
2008
2007
LEUNG, JOANNA
WALKER, PATRICK
Video Game Portal 2 ©
Image courtesy of Valve.
31
OUR ALUMNI
FROM TAG
TO P O RTA L 2
BS in Computer Science in RealTime Interactive Simulation students
Tejeev Kohli, Brett English, Pongthep
“Bank” Charnchaichujit, and Ted
Rivera had a “wish list” for their time
at DigiPen: “Make a sweet game,
win at IGF, and get hired by Valve,”
in English’s words. For most student
developers, accomplishing one of
those items would be a tremendous
achievement – but these DigiPen allstars managed to hit all three.
It all started at DigiPen’s annual Career Day, where
students present their game projects to visiting game
developers. The team already had their “sweet game,”
a 3D platformer called Tag: The Power of Paint that
let players travel through an urban landscape by
“tagging” surfaces with magical paint, and they were
demonstrating it to recruiters. “Robin Walker from
Valve was there, and we spoke with him for about
an hour,” Kohli says. “He played the whole game,
and while he played it, he kept asking us questions
about our process and how we worked on the game.
It was essentially an interview with us, but a very
informal one.”
A month later, the team flew down to San Francisco
for the Independent Games Festival, where they
checked the second item off their list: Tag won the
honor of Best Game in the festival’s Student Showcase.
“That’s when the Valve guys got back to us and said,
‘Hey, do you guys want to work at Valve?’” Kohli says.
They didn’t need much convincing. The team’s first
project at Valve was an unusual one. “It was just the
four of us in our own office, and we were told, ‘Make
Tag in the Source Engine,’” says Kohli. (The Source
Engine is Valve’s proprietary game development
framework.) “So we essentially re-wrote all the stuff
from Tag – the painting and the paint gun – and made
a few levels so that people in the company could try
it and then assess what to do with the technology.”
Around the same time they finished their tech demo,
the “paint guys,” as they came to be known within the
company, found a new opportunity: playtesting Portal
2, the nascent sequel to Valve’s 2007 blockbuster
that was itself based on the work of another DigiPen
student game team. “At that point, which was maybe
two months into our jobs, we were deciding what to do
with the paint technology,” Kohli says. “We had a bunch
of options, and one of them was ‘let’s incorporate this
into Portal.’” It wasn’t a completely smooth transition.
“It took a little while for us to convince the Portal team
that it was worth experimenting with,” says Rivera. And
even after they found allies willing to take up their
cause, certain elements of Tag simply didn’t translate
into its new setting. “The feedback we got was that
adding a second gun to Portal would complicate things
a bit too much,” Kohli says. Likewise, Tag’s “stick paint,”
which allowed players to walk on walls and ceilings,
was deemed too disorienting for the game’s already
complex puzzles.
But it wasn’t long before the entire Portal 2 team was
coming up with their own ideas for how to incorporate
the Tag team’s paint technology into their game. “That’s
when it really cemented itself as a core part of Portal
2,” Kohli says.
At that point, Kohli, English, Charnchaichujit, and
Rivera were assigned to separate teams within the
greater Portal 2 group. Charnchaichujit jumped into
the main programming team to work on the game’s core
features. English helped write code for a redesigned
camera that was more intuitive for players. And all four
of the “paint guys” helped design new and unique
obstacles for players to overcome.
They couldn’t be happier with how things turned out.
“The first few months there, we were very much on our
own – and that was very scary,” says Kohli. “We took
it as a ‘sink or swim’ situation – being thrown into the
deep end.” But by trusting in their abilities and working
as a team, they didn’t just finish their checklist - they
helped create one of the best games of 2011.
TWO GENERATIONS OF STUDENT SUCCESS
The original Portal was also
developed by a team of DigiPen
students based on their senior
project, Narbacular Drop.
Video Game Journey ®
Journey © 2012 Sony Computer Entertainment America LLC. Journey is a registered
trademark of Sony Computer Entertainment America LLC. Developed by thatgamecompany.
33
OUR ALUMNI
BREAKING NEW
GROUND IN
JOURNEY AND
THE LAST OF US
Looking back at his career so far, DigiPen graduate
Bryan Singh considers himself very fortunate. While
many game developers would be thrilled to work on one
landmark game project, Singh has already managed to
be a part of two.
After earning his BS in Computer Science in Real-Time
Interactive Simulation in 2009, Singh’s first job out of
college was at thatgamecompany in Los Angeles, where he
and a small team of ambitious developers worked to bring
the studio’s groundbreaking Journey to the PlayStation
3. Then, after a short stint at indie studio The Behemoth,
Singh signed on with Santa Monica-based Naughty Dog,
which recently released the post-apocalyptic adventure
The Last of Us.
Singh’s personal game development story began even
prior to his four years at DigiPen. As a longtime dabbler
in all things creative — from music to writing to drawing
— Singh says he always enjoyed the output but wasn’t
particularly good at any one thing.
That is, until he stumbled across an online animator’s
forum, where he discovered the world of Adobe Flash and
began teaching himself the platform’s built-in scripting
language, ActionScript. From there, Singh was making
his very first games.
“This was only in middle school and high school,” Singh
says. “Eventually people were responding positively to
these little things I was making, so it just felt natural to
want to continue to do that.”
Despite his success in making web-based games on
his own, Singh says his education at DigiPen cemented
his understanding of programming and the collaborative
effort that goes into making larger, more complex games.
“I feel like DigiPen really captures that feeling where …
everyone works together to teach each other and learn
together," Singh says. "That structure really translates to
what I’ve experienced professionally.”
Singh’s knowledge of computer science, combined
with his previous game design experience, ended up
making him a strong candidate when he applied for a
job at thatgamecompany, which was looking for new
talent to help make the follow-up to their game Flower.
During the interview process, studio founder Jenova
Chen pitched the concept for Journey. Singh got to see
an early 2D prototype, as well as the first stages of the
new game engine.
Singh joined the team as a technical designer but soon
found himself — along with his coworkers — juggling a
wide range of responsibilities. Singh worked on character
movement, camera controls, and AI programming, such as
for the game’s ambient cloth creatures that flitter about as
players make their way through the desert landscape. He
also helped program and design the game’s multiplayer
features, which allow players to connect, travel, and
communicate with other anonymous companions.
“While working on Journey, I think I started gaining
a really big respect for the implications of games as a
medium and the importance of reaching people with the
work that you do,” Singh says. “And I think that’s pretty
evident in the game.”
While Journey was an enormous critical and financial
success, a strange thing happened. Having delivered
the last title for a three-game contract with Sony,
thatgamecompany was free of obligations. As such, several
team members — including Singh — left the studio to
pursue the next stages of their respective careers.
“And we all left on pretty good terms, too,” Singh says.
For a short time Singh worked at indie game studio
The Behemoth, makers of the popular beat ‘em up Castle
Crashers. That offer came at the invitation of artist and
designer Dan Paladin, one of the very figures who inspired
Singh from his early days in Flash game development.
Singh worked independently for close to three months
prototyping new game ideas, but ultimately felt he might
be happier at another studio.
When a position opened at Naughty Dog, he applied,
quickly got an interview, and was hired soon after.
Beginning last December, Singh dove in to help finish
and ship The Last of Us. As a gameplay scripter, he helped
with the timing and placement of in-game story content.
“There are several sections in which you are in a lowtension moment. You’re kind of just hanging out with a
handful of other characters,” Singh says. “So I did a lot
of scripting of NPCs — deciding where a character goes,
where a character looks, when they decide to deliver a
line of dialogue.”
As with Journey, The Last of Us has already been
trumpeted as a tremendous achievement, particularly
in the areas of character development and impactful
storytelling.
For Singh, the experience has been humbling.
“For a lot of the people that I worked closely with on
The Last of Us, this is going to be their first project that
even got a decent critical reception — and they’ve been
working for decades,” Singh says. “I reflect on my history
and feel like I’m basically the luckiest person.”
“While working on Journey,
I think I started gaining a really
big respect for the implications
of games as a medium and the
importance of reaching people
with the work that you do.”
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
CHONG KWOK BENG » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
“Over the years we’ve been in business, we’ve come to believe the best way
to learn how to make games is to see how real players react when they’re
put in front of real games. To see that process being replicated inside an
academic institution was really exciting. Our company today is stronger than
it’s ever been, thanks, in part, to our DigiPen graduates."
- ROBIN WALKER » DEVELOPER AND CREATOR OF TEAM FORTRESS
V A LV E S O F T W A R E
DIGIPEN CAMPUS, EUROPE-BILBAO
ACA D E M I C S
AC A D E M I C S AT D I G I P E N
AC A D E M I C S
AT D I G I P E N I N S T I T U T E O F T E C H N O LO G Y E U R O P E - B I L B AO
DigiPen’s degree programs give students a comprehensive understanding of the
academic fundamentals of their field while preparing them to effectively apply what
they learn in a professional environment.
By starting out with a strong focus on foundational theory and challenging students to
apply what they learn in the classroom to intensive year-long projects and internships
with local developers, DigiPen’s programs give students an understanding of their
profession that goes far deeper than current tools and processes. Students learn
how to put their knowledge into practice in a results-driven studio environment while
gaining valuable team skills.
By the time they complete their degrees, students are equipped with a portfolio
of work that can help them stand out to prospective employers and the industry
connections to jump-start their job search. But more importantly, they leave with
a depth of knowledge and wealth of hands-on experience that allows them to
meaningfully contribute to their team from day one on the job.
U N D E R G R A D U AT E
DEGREE PROGRAMS
Bachelor of Science in Computer Science in
Real-Time Interactive Simulation
Bachelor of Fine Arts in
Digital Art and Animation
37
D I G I P E N ST U D E N T A RT WO R K » VA R I O U S CA M P U S E S
ACA D E M I C S
XIN LI
D E A N O F FAC U LT Y
S E N I O R V P O F AC A D E M I C A F FA I R S
Dr. Li received his Ph.D. in Computer Science
from the University of Central Florida. He
served as a Senior Software Engineer at
Nintendo Software Technology and as a
Senior Staff Engineer at Lockheed Martin’s
Advanced Simulation Division before coming
to DigiPen. As Dean of Faculty, he oversees
DigiPen’s academic departments and degree
programs. In addition to his administrative
duties, Dr. Li has published 35 technical
papers in research journals and conference
proceedings. He also teaches animation,
modeling, and real-time rendering techniques
to seniors and graduate students.
“DigiPen graduates go on to become tomorrow’s leaders and
innovators in a field that is continually expanding to new heights and
achievements. This is a truly exciting time to become a part of the
digital entertainment industry.”
39
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
GLORIA KANG » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
"DigiPen is still the greatest place to study game
development anywhere. The curriculum has continued
to evolve to keep up with the latest technologies, which
gives students a solid head start in the industry. DigiPen
graduates are typically the top performers of their
teams, and they tend to rise to leadership roles."
- SONIA JACKSON » HIRING & OPERATIONS
SUCKER PUNCH PRODUCTIONS
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
SENDOA BERGASA » SPAIN CAMPUS
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E I N R E A L-T I M E I N T E R A C T I V E S I M U L AT I O N
U N D E R G R A D UAT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M S
T H E BACH E LOR OF S CIE N CE IN
COMPUTER SCIENCE IN
REAL-TIME INTERACTIVE
SIMULATION
The BS in Computer Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation is a four-year
computer science degree focusing on developing, implementing, and programming
complex interactive simulations and computer graphics in real-time. This program
uses game development as a tool for teaching advanced computer science concepts.
Students begin with a solid foundation in mathematics, physics, and programming,
then apply that knowledge in yearly team-based projects where they design, program,
test, and finally release their own original game software to the public. Those who
successfully complete the BS in Computer Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation
program have the knowledge and skills to produce highly complex software systems
at a professional level.
43
DIGIPEN STUDENT GAME » IONA
S E N D O A B E R G A S A , X A B I E R E S PA Ñ A A N D X A B I E R S E V I L L A N O » S PA I N C A M P U S
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E I N R E A L-T I M E I N T E R A C T I V E S I M U L AT I O N
TOPICS COVERED
Students in the BS in Computer Science in RealTime Interactive Simulation program learn how to:
CAREER OUTLOOK
■
Program a variety of simulations and game
software in core programming languages
like C++.
