2012-13 Eye PAT Training Guide v 3

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2012-13 Eye PAT Training Guide v 3
Using the Internet Safely
Table of Contents
Introduction ......................................................................................................... 7
About EyePAT ................................................................................................. 7
About this Guide ............................................................................................. 7
Why do we need to learn online safety? ................................................................... 9
How can the internet affect your children?.............................................................. 11
How does a child’s brain work ............................................................................ 12
What to do at what age? ................................................................................... 13
Is Your Child Addicted to the Internet? How to Tell and What Parents Can Do ............ 16
Child/Parent Contracts on Internet Use .................................................................. 18
Example Contracts ........................................................................................... 19
The Internet - an introduction ............................................................................... 21
Different ways to chat online ................................................................................ 22
Social Networking ............................................................................................ 22
Instant messaging............................................................................................ 22
Chat Rooms..................................................................................................... 22
Video Messaging .............................................................................................. 22
Discussion groups ............................................................................................ 22
Internet & DVD Gaming ....................................................................................... 23
The good......................................................................................................... 23
The bad .......................................................................................................... 24
Gaming classifications....................................................................................... 24
Mobiles .............................................................................................................. 26
The Good ........................................................................................................ 26
The Bad .......................................................................................................... 26
Viewing Inappropriate Images on Mobiles............................................................ 26
Parents fear porn on children's mobiles ............................................................... 27
What can you do? ............................................................................................ 27
Sexting .............................................................................................................. 29
Advice for Schools and Professionals who care for young people ............................ 30
Bullying ............................................................................................................. 31
Happy People Don’t Bully .................................................................................. 31
Happy Kid’s Don’t Bully ..................................................................................... 31
Cyber Bullying .................................................................................................... 32
Instant Messaging/Text Messaging/e-mail harassment .......................................... 33
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Web Sites and Social Networking Sites ............................................................... 33
Sending Pictures through E-mail and Mobile Phones ............................................. 33
Impersonation ................................................................................................. 33
Sending Malicious Code..................................................................................... 33
Sending Porn and Other Junk E-Mail and IMs ....................................................... 33
Blogs .............................................................................................................. 34
Stealing Passwords........................................................................................... 34
Internet Polling ................................................................................................ 34
Trolling ........................................................................................................... 34
How would you know if your child is being bullied................................................. 34
I am an adult and I am bullying what can I do? ................................................... 35
I am a child and I am bullying what can I do? ...................................................... 36
How would you know if your child was a bully ...................................................... 36
Why should I do something ............................................................................... 36
How can you prevent or stop bullying ................................................................. 36
Google Alerts ...................................................................................................... 38
Grooming and online child abuse? ......................................................................... 39
Why do Child sex abusers like to use the internet to contact children? .................... 39
What are children at risk of? .............................................................................. 39
Children at specific risk ..................................................................................... 39
Tips to keep your children safe on the internet..................................................... 40
Internet Explorer History ...................................................................................... 43
Deleting the History.......................................................................................... 43
In Private Browsing .......................................................................................... 44
Games/Social Networking for Young Kids ............................................................... 46
Habbo............................................................................................................. 46
Club Penguin ................................................................................................... 46
Jacqueline Wilson ............................................................................................. 46
Moshi Monsters ................................................................................................ 47
Disney Superbia ............................................................................................... 47
SmileyTalk ...................................................................................................... 47
Yoursphere ...................................................................................................... 47
Messaging .......................................................................................................... 48
Facebook ........................................................................................................ 48
WhatsApp Messenger........................................................................................ 48
KikMessenger .................................................................................................. 48
Facebook Messenger......................................................................................... 48
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Messenger WithYou .......................................................................................... 49
Bump ............................................................................................................. 49
Ping................................................................................................................ 49
Touch ............................................................................................................. 49
BBM ............................................................................................................... 50
Snapchat (Sexting Messaging!!!)........................................................................ 50
Video Messaging ................................................................................................. 53
Facetime (Apple).............................................................................................. 53
Google Chat .................................................................................................... 53
Facebook ........................................................................................................ 53
Skype ............................................................................................................. 55
Chatroulette.com and Pinkroutlette.com.............................................................. 55
Tinychat.com ................................................................................................... 56
Stickam .......................................................................................................... 56
Gaming .............................................................................................................. 58
Available Games .............................................................................................. 58
The Ville.......................................................................................................... 58
Social Networking Sites ........................................................................................ 60
Facebook ........................................................................................................ 60
MySpace ......................................................................................................... 61
Bebo .............................................................................................................. 62
Faceparty ........................................................................................................ 62
Friendster ....................................................................................................... 63
MSN Messenger ............................................................................................... 63
Anonymous social networking ............................................................................... 64
Honesty Box .................................................................................................... 64
Formspring...................................................................................................... 64
Little Gossip .................................................................................................... 64
Spillit .............................................................................................................. 65
Blogging ............................................................................................................ 67
Tumblr............................................................................................................ 67
Parental Controls and Privacy Settings ................................................................... 69
Mobile Phone Operators Parental Controls ........................................................... 69
My Secure PC .................................................................................................. 70
Kaspersky ....................................................................................................... 71
Other Parental Control Software ......................................................................... 72
ISP Parental Controls ........................................................................................ 73
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Internet Explorer - Parental Controls .................................................................. 73
Internet Explorer 8/9 running on Windows 7 – Parental Controls ............................ 74
Disabling In-App Purchases on iOS and Android Devices ....................................... 76
Disabling In-App Purchases on Android Devices ................................................... 77
Xbox 360 Netflix ‘Just For Kids’ User Interface ..................................................... 78
iPAD Applying Safety Controls............................................................................ 79
iPhone Controls ................................................................................................ 82
Wii Parental Controls ........................................................................................ 83
XBox 360 - Parental Controls ............................................................................. 86
You Tube Safety Mode ...................................................................................... 89
Use YouTube’s privacy settings .......................................................................... 90
Google Chrome Family Safety ............................................................................ 91
Firefox family safety ......................................................................................... 92
Yahoo Safe Search ........................................................................................... 93
Bing Safe Search.............................................................................................. 94
Router Security & Parental Controls ....................................................................... 96
Netgear .......................................................................................................... 97
BT .................................................................................................................. 98
Web blocking ................................................................................................ 98
Instant messaging......................................................................................... 98
Time limits ................................................................................................... 98
Email blocking .............................................................................................. 98
Social networking.......................................................................................... 98
Program blocking .......................................................................................... 99
Usage reporting ............................................................................................ 99
Instant alerts................................................................................................ 99
DrayTek .......................................................................................................... 99
Social Networking - Privacy and Parental Settings ..................................................101
Friends, Contacts or Strangers ..........................................................................101
Facebook - Privacy Settings ..............................................................................102
Changing your Privacy Settings......................................................................103
Photo Albums ..............................................................................................107
Is someone logging onto your Facebook account without you knowing? ..............109
Password - Changing your Facebook password ................................................109
Bebo – www.bebo.co.uk...................................................................................111
Privacy Settings ...........................................................................................111
Contact Details ............................................................................................112
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To change the password ...............................................................................113
Deleting a person from my friend's list? ..........................................................113
MySpace - www.myspace.com ..........................................................................115
Privacy options ............................................................................................115
Editing the Profile .........................................................................................116
To change the password ...............................................................................117
MSN (Windows Live Messenger) ........................................................................118
Changing your MSN Password ........................................................................119
Skype ...............................................................................................................120
Profile Settings ............................................................................................120
Privacy Settings ...........................................................................................120
Control who is allowed to make Skype-to-Skype calls to you .............................120
Control who is allowed to send you video and share their screen with you ...........121
Control who can send you instant messages ....................................................121
Removing the Share Profile with Advertisers option ..........................................121
Skype Button on Website ..............................................................................121
To manage your conversation history .............................................................122
To change your history settings: ....................................................................122
To block a contact ........................................................................................122
To unblock a contact ....................................................................................123
Accepting a Friend........................................................................................123
To change the password ...............................................................................124
Tracking & Monitoring Software ...........................................................................126
uKnowKids Software Review .............................................................................126
Screen Retriever Review and Installation ...........................................................129
Facebook Monitoring Solutions for Parents..........................................................134
Mamabear Parental Monitoring App Review ........................................................135
Kid Safe Search Engines......................................................................................139
Microsoft and CEOP create child-friendly version of IE9 ........................................139
Ranger Browser – A Safe Browser for a Child’s iPhone, iPad or Android ..................140
Windows Live Family Safety.................................................................................144
Protecting your kids with Family Safety ..............................................................145
Set up the Family Safety Filter .......................................................................145
Customize your family’s settings ....................................................................148
Set up web filtering ......................................................................................148
Allow or block a website ................................................................................149
Manage your child's contact list .....................................................................149
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Turn on activity reporting ..............................................................................152
What to do to stop abuse? ...................................................................................154
Homework Sites .................................................................................................155
Internet Cookies – What They Are and How to Block Them ......................................159
Internet Explorer.............................................................................................159
Firefox ...........................................................................................................160
Safari ............................................................................................................161
Chrome..........................................................................................................162
Text and MSN abbreviations ................................................................................163
Dictionary of terms used in chat rooms .................................................................166
A Dictionary of Sexting terms ..............................................................................171
List of popular social networking websites .............................................................173
Some Internet Chat and Drug Lingo .....................................................................184
Emoticons .........................................................................................................185
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Introduction
About EyePAT
EyePAT is a Not for Profit (CIC) Community Interest Company dedicated to keeping
children, young people, vulnerable adults and adults safe online and free from bullying.
We plough all our profits back into the company in order to help us develop and deliver
the online safety and anti-bullying training.
We have a team of unpaid Directors and Members see www.eyepat/aboutus. This
team is made up of Head Teachers, Teachers, from primary, secondary, state and
private schools. Members of the Police Force, Health Services, Financial and Marketing
experts, all of whom provide their time and expertise free. Our current Chair is Mr Derek
Thomas, Head Teacher, Murch Junior School. Penny Steinhauer is the Operations and
Training Director and can be contacted on [email protected]
About this Guide
This Information Guide is designed to work alongside the internet safety sessions created
by EyePAT. It contains information on how to use the internet safely.
This guide is not definitive as things change very quickly on a regular basis. If you can
think of any topics which are not covered, or have any ideas for inclusion please contact
us by email on [email protected]
Eye PAT provide training for:
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Teachers and School Staff
Care & Health Workers (Foster Carers, Social & Youth Workers, Nursery Workers
and Childminders)
Parents
Pupils
Businesses and organisations
We teach internet awareness of:
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Sexting
Cyber bullying and Trolling
Unsuitable content
Violent Gaming
Grooming
Identity Theft
Business and personal reputation
We run anti-bullying workshops for Adults and Young People called:
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Happy People Don’t Bully
Happy Kids Don’t Bully
We provide:
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Extensive Training Guide
Instructor Led Sessions
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
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Courses and materials to purchase and run training yourselves
Bespoke workshops
This guide has been created by EyePAT Community Interest Company. Training sessions
are run throughout the UK. If you are interested in running a session or require further
information please get in touch.
For current information check www.eyepat.org email [email protected] or ring 01446
795055.
Follow us on Twitter: @Eye_PAT
Like our Facebook page: Eye PAT Internet Safety
Please support our Facebook campaign: Block Online Porn for Kids
We have included information in this guide from many sources. One we would like to
specifically mention is http://internet-safety.yoursphere.com/ This is an American
Company who carry out research into many child safety products and a number of their
articles are included here.
Last updated September 2012 Please Note: You have purchased this guide for personal use only. You are
permitted to print copies for your personal use only. You are not permitted to print, duplicate, copy or sell the
CD or make additional copies for any other reason.
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Why do we need to learn online safety?
Putting things in perspective
These are the risks your children face.