■
Create robust artificial intelligence
algorithms to serve as the cognitive
processes for computer-controlled
objects.
■
Apply concepts such as computer
networks, TCP/IP, and internet
programming to multi-user software
environments.
■
Implement efficient graphical user
interfaces (GUIs), including the
management of windows, menus,
and dialogue boxes.
■
Draft technical design documents to aid in
the scheduling and organizational aspects
of software production.
Graduates of the BS in Computer Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation
program are prepared to enter the simulation or video game industries as computer
scientists and software engineers. Possible position titles include Computer
Scientist, Software Engineer, Software Development Engineer in Test, Software
Analyst, Computer Programmer, Gameplay Programmer, Engine Programmer, Physics
Programmer, Graphics Programmer, Networking Programmer, Artificial Intelligence
Programmer, User Interface Programmer, Tools Programmer, Web Developer, or
Game Scripter. After several years of experience in the industry, graduates may
obtain titles such as Lead Engineer, Lead Developer, Development Manager,
Principal Engineer, Technical Director, and Chief Technology Officer. This degree
program also includes secondary training that can contribute directly to graduates
obtaining positions with titles such as Producer, Program Manager, Technical
Program Manager, Technical Designer, and Technical Writer.
ADMISSIONS INFO
The BS in Computer Science in Real-Time Interactive Simulation produces some
of the most capable programmers in the industry, but applicants don’t necessarily
need any prior programming experience to be successful. The ideal candidate will
have strong math, science, and problem-solving abilities, and have completed math
through pre-calculus prior to attending DigiPen. Courses in computer science and
physics are also recommended.
45
COURSE SEQUENCE
RECOMMENDED BY SEMESTER
YEAR ONE
1.
Y EA R T WO
3.
4.
MAT 150 or MAT 180
MAT 200 or MAT 230
PHY 250
Calculus & Analytic Geometry I or
Vector Calculus I
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
or Vector Calculus II
Waves, Optics, and Aerodynamics
CS 170
CS 180
Computer Graphics II
High-Level Programming II - The C++
Programming Language
Operating System I, Man-Machine
Interface
CS 280
CS 170L
CS 200
CS 120
High-Level Programming II Lab
Computer Graphics I
High-Level Programming I - The C
Programming Language
CS 230
CS 225
Game Implementation Techniques
Advanced C/C++
GAM 150
GAM 200
Project I
Project II
COM 150
PHY 200
Interpersonal and Work
Communication
Motion Dynamics
MAT 140
Linear Algebra & Geometry
CS 100
Computer Environment I
CS 100L
Computer Environment Lab
CS 120L
High-Level Programming I Lab
GAM 100
Project Introduction
ENG 110
Composition
ART 210
Art Appreciation
COL 100
College Life and Academic Skills
2.
CS 250
Data Structures
CS 365
Software Engineering
GAM 250
Project II
MAT 250
Linear Algebra
HSS Elective
One Humanities and Social Sciences
elective from any three-credit HIS,
PSY, or SOS courses
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E I N R E A L-T I M E I N T E R A C T I V E S I M U L AT I O N
Y EAR THREE
Y EA R F O UR
5.
6.
7.
8.
CS 260
MAT 300
Art or Music Elective
English Elective
Computer Networks I, Interprocess
Communication
Curves and Surfaces
Select one: ANI 125, ART 400, ART
410, FLM 115, FLM 151, or MUS 115
One English elective chosen from
any ENG course, ENG 116 and
above
CS 315
CS 300
Low-Level Programming
English Elective
CS 350
Advanced Computer Graphics II
One English elective chosen from
any ENG course, ENG 116 and
above
Computer Science or
Physics Elective
Computer Science or
Physics Elective
Any 200-level or higher CS course
not required or PHY 350
Any 200-level or higher CS course
not required or PHY 350
3D Computer Animation
Production I
GAM 350
Math Elective
Project III
MAT 256 or any MAT course
greater than 300
GAM 450
GAM 300
Elective
Project III
An elective of the student’s choice
from any department at DigiPen
GAM 400
Elective
Project IV
An elective of the student’s choice
from any department at DigiPen
Advanced Computer Graphics I
CS 330
Algorithm Analysis
MAT 258
Discrete Mathematics
CG 130
Elective
An elective of the student’s choice
from any department at DigiPen
Computer Science or
Physics Elective
Any 200-level or higher CS course
not required or PHY 350
Computer Science or
Physics Elective
Any 200-level or higher CS course
not required or PHY 350
Project IV
47
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
MICHAEL HALL » REDMOND CAMPUS
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF SCIENCE IN
C O M P U T E R S C I E N C E I N R E A L-T I M E I N T E R A C T I V E S I M U L AT I O N
SAMIR ABOU SAMRA
P R O G R A M D I R E C TO R
C H I E F T E C H N O LO G Y O F F I C E R
Mr. Abou Samra is a 15-year veteran of
the video game industry with 18 years of
experience teaching computer science and
video game production classes. He has
held high-ranking positions at a number
of technology companies, including Lead
Engineer at Nintendo Software Technology,
Vice President of Operations at Nintendo
Software Incorporated, Canada, CEO of
Al Kalam Al Electronic, and Founder and
CEO of Multitek. In addition to serving as
DigiPen’s Chief Technology Officer and
Director of the BS in Computer Science in
Real-Time Interactive Simulation program,
Mr. Abou Samra also leads DigiPen’s
Research and Development Department,
which produces software for use at the
school, and also projects for clients ranging
from Boeing to the Lotus F1 Team to
Singapore Airlines.
“It takes passion, discipline, and determination for students to be
successful in this program. This degree is highly theoretical and
academic. In addition, students apply what they learn in realworld projects that simulate actual industry conditions. Students are
prepared to be productive as soon as they graduate – as a matter of
fact, we tell our students that their first day at DigiPen is equivalent to
their first day at work.”
49
50 S O M E O F D I G I P E N ' S A W A R D - W I N N I N G S T U D E N T G A M E S
CHRONO DISFUNGLEMENT
SOLSTICE
PERSPECTIVE
ACAD EM IC YEAR 2 0 1 2– 20 1 3
ACA DEM I C Y EA R 2 0 1 0 –2 0 1 1
ACADEM IC YEAR 2 0 11–2 0 1 2
PIXI
NITRONIC RUSH
SOLACE
ACAD EM IC YEAR 2 0 1 2– 20 1 3
ACA DEM I C Y EA R 2 0 1 0 –2 0 1 1
ACADEM IC YEAR 2 0 0 9 –2 0 10
ACA D E M I C S
IGNEOUS
TAG : T H E P O W E R O F PA I N T
NOUS
ACA D EM IC YEAR 20 0 8 – 20 0 9
ACA DEM I C Y EA R 2 0 0 8–2 0 0 9
ACADEM IC YEAR 2 0 12 –2 0 13
S U P E R S P A C E _____
A FLIPPING GOOD TIME
DREAMSIDE MAROON
ACA D EM IC YEAR 20 1 2– 20 1 3
ACA DEM I C Y EA R 2 0 1 0 – 2 0 1 1
ACADEM IC YEAR 2 0 0 8–2 0 0 9, 2 0 1 0
PLUS MANY MORE
Download and play student games at games.digipen.edu
51
DIGIPEN STUDENT GAME » IONA
S E N D O A B E R G A S A , X A B I E R E S PA Ñ A A N D X A B I E R S E V I L L A N O » S PA I N C A M P U S
“DigiPen is, bar none, the first choice for Airtight
Games in recruiting out-of-school talent. The
training they receive is rigorous and fully
applicable to the industry they are entering.”
- MATT BRUNNER » CHIEF CREATIVE OFFICER
AIRTIGHT GAMES
D I G I P E N S T U D E N T A N I M AT I O N » L E V E L 1 4 5 7, L A S T
X ABIER URRUTIA » SPAIN CAMPUS
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
D I G I TA L A R T A N D A N I M AT I O N
U N D E R G R A D UAT E D E G R E E P R O G R A M S
T H E BACH E LOR OF FIN E ARTS IN
DIGITAL ART
AND ANIMATION
The BFA in Digital Art and Animation offers comprehensive education in the
techniques, processes, and tools that professional artists use to create art assets for
games, animated films, and other digital media. Rather than simply teaching students
how to use current software, this program focuses on developing foundational skills that
remain valuable and useful regardless of the technology or medium. Graduates of the
BFA in Digital Art and Animation program have the ability to produce powerful, affecting
imagery in a professional studio environment.
55
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
E D U A R D O G A R C I A » S PA I N C A M P U S
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
D I G I TA L A R T A N D A N I M AT I O N
TOPICS COVERED
Students who successfully complete the BFA in
Digital Art and Animation program possess the
following:
■
Extensive production experience in both
2D and 3D animation, as well as an area of
greater focus that enables students to target
a specific sector of the industry according
to their interests and abilities.
■
Excellent drawing skills, including a
mastery of perspective, shading, drawing
from observation, figure drawing, value,
color, and composition.
■
Strong storytelling abilities, including
visual storytelling, literary traditions, story
through dialogue, story through acting,
and cinematic conventions.
■
Familiarity with modern studio processes,
including the ability to use current tools
and software, as well as the ability to learn
new software while maintaining a strict
production schedule.
■
Professional work habits, including an
understanding of how to maintain and
continually enhance their craft throughout
their career, as well as the ability to utilize
and integrate professional criticism into
their work.
CAREER OUTLOOK
The BFA in Digital Art and Animation prepares students for careers in digital art
and digital 3D animation, digital 2D animation, and video game or animation preproduction. Possible job titles include Props and Environment Modeler, Texture Artist,
Character Modeler, Character Rigger, Character Animator, 3D Lighting and Camera
Designer, Level Designer, UI Designer, Technical Artist, Producer, Project Manager,
Compositor, Simulation and Effects Animator, Storyboard Artist, Maquette Sculptor,
Web Designer, Art Instructor, Illustrator, Concept Artist, and Character Designer.
ADMISSIONS INFO
Candidates for the BFA in Digital Art and Animation should have a foundation in
drawing and art concepts and be open to constructive feedback on their work.
Candidates must provide an art portfolio of 15 to 20 samples of artwork and
should have experience with drawing and other fine arts disciplines such as
painting or sculpture.
57
COURSE SEQUENCE
RECOMMENDED BY SEMESTER
YEAR ONE
1.
Y EA R T WO
2.
3.
4.
ANI 101
ANI 125
ART 201
FLM 201 or FLM 210
Introduction to Animation
- Theories and Techniques I
Acting for Animation
Advanced Life Drawing
Cinematography or
Cinematography for Visual Effects
ANI 151
BIO 200
Animal Muscular, Skeletal, and
Kinetic Anatomy
ART 251
The Language of Drawing
Advanced Animation Theories and Techniques II
ART 110
ART 125
CG 201
ART 350
Fundamentals of Visual
Communication and Design
Process
Tone, Color, and Composition
2D Raster Graphics and Animation
Storyboards
ART 151
CG 225
CG 251 or Elective
Basic Life Drawing
Introduction to 3D Animation
Art and Technology
BIO 150
PRJ 201
2D Vector Graphics and Animation
or any course from the Elective
Requirements list
2D Animation Production
ENG 116
Human Muscular, Skeletal, and
Kinetic Anatomy
ART 101
ART 115
Storytelling
Character Design
CG 275
3D Character Animation
FLM 151
FLM 115
History of Film and Animation
Visual Language and Film Analysis
PRJ 251
2D Vector Animation Production
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
D I G I TA L A R T A N D A N I M AT I O N
Y EAR THREE
Y EA R F O UR
5.
6.
7.
8.
ANI 300 or Elective
ART 301 or Elective
ART 401
ART 299 or Elective
Acting through an Interface or
any course from the Elective
Requirements list
Concept Art Resources or
any course from the Elective
Requirements list
Conceptual Illustration and Visual
Development
Special Topics in Arts or any
course from the Elective
Requirements list.
ART 300
ANI 350 or Elective
Perspective, Backgrounds, and
Layouts
Voice Acting for Animation or
any course from the Elective
Requirements list
FLM 250 or Elective
Digital Post-Production or
any course from the Elective
Requirements list.
SOS 115
ART 205 or Elective
CS 115
Introduction to Applied Math and
Physics
Character and Environment Design
or any course from the Elective
Requirements list.
Introduction to Scripting
and Programming
Story through Dialogue
CG 350 or Elective
ART 450
Portfolio
Introduction to Intellectual
Property and Contracts
PRJ 300
Graphics for Gaming or any course
from the Elective Requirements
list.
PRJ 400
PRJ 450
Capstone Project I
Capstone Project II
CG 300
3D Environment and Level
Design
PHY 115
ENG 315
Limited-Scope 3D Production
Media and Ethics: A Social Science
Perspective
LAW 115
PRJ 350
3D Animation Production
COL 499
Career Search Preparation:
Materials, Logistics and
Communication
59
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
D A N E L I R I A R T E » S PA I N C A M P U S
ACA D E M I C S
BACHELOR OF FINE ARTS IN
D I G I TA L A R T A N D A N I M AT I O N
JAZNO FRANCOEUR
P R O G R A M D I R E C TO R
Mr. Francoeur’s career began in 1990, when
he interned at the Walt Disney Feature
Animation studio in Orlando, Florida. Upon
graduating from Kansas City Art Institute
in 1992, he began working at the Disney
studios in Los Angeles, California, where he
worked on a number of films, including Lilo &
Stitch, Tarzan, Mulan, Pocahontas, The Lion
King, Beauty and the Beast, The Emperor’s
New Groove, and The Hunchback of Notre
Dame, as well as the Aladdin video game for
Sega Genesis and numerous other projects.
Mr. Francoeur has served as an art instructor
at DigiPen since 2004. In addition to his
career as an animator and educator, he is a
performing musician, a published poet, and
an exhibiting photographer.
“Since the beginning of human history, artists have crafted beautiful
images, from the dynamic cave paintings of Lascaux to the stately
formalism of the high Renaissance. Yet no advancements in technique
or aesthetics would have been possible without parallel advancements
in technology. Today, thanks to computer hardware and software, our
tool sets are evolving faster than ever before. DigiPen has been on the
forefront of this rapidly changing field for 25 years, but the mission of its
BFA program has remained constant: to marry the rich artistic traditions
of the past with the boundless possibilities of the digital age.”
61
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
L E F T: J E S S I C A C H U N G » S I N G A P O R E C A M P U S / / R I G H T: J E R E M I A H B O O N » S I N G A P O R E C A M P U S
“It’s as close to the professional setting in the game
industry as you can get at DigiPen.”
- BRITTANY AUBERT, BS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE IN REAL-TIME
INTERACTIVE SIMULATION GRADUATE, CLASS OF 2009
P R O D U C E R AT 5 T H C E L L M E D I A
L E F T & R I G H T: R AC H E L D OW N I N G » R E D M O N D C A M P U S
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
JASON WANG » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
"I think DigiPen fundamentally prepared me
for the game industry. I still apply what I have
learned there to my everyday work."
- JOANNA LEUNG, BS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE IN REAL-TIME
INTERACTIVE SIMULATION GRADUATE, CLASS OF 2010
L E V E L S C R I P T E R AT T R E YA R C H
DIGIPEN CAMPUS, EUROPE-BILBAO
ACA D E M I C S
NON-GAME CAREERS
A SPECIALIZED EDUCATION
WITH BROAD APPLICATIONS
BS IN COMPUTER SCIENCE IN
R E A L- T I M E I N T E R A C T I V E S I M U L AT I O N
Graduates of this program can build software of
any kind, from scientific simulations to business
applications.
While graduates of DigiPen are well prepared for a career in the video game and
interactive entertainment industries, there are many other paths they can take. With a
strong foundation in traditional science, technology, engineering, mathematics, art,
and design, honed by years of applied team project experience, DigiPen graduates
can be very successful in many non-game careers. Video games are complex pieces
of software that push the limits of what technology is capable of. If students can be
successful at creating art or technology for games, they will have many other options if
they decide not to pursue a career in game development.
B F A I N D I G I TA L A R T
A N D A N I M AT I O N
Graduates of this program can create art of any
kind, from medical illustrations to special effects
for films.
67
D I G I P E N S T U D E N T G A M E » S A B OTAG E
TEAM HAMSTER WHEEL » SPAIN CAMPUS
CET PROGRAMS
D I G I PEN I NSTI TUTE OF TE CH N OLOGY E U ROP E -BILBAO
CONTINUING EDUCATION
“In the Continuing Education courses you
will take projects from their conception all
the way through to the finished product.
Our courses are a perfect balance of
theory and practice, preparing you for the
challenging game business.”
- Thomas Komair
Head of the BSCS in RTIS Department
DigiPen Institute of Technology Europe-Bilbao offers two continuing education courses:
Digital Art and Animation for Film and Video Games and Advanced Video Game
Programming.
In Digital Art and Animation for Film and Video Games, you will learn the techniques
and software to produce 2D traditional animation and 3D computer generated animation
for a range of traditional and interactive media.
In Advanced Video Game Programming, you will learn the fundamentals of computer
science, the math concepts at the heart of simulation software, and the basics of the
C++ programming language, as well as advanced debugging techniques and 2D and 3D
game design principles.
Learn more at:
digipen.es/continuing-education
69
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
DESMOND WONG LIANG WAI » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
“DigiPen is leading the academic community by providing a starting
point for those wishing to pursue a career in the country’s fastest
growing entertainment industry. From the Valedictorian of DigiPen’s
first graduating class to the seven graduates who produced 2007’s
Game of the Year, Portal, DigiPen has become a leading source for
finding new and talented employees at Valve.”
- DOUG LOMBARDI » VICE PRESIDENT OF MARKETING
V A LV E S O F T W A R E
Department of
Fine Arts
ART 101
The Language of Drawing (3 cr.)
U N D E R G R A D U AT E
C O U RS E
DES C R I PT ION S
DEPARTM ENT O F
FINE ARTS
ANIMATION AND PRODUCTION
COMPUTER SCIENCE
DIGITAL ARTS
GAME SOFTWARE DESIGN AND PRODUCTION
HUMANITIES AND SOCIAL SCIENCES
LIFE SCIENCES
MATHEMATICS
PHYSICS
This course explores the nature of drawing
as a language skill and the use of drawing
by production artists and animators. Applied
drawing goals and critical thinking skills are
given special consideration. Students are
introduced to basic professional habits in
drawing practice, drill, and play. Design principles, basic research, and the design process
are introduced and applied to a series of
practical problems. This course also explores
basic drawing materials, drawing strategy,
drawing sequence, linear drawing methodology, practice, and theory.
ART 110
Fundamentals of Visual
Communication and Design Process
(3 cr.)
Beginning with the Physiology of perception,
this course explores the simple building
blocks of visual communications and how the
viewer understands and responds to shapes,
symbols and images. The foundational skills
of design process and problem solving
methodologies are explored to develop the
student’s visual problem solving skills.
ART 115
Art and Technology (3 cr.)
This course provides an overview of art
history from Paleolithic times until the modern
day. It traces the technological advances of
society and art and considers the interplay
between art and technology. Classical art
materials and methods are examined, and
students explore how art has historically impacted society. This course has a worldwide
scope and is not limited to just European and
Western traditions.
ART 125
Tone, Color and Composition (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 101
This course continues to build upon students’
abilities to draw by exploring the nature
and use of tone, color, and composition in
drawing. It emphasizes methods of creating
tone, ways to use luminance as an organizational element, and the importance of
thinking critically. Additionally, the course
introduces students to a variety of classical
tonal systems and tonal illusions, including atmospheric perspective, sculptural modeling,
basic direct lighting, lighting position relative
to viewpoint, light intensity, local value, and
reflectivity. Students then explore the artistic
use of color. The course covers systems and
traditions of organizing hue and saturation,
and it examines methods of building from tonal preliminary studies. Students also explore
classical forms of compositional organization,
such as symmetry, asymmetry, golden mean,
and figure-ground relationships.
ART 151
Basic Life Drawing (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 101
This course introduces students to the
challenges of drawing the human form for
animation. Students examine life drawing for
animation in addition to methods for attaining
these goals. The course emphasizes capturing skeletal structure, muscle form, emotion,
and gesture. By drawing clothed and nude
models of both genders, students learn
to apply lessons in anatomy to the figure,
significantly expanding their understanding
of human kinetics and structure. Additionally,
students practice extrapolating basic human
life drawing strategies to other animals.
ART 201
Advanced Life Drawing (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151
This course builds upon the anatomy and
drawing courses students have already taken.
Students continue to improve their ability to
capture kinetics in humans and animals. By
engaging in a series of exercises designed to
enhance their visual memory, students build
the foundation for drawing accurate figures
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from their imagination. They also explore putting the figure into an environment, figurative
composition, and introductory sequential
figurative composition.
ART 205
Character and Environment Design
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 150
Students apply their drawing and anatomy
knowledge to the creation of animation
characters. The course introduces traditions
of character design and the basic structural
strategies for creating animation characters.
Students explore simplification gradients
relative to human, animal, and inanimate
object-based characters. The course also
covers issues of costume, personality, and
story interaction. Additionally, students learn
to place these characters into appropriately
designed environments. The curriculum
emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and standards of quality.
ART 210
Art Appreciation (2 cr.)
This introduction to art provides students with
a better understanding of the artistic influences upon our modern culture. Along with the
history of art, students study the meanings,
purposes, styles, elements, and principles
of art and the various media used to create
works of art. In helping students gain basic
awareness, knowledge, and enjoyment of the
visual arts, the course provides the groundwork for further personal study in the arts. In
turn, this influences the development of their
creativity.
ART 225
3-Dimensional Design and Sculpture
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 201 or BIO 150
modern polymer clays and build an animation
maquette.
ART 230
Painting (3 cr.)
This course explores ideas and various
techniques related to painting. The use of
color and the representation of space is
emphasized. Students explore masterworks,
studio painting, and painting en plein aire.
Technical and social problems related to
painting are explored using portraiture, still
life, and environment/landscape. A portable
field easel and appropriate painting supplies
will be required. The course will culminate in
a group show of student projects.
ART 234
Survey of Sequential Art (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 125, ART 151
In this course, students will learn to explore
and to exploit the power of sequential
images as a medium to craft stories beyond storyboarding, photography, and film.
Through the formats of the graphic novel and
related forms, students will tackle problems
of character and events; their solutions will
be limited only by their imaginations. The
course will begin with an historical overview
of sequential art and will then examine storytelling through pictures, focusing on clarity
and emotional impact. Students will examine
contemporary styles and conventions and
will be required to draw from previous art
experiences, while honing their skills in drawing, perspective, design, color, typography,
writing, editing, and acting. Demonstrations
of multimedia techniques and computer
technology relative to this field will also be
introduced.
ART 251
Character Design (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 201
This course introduces students to the principles of 3D design using both traditional and
digital tools. Students become acquainted
with additive, subtractive, and cast sculpture.
They consider the basic concepts of architectural space, interior design, landscape
design, surface interplay with light, lofted
forms, and skinning systems. Students use
Students leverage their drawing and anatomy
knowledge to the creation of animation characters. This course introduces student to the
traditions of character design and the basic
structural strategies for creating animation
characters. Students explore simplification
gradients relative to human, animal, and
inanimate object-based characters. They
consider issues of costume, personality, and
story interaction. The course emphasizes
professional applications, techniques, and
standards of quality. The work completed in
this course serves as pre-production design
for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.
ART 260
Graphic Design, User Experience,
and Input (3 cr.)
Students explore elements of visual design
and apply them to computer user interfaces. They analyze various types of sensory
interfaces and improve their skills in creating
representations of information valuable to
a system user. Additionally, emphasis is be
placed on the overall enjoyment of the user
experience, plus consideration towards relating the user experience to the theme of the
game or system. Students learn how to use
various industry-standard languages related
to prototype interfaces.