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90% of children view pornography on the internet with the average age of first
time view being 11
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25% of sexual offenders are now under the age of 21
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34% of children will be cyber bullied
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38% of young people are sexting
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49% of young people will be bullied during their school lives
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In 2010 <1% of children in the UK reported online abuse (grooming) to CEOP.
Here are a couple of the risks adults face:
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1 in 3 adults experience bullying in the workplace
1 in 25 elderly people will be bullied or mistreated
If you social network and you have not applied your privacy settings correctly
your posts could be seen by anyone!
Of the 336 cases of unacceptable professional misconduct heard last year by the
General Teaching Council 43 involved inappropriate use of Facebook or online
chatrooms!
If you wish to find out more we publish relevant reports and articles on
http://www.eyepat.org/Research.
The internet is a wonderful tool. Almost anything can be found on it. It has totally
changed the way we both live and work. However it has brought with it many challenges
which we did not have 10 or even 5 years ago and its essential we all learn how to keep
safe online, whether to protect us personally or professionally.
Used safely and responsibly the internet opens up no end of possibilities. However it
does not come without many problems. It has to be remembered the original design of
the internet was as a communication tool for businesses so it was never built with the
safeguards for private and family use.
Unsuitable Sites - If you do not apply the appropriate blocks, it is extremely likely
(90%) your children will encounter inappropriate materials this will damage or at the
very least affect their minds. Without restrictions they will be able to access the most
horrifying and horrendous violent and sexual images. They will be able to link up to
extremist sites and be able to join groups of likeminded individuals, whether they be
anorexics, terrorists, drug users etc. To prevent this all it takes is to apply age
appropriate parental controls which are now available from some ISP’s (Internet Service
Providers), through some Routers and via Parental Control Software. Every family with
children under the 18 should have this. See Page 69
Sexting - stats show 38% of young people are involved or have experienced Sexting
and this is growing at an alarming rate. There is no “type” of young people who do this.
Once an image has been sent control is lost. CEOP list this as one of their main
problems. They give it the name it SGII (Self Generated Indecent Imagery).
Bullying - Nearly half (49%) of all school age children are now bullied, and 34% of
children are being cyber-bullied. The problems is getting worse and bullying can have
devastating consequences.
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Workplace bullying has doubled in the last 10 years and is costing the country £billions
in lost productivity and staff absence. 1 in 3 adults now experience bullying and 80% of
victims said the abuse had affected their physical and mental health. 33% had decided
to take time off, or even left their jobs as a result.
Trolling - is the latest sick trend. This involves sending or posting sick or abusive
messages onto sites, often remembrance sites or social networking sites of people who
have died. There is nothing positive about trolling, however those that do it can have
emotional or mental problems.
Grooming - is the one threat most parents are aware of. When it happens it can have
devastating and far reaching effects and there is no doubt that the internet (especially
Social Networking) has become an extremely useful tool for paedophiles to contact
children. There is a lot of information in this guide on this subject.
Violent Gaming - Gaming on the internet is brilliant, both for children and adults. The
games can stretch and develop a child’s mind in many ways. However this can be bad as
well as good. This is why games, like films have an age rating. Please don’t ignore these
ratings. Violent online gaming is changing the behaviours and brain mapping of young
people.
Identity theft - How many people display their date of birth on social networking sites?
What is the first question, and sometimes the only one, you are normally asked to
establish your identity? Identities can be stolen in many ways. As an adult you may not
release private information easily, however are your children as aware?
Mobiles (Smartphones) and Tablets - are the norm, they now have internet access
(with all the associated dangers), cameras and many apps. Most people have had
photographs taken of them on mobiles which they don’t like. These images can now be
passed around hundreds or thousands of people in a matter of seconds.
The internet is here to stay and if you learn how to use it safely and teach your children
the same thing, it is brilliant.
Technology is not bad. Like everything in life it is what people do with it that is bad or
dangerous. In the same way as you need to learn to swim, ride a bike or drive safely you
need to learn to use the internet safely.
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How can the internet affect your children?
The following is a must read for anyone with children under the age of 16 and advisable
for anyone with young people under the age of 25. It explains how our online behaviours
can change our real world behaviour and how it can even change our brain development.
You may need to read it 2 or 3 times to totally understand it, but please do so. It is most
definitely worth it.
This extract is taken from the Bryon Review – Children and New Technology by Dr.
Tanya Byron, Consultant Clinical Psychologist – March 2008. To see the full report go to
http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/byronreview/
It in turn is sourced from “Brain development in Childhood: A literature review and
synthesis for the Byron Review on the impact of new technologies on children, by Mark H
Johnson, MRC Scientific Team Leader, Profession of Psychology, Birkbeck, University of
London. Director: Centre for Brain and Cognitive Development.”
Brain development takes place throughout childhood, developing ‘neural networks’
connecting different parts of the brain together as it grows and a significant change in
the amount of technology used during childhood, could potentially have a big impact on
how the structure and function of the brain develops. A major concern relating to video
game playing is whether children learn anti-social or violent behaviour from the games
they play. How much could children learn from inappropriate content or behaviour online
or in video games?
This could be positive (learning how to care for animals from playing a zoo-keeping video
game) or negative (learning how to victimise someone from playing a war game) and
depends also on the context of the experience (e.g. playing violent games within a
household where violence is the norm). Children’s expectations about the world may be
changed by what they see or experience online or in games
The implication is that if a child has had frequent experiences of playing a game, it is
possible that the brain will set up an ‘expectancy’ to act in the real world in the same
way that they act in their virtual world. However, whether this then generalises to their
real world behaviour is unknown.
One of the systems they use to make sense of other people’s actions is the “mirror
neurone system”. One of the earliest findings from research into mirror neurones is that
they are only activated when a human hand (versus a mechanical hand) grasps an
object (Tai et al, 2004). When we think about how children might learn from what they
see in a game or on the internet we need to consider whether the ‘agent’ (person or
cartoon) on the screen is perceived as ‘human’ by the brain. As graphics become more
real-life it is possible that these forms of learning, previously activated only by the real
world, will be activated. The implication is that media that requires active responses
(rather than simply passively viewing) is likely to have a more profound influence on the
children’s development. This could be beneficial (hand-eye coordination skills) or
negative (learning to use violence) – again, other factors such as the age and social
context of the children would be important determining factors here.
One of the key ways children learn about emotions, feelings and moral transgressions is
by discussing feelings, emotions and behaviour (usually in the family context). It could
have a detrimental impact if these discussions do not take place and are replaced by
excessive exposure to potentially inappropriate material that is not then discussed.
The nature of the experience during a video game might be very important in
determining children’s subsequent behaviour; although quite what the long-term impact
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of this might be, or what other factors in the child’s individual make-up or experience
modulate this learning mechanism, is unclear and needs to be considered.
However, it does appear that violent content may lead to sustained learning about
violent behaviour in children where violence is the norm (the game playing reinforcing
and validating real world experiences). More research is needed to clarify this so that we
can identify which children are more vulnerable.
Other concerns about the role of harmful or inappropriate material in technology is how
children use online or virtual information or experiences to develop a sense of self – the
inner working model of ourselves which drives how we think and feel about ourselves
and in turn affects how we behave (e.g. emotional regulation, impulse control, self
monitoring).
There is clear evidence of harm within the virtual world when vulnerable children with a
poor sense of self and low self esteem are ‘seduced’ and flattered by others who
represent themselves falsely within the virtual world (e.g. online predators pretending to
be children) (CEOP, 2007).
There are examples where the very vulnerable may access information and even
persuasion by others which may encourage them or even lead them to harm themselves
(suicide websites; pro-anorexia sites etc.). The online space can provide a supportive
environment and de-stigmatise the discussion of mental health or emotional difficulties
and enable those in distress to find sources of advice and support. However, what is
clear is that there exists a significant probability of risk for some individuals with mental
health and other vulnerabilities who engage with such material online.
How does a child’s brain work
Thinking about children’s age and stage of development is a
useful way of establishing general guidance on how to support children’s internet and
video game experiences. Children’s rate and profiles of growth vary enormously between
each other so while it is possible make broad statements, there will always be variations
with individuals.
One potentially very important set of robust findings relates to the development of the
front part of the brain – the ‘frontal cortex’ – the ‘intelligent’ part of the human brain.
This is the part of the brain that enables us to plan and organise, to have conscious
strategic control over our thoughts, feelings and behaviour and to choose between good
and bad, fantasy and reality. It also plays a key role in enabling us to override, suppress
or inhibit behaviours, such as unacceptable social responses.
The frontal cortex develops throughout childhood and into early adulthood and therefore
children with immature and developing frontal cortex structure and functioning are less
efficient at reasoning because they have yet to develop their critical evaluation skills
(how to judge information based on context), are worse at inhibiting irrelevant
information and also do not regulate their social behaviours well. Moreover, there is
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recent evidence that adolescence (post puberty) is a time of enormous growth and
development of the frontal lobes.
One very important way to think about how to support children with the management of
‘harmful’ or ‘inappropriate’ material online and in video games is to look at the
development of their frontal cortex. This is because the functioning of frontal lobes
enables us to make sense of the world and make judgments about our behaviour and
the behaviour of others, as well as differentiating between reality and fantasy.
So when we think about ways of making children safer online and in their gaming –
whether that’s through industry making the environments safer or parents being
supported to use the tools available to them – it is as if we are stepping in to provide the
necessary frontal cortex functions that enable children and young people to manage
risks at different ages and stages of development.
This approach acknowledges that children at different ages and developmental stages
have varying abilities in making sophisticated judgments about information such as the
credibility of a source or whether something is morally or socially appropriate.
These systems are not in place in the brain during early childhood and develop over time
into early adulthood. Just as we perform these functions for our children in the nondigital world, such as when helping them cross the road, we need to do this when they
use the internet and play video games.
What to do at what age?
Pre-school is a time when children are still very much focused on the family and the
home. Key to children’s development at this time is forming relationships with key
adults. These children are more vulnerable to content e.g. violent, frightening, sexual or
highly emotional as their ability to differentiate between reality and fantasy is very
limited. It is imperative that their access to the online world and video games is robustly
monitored and supervised. Their “technological diet” needs to be restricted, in terms of
what they should access, watch, play, when, and for how long.
5-11 years - during this time children start school and begin to make bigger shifts in
how they relate to others outside the family there frontal cortex is developing. They are
learning what is right and wrong, learning about social rules and norms, sorting
out reality from fantasy. They are still immature at self-regulation, and their ability to
inhibit and control impulses and emotions is still well below that observed in adults. This
is the time when children begin exploring websites beyond the boundaries originally set
for them by their parents and also when they start playing a wider range of video
games.
Critical evaluation and self regulation skills are still relatively poor due to their
underdeveloped frontal cortex, therefore adults need to provide support with these
functions for the child – allowing them to explore but at the same time regulating,
managing and restricting. Management of their media diet should start to change,
moving from heavy control to management by supervision and increasing discussion
about online and gaming behaviour. This enables the child to develop their own critical
evaluation and self management skills as well as being supported when they cannot or,
as in the case of the older children in this age band, choose not to.
11-14 years - The onset of puberty marks the beginning of a time during childhood
which is characterized by lots of brain and behavioural change. Adolescence is often an
unstable and emotional time when young people become vulnerable to the challenges
presented by the hormonal, physical and mental changes taking place. During this time
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there is a significant drive for social interaction. The focus of the child’s social world
changes from the home and family to the external world, to peers and idols. This may
involve taking risks. Peer communication becomes a central part of adolescent behaviour
due to this drive for social interaction as young people attempt to find their own sense of
who they are in relation to others. There is some evidence that social networking sites
offer teenagers a place to test various adolescent behaviours or to take ‘safe’ risks
(Livingstone, 2008).
Along with these changes comes an increased vulnerability to mental health problems
and susceptibility to poor self-esteem. Young people at this age may become more
vulnerable to messages about social acceptance including issues relating to body image
– this is a time with a significant increase in problems such as eating disorders, low selfesteem or depression.
There is an inherent drive at this age to seek out social experiences, access to age
restricted material and experiences such as video games which are designed for adults
These are more likely to be sought in the digital world as we restrict children’s and
young people’s access to the outdoor, offline socialisation.
There are biological drives and underpinnings to these changes in behaviour and we
need to respect and allow those while, at the same time, putting in place protections for
their vulnerabilities. In terms of adult input with the young person and technology, this
is a time to move towards collaborative management. Young people may evade and
rebel if parents are heavy handed at this stage. The aim is to protect them from some
content or experiences whilst empowering them by discussing risk.
15-18 years old - This period is the last stage of what we consider ‘childhood’, when
young people may still be the responsibility of their parents, but are also viewed as
young adults.
During this time, young people want to be seen as individuals and explore roles and
identities with a degree of autonomy and are often able to do this independently. They
can initiate and carry out tasks without supervision and can see themselves from the
viewpoint of others. By this stage their brain functioning is extremely close to that of an
adult and so they can master abstract thinking and develop theories to explain and make
sense of things. There are no longer the inherent restrictions of brain development that
lead to difficulties with evaluating information or making judgments. Indeed, young
people at this stage are beginning to develop their own set of values and beliefs (which
may be different from their parents).
Effective online management at this stage will involve providing opportunities for them
to explore and try different roles and identities while offering non-judgmental support in
the form of talking, discussing and supporting. At this stage young people need to begin
to make decisions for themselves and test things out while still having relationships in
place with e.g. parents, family members or friends to support them if opportunities turn
out to be too challenging.
Interestingly, much of the innovation and development of the new technologies and
games is done by people of this age.
Conclusion
When we teach our children to cross the road safely we do it in stages.
1. We hold their hand when they cross the road.
2. We teach them to think, look both ways and then cross.
3. When we see that they are starting to understand this we let them cross, walking
beside us, without holding on to them.
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4. Eventually we let them do it alone, maybe watching from a distance at first, but
then unsupervised.
And throughout this, the environment supports them with signs and expected behaviour
from others in the community – the green man, zebra crossings, speed limits and other
responsible adults. Going online and playing video games may be more complex and
diverse than crossing the road, but it illustrates that we should change the nature of our
approach and interventions
End of extract from - Children and New Technology by Dr. Tanya Byron, Consultant
Clinical Psychologist – March 2008. To see the full report go to
http://www.dcsf.gov.uk/byronreview/
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Is Your Child Addicted to the Internet?
How to Tell and What Parents Can Do
Many thanks to Yoursphere.com for providing this information
“Addiction to the Internet shares some of the negative aspects of substance addiction
and has been shown to lead to consequences such as failing school, family, and
relationship problems.” Got to www.eyepar.org/research to see the full study.
We live in a much more connected world today than we did even five years ago. Today’s
Smartphones are more powerful than computers were a decade ago. We’re constantly
connected with each other, tweeting, updating statuses and uploading photos, and we
see the addiction to this social media everywhere.
For children, however, they quickly get sucked into the idea that their online friends
need to know what they’re doing or thinking at all times, and that this information is
actually important. Social media is a participatory media where a site’s members create
the content and/or push traffic to the site versus just consuming the content that’s put
before them. Today’s popular social media sites aren’t only participatory, though, they
actually put a heavy emphasis on features that promote instant gratification: Likes,
thumbs up, +1’s, retweets and comments are all examples of this. Engaging in this
behaviour almost becomes automatic for children and teens as they whip out their
Smartphones every few minutes just to see if anyone has liked or commented on
whatever they posted.
Studies have shown that social media sites such as Facebook and Twitter can be more
addictive than cigarettes and alcohol. A team from the University of Chicago’s Booth
School of Business recently conducted a survey of 250 people which found that “the
urges to keep on top of social networks and work were the hardest to resist” and “In
contrast alcohol and tobacco prompted much lower levels of desire despite their
reputation for being addictive.”
Wilhelm Hofmann, the leader of the team, suggests people may fail to resist social media
so much because there is no obvious or immediate downside to checking services like
Twitter or Facebook. He does warn that these services can ultimately be a huge drain on
users’ time, however.
The big downside to today’s popular social networking sites is that they encourage
children to engage in repetitive, unoriginal activity in exchange for rewards such as Likes
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and comments. The activity doesn’t stimulate them; it instead feeds into an attentionseeking state of mind.
To help minimize the chances of Internet addiction affecting your children, we
recommend:
1. Keeping laptops/computers in the family room and away from the bedroom,
especially at night. Not only will this set the boundaries for when and where it’s
OK to use the computer, it allows you to monitor and regulate the amount of time
your child spends online.
2. Making time for outdoor activities. Establishing a healthy balance of online time
with outdoor time is a great way to minimize Internet addiction. Being outdoors
with family and friends reminds children that there’s more to life than status
updates and tweets.
3. Computer monitoring is a parental responsibility. Some people call it helicopter
parenting, others call it spying, but the bottom line is parental monitoring
software helps ensure that your child is having a safe and positive experience
online.
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Child/Parent Contracts on Internet Use
A good way of agreeing PC use with your children is by drawing up a contract. Parents
need to make their commitment as well as the children.
The contract needs to be drawn up with both you and your child’s agreement and signed
by both the child/children and the parents. If you have more than one child you may,
depending on their age difference, need more than one contract.
Here are some guidelines on setting up a contract.
1. Identify the key issues with your children on the internet. These obviously
will be:

specific to your children’s age, interests and time spent on the Internet.

specifically to keep them safe from viewing inappropriate sites, cyber
bullying, grooming and identity theft.

apply to any items they can access the internet from, laptop, home PC,
mobile phone, Ipad or clone, gaming machine.
An example with a younger child may be:

You must let Mum or Dad know whenever you are going to log onto
Habbo. Explain to your children that this is because bad people might
want to contact them, pretending to be children.
In your parents contract it might read

Mum or Dad promise to spend at least 15 minutes after school, 3 days
a week, playing with you on Habbo/Club Penguin.
For an older child it may be:

You will accept the age restriction software we have loaded onto your
machine and will apply by the restrictions. If you find you are unable to
do your homework/research due to these restrictions you will come to
us. Explain to them that not all the information on the internet is ok for
them to see and could hurt them in one way or another.
In your parents contract it might read.