ART 299
Special Topics in Art (2 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty or students that is not covered by
the courses in the current catalog.
ART 300
Perspective, Backgrounds and
Layouts (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 201, CG 201
This course explores the animation pre-production skills of background and layout art.
It emphasizes professional applications,
techniques, and standards of quality. Students are guided through classical depth cue
and perspective systems as they apply this
knowledge to the creation of animation backgrounds and layouts. Additionally, students
explore means of using drawing to create
elements such as camera lens illusions, architectural space, theatrical sets, game visual
design, matte painting, and surface texture.
ART 301
Concept Art Resources (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 251 or CG 201 or CG 275
This course builds upon all art disciplines,
primarily 2D related skills, to prepare students
for positions requiring the creation of concept
art. Emphasis is placed on the importance of
balancing speed of content generation with
quality, as this is one of the most pressing
and relevant challenges in this field. With this
mindset, students are challenged to evaluate
and understand new forms of character and
environment generation. Both theory and
technique are heavily stressed during this
course, with the final tangible outcome being
multiple portfolio pieces that demonstrate
the individual’s abilities and unique style/
interests.
ART 310
Architectural Spaces, Design, and
Lighting I (3 cr.)
This course introduces students to the aesthetics and principles of 2D (floor plans and
elevations) and 3D environment design. A
survey of architectural styles from throughout
the world is blended with concepts, such as
emotion, mood, lighting, shadows, aesthetics,
and more. The course emphasizes learning
the architectural vocabulary as well as the
aesthetics of environmental and game-level
design. Texturing, spatial design, negative
space, dramatic lighting, and other concepts
that affect not only the psychology of level
design but also gameplay principles are
covered. Students participate in numerous
field trips to local examples of architecture in
order to gain an understanding of architectural spaces and the field’s vocabulary.
ART 350
Storyboards (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 201 or ART 251, FLM 151
This course explores the animation pre-production skills of storyboard art. Students
leverage their knowledge of drawing, storytelling, and cinematography to create both
production and presentation storyboards.
They also explore means of using drawing
to create story flow, character development,
mood, time, and place. The course emphasizes professional applications, techniques, and
standards of quality. The work completed in
this course serves as pre-production design
for PRJ 300, PRJ 350, or ANI 300.
ART 360
Architectural Spaces, Design, and
Lighting II (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 310, CG 301
This class builds on the foundational skills
and knowledge from Architectural Spaces,
Design, and Lighting I (ART 310), covering
more period styles. Additionally, students
have opportunities to do more hands-on
creation of art, models, and textures relative
to various periods. Students participate in a
variety of field trips in order to research and
analyze architectural styles and then to build
them in the computer lab.
ART 399
Special Topics in Art (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty or students that is not covered by
the courses in the current catalog.
ART 400
Drawing Fundamentals (2 cr.)
The development of strong drawing skills is of
extreme importance since they are essential
tools for expressing ideas, particularly during
the pre-production stages of an animation
project. Therefore, this course presents
the basic elements of drawing and graphic
design in order to improve the student’s practical ability to draw with skill and imagination.
It covers methods of observing, describing,
and organizing forms using various mediums,
such as pencil, charcoal, and color pencils.
ART 401
Conceptual Illustration and Visual
Development (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 300
This course explores the animation pre-production skills of conceptual illustration and
visual development. Students apply their
knowledge of drawing, storytelling, and
composition to create speculative drawings
for animation. They review compositional
systems, design process, and illustration
techniques. Additionally, students explore
means of using drawing to visually explore
story and character ideas from both existing and original story materials. They also
consider adaptation, stylization, and visual
variety. The course emphasizes professional
applications, techniques, and standards of
quality. The work completed in this course
serves as pre-production design for PRJ 300,
PRJ 350, or ANI 300.
will serve as their BFA thesis. Additionally, this
course introduces students to the marketing
campaign needs of modern animation portfolios, including visual continuity, business
documents, traditional still art portfolios,
process and practice samples, digital portfolios, web sites, demo reels, and promotional
items. They use this knowledge to assemble
their own portfolios. The course also covers
related information regarding job interviews,
trade shows, professional standards, and
contract negotiation.
Department of
Animation and
Production
ANI 101
Introduction to Animation - Theories
and Techniques (3 cr.)
This course introduces students to the
principles of animation through classical
animation techniques. Students explore the
art of creating convincing movement through
effective timing, spacing, and drawing.
Works of master animators are screened and
analyzed frame-by-frame to illustrate the
principles covered in class, and students will
put their knowledge to work through a series
of exercises. The ultimate goal of both this
course and its sequel is to introduce methods
by which animators “act” and bring characters
to life through sequential images.
ART 410
Mechanical Drawing (3 cr.)
ANI 125
Acting for Animation (3 cr.)
Traditional and digital skills in drafting are
key components of an engineering career.
This course introduces students to the
basic skills of mechanical drafting including
layout and formatting conventions, typographic traditions, and classical drafting
tool usage. Students apply these skills to
actual problems in traditional mechanical
drafting. They are then exposed to modern
digital tools in mechanical drafting. The
course explores subjects, such as interface
conventions, usage strategies and output
options. Students work with a CAD program
and complete a variety of exercises designed
to establish foundational skills. The course
pays special attention to addressing how
professionals use these skills in production
and prototyping.
An animator’s ability to express attitude,
thought, and emotion through a character’s body language is a fundamental skill
necessary for success. Therefore, this course
focuses on presenting tools and techniques
for translating thoughts and feelings into
specific gestures and actions. The course
introduces students to the history of acting in
theater,animation, and film. Students explore
the basic fundamentals and differences of
acting for the stage, film, and animation.
through a series of acting exercises and problems. Special emphasis is given to classical
method acting.
ART 450
Portfolio (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): PRJ 350
Students use this course to compile the
elements of their professional portfolio, which
ANI 151
Advanced Animation - Theories and
Techniques II (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 101
In ANI 151 students continue to explore
and exercise the concepts and techniques
of classical animation through a series of
assignments. The exercises in this course are
considerably more demanding than those
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completed in ANI 101 as they are longer and
will require more refinement, subtlety, and
creativity. There is also a greater emphasis
on character development - the expression
of personality, mood, thought, and attitude
through motion and posing.
ANI 300
Acting Through an Interface (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 125, ANI 151, CG 275
An animator’s ability to express attitude,
thought, and emotion through a surrogate is
a fundamental skill of 3D character animation.
This course builds upon the earlier acting and
2D animation curriculum. It explores 3D character animation techniques of performance,
physicality and weight. Students complete a
number of animation assignments during the
semester.
ANI 350
Voice Acting for Animation (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 300
This course explores the nature of acting
through the medium of the human voice. The
curriculum explores narration, expressive
reading, diction, and vocal refinement. It
introduces students to basic audio technology and recording equipment. The course also
covers lip-synchronization techniques in animation and culminates in a series of practical
exercises in both 2D and 3D animation.
ANI 399
Special Topics in Animation (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it’s offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty or students that is not covered by
the courses in the current catalog.
ANI 400
Cinematic Animation (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 401 or CG 400, ANI 350,
FLM 275
This course is a culmination of the student’s
ability to use animation as a storytelling medium. It also provides an opportunity for the
student to demonstrate his or her personal
artistic growth. Each student works to complete a short piece of cinematic animation.
Working independently or in small groups
with the instructor’s approval, students may
use either 2D or 3D tools.
FLM 115
History of Film and Animation (3 cr.)
This course examines the more than 100-year
history of film and animation. Beginning with
the scientific and technical advances that
made these media technologies possible,
students explore every major movement and
genre as well as their impact on society. The
course gives students critical vocabulary
required for explaining story, animation and
cinematic techniques.
FLM 151
Visual Language and Film Analysis
(3 cr.)
Animation is ultimately “film making,” and
animators should learn from the many classics
on how to effectively bring various film production elements together. Students review
several films and study how the relationships
between scripts, cameras, lighting, sets,
production design, sound, acting, costumes,
props, directing, and production lead to
successful visual stories. They also examine
the fundamental theories underlying visual
storytelling. Understanding the creative processes utilized by these influential filmmakers
provides insight into how students may
improve their own animations.
FLM 201
Cinematography (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): FLM 151
Like a filmmaker, computer animators must
have a good understanding of appropriate
camera composition, lighting and editing
techniques to enhance the visual impact of
the story being told. Appropriate composition
and camera movement help to reveal action,
and lighting establishes focus, place, and
mood. Assignments in camera composition,
movement, lighting and editing help students
solidify their understanding of the concepts
presented.
FLM 250
Post-Production (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): FLM 151
The last step of any animation project
involves the assembly of various production
elements ranging from rendered files to
sound effects. This is also the stage where
the visual effects artists add the effects
seen in today’s movies. This course teaches
the fundamental skills these artists use in
post-production. Effective editing skills are
the primary outcome of the course. Students
will also cover the planning, execution, and
addition of special effects to animation.
FLM 399
Special Topics in Film (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
INT 390
Internship (5 cr.)
An internship is any carefully monitored
work or service experience in which an
individual has intentional learning goals and
reflects actively on what she or he is learning
throughout the experience. It is usually a
professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a
job situation, which places a high degree of
responsibility on the student. Internships are
well structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.
Permission of Instructor required.
INT 450
Internship (5 cr.)
An internship is any carefully monitored
work or service experience in which an
individual has intentional learning goals and
reflects actively on what she or he is learning
throughout the experience. It is usually a
professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a
job situation, which places a high degree of
responsibility on the student. Internships are
well structured along the Internship Guidelines available in the Administration Office.
Permission of Instructor required.
MUS 115
Fundamentals of Music and Sound
Design (3 cr.)
This course offers an introduction to the
fundamentals of music and sound design, and
an overview of the production of music and
sound for animation, film, and video games.
Topics include music notation, key, meter,
rhythm, melody, harmony, texture, tempo,
genre and form; historical musical styles;
dialog and timing; and digital audio production methods and techniques. Credit may be
received for MUS 115 or for FLM 275, but not
for both.
PRJ 201
2D Animation Production (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 125
This is a traditional animation course within
the context of a two-semester project. This
project builds on the cumulative skill sets acquired in ANI 101 and ANI 151, but with a focus
on team dynamics, acting, visual storytelling,
and the goal of completing a short animated
film rather than a series of learning exercises.
PRJ 201 concentrates on pre-production for
the project.
PRJ 251
2D Vector Animation Production
(5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): PRJ 201
This is a traditional animation course within
the context of a two-semester project. This
project builds on the cumulative skill sets acquired in ANI 101 and ANI 151, but with a focus
on team dynamics, acting, visual storytelling,
and the goal of completing a short animated
film rather than a series of learning exercises.
Building on the work completed in PRJ201,
PRJ251 concentrates on the production and
animation for the project.
PRJ 300
Limited-Scope 3D Production (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 251, ART 300, ART 350,
CG 275, PRJ 251
In PRJ 300 students will be guided through
the elements of creating a short animated
piece from design through pre-production
including designing and building a character
as well as an environment, then planning the
animation. The remainder of the production
continues in PRJ350.
PRJ 350
Applied 3-D Animation Production
Problems (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 300, CG 300, PRJ 300
PRJ 350 picks up where PRJ 300 left off in
further developing design and production
skills. The course is a full-semester project
where students will produce a short animated
production that demonstrates their skills in
design, modeling, animation, lighting and
rendering.
PRJ 400
Capstone Project I (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 350, ENG 116, PRJ 350
Working effectively as producers, the
Animation Faculty team will select from
student submissions one or more team
projects to be produced. They then assign
students to specific teams, based upon their
artistic strengths and career goals. Wherever
possible, individual students are introduced
to specialist advisers from outside the faculty.
Each student’s individual effort is assessed as
well as the overall teamwork and professional
success of the team. As in a professional
work environment, student teams are not
allowed to exclude individual members due
to production conflicts or performance. The
faculty alone retains the right to remove a
team member for failure to perform.
PRJ 450
Capstone Project II (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ART 401, PRJ 400
Having completed the pre-production work
for a team-based animated production
in PRJ 400, students then complete final
rendering and post-production. Students face
the challenges of commercial art direction,
quality control, production deadlines, and
team dynamics, as well as the many technical
challenges.
Department of
Computer Science
CS 102
Computer Environment (4 cr.)
This course provides an introduction to
digital computer organization. Topics covered
include basic electricity, electrical circuits,
encoding of numeric and non-numeric data,
digital systems, logic circuits and algebra,
arithmetic and logic unit, memory unit, basic
computer architecture and introduction to operating systems. The outcome of this course
is to provide students with sound knowledge
of the fundamental building blocks of the
functional units of digital computer systems.
CS 115
Introduction to Scripting and
Programming (3 cr.)
This class introduces programming environments to students who are not experienced
programmers. This course covers simple
logic, programming flow, and the use of variables. It introduces students to the history of
programming and the basic vocabulary of the
programming industry. The course culminates
in a series of hands-on exercises using this
knowledge to solve problems. At his or her
discretion, the instructor may cover special
topics in programming or scripting. Credit
may be received for CS 115 or for CS 120, but
not for both.
CS 120
High Level Programming I - The C
Programming language (3 cr.)
Concurrent Course(s): CS 120L
In presenting the C programming language, this
course serves as a foundation for all high level
programming courses and projects. It provides
the fundamentals of programming, including
control flows, such as statement grouping,
decision-making, case selection, procedure
iteration, and termination test and basic data
types, such as arrays, structures, and pointers.
Additionally, it intensively discusses the lexical
convention, syntax notation, and semantics.
CS 120L
High level Programming I Lab (1 cr.)
Concurrent Course(s): CS 120
CS 120L is the lab component of the introductory High Level Programming I course.
Students meet for two hours weekly to apply
the concepts presented in CS 120 in a controlled environment. This class must be taken
concurrently with CS 120, the associated
lecture course.
CS 170
High Level Programming II - The C++
Programming Language (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L
Concurrent Course(s): CS 170L
This course is a continuation of High Level
Programming I (CS 120). It introduces the
C++ language with particular emphasis on
its object-oriented features. Topics covered
include stylistic and usage differences between C and C++, namespaces, function and
operator overloading, classes, inheritance,
class and function templates, STL lists, and
vectors.
CS 170L
High Level Programming II Lab (1 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L
Concurrent Course(s): CS 170
CS 170L is the lab component of the
High-Level Programming II course. Students
meet weekly to work on topics presented in
the CS 170 lectures in a lab environment. This
class must be taken concurrently with CS 170,
the associated lecture course.
CS 180
Operating Systems I, Man-Machine
Interface (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170 or CS 170L, CS 102
This course presents an overview of modern
operating systems, in particular Windows
and Linux/Unix as implemented on modern
PCs. After an overview of what an operating
system is and does, the following is also
covered: organization and design (the kernel
and various subsystems), process management (creation and management of processes
and threads, including an introduction to
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multi-threaded programming), networks
(the TCP/IP stack and the organization of
the Internet), interprocess communication,
process synchronization (locks, semaphores,
and methods to avoid deadlocks), memory
management (hardware and process views
of memory layout and demand-paged virtual
memory), file systems, and security and protection (viruses, worms, and Trojan horses).
CS 200
Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L, MAT 140
CS 200 presents fundamental mathematical
elements, data structures, and algorithms
useful for animating and viewing 2D primitives. The course aims to fulfill two objectives.
The first objective is to provide students with
a sufficient mathematical and algorithmic
background to design and implement 2D
graphics applications. The second objective
is to prepare students with the knowledge
required for writing 3D graphics applications. The first half of the course deals with
scanconversion algorithms for rasterizing 2D
primitives such as lines, circles, ellipses, triangles, and arbitrary polygons. The second half
of the course is concerned with the viewing
and animation of these 2D primitives. The
course covers topics such as interpolation
techniques, transformations, culling, clipping,
animation techniques, and the 2D viewing
pipeline.
CS 225
Advanced C/C++ (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L
This course builds on the foundation created
in the first two high-level programming
courses (CS 120/170). It presents advanced
topics of the C/C++ programming language in
greater detail. Such topics include advanced
pointer manipulation, utilizing multi-dimensional arrays, complex declarations, and
standard library functions. Advanced C++
topics include class and function templates,
operator overloading, multiple inheritance,
runtime type information, the standard template library, and performance issues.
CS 230
Game Implementation Techniques
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 120
Concurrent Course(s): CS 170
CS 230 presents game implementation
techniques and engine architecture. Students
investigate foundational concepts of game
architecture, such as game-system component separation and game flow, while
learning about essential elements such as the
game state manager, input/ output handler,
and frame rate controller. CS 230 introduces
Windows programming, state machines,
and collision detection algorithms, which
students will integrate into their own remakes
of classic games. As part of their implementation, students create and expand their own
collision, vector, and matrix libraries, enabling
them to incorporate basic physics engines.
Students survey concepts in space partitioning, particle systems, map editors, and
other elements as a bridge to more advanced
concepts in implementation techniques and
engine architecture.
CS 245
Introduction to Interactive Sound
Synthesis (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 180, MAT 140, PHY
200
This course explores dynamic sound synthesis, 3D-directional auditory effects, and sonic
ambience to real-time simulations and video
games. The subjects include mixing audio
and modulating dry recorded sounds using
wave table synthesis. Students learn how to
create collision sounds using additive synthesis, wind effects using subtractive synthesis,
natural sounds using granular synthesis and
physical modeling, ambiences using layering
and spectral filtering, 3D spatialized surround
sound panning, inter-aural time difference,
inter-aural intensity difference, and Head
Related Transforms (HRTFS). Students also
study algorithms and techniques for real-time
multi-threaded programming and synthesized
sound integration for game engines.
CS 250
Computer Graphics II (3 cr.)
CS 261
Computer Networks II (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 200
Prerequisite(s): CS 260
CS 250 examines the mathematical elements and algorithms used in the design
and development of real-time 3D computer
graphics applications, such as games, cockpit
simulators, and architectural walk-throughs.
3D computer graphics involve drawing pictures of 3D objects, usually on a 2D screen.
This process of generating a 2D image of a
3D graphics application can be described as
a series of distinct operations performed on
a set of input data. Each operation generates
results for the successive one. This process
is called the graphics rendering pipeline, and
it is the core of real-time computer graphics.
The graphics pipeline can be conceptualized
as consisting of three stages: application,
transformation, and rasterization. The course
begins by introducing the 3D graphics pipeline. The application stage is examined from
the viewpoint of the representation, modeling, and animation of 3D objects. Topics
include user interaction, camera animation
techniques, simulation of dynamic objects,
and collision detection techniques. Next, the
course examines the process of mapping
3D graphic objects from model-space to
viewport coordinates. The transformation
stage implements this process. Finally, the
conversion of a geometric primitive in viewport coordinates into a 2D image is studied.
The rasterization stage implements this final
process.
This class extends the TCP/IP protocols
studied in CS 260 to wireless devices. This
course goes further in depth into some topics
covered in the introductory networks course,
as well as additional subjects of interest. Topics include TCP/IP related protocols, (such as
NAT, WAP, and DNS), physical media access,
(such as aloha, OFDM, and WIDEBAND), wireless standards and protocols and network
security. The curriculum covers additional
topics based on the state of the industry.
CS 260
Computer Networks I, Interprocess
Communication (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170
This course introduces the hierarchical
network communication in a distributed
computing environment. Course topics
cover network technologies, architecture,
and protocols. The curriculum gives specific
emphasis to the TCP/IP stack and in making
students familiar with writing portable socket
based software. It prepares students for
programming multi-player games in later
semesters.
CS 280
Data Structures (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 225
This course introduces the classical abstract
data types (ADT) in computer science. ADTs
provide the hierarchical views of data organization used in programming. Among the
topics covered are the algorithms and primitives of the data structures for arrays, linked
lists, stacks, queues, trees, hash tables, and
graphs. In addition, the course provides an
introduction to algorithm complexity and
notation.
CS 300
Advanced Computer Graphics I (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 250
This course introduces students to algorithms
that are essential to creating photorealistic
images in interactive simulations. Topics
covered include an overview of modern GPU
(graphics processor unit) architecture and
the common graphics APIs used, including
OpenGL and DirectX. Rendering techniques
covered include texturing, illumination
models, transparency, shading algorithms,
mapping techniques (bump mapping,
environment/reflection mapping, etc.), and
shadows. Students learn how to implement all
algorithms by using vertex and pixel shaders.
CS 311
Introduction to Database (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L
CS 350
Advanced Computer Graphics II
(3 cr.)
CS 380
Artificial Intelligence for Games (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 280
Prerequisite(s): CS 300
This course provides students with a broad
overview of database systems. It presents
the fundamentals, practices, and applications of computer databases. Topics include
database architectures, data modeling,
design schemes, relational algebra, query
languages, transaction processing, and database implementation. Students will explore
massively multiplayer online games (MMOG)
to examine a case study of database design
and implementation.
CS 315
Low Level Programming (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 100 or CS 102, CS 120, CS
120L, CS 180
This course deals with the efficient representation and processing of complex 3D scenes
in order to avoid bottlenecks in the use of
the CPU and the GPU. Specific topics include
a variety of spatial data structures (binary
space-partitioning trees, octrees, kd-trees,
and grid data structures), several object-culling methods (occlusion, viewport, and portal),
and finally the construction and uses of bouding volumes and their hierarchies for collision
detection and related geometric operations.
CS 365
Software Engineering (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 225
This course introduces students to modern microprocessor architectures using
x86 series for case studies. In this course,
students are expected to write both assembly
language programs and to use assembly language to optimize various C/C++ programs.
Topics may include pipelining, superscalar/
VLIW machines, register-renaming, out-oforder execution, multi-core architecture,
caches, multicore-cache coherency, x86
instruction set architecture, application binary
interfaces, Flynn’s taxonomy, and Streaming
SIMD extensions.
This course covers a wide range of topics
in software engineering from the practical
standpoint. It encompasses project management issues as well as technical development
principles and methods. Topics include
system architecture, security, methodologies
and notation, UML, object oriented analysis
and design, requirements analysis, implementation, verification, validation, maintenance,
and software engineering standards. Risk
management and iterative design receive
special emphasis. Student teams apply
acquired knowledge to a substantial project.
CS 330
Design and Analysis of Algorithms
(3 cr.)
CS 370
Computer Imaging (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 280
Prerequisite(s): CS 225, CS 280
This course provides students with an
introduction to the analysis of algorithms,
specifically proving their correctness and
making a statement about their efficency.
Topic for discussion may include loop
invariants, strong mathematical induction and
recursion, asymptotic notation, recurrence
relations, and generating functions. Students
examine examples of algorithm analysis from
searching and sorting algorithms.
The course introduces students to computer
imaging where image analysis and image
processing are unified to provide a useful
paradigm for both computer vision and image
processing applications. Students use C++ to
implement different algorithms introduced in
the course. Upon completion of this course,
students are expected to have gained a
general understanding of the fundamentals of
digital image processing and computer vision.
They also have achieved a familiarity with
the current analytical tools that are used in
computer imaging applications and the ability
to design and develop basic algorithms to
solve computer-imaging problems.
This course introduces students to a wide
range of concepts and practical algorithms
that are commonly used to solve game AI
problems. Case studies from real games
are used to illustrate the concepts. Students
have a chance to work with and implement
core game AI algorithms. Topics covered
includes the game AI programmer mindset, AI
architecture (state machines, rule-based systems, goal-based systems, trigger systems,
smart terrain, scripting, message passing,
and debugging AI), movement, pathfinding,
emergent behavior, agent awareness, agent
cooperation, terrain analysis, planning, and
learning/adaptation.
CS 381
Introduction to Artifcial Intelligence
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 330, MAT 258
This course deals with constructing computer
programs that automatically improve with
experience. Observed events are used to
inductively construct decision trees, which
can be used by computer-controlled game
characters to change behaviors. Students
explore concept learning, partial ordering,
reinforcement learning, conditional probability, Bayesian learning, the evaluation of
hypotheses and instance-based learning.
Types of neural networks examined include
perceptrons, back-propagation, radial basis
functions, and adaptive resonance theory.