If you are unable to do your homework/research, we promise to spend
time with you on the internet helping you with this research.
2. Be clear and concise when identifying each issue.
Its important there is no chance of a child or teenager being able to say, they
didn’t understand what was meant.
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3. Agree and list what the rewards and consequences will be when your
child either follows the rules or chooses to break them.
These privileges and consequences should be natural and logical. In other words,
when possible, set a consequence that is related to the misbehaviour. Be sure
you, the parent, are willing and able to enforce the consequences that you set or
your contract will be worthless.
For example:
For younger children.

If you comply with this for one week/month, we will take you to the park
for one hour at the weekend.

If at any time you do not comply with this, we will add ‘your favourite site’
to the banned list of web sites for 1 day/week/month.
For older children

If you comply with this for one week/month you will earn our trust and we
will extend your evening period on the PC by half an hour.

If at any time you do not comply with this we will reduce your evening
period on the PC by half an hour.
4. Set a date that the contract may be revised and/or negotiated.
Let the child/teenager know that he/she may earn more or fewer privileges based
on their behaviour until that renewal. If they can be trusted you can trust them
more. Talk to them about privileges they may want to earn in the future.
5. VERY IMPORTANT – Make sure anyone else involved in parenting your
child is party to this agreement and are willing to enforce the contract..
If parental figures do not agree on some of the items, revise them until you come
to an agreement.
Example Contracts
If you search the internet you will find layouts for contracts. However it can be fun for
your children to design their own. They can:

Cut and stick or draw pictures

Word Art or create special writing

Paint or colour it in
The most important thing is the content. It needs to say what the children will do and
also what the parents will do.
They have both a child and a parent contract. Remember for this to be effective both you
and your child need to agree the terms.
Alternatively you can use the EyePAT contracts which can be downloaded from
www.eyepat.org/contracts.
Here are some ideas:
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Ideas for Parents

I promise to listen to what my child’s wants

I promise not just to say no without thinking

I promise never to be annoyed if my child tells me about any problem they are
having on the internet.

I promise we will work together and solve any problems

I promise to get to know my child’s online friends just as I know their other
friends

I promise to listen if my child tells me if they are planning to meet an online
friend and to always go with them

I promise not just allow my child to use the computer or internet as a means for
me getting some peace and quiet

I promise to play games on the computer with my child

I promise to help them with their online homework

I promise to get to know the sites my child uses. If I do not know how to I will
get my child to show me

These rules will be stuck on the computer so everyone remembers them
Ideas for kids

We will decide as a family when I can be online and what I can do. I won’t do
anything else without asking permission first

I will use the internet sensibly and not do anything that hurts other people

I will not give out any personal information such as address, phone numbers or
school details without asking my parents first

I will not give out my password to anyone except my parents (especially not to
my friends)

I will ask my parents about any messages I do not understand

I will never send anyone my picture without asking my parents first

I will tell my parents if I find anything which makes me feel uncomfortable

I will never agree to meet any of my online friends without asking my parents
first.

I will not reply to any messages that upset me or make me feel uncomfortable. If
I do I will tell my parents straight away

I will help my parents understand how to have fun and learn things online and
teach them anything they would like to know
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The Internet - an introduction
The internet can be accessed by PC’s, laptops, tablets, mobile phones, games consoles,
Kindle, etc.
It is a wonderful and amazing tool for obtaining information about almost anything you
want or need to know about. Children (and Adults) have at their finger tips the most
extensive encyclopaedias available which can be invaluable in their studies.
It provides unequalled communication packages enabling children (and adults) to talk
across not only countries, but continents for little or no cost. They can share pictures and
speak live using webcams. They can view movies and listen to music.
Monitored properly it is an extremely useful tool and is now almost an essential study
tool. Schools (from primary upwards) and universities use it as part of their study
programmes. For those parents who do not have their own computers, links to the
internet facilities are normally available at libraries, cyber cafes etc.
However, as the internet is open to everyone who has access, there are risks.
Remember not everything you read on the internet is true – anyone can post anything –
make sure you check your sources before taking information as fact.
It is extremely rare for financial institutions like banks to contact you via email and if
they do they never ask you to click on a link or provide your password or personal
details. These are always scam messages designed to get you to release data so they
can access your bank account. Never respond to them.
Recently there have been a spate of messages purporting to be from the Inland Revenue
saying you have a tax rebate. These are also scams, just very clever ones as the email
address it is sent from is @hmrc.gov.uk. The earlier ones were easier to spot as they
used @hrmc.gov.uk.
Simple answer to this problem, never click on any link from anyone who is in any way
suspicious. If you are unsure ring them to check and look their phone number up, don’t
just accept the one on the web site.
Stories known as “urban legends” and “virus threats” can be sent to you by e-mail by
well meaning friends telling you to pass them on to everyone in your address book.
Many of these are hoaxes. A good way to check before sending them on is to go to
http://www.symantec.com/norton/security_response/threatexplorer/index.jsp.
They list all the current threats and whether they are real or not.
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Different ways to chat online
Social Networking
These are sites like Facebook, Bebo, MySpace where you can make contacts and share
“posts”, “messages”, “photographs” and play games. See Page 60
Instant messaging
Examples include: KIKMessenger, WhatsApp Messenger, FacebookMessenger,
MessengerWithYou, BBM (Blackberry Messenger)
Instant messenger is one of the most popular ways of chatting for young people. Often
known as IM, this involves two or more people being online at the same time, and is
different from chat rooms, because the people involved can only chat to people who are
on their contact list. Young people often feel that they can talk more intimately in this
environment, and often use their own text style language to do so.
Instant messaging is now available through Facebook, but is not currently available
through many of the sites for younger children (with the exception of Habbo). However
this is changing and you do need to check out each individual site your child goes on.
Some sites such as Club Penguin and Moshi Monsters use a system of postcards where
messages can be left. See Page 48.
Chat Rooms
Chat Rooms are for a group of people to chat online. They do not need to be friends,
they just enter the chat room site and start talking. More often than not, you have no
idea who you are actually talking to as most people use pen names rather than their real
identity.
Chat rooms are usually areas where people meet to chat as they would in the real world
in a youth club or bar. Young people love them because they are often unrestricted; and
they can be exciting places to meet old and new friends.
Although chatting online can be great fun, young people can sometimes find themselves
in situations where they can feel out of their depth.
Video Messaging
This is where you chat using the webcams to talk on camera rather than typing. On
some of the sites you chat with “Friends” you have chosen, Facetime, Google Chat,
Facebook, Skype, however on others Chatroulette, Pinkroulette, Tinychat and Stickam,
you can randomly chat to anyone on line. See Page 53
Discussion groups
They are similar to chat rooms, but do not take place in real time, you post messages
and then wait for responses. They are often used by groups of like minded people to
swap ideas and thoughts. Many professional people use these to share information or
get answers.
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Internet & DVD Gaming
Many children have games consoles, computers, laptops, tablets and smartphones.
These technological wonders open up hours of fun and because they can link to the
internet, allow all sorts of opportunities to communicate with friends ... and strangers.
But do you know what your child is doing in this virtual world? Are you parenting them in
the same way you would perhaps in real life situations? Would you know what they are
doing?
Some of the new technology and terminology can baffle parents and carers. It can also
alarm them with frequent stories in the media about spam, online grooming, cyberbullying and video messaging. It's hard to protect children when you aren't as familiar
with the technology as they are.
Current day gaming consoles such as X-box and Playstation enable multiplayer gaming this is where multiple people can play the same game at the same time over the
internet. In multiplayer games, players either all compete against each other, or team
up to achieve a common goal such as defeating an enemy that can consist of either a
computer or human players.
The good
Playing games online can be a fantastic pastime for young people, and gives parents a
wonderful opportunity to play along with their children, so they can understand what
they are playing and how to help keep them safe.
Gaming is great fun, and can be a place where young people play and chat with each
other.
Gaming can be escapism from the stress of school and exams and can develop and
stretch children’s minds.
Gaming chat is normally focused solely on the game, and young people will swap user
names to ensure that they can get to the next levels so they can learn to work as a team
with other children.
Gaming can be a fun way for children to learn computer skills.
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The bad
Children can be affected by the adult content of some games, for example extreme
violence or sexual behaviour.
There are some young people who engage in risky behaviour (sometimes for the thrill or
the challenge) to obtain cheats or knowledge to progress within a game. Adults with a
sexual interest in children will encourage them to engage in ‘inappropriate’ behaviour for
rewards, including sexual acts via a webcam or sex chat.
At a recent session for foster parents and children’s home staff, we were told by some
people who work with these children that some children in care actively promote
themselves online in order to attract potential paedophiles. Their very sad reasoning is
“that to be wanted by someone is better than not being wanted at all”!
We would never recommend giving a young child a laptop and wireless internet, as
parents then have no control whatsoever over what the child is doing, talking to etc. One
specific risk is when you combine this with a web cam as they can then be seen in their
bedroom, perhaps getting changed, or ready for bed. One solution to this is to apply
time controls to their internet access via either Parental Control software or Routers. See
Pages 75 and 73.
It needs to be recognised that children who spend excessive hours playing on-line to the
exclusion of other activities, may not develop the social skills necessary to meet friends
and can resort to using the computer for this. There was a case in 2009 of a young man
of 22, who had spent most of his life on his PC and perhaps had not developed the
necessary skills to meet girls of his age. In this particular case he ended up abducting a
(willing) 13 year old girl. He was sentenced for 6 years for child sex offences and had to
sign the sex offenders register. This is not beginning to suggest that every child who
spends hours on the internet is going to become violent or a paedophile and it is possible
that in this case his online behaviours made no difference as he was sexually attracted to
young girls.
However, we need to be aware that studies suggest what we do in our lives changes the
way we think and our brain mapping. Gaming is no exception and violent and/or
prolonged gaming can potentially alter our brain mapping and our behaviours. This is
most relevant to children but also applies to adults.
Gaming classifications
Games have an age rating similar to that for films. Shops are restricted from selling
games to underage children, however they are often bought by elder siblings and then
passed on.
Please make sure you match the age rating of the game to the age of the child playing
it. However much the child or young person enjoys playing it, it is important to
understand what affect it could be having on them.
Video game ratings using the Pegi (Pan-European Game Information) system have become
legally enforceable in the UK.
Retailers that sell titles with ratings of 12, 16 or 18 years to children below the age limits will
be subject to prosecution.
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In addition to the age ratings, packaging will also feature diagrams warning if the title
includes bad language, drugs, discrimination, fear, gambling, sex, violence or online
gameplay with other people.
Violence
Bad
Fear
Sex
Drugs
Language
Discrimin
Oline
Online
ation
Gambling
Game
Violence



Games are rated for 12-years and over if they include non-graphic violence to human
or animal characters, a slightly higher threshold of violence to fantasy characters or
significant nudity or bad language.
Games are rated 16-years and over if the depiction of violence or sexual activity
looks the same as it would do in normal life. Drug and tobacco references also trigger
the age limit.
Games are rated 18-years and over if there is a "gross" level of violence likely to
make the viewer feel a sense of revulsion.
The PEGI website will contain up to date information and can be found at
http://www.pegi.info/en/index/
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Mobiles
Many mobiles are now Smartphones and have gone way beyond being used just for
telephone calls and text messages. They are used for messaging, e-mails. apps, cameras
and online activities.
The Good
Few young people like to be without their mobile phone! Though many parents can be
heard complaining about the bills, they can also be a good way of keeping in touch with
family and friends, and ensuring that you can contact your child.
Smartphones are computers in a mobile. They are great for keeping in contact and for all
the apps you can download etc. However they have the same risks as computers.
Many phones now have GPS functionality inbuilt and there is software available (such as
Google Latitude), which you can set up (some free and some chargeable) which allows
you to track exactly where your children are, and set up areas, say the park and
surrounding area, which if they stray outside sends an alert to your phone, email etc.
To find out what is available type “GPS phone tracker software” in your internet browser.
Do remember if someone else gets hold of your child’s phone number, there is
potentially a risk they could set up a tracking app, so they know where your child is.
To help you understand what your children are texting have a look at our texting
dictionary on page 163
The Bad
With the advent of picture and video messaging - young people need to be increasingly
careful about the images they share. It is very easy for inappropriate images to be
shared around a number of phones, changed and even put online, where it is impossible
to get back. This is particularly worrying, if images are used in child abuse sites. There
was an article in the Daily Mail on January 21 2009 where Allison Pearson, a regular
columnist, found to her horror pictures of her 12 year old daughter dancing in shorts on
YouTube! Sexting is also now a growing problem. See Page 29.
Young people also need to be aware that they put themselves at risk of mobile bullying,
or inappropriate intimate contact if they give out their mobile number to people they
don't fully trust. Mobile phones are nearly always used in cyber bullying. Children can be
sent messages or receive calls 24/7 allowing no time away from the bullies.
Viewing Inappropriate Images on Mobiles
Young people can and do access content from the internet and TV wherever they are,
and without parental or teacher supervision. Young people use them at school to view
pornography and other inappropriate sites.
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Parents fear porn on children's mobiles
Daily Telegraph - 10th October 2012
More than two-fifths of parents are worried that their children can access unsuitable
content online on their mobile phones, research has found.
95 per cent of 11-13 year olds have a mobile
phone, according to new research
According to a new survey, more than half of
all children get their first mobile phone before
the age of 11 but almost a third of parents are
unaware of online safety tools that can prevent
their children from seeing inappropriate
content, such as pornography, gambling or
other adult material.
Though mobile networks do automatically block access to adult content via their own
networks, the Wi-Fi capabilities on modern smartphones mean that children often do
have access to inappropriate material. Forty-two per cent of parents said they were
concerned about their children's access to unsuitable material, according to a survey for
Phones4U.
One in eight said they felt they had no control over what their child accesses online on
their phone, while only one in 16 parents had the same concern about their child's
computer access.
The research comes just weeks after a senior board member of the UK Council for Child
internet Safety warned that social networks "cannot be trusted to protect children
online".
John Carr called for closer regulation of online brands by external organisations such as
Ofcom of in the wake of "scandals" such as the exposé of sexualised content on
children's social network Habbo Hotel.
What can you do?
Check out Mobile Phone Parental Controls on Page 69.
As all the phone companies offer something slightly different we suggest you contact
your mobile service provider and ask them to tell you what protection they offer and how
to activate it.
Remind your child that any image they send on their mobile can be changed and shared
online, and that once they have sent an image they have lost control of it. That funny
photo they share with their “friends” could suddenly find its way onto everyone’s phone
at school and could even be posted on YouTube.
If your child suddenly purchases a “pay as you go” mobile, have a good look at it and
check their outgoing messages. They may have been drawn into a cyberbullying ring and
be using it, or having it used, to make “nasty” calls. Remember although bullying is not
illegal, harassment and threatening behaviour is.
Teach your child that if they get a text from a strange number to check who they are
talking to. When you can’t be seen it’s easy to pretend to be someone else! When
texting you can’t hear their voice.
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Read through www.thinkuknow.co.uk with your child, and help them to understand
that they shouldn't give out personal details such as their mobile number to strangers,
or other young people that they don't fully trust.
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Sexting
Sexting is texting but with a sexual message. It can consist of just text messages but it
also often involves intimate photographs.
Children as young as 11/12 are Sexting and the latest statistics show that 38% of young
people are participating. Often it involves sending photographs to boys/girls with whom
they are currently in a relationship, or would like to be in a relationship with. What these
young people forget is that once they send a photograph or message to someone else
they have lost control over it. Very often these messages and especially photographs are
sent on by the recipient to their mates who “have a good laugh”. This can be devastating
for the sender and it is very important that children realise what can happen.
One high profile star to become a victim was Vanessa Hudgens (Gabriella from High
School Musical). In 2007 at the age of 19 she sent some nude pictures of herself to her
then long term boyfriend Zac Efron (Troy in High School Musical) but the pictures ended
up on the web and are still there for anyone to see. They will be there for many years to
come.
Jessica Logan was only 1 year younger.
Sexting is not new, but it is becoming more prevalent amongst younger people.
One tragic case was Hope Witsell was just beginning the
journey from child to teen. The middle-school student had
a tight-knit group of friends, the requisite poster of
“Twilight” heartthrob Robert Pattinson and big plans to
become a landscaper when she grew up.
But one impetuous move robbed Hope of her childhood,
and eventually, her life. The 13-year-old Florida girl sent a
topless photo of herself to a boy in hope of gaining his
attention. Instead, she got the attention of her school, as
well as the high school nearby.
The incessant bullying by classmates that followed when
the photo spread put an emotional weight upon Hope that
she ultimately could not bear.
Hope Witsell hanged herself in her bedroom
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One of the big problems is what to do if you receive or become aware of sexting
messages.
In the UK it is illegal to be in possession of or to distribute child pornography. How do
these laws fit in with images being taken by the children of themselves and then sent on.
One thing is clear, you are breaking the law if you have indecent images of children
under the age of 18 on your phone or any phone in your name, however they got there.

If as an adult these images are on your phone or a phone owned by you, you are
in possession of child pornography. Never send on or show these images onto
anyone. To protect the child you should hand the phone over the Police or to the
Head Teacher of the school the child attends, or if appropriate, to the Child’s
Parents, if you know them, and advise them that the images are there. You do
not under any circumstances show the images to them. If you are not willing to
do this, then immediately delete the images.

If your son or daughter receives an image like this they should immediately
delete it, they could potentially be prosecuted if they do not.

The way the law stands at the moment, as a Parent you should also delete it.

The Schools in particular need to be careful as personal equipment is likely to be
involved. It is not recommended that anyone in school should look at a pupil's
phone without the parents being there.

Schools should have a policy for reporting incidents. Many LAs use the flowchart
in the Becta AUPs in context publication. If they are concerned at all, they
should contact their LA for advice (they all have a LSCB - local safeguarding
children's board) or contact the Police.

Parents and Teachers should talk about the issues with pupils about the serious
consequences of doing this. Preventing it happening is the top priority.

If a child brings their phone into school with an image someone else has sent
them the schools need to follow the ‘Dealing with an Incident Flowchart’.

If these images are published on the web it could need reporting to the IWF sexual photographic images of children under 18 are illegal. These are not child
pornography pictures as some sites refer to them - they would be classed as
child abuse.
There is a dictionary of sexting terminology on Page 171
For more information on Sexting or SGII see the CEOP website www.ceop.gov.uk.
Advice for Schools and Professionals who care for young people
Up to date information of how to deal with Sexting (SGII) incidents is available on our
website www.eyepat.org/sexting. This topic is also covered in detail in the EyePAT
Training Workshops for Teachers, Social Workers, Foster Carers and Childminders.
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Bullying
Bullying is on the increase. Social media, texting and online messaging has meant the
bully no longer has to be physically strong or ‘brave’ to bully. They don’t have to have
followers to make them feel safe in a group, they can now operate alone and if they wish
anonymously.
We can help the victims to deal with the bullying and there is a lot of much needed help
and support available for this.
However few people think of helping the Bully. Bullies bully for a reason and if we can
help them deal with that reason and stop bullying then we won’t have the victims. If we
recognise that the bullies, not the victims, are the ones with the problems then the
power of the bully is diminished.
Happy People Don’t Bully
Think about it. Do you know one happy person who bullies. There are lots of unhappy
people who don’t bully and there are lots of ok’ish people who don’t bully, but happy
people never bully. They have no reason to.
So - if you bully it is because you are unhappy. The victim is just the person the bully
uses to pick on. The reasons for the bullying are nothing to do with the victim, it is the
bullies problem.
EyePAT run workshops for adults called Happy People Don’t Bully. We also run a Happy
People Don’t Bully for parents which complements our Happy Kids Don’t Bully Workshops
for children.
Workplace bullying has doubled in the last 10 years and is costing the country billions of
pounds in lost productivity and staff absence. 1 in 3 adults (34%) now experience
bullying and 80% of victims said the abuse had affected their physical and mental
health. 33% had decided to take time off, or even left their jobs as a result.
Apart from the mental anguish this causes what cost is there to society and to our
national purse. How much more effective would businesses and organisations be if they
did not have to contend with bullying?
If you would like to find out more about the workshops we run for businesses,
corporations and organisations please get in touch. [email protected] or 01446 795055.
Happy Kid’s Don’t Bully
Everything we say about bullies applies to children. However with children the statistics
are even worse. Nearly half (49%) of all school children will be bullied.
We have children taking their lives because they cannot deal with it.
We have young people growing up into damaged adults because of it.
If you would like to know more about the workshops we run in schools please get in
touch [email protected] or 01446 795055.
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Cyber Bullying
Cyber Bullying is social terror by technology ... and it’s on the rise. Next to viewing
“unsuitable” images, it is the second most likely thing to affect your child.
When a child of any age, up to 18 is threatened, harassed, or humiliated via the use of
technology --- this is Cyber Bullying.
Cyber Bullying is not illegal but harassment and threatening behaviour is. If it is
consistent or physically threatening, you can and should report it. However please bear
in mind, the problem is so great the police are inundated and are struggling to deal with
the number of cases. If the cyberbullying stems from the school, go first to the school
and then if necessary, through them to the Police Schools Liaison Officer.
Cyber Bullying makes it easier for bullies because they are not face to face with their
victim(s.) One of the worst things about cyber bullying is that it is 24/7 – there is no
escape.
15% of Teachers are subjected to cyber bullying. This can have a whole host of effects
on the teacher personally, their class and the school.
This social online terror is sent through e-mail, Mobile Phones, social networking sites,
pager text messages, instant messaging, web sites and online personal polling web sites.
It is normally, but not always, done by children, deliberately and repeatedly and is used
by an individual or group with the intention of harming other children and teens.
Children use technology to talk to their friends and make new ones. While most children
use the Internet responsibly, others are using all of this technology to terrorize and
Cyber Bully!
Cyber Bullying is the perfect way for bullies to remain anonymous. So anonymous, the
bully thinks he has no fear of punishment. However this is not the case. Most bullies do
not realise that in fact they can be traced.
Children and teens bully online in various ways:
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Instant Messaging/Text Messaging/e-mail harassment
This includes:
Sending hateful or threatening messages to other children
Sending death threats using text messaging, photos and videos
Ganging up on their victim in text wars or text attacks. They send hundreds or
thousands of text messages to the victim's cell phone or other mobile device.
Creating a screen name which is very similar to another child's name but adding or
removing an extra letter. Then they use this name to say disparaging things to other
users whilst posing as the other person.
Web Sites and Social Networking Sites
Children can post photos, videos and all kinds of personal information (such as phone
numbers, address, etc.) which could endanger the child who is the victim.
Sending Pictures through E-mail and Mobile Phones
Mobile phones allow children to send pictures to each other. Pictures are received
directly on the phones and could end up in everyone's picture library.
Children often take photos of someone in a locker room, bathroom or dressing room and
post it online or send it to others on Mobile Phones. They send these via mass e-mail to
others. Some of these photos could include nude or degrading pictures of their victims.
E-mails like that get passed around to hundreds of others - ending up everywhere in
cyberspace.
Remind your child that any image they send on their mobile can be changed and shared
online, and that once they have sent an image they have lost control of it. Ask them if
they would like it posted on the school notice board. If they don’t, don’t send it!
Impersonation
Posing as the victim, Cyber Bullies may post erotic or suggestive messages in a group's
chat room posing as the victim - inviting an attack against them. They give the name,
address and phone number of the victim to make the hate group's job easier. They
might even send a message to someone saying hateful or threatening things while
masquerading as the victim. They often alter a message actually from the victim, making
it seem that they have said something horrible.
Sending Malicious Code
Children can send viruses, spyware and hacking programs to their victims to destroy
their computers or spy on their victim. If the Cyber Bully uses a Trojan Horse program
they can potentially control their victim's computer remotely, and do whatever they
want.
Sending Porn and Other Junk E-Mail and IMs
Cyber Bullies may sign their victims up for numerous e-mailing and IM marketing lists
which creates mass e-mails for the victim. They can even sign them up for porn or adult
dating sites.
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Blogs
These online journals are a way for children to damage other children’s reputations or
invade their privacy. Sometimes children set up a blog or profile page pretending to be
their victim and saying things to humiliate them.
Stealing Passwords
-
Children can steal the password and lock the victim out of their own account.
-
Children may use another child's password to change his/her profile and write
sexual, racist and disparaging remarks about that person.
-
Children may steal another child's password and chat with others pretending to
be the other child. They can say mean things to this person's friends or other
people.
-
Children can give or sell the password to a hacker to hack into the victim's
computer
Internet Polling
A perfect way for children to create more rumour! Asking Who's a Bitch? Who's Not? And
children poll to answer by voting.
Trolling
This involves the posting of hateful or vindictive messages on notice boards normally
posthumously, or following a specific incident. The terms is also used when for example,
during the Olympics 2012 Trolls tweeted and posted messages on social networking to
Tom Daley saying he had let his dead father down but not getting a medal in the pairs
diving.
How would you know if your child is being bullied
With physical bullying there are often physical signs, bruises, ripped or dirty clothes,
damaged book bags or books. However with cyber bullying there are no such signs.
1. Check your child’s body language when they receive a text, are they happy or
depressed. Do their shoulders drop as if in anticipation of reading something they
don’t want to see.
2. Keep an eye for changes in a child’s appetite. A child under stress will often either
stop eating or comfort eat.
3. For the same reason, have they started to complain regularly about feeling sick.
4. Has the child suddenly started not wanting to go into school, or hang around with
their mates.
5. Is the child shutting down e-mails/social networking sites when you walk into the
room.
6. Has the child become withdrawn and stopped talking about their friends or their
day.
7. If you are a parent and are concerned you can check the child’s incoming and
outgoing text messages. It is obviously up to you as a parent to decide whether
you do this with your child’s knowledge or consent.
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If you child has deleted their messages, ask why?
8. If you are concerned, speak to your child’s teachers. Ask them if they have
noticed anything different in their behaviour.
9. Set your Google Alerts with your child’s name. See Page 38.
I am an adult and I am bullying what can I do?
Get the help you need to deal with the issues which are causing you to bully so you can
stop.
In the workplace go to your HR Department and ask to speak to a counsellor.
Go to your GP and ask them to refer you to a counsellor. Explain to them what has
caused you to bully.
Why Do I Bully?
Are you unhappy with your job or your life and taking it out on others?
Do you enjoy the sense of power when you hurt someone's feelings?
Do you think those people you bully deserve to be picked on because they are inferior to
you?
Were you bullied in the past and are now getting your own back?
Are you bullying your spouse or partner and your children?
Whatever the reason, we know that people who bully others do not function as well as
those who have good relationships with their families, friends and colleagues. You may
not even be aware of the hurt and suffering you are causing, but the reality is that you
need to change your behaviour.
Some suggestions:

Think before you act or speak - a delay of even 10 seconds can help you to
temper your behaviour

Ask yourself if you would like to be treated in the way you are treating others

Tell yourself that you do not need to be a bully - you can be nice

Apologise if you bully someone. If you can't bring yourself to say sorry at first,
then write a note

Give yourself time - it takes a while to break the habits of a lifetime

If the bullying is related to your job, change jobs

If something in your life is making you miserable and causing you to act
like a bully, then make a decision to tackle the problem
These are some websites which may help you.
http://www.kidscape.org.uk/advice/step6a.shtml
http://www.direct.gov.uk/en/YoungPeople/HealthAndRelationships/Bullying/
DG_10031375
http://www.youthoria.org/home/life/relationships/relationshipsbullying/1239707769.175/
http://www.experienceproject.com/groups/Am-A-Bully/117245
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I am a child and I am bullying what can I do?
Speak to your school or a teacher and ask them to help you.
Talk to an adult you can trust and ask them to help you. This could be a parent, a
brother or sister, a relative or a family friend.
If you are in care, talk to your Foster Carer, Social Worker or Guardian.
Contact CybeMentors, BulliesOut or ChildLine and ask them to help you. Details of all
these organisations are available on www.eyepat.org/help.
Remember - Happy Kids Don’t Bully. There is a reason you are bullying and it is this
reason you need to deal with and get help with.
How would you know if your child was a bully
This is more difficult, but the sad fact is that all bullies are somebody’s children. A couple
of things you might look for or do are:
1. Open up a line of communication for the child to talk to someone about issues
which affect them and how they deal with them. Remember Happy Kids Don’t
Bully.
2. Check if they suddenly buy a secondary ‘pay as you go’ mobile phone as to why?
Hiding behind non registered numbers is a favourite tool for a bully.
3. Keep an eye on their social networking and the things they are posting online.
4. Think if they have recently started saying really nasty things about someone,
either in general or more specifically within their groups of friends.
Why should I do something
Remember threatening behaviour and harassment are both illegal. Posting information
on social networking sites is considered in law publishing.
If you or your child is bullying the police can get involved and you/they could be
charged.
Under British Law you could find yourself being sued for damages for libel if you publish
defamatory untrue information about someone.
How can you prevent or stop bullying
There is not one quick fix to stop cyber bullying in the way you can with blocking web
pages and sites. Here are some suggestions which you may find useful.
You are the parent and as such it is up to you to decide how, when and where your
children can use technology. Especially as you are normally the one paying the bill!
If you give your child a mobile phone, it is a good idea to make it clear at the outset,
what the conditions are for your child to have this phone.
If you give your child access to a PC/Laptop and the Internet, it is again up to you, as
the parent, to agree the timings, content and location of that access.
One good way is to draw up a contract with your child at the outset, so the rules are
easily understood by both you and your children.
Things you can do are:
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For Adults
1. In work - ask your workplace to run an EyePAT Happy People Don’t Bully
Workshop to help the bullies to stop.
2. If you are being bullied in work talk to someone. Do not keep it to yourself. If
possible go to your HR Department. If it is a line manager, go to a senior line
manager.
3. If the bullying is via a social networking site, report it to them. They should take
action.
4. If it threatens physical violence or is life threatening contact the police.
5. Talk to someone you know or if needs be contact organisations who can help you
deal with the issues like the Samaritans.
6. Never erase anything – it may be needed as evidence,
7. Above all, remember bullying is all about the bullies problems, not about you.
For Children and Young People
1. At school - ask the school to run an EyePAT Happy Kids Don’t Bully Workshop to
help the bullies to stop.
2. Do not allow a child to have a laptop with wireless internet. Make sure they can
only access the internet when in your sight.
3. Teach children not to open or read messages from cyber bullies. Pass them onto
you and just store them as evidence.
4. Talk to the child now and tell them they can always talk to you. If you think they
may not for whatever reason, find another family member/friend who they may
be able to talk to.
5. If the child is cyberbullied, go to the school immediately. Some schools are better
than others in taking action, especially if they consider the bullying to be taking
place “out of school”, but they need to be informed.
6. Tell the child they can contact www.cybermentors.org.uk or
www.bulliesout.com . They provide on-line mentors for children who have been
bullied and give your child someone to talk through their experiences with.
7. Go online to http://www.beatbullying.org/ they provide invaluable help and
advice.
8. Go online to www.anti-bullyingalliance.org.uk. They are an alliance of over 60
organisations who work together to stop bullying.
9. Contact your local anti-bullying groups. Try typing your local town/city name into
your search engine followed by “anti bullying”. This should give you a result. You
could always ask the local schools, or ring the Local Council.
10. If the bullying is via a social networking site, report it to them. They should take
action.
11. If it threatens physical violence or is life threatening contact the police. Each
school should have a school liaison officer. Ask the school for their name and
contact them.
12. Never erase anything – it may be needed as evidence
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Google Alerts
One key way to keep tab on what is being said about you, your company, or your family
is via Google Alerts. This will not let you know what is being said inside a Facebook
account, but it will let you know if anything is being published elsewhere.


Google – ‘google alerts’
The following screen will appear

Create your first entry, if you do not have a Google Account you will need to
verify your e-mail address.
Once you have entered your one alert you should then be taken to the following screen
where you can create New Alerts or delete existing alerts.
E-mails will then be sent to you automatically every time one of your search items is
mentioned.
These alerts can be used for any subject you wish.
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Grooming and online child abuse?
Adults who want to engage children in sexual acts, or talk to them for sexual
gratification will often seek out young people who are looking for friendship.
They will often use a number of grooming techniques, including building trust with the
child through lying, creating different personas and then attempting to engage the child
in more intimate forms of communication including compromising a child with the use of
images and webcams.
Child sex abusers will often use blackmail and guilt as methods of securing a meeting
with the child.
The reality is that children leave themselves so open online, that paedophiles no longer
have to work that hard to make contact.
Why do Child sex abusers like to use the internet to contact children?
Child sex abusers find the internet an easier place to participate in a range of child
sexual abuse activity including contact with children due to its anonymity. They will often
lie and pretend to be younger than they are, or people other than themselves.
They set up bogus email accounts and chat personas to mask their identity online. It is
very easy to do – you can set up an account on these chat rooms calling yourself
anything and using any email address to engage in conversations. During our initial
research, to find out how easy it was, one of our team, a man in his late 50s, set
himself up as a 15 year old girl called Petra. There were no checks and no come backs.
For information we did delete the account unused!
What are children at risk of?
There are a number of actions which these adults will engage in online.
These include:

Swapping child abuse images in chat areas or through instant messaging with
other adults or young people and forming networks with other child abusers to
share tips on how to groom more effectively and how to avoid being caught.

Swapping personal information on children that they have collected with other
abusers. Seemingly unrelated and disguised questions can be asked, for example
– “I hate living in Newtown, it’s the pits, nothing to do – what’s it like where you
live?” – followed by “my school uniform is brown and yellow – it’s so yuk, what’s
yours like?” The groomer knows where the child lives and just by checking out
school websites for the area to see uniform colours, what school the child goes to,
and so it goes on!

Participating in online communities such as blogs, forums and chat rooms with
the intention to groom children, collect sexually explicit images and meet them to
have sex.
Children at specific risk
Certain groups of children are more at risk than others. Some children will be more
secretive about who they are meeting. They are also, in some cases, more likely to elect
to meet someone in private, so they cannot be seen.
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Some groups of children and young people who will be at more risk are those who intend
meeting someone if they:

are from a different religion

are from a different culture whom their family may not approve of

are gay or bi-sexual

have not developed a trusting relationship with their carers

live within a family where parental alcohol or substance abuse is common.

are estranged emotionally from their parents and siblings.

are from a different social background whom they know their parents would not
approve of.
These groups of children need to put separate plans in place to ensure their safety.

Never meet anyone in private, the risk of doing so, is far greater than any risk of
being seen. If necessary go somewhere you are unlikely to see anyone you know,
but never a private place.

Take the mobile phone number, car registration number of any person you are
meeting and text it to someone you trust. Let them know the time you are
meeting the person and text them when you leave.

Expect the person you are meeting to do the same with you. They also need to be
safe, but never assume that because they are going through the motions of doing
this that they are genuine.

Openly in front of the person you are meeting, take their picture and text it to
someone. If the person you are meeting is not genuine, they are unlikely to allow
you to do this.

If at all possible take someone with you as a chaperone, or if you know someone
who runs a coffee shop, restaurant, pub or bar meet there. If you leave with the
person, give a note to the person at the shop with the person’s details. They do
not have to sit with you, they can just be in the vicinity.

If you are gay and you don’t want your friends or family to know yet, don’t tell
them the real reason you are meeting the person, but do tell them who they are
and where you are going.

View the person via web cam so you can at least see that the person who you are
talking to is who they say they are. Do not however agree to do or say
anything on camera, other than general conversation. You may be being
filmed or recorded.
Tips to keep your children safe on the internet
1. Know what your children are doing online and who they are talking to.
2. Ask them to teach you to use any applications you have never used.
3. Talk with your children about limiting approved Web sites and the hours spent online.
4. Sit with them when they’re online - play online games with them especially when the
interact with other people.
5. Ask an elder sibling to supervise them if you can’t.
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6. Keep the computer(s) in a communal area of the house, where it is easier to monitor
what your children are viewing.
7. Help your children to understand that they should never give out personal details to
online friends - personal information includes:

Their messenger ‘addy’, email address,

Mobile number

Pictures of themselves, their family or friends - if your child publishes a
picture or video online - anyone can change it or share it.

Their name, age, sex, home address, phone numbers,

Your bank details, pin numbers, passwords and user names.
8. Never ever share passwords with friends. Friends can think it’s funny to log in as
you and send out messages pretending to be you. It happens quite regularly! They
can also purposely or inadvertently pass them on.
9. If it is necessary to supply details for registration, or to buy something, your children
should always ask for permission and help from you.
10. If they want to subscribe to any services online, use a family email address to
receive the mail, or use yours.
11. If your child receives chain/spam/junk email & texts, remind them never to believe
them, reply to them or use them. They will not lose all their friends and develop
spots overnight if they don’t forward them on to 10 other people!
12. It's not a good idea for your child to open files from people they don't know. They
won't know what they contain - it could be a virus, or worse - an inappropriate image
or film.
13. Help your child to understand that some people lie online and that therefore it's
better to keep online mates online. They should never meet up with any strangers
without an adult they know and trust.
14. Teach your child to always ask anyone who contacts them on-line to switch on their
web cam so they can see who it is, or ring them over the phone so they can check
that they are really talking to the person they think they are. If you can’t see or hear
them, how do you know it’s them?
15. Warn your child that some children may think it’s amusing to goad your child into
saying bad things about someone else on a chat site, knowing that the target is
sitting with them and reading everything as it is typed.
16. Let your child know that it's never too late to tell someone if something makes them
feel uncomfortable.
17. Teach young people how to block someone online and report them if they feel
uncomfortable.
18. Think seriously about using internet filtering software, walled gardens and childfriendly search engines. Use your browser's controls where these offer varying levels
of security for each family member. Details of this are available on Page 120.
19. Check out the child protection services from your internet service provider, for
example, do they filter for spam? If not, ask them why they don’t.
20. Children love to ‘chat’, but make sure they only use moderated chatrooms. Monitor
the chatrooms they are using and encourage them to introduce you to their online
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friends. No one should visit private areas of chat rooms. All chat rooms visited
should be moderated and child friendly.
21. Extreme caution should be taken if your children should arrange to meet someone
they have met via the internet. You or another responsible adult must be present
and always ensure the meeting is in a public place. It may be totally genuine and the
start of a new friendship, however it may not be!
22. Encourage your children to tell you if they feel uncomfortable, upset or threatened by
anything they see online. If they receive frightening or bullying emails, or any spam
with unacceptable content they should tell you. It is not their fault that they have
received them and they must always feel confident in talking to you about anything
which makes them unhappy.
23. Suggest to your younger children that they use child friendly search engines like
Yahooligans, AskJeeveskids. To find out what is currently available type ‘child friendly
search engines’ into your internet browser.
24. Most schools will now have an Acceptable Use Policy for use of the internet (including
emails) within school. This should be made available to you, as parents. You will also
probably be asked to sign a consent form for your child to use the internet in school.
Ask the school for a copy and use it for guidance.
25. Surf the web together. Talk with your children. Go online with your children and
become part of their online life. Communication is the key to safe surfing. Involve
your children in writing your own family code of acceptable Internet use. Remember
that what is acceptable for a teenager is not necessarily alright for a primary school
child so get their input.
26. To keep up to date (with your children) on emerging technologies register on
www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents
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Internet Explorer History
One way of keeping track on what sites have been looked at is to use the History Option.

To find History click on View, then choose the Explorer bar

Choose History

You will see a list of days and weeks, similar to below.

Click on any one of these and you will see the sites visited that day provided:
o
they have not been deleted
o
InPrivate Browsing has not been used.
Deleting the History
It is extremely easy to delete the history. All you need to do is press the right hand
mouse button over any link and choose delete. It is therefore by no means a fool proof
way of tracking web sites which have been viewed and technologically savvy kids will
know exactly how to do it. It can be useful however to see where younger children have
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been. Be aware, if your kids know how to use it, they can see where you have been –
especially to track Christmas present shopping!
One thing which may help, if you know your kids have been online and there is no
history, you know they have been deleting it.
In Private Browsing
InPrivate Browsing is probably one of the worst inventions by Microsoft when it comes to
child safety! Its purpose is that if you use someone else’s PC or a public PC in a Library
or Internet, then you can turn it on so it does not leave a trail. However unfortunately it
also applies to your PC.
To turn it on

click on Tools in the Internet Explorer Toolbar.