The effectiveness of genetic algorithms
and power of a neuro-genetic approach
are demonstrated. The class concludes by
looking at inductive analytical learning.
CS 391
Code Analysis and Optimization
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 280, CS 315
This course focuses on understanding the
details for the computer, complier, and
language, specifically how to apply these
towards practical problem of solving crashes
and performance issues. The emphasis is
not only on knowing what and why, but also
about taking that knowledge and creating
useful tools and techniques for solving these
programs.
CS 399
Special Topics in Computer Science
(3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
CS 420
Graphics File Format and Data
Compression Techniques (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 250, CS 280
This course covers data compression
techniques for still images and multimedia.
Students learn the theory behind data
compression and how it is used in specific
formats. Methods covered include run-length
encoding, Huffman coding, dictionary compression, transforms, and wavelet methods.
Students learn these techniques by examining various popular graphic file formats such
as BMP, JPEG, DXTn, and MPEG.
CS 460
Advanced Animation and Modeling
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 300, MAT 300
3D animation and modeling play significant
roles in computer simulation and video game
software. Game developers need to have
a comprehensive understanding of these
techniques. This course introduces algorithms for specifying and generating motion
for graphical objects. It addresses practical
issues, surveys accessible techniques, and
provides straightforward implementations for
controlling 3D moving entities with different characteristics. The class covers two
broad categories. Students will first learn an
interpolation-based technique, which allows
programmers to fill in the details of the motion
or shape once the animator specifies certain
basic information, such as key frames, paths,
coordinate grids, or destination geometry.
Then they learn a behavior-based technique,
which generates motion that satisfies a set of
rules, such as kinematics, physics, or other
constraints.
Department of
Digital Arts
CG 130
3D Computer Animation Production I
(3 cr.)
This course introduces students to the basic
theories and techniques of 3D computer animation. The curriculum emphasizes standard
3D modeling techniques, including polygonal
and spline modeling, texture map creation and
application, keyframing, and animating through
forward kinematics and inverse kinematics.
CG 201
2D Raster Graphics and Animation
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 151, ART 101, ART 125
This course introduces students to the industry-standard software and practices of raster
graphics and animation. The course begins with
basic information, such as interface organization strategies, system components, bit depth,
resolution, memory management, and output
strategies. It also explores techniques and critical thinking skills for digital painting, scanning,
still compositing, and texture creation. Additionally, it looks at basic interface customization
options and strategies in 2D raster graphics.
CG 225
Introduction to 3D Animation (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ANI 101, ART 101, ART 125
This course introduces students to industry-standard software and practices of 3D
animation. The course begins with basic
information such as interface organization
strategies, equipment options, and production elements. It also introduces techniques
and critical thinking skills for texture mapping,
modeling, rigging, lighting, cameras, and animation. Additionally, it looks at basic interface
customization options and strategies in 3D
graphics, culminating in a series of applied
problems in 3D production techniques.
CG 251
2D Vector Graphics and Animation
(3 cr.)
CG 301
Environments and Backgrounds
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CG 201
Prerequisite(s): CG 275
This course examines the principles and practices of 2D vector graphics and animation.
It introduces students to industry standard
software, output options, and production
strategies for using vector graphics in both
graphic design and animation. The course
gives special consideration to critical thinking
and refinement strategies when modifying
vector images. Students examine methods
of using vector-based tools for creating web
and broadcast animation, and the course
concludes with a series of applied problems
in 2D vector animation.
This course provides game design students
with an understanding of the design and
production process of environments for 3D
games. It introduces the principles of 3D environment creation and provides a functional
working knowledge of modeling, texturing
and lighting skills within the framework of a 3D
modeling package to create believable and
well designed environments. Student work
with be implemented into a game engine.
CG 275
3D Character Animation (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CG 225
Students continue to explore and exercise
the concepts and techniques of 3D animation
through a series of assignments applied
to characters. Exercises in this course are
considerably more demanding than those
completed in CG 125 as they are longer
and require more refinement, subtlety, and
creativity. The course emphasizes character
development - the expression of personality,
mood, thought, and attitude through motion
and posing. It also gives special consideration to proper model rigging.
CG 300
3D Environment and Level Design
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CG 275
This course introduces students to the principles of 3D environment design. Theatrical
sets, architectural simulations, and level
design are considered. In order to provide
students with a broader skill set, this course
also presents the “mechanics” of how to
use other 3D animation software, with an
emphasis on the unique strengths of the
package. Students explore the comparative
strengths of different software packages and
the impact that this has on workflow. The
course emphasizes critical thinking skills and
strategies for tool selection.
CG 350
Graphics for Gaming (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CG 300
This course examines the unique problems of creating graphics for games, and it teaches effective
production techniques for addressing these issues.
CG 399
Special Topics in Computer Graphics
(3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering
a new or specialized course of interest to the
faculty or students that is not covered by the
courses in the current catalog.
CG 400
Advanced 3D Modeling Techniques
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CG 275
This course focuses on the design and production
of highly detailed models for use in feature and
broadcast animation. Students use a best-of-breed
approach to define their tool set, with particular
emphasis placed on organization and structure.
Additional emphasis is placed on generating
layered digital intermediate files for use in a model-composite workflow in a desktop production
environment. Lectures also cover environment
and character design research as relevant to detail
modeling, presented in a framework of industry-standard geometries and methods. Students
also explore advanced material creation using a
global illumination-capable rendering engine, incorporating advanced texture creation techniques.
Department of
Game Software
Design and
Production
GAM 100
Project Introduction (3 cr.)
This class presents an overview of the way
the game development industry works and a
history of game development. It exposes students to the positions and job responsibilities
that each member of a game development
team has, along with the industry requirements for concept pitches, design documents
and schedules. It also introduces sprite animation, object motion, and input processing,
which students use in the creation of a game
of their own design.
GAM 150
Project I (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 120, CS 120L, GAM 100
This project focuses on the creation of a
simple game or simulation. Students work
together on teams of three or four members.
All projects must be written entirely in C (C++
is not allowed) and cannot use external libraries or middleware of any kind (except those
provided by the instructor). Topics include
effective team communication, planning,
documentation, debugging, source control,
testing, and iterative software development
techniques.
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GAM 200
Project II (4 cr.)
GAM 350
Project III (5 cr.)
GAM 450
Project IV (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 170, CS 170L, CS 230, GAM
150, MAT 140
Prerequisite(s): GAM 300
Concurrent Course(s): CS 250
Prerequisite(s): GAM 400 or GAM 490 or
GAM 390, MAT 300
This project is divided into two semesters
during which students design and implement a 2D scrolling game engine. Similar to
Project I, they start by writing a Game Design
Document and a Technical Design Document.
Along with creating a scrolling engine, students will also explore multilayer functionality
within conventional games, sound, and music
as it affects game design for a multilayer environment. Additionally, students will explore
basic enemy programming and level design
while learning to work in a team environment.
In this class, students work to complete the
projects they began in GAM 300. Additional
topics may include large project software
architecture, advanced testing techniques,
internships, and an introduction to resumes
and interviews.
In this class, students work to complete the
projects they began in GAM 400. Additional
topics may include working in the industry,
personal networking, and career strategies.
GAM 390
Internship I (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): GAM 250
GAM 250
Project II (4 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 225, GAM 200
Concurrent Course(s): CS 200
In this class, students work to complete and
polish the projects they began in GAM 200.
Additional topics may include intermediate
software architecture, advanced debugging
techniques, bug tracking, formal playtesting,
game pacing, and game balance.
GAM 300
Project III (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 200, CS 280, GAM 250,
PHY 200
Concurrent Course(s): CS 26
This project is divided into two semesters
and focuses on the creation of an advanced
real-time game or simulation with hardware-accelerated graphics. BSCS in RTIS
students work together on teams of three
to five members and implement technical
features, such as networking, artificial
intelligence, and physics. All projects must be
written with a core of C++ code and cannot
use middleware, such as pre-existing physics
engines, networking engines, etc. Additional
topics may include advanced software architecture, 3D art pipelines, building content
tools, and advanced team dynamics.
Prerequisite(s): GAM 250 or GAT 250
An internship is any carefully monitored
work or service experience in which an
individual has intentional learning goals and
reflects actively on what she or he is learning
throughout the experience. It is usually a
professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a
job situation, which places a high degree of
responsibility on the student. Internships are
structured along the Internship Guidelines
available in the Administration Office.
GAM 400
Project IV (5 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): GAM 350 or GAM 390 or GAM
490, CS 250
This project is divided into two semesters
and focuses on the creation of an innovative game, simulation, or demo. Students
may use current software and hardware
technologies with instructor approval, such
as web technologies, gaming consoles,
mobile devices, commercial physics engines,
commercial game engines, hands-free input
devices, etc. These technologies can be used
to implement technical features, such as 3D
animation, advanced lighting and rendering,
advanced 3D physics, high-performance
networking, and advanced AI algorithms.
Innovation can also come from the design,
visuals, and/or audio components of the
project. Students work independently or in
teams, as appropriate to the scope of their
project. Additional topics may include advanced interviewing techniques and writing
effective resumes.
GAM 490
Internship II (5 cr.)
An internship is any carefully monitored
work or service experience in which an
individual has intentional learning goals and
reflects actively on what she or he is learning
throughout the experience. It is usually a
professional activity under general supervision of an experienced professional and in a
job situation, which places a high degree of
responsibility on the student. Internships are
structured along the Internship Guidelines
available in the Administration Office.
Department of
Humanities and
Social Sciences
COM 150
Interpersonal & Work Communication
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110
Students explore how their culture, gender,
economic status, age and other personal
characteristics influence their work communications. The course explores verbal and
non-verbal communication skills in a global
work environment. Students learn written
communication techniques most effective for
use in the technology workplace. Additionally,
students explore and practice negotiation
skills, both internally and externally at their
workplace.
ENG 110
Composition (3 cr.)
This course focuses on generating and discussing ideas for composition and engages
in all stages of the writing process, with emphasis on the development and application of
critical thinking skills. The primary focus of the
course is developing the ability to construct,
write, and revise argumentative/ persuasive
essays. Assignments may also include other
types of writing, such as narrative, descriptive, and comparative essays.
ENG 116
Storytelling (4 cr.)
This course covers the principal elements
of storytelling including theme, character,
perspective, setting, plot, and dialogue. It encompasses both visual and non-visual media,
such as short stories, novels, drama, and film.
Through a series of creative writing exercises,
students practice developing stories with
both words and images.
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ENG 150
Mythology for Game Designers
(3 Cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110
This course studies myths from different
world cultures. It provides an in-depth
discussion of the Hero’s Journey (a basic
pattern that appears in many narratives)
and its principal archetypes. It also studies
mythology across the arts and examines how
essential it is to the study of literature, drama,
film and video games.
ENG 242
Multicultural Literature (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110
This course explores what modernity and
post-modernity have or have not meant
to American writers whose histories and
cultures are not European in origin but whose
writings are steeped in European- American
literary traditions. The course explores the
cultural hybridism of this literature as well
the unique visions of the world they have
created. These funny, humorous, bitterly
satirical, and downright serious (post)- modern fantasies are quintessentially American,
yet also unique and peculiar to these authors’
ethnic experiences. The selected works also
offer an opportunity to read or re-read well
established and newer American works of
literature.
ENG 243
Epic Poetry (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116, ENG 150
This course provides an introduction to the
literary form of the epic poem. Students
gain in-depth knowledge of the form and
apply this experience by adapting the epic’s
themes and structures into their own creative
endeavors, including video games. Students
also produce an epic-based creative work as
a final project in the course.
ENG 245
Introduction to Fiction Writing (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116
This course provides an introduction to the
study and practice of fiction writing including
characterization, plot, setting, and point of
view. It presents selected works of short and
long fiction. The course is an opportunity for
students to practice their own creative writing
skills. They are required to write an least two
short stories.
ENG 246
American Ethnic Literatures (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116
This course covers prominent themes and
techniques in American ethic literatures
such as Native, African, Asian, and Hispanic
American Literatures. Modern Texts are
emphasized but pre- or early 20th century
classics may also be included.