Select InPrivate Browsing
Click on a new tab and the following will appear. You can see that InPrivate is turned on
in the title bar.
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
type in the name of your web site, anything you enter using this browser window
will not show in the history.
When you start InPrivate Browsing, Internet Explorer opens a new browser window. The
protection that InPrivate Browsing provides is only in effect during the time that you use
that window. You can open as many tabs as you want in that window, and they will all
be protected. However, if you open another browser window, that window will not be
protected. To end your InPrivate Browsing session, close the browser window.
While you are surfing using InPrivate Browsing, Internet Explorer stores some
information—such as cookies and temporary Internet files—so that the webpages you
visit will work correctly. However, at the end of your InPrivate Browsing session, this
information is discarded. The following table describes which information InPrivate
Browsing discards when you close the browser and how it is affected during your
browsing session:
Information
How it is affected by InPrivate Browsing
Cookies
Kept in memory so pages work correctly, but cleared when you
close the browser.
Temporary Internet
Files
Stored on disk so pages work correctly, but deleted when you
close the browser.
Webpage history
This information is not stored.
Form data and
passwords
This information is not stored.
Anti-phishing cache
Temporary information is encrypted and stored so pages work
correctly.
Address bar and
search AutoComplete
This information is not stored.
Automatic Crash
Restore (ACR)
ACR can restore when a tab crashes in a session, but if the
whole window crashes, data is deleted and the window cannot
be restored.
Document Object
Model (DOM) storage
The DOM storage is a kind of "super cookie" web developers
can use to retain information. Like regular cookies, they are not
kept after the window is closed.
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Games/Social Networking for Young Kids
There are a number of sites aimed at primary school children where the children can
interact with other characters. Two such sites are Habbo and Club Penguin. There are
many of these sites, ask your children to tell you about the ones they or their friends
use, and then check them out. If you need help, ask your child to help you.
Habbo
In Habbo the children create their own character (Avatar)
and then go around the online hotel talking to the other
avatars.
There can be many thousands of children online at any one
time.
This is an example of the chat going on in one of the clubs.
Our character is standing on her own not talking to anyone,
but we can still see all the chat going on in the room.
Habbo has been flagged as a high risk site for young
children and a number of high street retailers are now
refusing to stock it.
Club Penguin
With Club Penguin the child’s avatar is a penguin. They do
not engage in live chat, but they can leave post cards for
the other penguins.
With all these games it is possible for anyone to set up an
account.
This can be a really good game to play with your younger children.
Jacqueline Wilson
Jacqueline Wilson is a children’s author. This is popular
with the younger children as they can send chat. It is
aimed at the 6-11 market. The kids can play games, talk to
each other (only after messages have been checked for
content), enter competitions, set up book groups etc.
Web address is http://www.jacquelinewilson.co.uk/
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Moshi Monsters
With over 50 million Moshi Monsters already adopted by
children this is an extremely popular site for young children.
They can ‘chat’ with friends and play games.
However beware, some children have had messages left
asking them their “real name” “what school they go to” etc.
Disney Superbia
There are two ways to make friends in Superbia. Children
can find real life friends by asking them what their Share
Code is and adding them to their game, or they can make
friends by visiting other people’s houses. Superbia claim
they keep children safe and as this is a Disney product one hopes that this is the case.
They claim that there is no way people you don’t know can contact the children directly
within the game.
SmileyTalk
SmileyTalk is a relatively new package. It is probably the
safest social network for young children simply because
there is no free typing. The children choose questions and
answers from lists. Within SmileyTalk there are no language
barriers. The child selects the question or answer in their
language and it is automatically translated into the recipient
child’s language.
Yoursphere
Yoursphere.com is the kids' social network that's a
destination for imagination offering members a uniquely
engaging age-appropriate online experience.
Yoursphere.com is approved by the Privacy Vaults Online
Safe Harbor of the FTC for it's online privacy and safety
practices.
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Messaging
Far cheaper than texting, but then they have to have internet access and have to be
used on a mobile phone or tablet. Be aware however that all of these messaging
systems leave the young person open to cyber bullying and grooming. KikMessenger is
extremely popular and is one which protects the users privacy by using usernames, not
phone numbers. This does protect children, but it can also create a shield to protect
bullies.
Facebook
Within Facebook you can use instant
messenger. You can talk to one or
multiple people at the same time.
Go to the chat feature at the bottom
right hand corner of the screen and
choose one person to chat to. The click
on the star and choose Add Friends to
Chat
WhatsApp Messenger
WhatsApp Messenger is a smartphone messenger available
for Android, BlackBerry, iPhone, Windows Phone and Nokia
phones. WhatsApp uses your 3G or WiFi (when available) to
message with friends and family. With WhatsApp you can
send and receive messages, pictures, audio notes, and video
messages. First year FREE! ($0.99/year after)
KikMessenger
KikMessenger has 19 million users! It's the fast, simple, and
personal smartphone messenger that connects you to
everyone
Kik say they are hands-down the fastest, most reliable
smartphone messenger available. And with sent, delivered,
read, and typing notifications, your conversations will come to life.
You can send messages, pictures, videos, sketches and more.
Your Kik username - not your phone number - is your Kik Identity, so they say you can
keep complete control of your privacy. KikMessenger can connect with other social apps
like Instagram, SocialCam, and Viddy.
Facebook Messenger
Facebook Messenger is free. You can reach Facebook friends
wherever they are now – on their phones or the web.
You can text a friend or start a group conversation and
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include your location and share photos
Messenger WithYou
Allows unlimited chatting with all your Messenger Contacts.
The app is FREE and there is no charge for sending &
receiving messages!
Key features include:


Chat with Windows Live Messenger (MSN) and Yahoo
Messenger contacts
Chat with contacts whether they are connected on
mbile, Tablet, PC or even Xbox
Bump
You Bump two phones together to share photos, contacts,
and apps! You can Bump photos from your phone to your
computer! Co to http://bu.mp on your computer web
browser.
Ping
Ping! is a instant messaging client for the iPhone that looks
and feels like the built in iPhone SMS client. It aims to
provide free iPhone to iPhone (and iPod touch on wifi)
messaging.
Once you’ve download the (currently free) app and selected
a username, you can invite/find friends and family you know
own an iPhone or iPod touch, and you’re ready to go.
Once you’ve started a conversation, the application works
just like the SMS client except it’s free, instant and works
internationally at no extra cost (aside from your
international roaming costs that is).
Touch
You can message your friends through chats and, share photos. It works on
Blackberry, i-Phone and Android.pp has b
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BBM
You share your pin or unique
barcode to connect with friends.
You can chat, share stories,
pictures, videos and more with
individual contacts or groups of
friends instantly. Even share app
experiences with BBM-connected
apps
These are some of the apps
which are available with BBM. I
found these by searching for
Parental Controls under BBM.
Parental Controls is an application that provides parents
and guardians simple options to restrict access to specific
BlackBerry functions, features and applications such as
the Browser and Text Messaging.
Track your child's movements online with this
app from Spare Backup Inc. Website account
required. UK users: www.mycellguardian.co.uk
Mobiflock My Life is a free smart device protection
service, or upgrade to Mobiflock My Child for
parental control services (30 day free trial!) and
protect your kids from online threats such as
cyberbullying, accessing inappropriate content, sexual harassment & sexting. Mobiflock
My Life (free!) Remotely locate and lock a missing device Remotely delete device
information Block unwanted contacts.
Midon7, proactive safety. After your 15 days trial
your app will reverse to Midon7 FREE version. The
family safety tracking app for mobile can monitor
your children’s whereabouts and cell phone
activities to keep them safe.
Snapchat (Sexting Messaging!!!)
Software which deletes images after 10 seconds
With all the problems and publicity around Sexting, it was never going to be long before
someone developed a “safer” way of Sexting pictures. The idea is that they use Snapchat
and the picture is only visible for 10 seconds and it cannot be shared or posted.
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Can however a screen image be taken in that 10 seconds?
The morals of this are mixed. It will encourage Sexting as individuals will perceive there
to be no risk, however if you are going to Sext anyway, it is better to do it using
Snapchat as at least it applies an element of safety.
The only real safeguard is not to Sext and please remember naked or sexual images of a
young person under the age of 18 are considered child pornography and are therefore
illegal.
Thank you to Yoursphere.com for this following article
A new photo-sharing application called Snapchat has just been released for the iPod
Touch, iPhone and iPad. Snapchat is an app that allows users to take a photo and share
it with someone for up to 10 seconds. When the allotted time is up, the photo is
permanently deleted. If the recipient tries to take a screenshot of the photo, the sender
is notified.
Toyopa Group, LLC, the makers of Snapchat, has designed the perfect sexting app. Of
course, the application’s description page doesn’t specifically say that it can be used for
sexting, but the screenshots they show (below) leave little to the imagination.
Furthermore, and despite receiving a 12+ rating from Apple for “Infrequent/Mild Sexual
Content or Nudity”, Toyopa Group has no shame in marketing their app to the younger
crowd, as the screenshots and kid-friendly ghost app icon suggest.
Snapchat’s main feature may be implying a false sense of security, though. Their privacy
policy states that they “cannot guarantee that the message data will be deleted in every
case” and “Messages, therefore are sent at the risk of the user”.
So, theoretically, if a child were to send an inappropriate photo through Snapchat, the
image could be floating around on their servers even after the photo has been deleted
from the recipient’s phone. How do we know that we can trust Snapchat employees to
respect their users’ privacy? The answer is: We can’t.
Such invasions of privacy have happened before, most notably at Google.. There is
nothing’s to say it won’t happen again at a smaller, newer company with less oversight
over their employees and less stringent internal privacy standards.
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Snapchat would allow a child or teen to send nude photos to their friends without fear of
becoming the laughing stock of the school or ending up on a porn site, but should we
expect more from our children.
We should expect them to make good decisions for themselves, regardless of how easy
technology makes it from them to do otherwise. My hope is that you will take this
knowledge and use it to leverage your vigilance at home. Keep an eye out for this app
on your child’s iPhone, iPod or iPad. If you see that they’ve downloaded it, chances are
it’s time to sit down and have a serious conversation about the consequences of sexting.
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Video Messaging
With all these applications you chat with a video link. This of course can be brilliant when
talking to family or real friends, but opens up a whole load of possibilities when talking to
people you may not know so well.
Parents who give their children smartphones and tablets need to be aware of this.
There are a number of other Video Calling packages out there but these are just a few of
them.
Facetime (Apple)
You can make video calls to iPad 2, iPhone 4, the new iPod
touch, or another Mac. from your Mac. You don’t need to set
up special accounts or screen names. All you do is find the
entry in your contacts and tap the FaceTime button. When
you are talking to the person you can tap the FaceTime
button any time you like on the screen. The person at the
other end has to accept the invitation before the video call
commences.
t
Google Chat
This is Google’s alternative to Facetime. If your friend
doesn't have a camera next to their name in your chat list,
you can invite them to download the voice and video chat
plug-in from the Video & more menu in a chat window. Even
if your friend doesn't have a video camera, you can still have
a voice chat or a 1-way video chat.
Facebook
You can now make Video calls via Facebook and chat to any of your friends who are
online.
You will need a webcam. Most laptops have them inbuilt and the modern ones have
amazing clarity. If you are using a PC you will need to buy a webcam if you do not
already have one.
Although you will be able to hear someone through your device speakers you will need a
microphone so they can hear you. If you don’t have one you need to buy a headset.
You will need to install the “plug in” to start the process, however this is very simple to
do.
Facebook uses the Skype technology to do this.
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This means that if you have children you need to be aware they could be doing this.


Open your Facebook account
Go to Chat and click on the Camera symbol (see below). Your PC or laptop will
take you through the process to install it.

If this box comes up select allow. It will keep coping up each time you make or
received a call unless you select Do not show me the warning for this
program again.

The receiver will hear a ringing sound and will be prompted to answer the call.
You will see this.

Likewise if you hear a ring tone you will be prompted to answer the call.
Note: Make sure you have a headset attached and set up so you can hear and
speak to the person.
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Skype
Skype has 600 million users. It was bought by Microsoft in May 2011 for £5bn. Microsoft
is paying a big price for the right to embed Skype in its other consumer platforms such
as 'Windows', 'Microsoft Office' software, email service 'Hotmail', and the search engine
'Bing'
It is a free program which enables you to speak to another Skype user over the internet,
anywhere in the world and at any time, for nothing. Skype to Skype users can also
make video calls and use instant messaging for nothing.
You can also use Skype to make ordinary phone calls to landlines or mobiles but there is
a charge. Depending on your package, these calls can still be much cheaper than others
offered on the open market.
You will need speakers and a microphone to use it, and if you want people to see you, a
web cam.
To get the Skype program, just type in Skype in your search engine or type in
www.skype.com in the address bar of your browser and press the enter key. This will
take you to Skype’s home page. Follow the instructions.
Chatroulette.com and Pinkroutlette.com
Like the other sites these involve the use of web cams and online written chat. Unlike
the other you are linking with total strangers and you are not given the option to accept
or request each interaction.
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They are basically communication sites with no rules and no control. You have to have a
web cam and this has to be enabled to use them. You log in and dial, you are connected
with anyone at random and you can keep clicking on next until you find someone you
want to talk to.
Unfortunately many children go on these sites and some repeatedly. There are no
controls, they are not suitable for children, and it is used by many perverts who like to
be watched, often by the children.
These sites should be added to the blocked list on your Parental Control software if you
have children.
Tinychat.com
This is advertised via Facebook. It’s aimed at teens and its instant live chat with cameras
and is totally uncontrolled. There are a lot of kids on there, but there are also a lot of
older people or perhaps you might call them perverts! This site should be added to the
blocked list on your Parental Control software if you have children.
Stickam
http://www.stickam.com/
Launched in 2005, Stickam claim to be the pioneer of the live interactive web
broadcasting space and have the largest live community online.
Anyone with a camera and an internet connection can instantly broadcast LIVE to the
world from a computer or mobile device. Whether you want to videochat live with friends
or broadcast a show live to thousands of fans, Stickam provides the tools -- and the
audience.
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STICKAM FEATURES:

Broadcast your live video feed to the world

Add your Stickam player to your website, blog, or Facebook page

HD streaming supported

Multiple guest camera support

Mobile broadcasting and viewing support

White label, fully customizable API, virtual “velvet roping” and pay-per-view
options are available
STICKAM BY THE NUMBERS:

9 Million Registered Users

6 Million Unique Monthly Visitors

3 Million Daily Page Views

3 Million Streams Viewed Daily

Long Average Stay of 20 minutes -- Stickam is sticky!