ENG 315
Story Through Dialogue (4 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 116 or ENG 245
This course introduces students to the basics
of screenplay writing for film beginning with
the fundamentals of dramatic structure, story
arcs, character arcs, and dialogue. Through
a series of related assignments, students
experiences the process of developing a
script of their own and practice their hand at
writing dialogue for film. Students will write
at least one original pre-production script in
screenplay format.
ENG 340
Creative Writing Across the Arts
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110 or ENG 116
This course focuses on the generation of
creative writing in multiple genres and media,
including poetry, fiction, creative non-fiction,
and graphic novels. Students study and
practice writing in a workshop atmosphere
and engage in intensive reading of excellent
writings, most of which employ interdisciplinary, cross-genre approaches that encompass
painting, photography, and other visual art.
Discussions of readings are followed by writing experiments designed to spark original
thinking, to develop facility with writing, and
to enhance understanding of the creative
process. Students gain in-depth knowledge
of the possibilities of creative writing and
apply this experience by writing both short
creative pieces and longer works.
ENG 399
Special Topics in English (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
ENG 400
Creative Writing for Game Design
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 150 or ENG 110
This course focuses on the narrative elements of creative writing. Exercises generate
thinking and hone students’ basic storytelling
talents, including characterization, exposition,
plot, conflict, back-story, dialogue, and appropriate use of language. Students learn how
to use symbols to design a story and how to
manipulate the symbols to create character,
plot, message, and interactivity. Students are
encouraged to access their own genius, culture, and life experience in the development
of their stories.
ENG 410
Interactive Storytelling (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110
In this class, students learn to design stories
with symbolic language. Exercises help students apply and understand character design
and development, archetypes, conflict, plot
patterns, back-story, dialogue, exposition,
premise, and the psychological dynamics of
human choice. Students also learn how to manipulate symbols in images by drawing from
a variety of theoretical models, such as Carl
Jung’s dream analysis, personality profiling
per Myers-Briggs, Gestalt psychology, and
narrative architecture.
ENG 420
Cybertexts: Interactive Media and
the Future of Narrative (3 cr.)
Video games and other forms of interactive
media are widely touted as the future of
both popular entertainment and narrative
storytelling. If video games and other interactive media are developing into art forms,
then we can expect that these emerging
narrative forms will be able to accommodate
genres of storytelling that have existed
since time immemorial, including romance,
comedy, tragedy and epic. Yet the dynamics
of nonlinear storytelling, the limits of current
video game technology, and the constraints
of the marketplace do not seem conducive
to expanding the narrative elements of
interactive media. This course traces the
boundaries between narratives and games,
and aims to identify areas of overlap that can
lead to the development of new expressions
of narrativity in interactive media. One central
goal of the course is to grapple with the
problem(s) posed by interactive narrative.
Assigned readings examine the difference
between traditional narrative texts and texts
that require a higher degree of interactivity,
collectively called cybertexts. The goal of
the course is to identify what differences
may exist, and to analyze the possibilities for
adapting traditional narrative into interactive
media. This class’s central innovation requires
students to actively adapt an element of
traditional narrative into a cybertext. By the
end of the class, students reach a conclusion,
based on their reading and course work, as to
whether cybertexts can effectively encompass traditional narrative genres, and if not,
whether this is due to limitations of the form,
or the limitations of technology.
ENG 440
Advanced Fiction Writing (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 245 or ENG 315
This course builds upon the concepts and
skills taught in previous writing courses.
Advanced Fiction Writing offers students
the opportunity to further develop their
fiction-writing skills by engaging in intensive
writing and regular critique of their peers’
creative work. The emphasis is on refining
narrative writing skills and developing
individual style and voice. Students write
three full-length short stories and read
contemporary fiction by established authors
not discussed in previous courses. Enrollment
is limited to a maximum of 12 students. The
limited class size will afford the intensive
production schedule and frequent discussion
of writing.
ENG 450
Elements of Media for Game
Developers (2 cr.)
Other topics covered may include mental
representation and transformation, language
processing, and concept formation.
Relative to modern technological media, the
most important issue to consider is the nature
of the interactive loop of influence between
media and culture. Interactivity is one of the
most powerful and important potentials of
the game medium, but the term is often used
with superficial understanding of its implications. This course emphasizes the nature of
interactivity primarily from psychological and
sociological perspectives. Students review
and define interactive media using examples drawn from academic research, film,
television, and games. Students have ample
opportunity to contemplate and discuss
how they can apply a more comprehensive
understanding of interactivity in order to
surpass the current limits of interactive media
products.
PSY 399
Special Topics in Psychology (3 cr.)
LAW 115
Introduction to Intellecutal Property
and Contracts (3 cr.)
The animation and computer software
industries are founded upon the principle of
intellectual property. This course introduces
students to the social concepts and traditions
that led to the idea of intellectual property. It
surveys the various international legal systems governing intellectual property, giving
special consideration to Title 17 and the local
statutes that govern copyrights, trademarks,
and patents in the United States. Students
learn fundamental issues surrounding this
field, such as fair use, international relations,
and economics. The course also introduces
students to a basic overview of contracts, including structure, traditions, and vocabulary.
PSY 101
Introduction to Psychology (3 cr.)
This course introduces major topics in
psychology, specifically as they relate to
cognition and learning. These topics include
perception, cognition, personality and social
psychology, and biological aspects of behavior. Students are also introduced to human
information processing, memory, problem
solving, attention, perception, and imagery.
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
SOS 115
Media and Ethics: A Social Science
Perspective (3 cr.)
contemporary world, it also uses an historical
approach to address some of the technological innovations that have most affected U.S.
society in the past. The course considers how
technologies are developed and sustained,
and how they interact with and affect our
urban culture. Specific themes likely to be
addressed include technology’s impact on
the private and public spheres; the body and
the self in cyberspace; and the criteria used
to determine a technology’s success, failure,
and danger.
SOS 180
Race & Gender in 21st Century
America (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): ENG 110
This course guides students in the ethical
assessment of both the processes and
outcomes of social decision-making. After
an introduction to basic ethical theories,
students acquire an understanding of the
structure of social institutions and the process
through which one makes social choices.
Central to the analysis is a study of ethics as
a criterion for assessment of social decision-making with emphasis on the study of
particular issues of social choice. The course
also provides a theoretical framework within
which to spot and analyze ethical issues in
the media.
SOS 150
Society and Technology (3 cr.)
This course draws on techniques and
perspectives from the social sciences,
humanities, and cultural studies to explore
technology and change in the modern era. In
particular, students examine how technology
influences and is influenced by values and
cultures in America and abroad. The course
helps students recognize the range of consequences that technology in general, and
information and communication technology
(ICT) in particular, have when shaped and
used by individuals, organizations, and society. Through readings, discussion, lectures,
and written assignments, students become
acquainted with current controversies related
to the socio-cultural dimensions of technology in the “digital era.” While the course
examines the impact of technologies— including video gaming and robotics—on the
This course takes a close look at current
debates on race, gender, and ethnicity in
American society. It begins with an overview
of definitions of race, gender, and ethnicity,
exploring what they have meant in the past
and what they mean now. Then the course
examines the intersections between race,
gender, and ethnicity, asking the following
questions: How do race and ethnicity differ,
and how are they related? What difference
does race make? How are race and gender
related? Where does sexual orientation fit
into the discourse on gender, and how does
it fit into discussions on race and ethnicity?
Current debates on race, gender, and ethnicity were highlighted by the 2008 election of
the first African-American president and the
ever-growing prominence of women in the
highest levels of American politics. Does this
mean that we have entered a post-racial era?
Where exactly do we stand on women and
gender-related issues? What about the place
of GLBT issues in the public domain? This
course explores these themes and topics.
SOS 399
Special Topics in Sociology (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
Department of
Life Sciences
BIO 150
Human Muscular, Skeletal and
Kinetic Anatomy (3 cr.)
This course explores the skeletal and muscular structures of the human body. Students
learn to identify skeletal and muscular
forms from both live models and anatomical
references. Additionally, students consider
terminology, structural arrangement, and
kinetic function. The course gives special
emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the
needs of artists and animators.
BIO 200
Animal Muscular, Skeletal and Kinetic
Anatomy (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): BIO 150
This course introduces the major skeletal and
muscular structures of animals. Students extrapolate their knowledge of the human form
to the structure and form of a variety of animal
types, specifically focusing on the impact of
locomotion and feeding strategies on form.
Additionally, students consider terminology,
structural arrangement, and kinetic function.
The course also considers standard locomotion cycles and the relationship between
humans and various animals. It gives special
emphasis to adapting this knowledge to the
needs of artists and animators.
BIO 399
Special Topics in Biology (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
Department of
Mathematics
MAT 140
Linear Algebra and Geometry (4 cr.)
83
partial derivatives, extrema of multi-variable
functions, vector fields, gradient, divergence,
curl, Laplacian, and applications.
MAT 200
Calculus and Analytic Geometry II
(4 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 150
and eigenvectors. Other topics may include
applications to least-squares approximations
and Fourier transforms, differential equations,
and computer graphics.
MAT 256
Introduction to Differential Equations
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200
The two main themes throughout the course
are vector geometry and linear transformations. Topics from vector geometry include
vector arithmetic, dot product, cross product,
and representations of lines and planes in
three-space. Linear transformations covered include rotations, reflections, shears
and projections. Students study the matrix
representations of linear transformations
along with their derivations. The curriculum
also presents affine geometry and affine
transformations along with connections to
computer graphics. This course also includes
a review of relevant algebra and trigonometry
concepts.
This course builds on the introduction to
calculus in MAT150. Topics in integration
include applications of the integral in physics
and geometry and techniques of integration.
The course also covers sequences and
series of real numbers, power series and
Taylor series, and calculus of transcendental
functions. Further topics may include a basic
introduction to concepts in multivariable and
vector calculus.
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200
MAT 150
Calculus and Analytic Geometry I
(4 cr.)
This course extends the basic ideas of
calculus to the context of functions of several
variables and vector-valued functions. Topics
include partial derivatives, tangent planes,
and Lagrange multipliers. The study of curves
in two- and threespace focuses on curvature,
torsion, and the TNB-frame. Topics in vector
analysis include multiple integrals, vector
fields, Green’s Theorem, the Divergence
Theorem and Stokes’ Theorem. Additionally,
the course may cover the basics of differential equations.
This course gives an introduction to several
mathematical topics of foundational importance in the mathematical and computer
sciences. Typically starting with propositional
and first order logic, the course considers applications to methods of mathematical proof
and reasoning. Further topics include basic
set theory, number theory, enumeration,
recurrence relations, mathematical induction,
generating functions, and basic probability.
Other topics may include graph theory,
asymptotic analysis, and finite automata.
MAT 250
Linear Algebra (3 cr.)
MAT 300
Curves and Surfaces (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
This course presents the mathematical
foundations of linear algebra, which includes
a review of basic matrix algebra and linear
systems of equations as well as basics of
linear transformations in Euclidean spaces, determinants, and the Gauss-Jordan
Algorithm. The more substantial part of the
course begins with abstract vector spaces
and the study of linear independence and
bases. Further topics may include orthogonality, change of basis, general theory of
linear transformations, and eigenvalues
This course is an introduction to parameterized
polynomial curves and surfaces with a view
toward applications in computer graphics. It
discusses both the algebraic and constructive
aspects of these topics. Algebraic aspects
include vector spaces of functions, special
polynomial and piecewise polynomial bases,
polynomial interpolation, and polar forms.
Constructive aspects include the de Casteljau
algorithm and the de Boor algorithm. Other
topics may include an introduction to parametric surfaces and multivariate splines.
This course introduces the calculus of
functions of a single real variable. The main
topics include limits, differentiation, and
integration. Limits include the graphical and
intuitive computation of limits, algebraic properties of limits, and continuity of functions.
Differentiation topics include techniques of
differentiation, optimization, and applications
to graphing. Integration includes Riemann
sums, the definite integral, anit-derivatives,
and the Fundamental Theorem of Calculus.
MAT 180
Vector Calculus I (4 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 140
This course extends the standard calculus of
one-variable functions to multi-variable vector-valued functions. Vector calculus is used
in many branches of physics, engineering,
and science, with applications that include
dynamics, fluid mechanics, electromagnetism,
and the study of curves and surfaces. Topics
covered include limits, continuity, and differentiability of functions of several variables,
MAT 225
Calculus and Analytic Geometry III
(3 cr.)
This course introduces the basic theory and
applications of first and second-order linear
differential equations. The course emphasizes specific techniques such as the solutions
to exact and separable equations, power
series solutions, special functions and the
Laplace transform. Applications include RLC
circuits and elementary dynamical systems,
and the physics of the second order harmonic
oscillator equation.
MAT 258
Discrete Maths (3 cr.)
MAT 340
Probablility and Statistics (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200, MAT 258
This course is an introduction to basic
probability and statistics with an eye toward
computer science and artifical intelligence.
Basic topics from probability theory include
sample spaces, random variables, continuous
and discrete probability density functions,
mean and variance, expectation, and conditional probability. Basic topics from statistics
include binomial, Poisson, chi-square, and
normal distributions; confidence intervals;
and the Central Limit Theorem. Further topics
may include fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic.
MAT 350
Advanced Curves and Surfaces
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 300
This course is a continuation of MAT 300 with
topics taken from the theory and applications
of curves and surfaces. The course treats
some of the material from MAT 300 in more
detail, like the mathematical foundations for
non-uniform rational B-spline (NURBS) curves
and surfaces, knot insertion, and subdivision.
Other topics may include basic differential
geometry of curves and surfaces, tensor
product surfaces, and multivariate splines.
MAT 351
Quaternions, Interpolation and
Animation (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 300
This course gives an introduction to several
mathematical topics of foundational importance to abstract algebra, and in particular
the algebra of quaternions. Topics covered
may include: operations, groups, rings, fields,
vector spaces, algebras, complex numbers,
quaternions, curves over the quaternionic
space, interpolation techniques, splines,
octonions, and Clifford algebras.
MAT 352
Wavelets (3 cr.)
MAT 355
Graph Theory (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
This course presents the foundations of
wavelets as a method of representing and
approximating functions. It discusses background material in complex linear algebra
and Fourier analysis. Basic material on the
discrete and continuous wavelet transforms
forms the core subject matter. This includes
the Haar transform, and multi-resolution analysis. Other topics may include subdivision
curves and surfaces, and B-spline wavelets.
Applications to computer graphics may
include image editing, compression, surface
reconstruction from contours, and fast methods of solving 3D simulation problems.
This course provides an introduction to the
basic theorems and algorithms of graph
theory. Topics include graph isomorphism,
connectedness, Euler tours, Hamiltonian
cycles, and matrix representation. Further
topics may include spanning trees, coloring
algorithms, planarity algorithms, and search
algorithms. Applications may include network
flows, graphical enumeration, and embedding
of graphs in surfaces.
MAT 353
Differential Geometry (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 300
This course presents an introduction to differential geometry, with emphasis on curves
and surfaces in three-space. It includes
background material on the differentiability
of multivariable functions. Topics covered
include parameterized curves and surfaces
in three-space and their associated first and
second fundamental forms, Gaussian curvature, the Gauss map, and an introduction
to the intrinsic geometry of surfaces. Other
topics may include an introduction to differentiable manifolds, Riemannian geometry, and
the curvature tensor.
MAT 354
Discrete and Computational
Geometry (3 cr.)
MAT 356
Advanced Differential Equations
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 256
This course covers the advanced theory
and applications of ordinary differential
equations. The first course in differential
equations focused on basic prototypes, such
as exact and separable equations and the
second-degree harmonic oscillator equation.
This course builds upon these ideas with
a greater degree of generality and theory.
Topics include qualitative theory, dynamical
systems, calculus of variations, and applications to classical mechanics. Further topics
may include chaotic systems and cellular
automata. With this overview, students will be
prepared to study the specific applications of
differential equations to the modeling of problems in physics, engineering, and computer
science.
MAT 357
Numerical Analysis (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
Topics covered in this course include convex
hulls, triangulations, Art Gallery theorems, Voronoi diagrams, Delaunay graphs, Minkowski
sums, path finding, arrangements, duality, and
possibly randomized algorithms, time permitting. Throughout the course, students explore
various data structures and algorithms.
The analysis of these algorithms, focusing
specifically on the mathematics that arises in
their development and analysis is discussed.
Although CS 330 is not a prerequisite, it is
recommended.
This course covers the numerical techniques
arising in many areas of computer science
and applied mathematics. Such techniques
provide essential tools for obtaining approximate solutions to non-linear equations
arising from the construction of mathematical models of real-world phenomena. Topics
of study include root finding, interpolation,
approximation of functions, cubic splines,
integration, and differential equations.
Further topics may include stability, iterative
methods for solving systems of equations,
eigenvalue approximation, and the fast
Fourier transform.
MAT 359
Computational Algebraic Geometry
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 300
This course introduces computational algebra
as a tool to study the geometry of curves and
surfaces in affine and projective space. The
central objects of study are affine varieties
and polynomial ideals, and the algebra-geometry dictionary captures relations between
these two objects. The precise methods
of studying polynomial ideals make use of
monomial orderings, Grobner bases, and
the Buchberger algorithm. Students have
opportunities to program parts of these
algorithms and to use software packages to
illustrate key concepts. Further topics may
include resultants, Zariski closure of algebraic
sets, intersections of curves and surfaces,
and multivariate polynomial splines.
MAT 361
An Introduction to Number Theory
and Cryptography (3 cr.)
fuzzy relations, fuzzification/ defuzzification,
classical logic, multi-valued logic, fuzzy logic,
fuzzy reasoning, fuzzy arithmetic, classical
groups, and fuzz groups. Students will also
explore a number of applications, including
approximate reasoning, fuzzy control, fuzzy
behavior, and interaction in computer games.
MAT 364
Combinatorial Game Theory (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 258
Combinatorial Game Theory studies finite,
two-player games in which there are no ties.
Techniques from logic combinatorics and set
theory are used to prove various properties
of such games. Typical games include Domineering, Hackenbush, and Nim. The analysis
of such games can also be used to study
other more complex games like Dots and
Boxes, and Go. Topics covered in this course
include Conway’s theory of numbers as
games, impartial and partizan games, winning
strategies, outcome classes and algebra of
games.
MAT 365
Topology (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
This course is an introduction to elementary
number theory and cryptography. Among
the essential tools of number theory that are
covered, are divisibility and congruence,
Euler’s function, Fermat’s little theorem,
Euler’s formula, the Chinese remainder
theorem, powers modulo m, kth roots modulo
m, primitive roots and indices, and quadratic
reciprocity. These tools are then used in
cryptography, where the course discusses
encryption schemes, the role of prime
numbers, security and factorization, the DES
algorithm, public key encryption, and various
other topics, as time allows.
This course introduces topology and its
applications. Topics covered include topological spaces, quotient and product spaces,
metric and normed spaces, connectedness,
compactness, and separation axioms. Further
topics may include basic algebraic topology,
fixed point theorems, theory of knots, and
applications to kinematics, game theory, and
computer graphics.
MAT 362
Fuzzy Sets and Logic (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 250, MAT 258
This course introduces the basic theory of
fuzzy sets and fuzzy logic and explores some
of their applications. Topics covered include
classical sets and their operations, fuzzy sets
and their operations, membership functions,
MAT 399
Special Topics in Mathematics (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
85
Department of
Physics
PHY 115
Introduction to Applied Math and
Physics (3 cr.)
PHY 250
Waves, Optics and Aerodynamics
(3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): MAT 200, PHY 200
This calculus-based course presents
the fundamentals of fluid dynamics, oscillations, waves, geometric optics, and
thermodynamics.
We live in a world governed by physical
laws. As a result we have become accustomed to objects’ motions being in
accordance with these laws. This course
examines the basic physics and mathematics governing natural phenomena, such as
light, weight, inertia, friction, momentum,
and thrust as a practical introduction to
applied math and physics. Students explore
geometry, trigonometry for cyclical motions,
and physical equations of motion for bodies
moving under the influence of forces. With
these tools, students develop a broader
understanding of the impact of mathematics
and physics on their daily lives.
PHY 250L
Waves, Optics and Thermodynamics
Lab (1 cr.)
PHY 200
Motion Dynamics (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): PHY 250
Prerequisite(s): MAT 150
This calculus-based course presents the
fundamental principles of mechanics,
including kinematics, Newtonian dynamics,
work and energy, momentum, and rotational
motion.
PHY 200L
Motion Dynamics Laboratory (1 cr.)
Concurrent Course(s): PHY 200
This course presents the concepts of PHY
200 in the laboratory. The experiments
allow the student to experience the laws of
basic physics involving linear motion, force,
gravitation, conservation of energy, conservation of momentum, collisions, rotational
motion, and springs. Error analysis and data
reduction techniques are taught and required
in experimental reports.
Concurrent Course(s): PHY 250
This course presents the concepts of PHY
250 in the laboratory. The experiments
allow students to experience the physical
laws involving oscillations, waves, sound,
interference, lift, drag, heat, optics, and entropy. Extended error analysis and statistics
are taught and required in experimental
reports.
PHY 270
Electricity and Magnetism (3 cr.)
This calculus-based course presents the
basic concepts of electromagnetism,
including electric fields, magnetic fields,
electromagnetic forces, DC and AC circuits, and Maxwell’s equations.
PHY 270L
Electricity and Magnetism Lab (1 cr.)
Concurrent Course(s): PHY 270
This course presents the concepts of PHY
270 in the laboratory. The experiments
allow students to experience the physical laws involving electric fields, electric
potential, electric current, electric charge,
capacitance, current, resistance, inductance,
circuits, and magnetism. Error analysis and
statistics are taught and required in experimental reports.
PHY 290
Modern Physics (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): PHY 250 or PHY 270, MAT
200, PHY 200
The wake of moden physics has given rise
to massive technological advancements that
have changed our daily lives. This course
covers many of the modern issues within
the field, with an emphasis placed on the
problem-solving nature of physics. The class
is a calculus-based scientific examiniation of
topics from general relativity and quantum
mechanics through nuclear physics, high
energy physics and astrophysics.
PHY 290L
Modern Physics Lab (1 cr.)
Concurrent Course(s): PHY 290
This course presents the concepts of PHY
290 in the laboratory. The experiments allow
students to experience the discoveries of
the last 100 years. The Michelson-Morley
interferometer, the photoelectric effect, the
electron’s charge to mass ratio, the FranckHertz experiments, electron diffraction and
the thermal band-gap. Error analysis and
statistics are taught and required in experimental reports.
PHY 300
Advanced Mechanics (3 cr.)
Prerequisite(s): CS 200, CS 250, MAT 150,
MAT 200, MAT 250, PHY 200, PHY 250
This course covers the physics behind more
complex mechanical interactions as well
as the numerical techniques required to
approximate the systems for simulations. A
thorough analysis of mechanical systems
through energy analysis provides the basis
for the understanding of linear and rotational
systems. The combination of theoretical
physics and numerical methods provide
students with the background for simulating
physical systems with limited computational
power. Topics covered include Lagrangian
Dynamics, Hamilton’s Equations, dynamics of
rigid bodies, motion in non-inertial reference
frames, the use of the inertia tensor, collision
resolution, and numerical techniques including methods of approximation.
PHY 399
Special Topics in Physics (3 cr.)
The content of this course may change each
time it is offered. It is for the purpose of offering a new or specialized course of interest to
the faculty and students that is not covered
by the courses in the current catalog.
DIGIPEN STUDENT ARTWORK
JASON WANG » SINGAPORE CAMPUS
“As a student at DigiPen, you’re constantly faced with new challenges.
You quickly learn not to fear the unknown and to approach each problem
with the mindset that success is attainable. The education and experience at
DigiPen gives you the knowledge and skills you need to thrive in the industry,
but just as importantly, it gives you the confidence to take on seemingly
impossible problems and know that you’ll find a solution in the end.”
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as additional program-specific materials.
For a complete list of admissions requirements and to begin the application process,
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