20, 000+ Views Per Hour For Shows Featured on the Stickam homepage – unlike
a lot of live streaming sites, Stickam can bring an audience to you!

Named the “Top Video Destination for Teens” by Nielsen.
Safety - in their words
Our goal is to offer the Stickam social networking community a service where friends and
family can interact within the guidelines set forth in our Terms of Service. Although the
Stickam service offers features for reporting and filtering content that violates our Terms
of Service or is otherwise deemed inappropriate, there is no assurance you will not
encounter such content while using Stickam.
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Gaming
There are millions of games out there and it would be impossible to list them all here.
there are many sites offering simple and free games for your children to play and many
of the social networking sites include gaming.
Be aware that whilst many of these sites appear to be free, you often find you are
“giving the opportunity” to buy credits using a credit card.
A number of them also have a free and a subscription option which has many more
features.
There are some brilliant, fun and sometimes educational games out there however,
remember that the gaming your children do can affect their behaviour and brain
development.
Games have an age restriction rating, not just as a guide, but to try and prevent young
children from playing games which they are too young to be able to deal with.
Please see 24 for information on gaming classifications.
We personally have heard many stories of young children developing violent behaviour in
school, and when traced it often went back to games they were playing at home,
perhaps ones they had borrowed from their older siblings.
Available Games
Also, if you want to find out about a specific game, you can either Google it or look a a
site which sells and gives reviews of games.
One such site is http://uk.ign.com/.
The Ville
(allows virtual sex)
In a first for a Zynga casual game, users can now have virtual sex in the company's new
title, The Ville.
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The Ville, which appears to be heavily inspired by the popular game The Sims, is the
most realistic game yet in the Ville series of games that includes FarmVille, CityVille, and
CastleVille. The concept is that you build your dream house in the app and then invite
your friends over to hang out.
Or more.
According to Zynga executive producer David Gray, when someone is in your house and
you begin to interact with them, you can level up by interacting with them in ways that
the game sees as romantic. As you climb the experience tree, you eventually unlock the
capability to initiate the "happiness home run," or just "whoopee," as Gray called it in an
interview.
When you do so, the two characters begin to disrobe on-screen (not completely, though)
and the bed in the virtual bedroom gets covered, briefly, with little floating hearts.
Then it's over. Congratulations.
While you can have virtual sex in The Ville, you cannot yet get virtually married. And
there are no virtual consequences, like children.
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Social Networking Sites
For a full list of sites see Page 173
A social networking site is an online forum where people can chat online (talk by
broadcasting messages to people on the same forum in real time) and now increasingly
chat by video link using webcams (Facebook for example).
Sometimes these venues are moderated by having people patrol the venue, watching for
disruptive or otherwise undesirable behaviour.
The sites are varied and are used by children, young people and adults. Some have a
very adult theme and should not be used by children.
It is quite alarming how much personal information both children and adults will record
on their sites and share out with people. Many give away their date of birth, their e-mail
address, their phone number and even their address.
Unfortunately many children will put photographs up thinking they ‘look cool’, when in
fact these photographs are a paedophile’s dream.
To have a site on for example Facebook you should be 13. However no checks take place
and as Facebook is the 6th most popular site for children aged between 6 and 11, clearly
this age limit does not work.
Most social networking sites operate a friends or buddy list where other members ask to
be your ‘friend’ and the number of ‘friends’ you have are listed. Unfortunately with many
children, quantity is more important than quality and some children gauge their
popularity by the number of friends they have, irrespective of who these ‘friends’ are.
Hoax sites are also common. This is where a site is set up by one person or a group of
people, pretending to be someone else. This occurs with



celebrities (always check celebrity official web pages for links
cyber bullyies where fake sites can be set up in either a child or a teacher’s name
paedophile who then ‘makes friends’ with other pupils in order to see their
personal information.
Facebook
No of users
On 4th October 2011 there were over 1 billion active Facebook users around the world. Each day,
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Facebook processes 2.7 billion "Likes," 300 million photo uploads, 2.5 billion status updates and
check-ins, and countless other bits of data
Blocking Facebook
There is free software which you can download called FB Limited. You can use it to block facebook
for certain periods of time, say during work or study hours. www.facebooklimited.com. We have not
tried it, but in theory it sounds good.
MySpace
No of users
In June 2012 25 million
The number of people using MySpace is declining. From 2005 to 2008 it was the largest
social network site.
To register, users must have a valid e-mail address. You set up your profile load up info
about yourself and pictures. You invite a ‘friend’, they accept and then the link is made.
Profiles can contain basic personal information such as relationship status, birthday and
hometown, as well as favourite activities, interests, music, television shows, movies,
books etc.
Users can send messages to their ‘friends’ and send invitations to events through the
site.
Your privacy settings determine what information others see about you. It is crucial that
for children these are restricted.
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Bebo
The social networking website Bebo is quite similar to MySpace and was founded in
Januray 2005. Like with MySpace, users can create a profile, post comments on their
friends' profiles and have their friends displayed on their profile page. Users can locate
friends through a school and college search and interest in the online community by
posting pictures, writing blogs, and sending messages within the Web site.
Bebo was initially criticized for poorly protecting the privacy of users’ personal
information including phone numbers and home addresses. In response, Bebo has hired
a safety and privacy inspector based on urging from the National Council for Technology
in Education (NCTE).
Faceparty
Not to be confused with Facebook, Faceparty is open to members aged 16 and above. It
is definitely aimed more at the adult market, rather than younger people.
These site should be added to the blocked list on your Parental Control software if you
have children.
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Friendster
An online community with more than 90 million members worldwide, Friendster uses
friend networks to locate and stay in touch with old friends and connect with new people.
Users, who are a minimum of 16 years old, create basic online profiles featuring name,
gender, age, relationship status, zodiac sign, location, hometown, and “member-since”
date.
Profiles are personalized with photographs, school information, occupation, hobbies and
interests, employers, favourite books, movies, music, television shows, and an “about
me” and “who I want to meet” section.
Search boxes allow users to locate friends by name, school, hometown, keywords, age
range, gender, and affiliations; friends are approved by the individual, as well as
personal testimonials featured on the profile. Within Friendster, users can create blogs,
e-mail other members and join interest groups.
MSN Messenger
MSN Messenger is a popular site with preteens and young
teens. It was originally set up as a messaging service for
university and college students (as Facebook was) but is
now widely used by a much younger audience.
You can chat in real time, use the webcam and share
pictures.
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Anonymous social networking
There has been an increase in the number of anonymous social networking sites. The
issues regarding these sites are that by their very nature, they can be used to post nasty
or malicious messages online. There is a specific problem within schools, where pupils
are using these sites to bully their peers.
Honesty Box
Is an application within Facebook. It
allows you to ask questions and it
allows people to post anonymous
comments about you. The fact that
messages can by posted anonymously
leaves it wide open to be used by
people who wish to post nasty or
bullying messages. Schools are
increasingly reporting that this is one
of the applications being used in
bullying.
Formspring
Formspring (formerly formspring.me) is a question-andanswer-based social website, launched in November 2009.
The site allows its users to set up a profile page, from which
anyone can ask them questions. The questions and their given responses are then
published on the user's profile page.
The questions can be asked with a user's name hidden, or they can be visibly sent from
another Formspring account, according to the asker's preference. Users can however
choose to disallow anonymous questions, and have the ability to block selected people
from asking further questions, even if the asker has remained anonymous. The site also
allows users to link their accounts to many popular social networking and blogging
websites, including Facebook, Twitter, and Blogger.
On February 9, 2011, Formspring announced on its blog that it was approaching 22
million registered users.
Little Gossip
This site appears, gets closed down and then appears
again. As at October 2012 it was up again. Its only
purpose is to spread malicious anonymous gossip and
there is nothing positive about it.
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Spillit
The only purpose of spillit.me appears to be to put yourself
up there for criticism, which begs the question, why are so
many young people setting up accounts. It brings to mind
the Oscar Wilde quote “There is only one thing in life worse than being talked about, and
that is not being talked about”.
By default the public search option is on and you can turn it off.
These are the questions you can ask about yourself. The questions are all predertimed.
Unfortunately they don’t seem to have the most obvious one “Why have I set up an
account here - do I want to be bullied?”.
So not to be deterred we used the option to create our own question
You appear to have the choice as to how anonymous you want your bullies sorry
contacts to be and can choose from these options.
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As the site is obviously aware that you are going to get a shed load of abuse they make
you accept this disclaimer if you accept anything other than the high level so they cannot
be held responsible.
It does give you an opt out however:
In case it is not obvious, our recommendations is that unless you would like to receive
abuse don’t set up an account with Spillit.
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Blogging
Tumblr
Why Kids Love It and What Parents Need To Know
Thank you to Yoursphere.com for this article
Maybe you’ve heard your teen talking about something called
Tumblr. Or perhaps you’ve seen it on the Internet somewhere
and always wondered what it is. Aside of its increasing
popularity among the younger crowd, there’s really only one
reason why you might want to consider blocking Tumblr on
your home computer, or at the very least having a
conversation with your child/teen about why they should wait
until they’re older before signing up for an account.
In contrast to other blogging platforms like WordPress,
Typepad or Blogger, Tumblr is a streamlined blogging platform
that adds a unique creative element to creating and sharing (“re-blogging”) photo, video
and audio blog posts. Of course, users can post traditional blog articles, but what
attracts the younger crowd is the ability to create somewhat of a collage of photos,
videos and quotes that represent their individuality. As many Tumblr users will tell you,
this can be a great way for anyone to express their creativity and interests. Why did I
italicize “anyone”? Well, because just like with Facebook both adults and children can
join the Tumblr community, and just like on Facebook the inappropriate content isn’t
necessarily promoted, but it’s there if you (or better yet your children) want to find it.
On the safety side of things Tumblr keeps things simple. The only information they ask
of you during sign up is what’s shown in the screenshot above. However, as soon as you
hit start you’re asked to type in your age, and if you type in anything below 13 Tumblr
rejects your registration. This means, and as Tumblr’s Terms of Service makes clear,
children 12 and under are not allowed on Tumblr.
If cyberbullying or any kind of online harassment becomes an issue, Tumblr makes it
easy to report and block a specific user and/or their Tumblr blog.
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What Parents Need to Know
In a lot of ways Tumblr is an online collection of contemporary culture. Users can follow
Tumblr blogs of celebrities, architects, fashion designers and professional athletes,
among many others. And because of Tumblr’s compilation style of blogging, you can
literally find anything from art and crafts ideas to hardcore porn, and equally as easy.
All of that being said, finding pornography on Tumblr is no different than finding it on
Twitter or
Facebook. A simple tag search for
“porn”, “sex” or “adult” results in a
stream of pornographic images and video that any Tumblr user can see and share.
Despite it being a creative outlet for young minds, the fact remains that Tumblr is not for
children. Websites like Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr can only go as far as requesting
their age during registration; it’s in your hands to educate your child about following the
rules, whether it’s in school, on the soccer field or online.
I can hear a child saying: “Dad, I don’t use Tumblr for all these things you’re worried
about. My friends and I don’t go looking for that stuff you mentioned. Don’t worry so
much!” Don’t fall prey to these comments. The fact of the matter is, Tumblr, like many
websites, blog platforms and social networks, does not have the content filters or
oversight in place to ensure a healthy experience for your child.
For your teens, it might help to create a dialogue about their activity on Tumblr – find
out what they post, who they follow, and if necessary, create an account of your own
and follow them. Let them know you know what kind of content is available to them in
the Tumblr community and how inappropriate content, regardless of where it’s coming
from, can often times lead to malicious applications and computer viruses. If you feel
that blocking Tumblr altogether is necessary in your home, there are several options
available to you:
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Parental Controls and Privacy Settings
The key things you need are:
1. Virus Control
2. Controls which match the ages of children in your family. If you have large age
gaps, you will need a control which can provide different settings for different
children.
3. Ease of use for the parents - this must match your IT skills.
4. Time Controls both in terms of length of time and o’clock times.
There are a number of software packages available on the market to help you monitor
what your child(ren) can look at and do on the internet. They range in their functionality
from:
 Reading every email sent or received
 Seeing both sides of every chat or message they take part in
 Seeing every webpage they visit and how long they stay there
 Blocking access to inappropriate sites
 Seeing every keystroke they type in on their computer
 Controlling when they can use the computer and what programs they can use
 Being notified when any specific words you select are used in any communication
 Filters are updated regularly and automatically when they are logged on,
irrespective of which computer is used, e.g. home desktop, own laptop, etc.
 Different operating systems are covered
It is imperative you have good anti virus software on your PC. If children or young
people have access to the laptop/PC it is also imperative that you install a good parental
control software.
Mobile Phone Operators Parental Controls
Check out the websites for these operators for more up to date information. At the time
of writing October 2012.....
T-Mobile Provides content lock automatically to all pay as you go and pay monthly
mobiles. It blocks all adult content until you prove that you’re over 18 by a credit card or
by a name and address check through a credit reference agency. You can then request
the removal of the block.
Blocks unmoderated social networking sites and chatrooms, sites with persistent bad
language, visual material of a sexual nature, horror and extreme violence.
Three (3) –Applies Adult Filter as standard to all mobile phones. The user must prove
they are over 18 and then are given a security pin to allow access to the content.
Blocks nudity, unacceptable violence, racism, and websites that could expose you (or
their network) to hacking, phishing and other harmful content.
Talk-Mobile – Adult Content Restriction as standard on all their Pay As You Go, Prepay,
World, Pay Monthly, SIMple and Control plans. The block is removed by paying a fee via
a credit card to verify age. The restriction is then removed. There is no indication as to
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whether the restriction can be applied again. The site does not give any information
about type of content blocked or what blocker is used.
O2 – Applies Parental Control as standard, limiting web content to that deemed suitable
to a 12 year old. It seems a fee is applied every time the Parental Controls are activated
or deactivated.
Vodaphone – They provide parental controls which are applied automatically to all
phones where the age of the user can not be determined. The block can be removed if
the user can confirm they are over 18. It is not clear if the block is automatically applied
if you buy a new service or phone with a credit card.
They block 18-rated content and services which includes premium rate picture
messaging, premium rate picture messaging, chat and dating services, erotica, gambling
and betting and violent games.
Orange – No Information
Virgin – No Information
(Thank you to In 80 clicks for compiling this above information)
My Secure PC
To order go to : www.telecomplus.org.uk/G35815
As part of their ‘Broadcall’ package, Utility Warehouse offer MySecurePC. It provides allround protection against internet threats such as spam, viruses, and hackers. It has a
firewall and parental controls to keep your family safe . It's also really simple to install!
It automatically protects your computer in the following ways:

Anti-virus - Detects and removes all known viruses, with automatic updates.

Firewall - Protects your computer against hackers. You are in control of who can
access your computer and data.

Anti-spyware - Constantly checks and removes any malicious software which may
have become installed on your computer.

Anti-spam - Monitors all incoming e-mail and automatically transfers any suspect
e-mails into a spam folder for you to view at your leisure.

Parental Control - Allows parents to restrict which websites can be accessed and
also limit internet use to specific times of day, giving you complete control and
peace of mind.
To purchase a broadband package visit www.utilitywarehouse.co.uk/G35815. If you
need any help with this call us on 01446 795055 or contact us on [email protected]
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MySecurePC can then be added to your order
for:
Note: If you are already a customer of UW, you
can download the MySecurePC service via 'the
Clubhouse' by logging in with your customer
details.
Number of
Licences
Monthly fee
(£)
1
3
5
£3
£4
£7
8
£10
16
£17
24
£25
Kaspersky
One product on the market worth considering is Kaspersky as this offers on line
protection for viruses as well as parental controls.
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Other Parental Control Software
There are a number of other packages available on the market. Whichever one you
choose, whether it is Kaspersky, MySecurePC or any other, install one. No child under 18
should be online without one.
To find out what is available type “Parental Control software” into your search engine
(Google, Bing, Firefox etc.)
---
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ISP Parental Controls
These ISP providers now provide parental controls as part of their broadband package.
For details please contact the ISP provider.
ISPs commit to aiding parental control
New Code of Practice sets out measures to help parents block inappropriate online
content.
The UK’s biggest internet service providers (ISPs) have pledged to better inform and
educate parents about controlling access to material on the internet.
BT, Sky, TalkTalk and Virgin Media have published a Code of Practice developed
from talks between ISPs, Government, NGOs and parents’ and children’s groups. It
follows a recommendation in the Bailey Review that ISPs should make it easier for
parents to block access to adult and age-restricted content.
Communications Minister Ed Vaizey said he was pleased to see practical steps being
taken to help parents. He added: “I look forward to continuing to work with the ISPs and
the rest of the industry to help children enjoy the benefits of the internet safely.”
The code is the first step in an ongoing commitment by the four main ISPs to work with
each other and other interested parties to explore new technologies that will give -parents an active choice to control the content their children can access.
It includes commitments to increase awareness of the availability of parental controls, to
present new customers with an enforced choice about filtering access when their service
is set up and to work closely with the UK Council for Child Internet Safety to
promote clear, accessible channels for parents to report concerns.
An annual review of progress against the commitments will be published, with the first
report set to be released in October 2012.
Internet Explorer - Parental Controls
A browser is an application that lets you view web sites on the internet. The most
popular one at present is Internet Explorer. It has security and privacy options that can
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be set by users, but the options differ slightly, depending on which version of Internet
Explorer you have on your computer.
To find out which version you have on your computer:



Open Internet Explorer
Click on the Help Menu option at the top of the screen
Select the About Internet Explorer option
Depending on whether you are using Internet Explorer 9, 8, 7 or 6 it will display one of
these screens:
Internet Explorer 8 and 9 have Parental Control with Windows 7. These are not available
with Vista.
In the above picture, the one on the left is version 9 (the latest one), then 8, 7 and 6,
the oldest version.
Internet Explorer 8/9 running on Windows 7 – Parental Controls
Set up Parental Controls (Instructions from Microsoft)
You can use Parental Controls to help manage how your children use the computer. For
example, you can set limits on the hours that your children can use the computer, the
types of games they can play, and the programs they can run.
When Parental Controls blocks access to a game or program, a notification is displayed
that the program has been blocked. Your child can click a link in the notification to
request permission for access to that game or program. You can allow access by
entering your account information.
To set up Parental Controls for your child, you'll need your own administrator user
account. Before you get started, make sure each child that you want to set up Parental
Controls for has a standard user account. Parental Controls can be applied only to
standard user accounts. For more information about user accounts and setting them up,
see What is a user account?
In addition to the controls that Windows provides, you can install additional controls,
such as web filtering and activity reporting, from a separate service provider. For more
information, see How can I add additional parental controls?

Open up Click on the Tools Menu and select Internet Option

Click on the Tools Menu and select Internet Options

Select Parental Controls
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
Follow the instructions given in this box.
To turn on Parental Controls for a standard user account (Microsoft
Instructions)
1. Click to open Parental Controls.
If you're prompted for an administrator
password or confirmation, type the password or provide confirmation.
2. Click the standard user account that you want to set Parental Controls for. If the
standard user account isn't set up yet, click Create a new user account to set
up a new account.
3. Under Parental Controls, click on, enforce current settings.
4. Once you've turned on Parental Controls for your child's standard user account,
you can adjust the following individual settings that you want to control:
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o
o
o
Time limits. You can set time limits to control when children are allowed to
log on to the computer. Time limits prevent children from logging on
during the specified hours. You can set different logon hours for every day
of the week. If they're logged on when their allotted time ends, they'll be
automatically logged off. For more information, see Control when
children can use the computer.
Games. You can control access to games, choose an age-rating level,
choose the types of content you want to block, and decide whether you
want to allow or block unrated or specific games. For more information,
see Choose which games children can play.
Allow or block specific programs. You can prevent children from running
programs that you don't want them to run. For more information, see
Prevent children from using specific programs.
Disabling In-App Purchases on iOS and Android Devices
Many thanks to Yoursphere.com for providing this information
In-app purchases can pose one of the biggest headaches for parents whose children
have Smartphones or tablets. If you assigned your credit card to your child’s
Smartphone, you probably didn’t give it much thought. By why would you? They don’t
have their own credit card, so it only made sense. But what parents usually don’t realize
about these devices is that their child has easy access to three different types of mobile
apps out there:
Free
Paid-for
“Freemium”
The first two are self-explanatory, but freemium is a word that’s new to a lot of people,
and it essentially means that the app is free to download and free to use, for the most
part, but the user has the option to make purchases from within the app. These
purchases are tied directly to your credit card account, making the entire purchasing
process rather easy and fast for even the youngest child.
Months later, the unsuspecting parent takes a look at their credit card statement only to
find a £5 charge here, a £10 charge there and a few more £1 charges from a company
they’ve never heard of. At this point, of course, it’s a day too late, but that doesn’t mean
you can’t prevent it from happening again.
Below is a guide that shows you how to quickly disable in-app
purchases in an Apple or Android mobile device, including
Smartphones and tablets. Please share it with other parents who
you think would benefit from it.
Tap the Settings icon
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Tap General
Tap Restrictions and then Enable Restrictions
Enter a PIN and re-enter to confirm
Now, scroll down and turn off in-app purchases
Disabling In-App Purchases on Android Devices
1. Open the Google Play Store app
2. Press the Menu button and then choose Settings
3. Scroll down a bit and under User Controls select Set
or Change PIN
4. Enter a PIN and press OK
5. Re-enter the PIN
6. Check the box that says Use PIN for purchases
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Now you can take comfort in knowing that your child is enjoying their smartphone
without having to worry about an unexpected credit card bill or them seeing content that
you don’t approve of. Technology should be enjoyed by all of us, especially our children,
but only when parents are involved and proactive!
Xbox 360 Netflix ‘Just For Kids’ User Interface
Many thanks to Techcrunch for providing this information
Netflix is making it even easier for kids to bypass channel surfing and search for their
favorite shows and characters, with an updated app for the Xbox 360. The latest version
of Netflix’s Xbox 360 app, brings its increasingly popular ‘Just For Kids’ user interface to
the gaming console.
Netflix’s Just For Kids UI debuted nearly a year ago, offering its younger users an easier
way to find and watch their favorite shows.
Unlike Netflix’s usual user interface, which highlights movie box art and descriptions,
Just For Kids is character-centric, so that toddlers can navigate what they want to watch
based on which popular characters most appeal to them, whether it be Dora The
Explorer or Spongebob Squarepants.
Since introducing the UI on the web, Netflix has been busy porting it to other devices,
such as the Nintendo Wii, PlayStation 3, Apple TV… and now the Xbox.
For the Xbox 360, the updated app is a clear win, as it will mean even more media
consumption on the game console. Microsoft seems to be pushing the Xbox more as a
media hub than a game console these days, so grabbing the attention of a home’s
youngest users is one way to solidify its place in the living room.
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iPAD Applying Safety Controls
The iPad is a hand held computer which connects to the
internet. This means parents should take the time to
understand the iPad’s parental controls and how to set
them. Taking a few minutes to apply the correct controls
can be invaluable for your children.
The process is fairly simple and very similar to that of the
iPhone and the iPOD Touch
You can always use RangerBrowser instead. See Page 140
Find the Settings button on your home
screen
Find the General tab on the left side.
Click the Restrictions option
At the top of the screen click Enable
Restrictions. This will bring up a password
box. As this is your first time, you’ll need
to think of a code and enter it twice to
confirm.
Note we suggest you use the same code
for all these applications.
Note Don’t forget this password. It’s your only
way to turn restrictions on and off on the
iPad. If you forget, the only way to bypass
it is by resetting your iPad to the factory
settings.
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You have the option to disable or enable a
number of apps and allowances:
Safari – (the Apple Internet Browser),
YouTube, installing apps, etc.
Switching these apps to the off position
will actually remove them from the iPad’s
homepage—meaning your children won’t
be able to access them until you switch
them back on.
Some suggestions:
Safari – Turn this off if you don’t want your
child browsing the web.
Safari doesn’t have a content filter, so
unless you’ve installed a third-party, kidfriendly web browser, it is advisable to
switch this to off.
YouTube Safety mode isn’t available, so it
is safer to switch this to off.
Installing Apps with this switched on
children can download apps and you could
well receive unwanted bills from Apple.
Scroll down on the same page.
You can choose the type of content you
allow to be downloaded, installed or viewed
on your iPad, as well as the option to
disable in-app purchases.
The recommended setting for these is Off.
In-app purchases – these are actual
purchases made inside any app that’s
downloaded to your iPad. Eg If your son or
daughter decides that they want to buy
£100 worth of gold coins in a game they
can.
Note - if you’ve ever bought an app in the
App Store your iTunes account is probably
linked to your credit card.
You can also limit the kind of content that
gets downloaded or played on your iPad.
This is done by selecting the rating for
each type of content.
Music – setting the Explicit setting to OFF
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disables all explicit purchases in the iTunes
Store and stops explicit songs that your
child may already have on their iPad being
played
Movies
The recommended setting for this is G or
PG
TV Shows
The recommended setting for this is G or
PG
Apps
The recommended setting for this is 4+ or
9+ depending on the age of your children.
Note These settings are based on your children being under 11. If the children are
older then adjust the settings accordingly.
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iPhone Controls
iPhones, as with nearly all mobile phones have internet access.
This needs to be controlled in the same way as any other
internet enabled device.Here are a few things you can do.
However you still need to phone the service provider (whom
you pay) and ask for Parental Controls to be applied to the
phone if it is being used by a child.
You can always use RangerBrowser instead. See Page 140
Go into the phones
Settings
Go to the General Tab
Scroll down and look for
the tab called
Restrictions.
If it says Off change it to
Enable Restrictions.
At the top, click on
Enable Restrictions.
Create a password and
don’t forget it as
there’s no way to
retrieve it.
Disable any functions such
as YouTube. This removes
the icon completely from
the iPhone’s screen.
Note Re-enabling these functions is as simple as following the same steps, re-entering
your password, and turning the functions back on.
Passwords – it’s a really good idea to create one sophisticated password but easily
remembered password for all your children’s devices. It must be one they cannot
guess. It should contain capitals and lower case and numerals
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Wii Parental Controls
If your Wii connects to the internet you need to set the
parental controls to keep your children safe.
It’s your choice whether you tell the children you have done
this, but children don’t always like parental controls and some
do try and get around them. Quietly setting it up beforehand
means the children may not realise they are there.
These step by step instructions should make it easy to do.
What to do:
1. Turn on the WII and from The Wii Menu, select the Wii button
2. Select Wii Settings.
3. Click the blue arrow on the right to access Wii System Settings 2.1
4. Select "Parental Controls" and Yes.
5. Click Ok 3 times to begin setup.
6. Input a PIN number then select OK. Your pin number must be secret but something you
will easily remember but not easily guessed (avoid birthdays your children know them!)
7. Enter the PIN number again and select OK.
8. Select a secret question and click OK. Again make sure the children can’t guess it.
9. Enter the answer and select OK.
10. Select Game Settings and PIN then
The Highest Game Rating.
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11. Use the blue arrow to scroll through the ESRB ratings.
See below for a description of the settings.
12. Select the desired rating restriction and OK.
13. Select Confirm.
Select Other Settings and OK.
This allows you to restrict settings to:

Internet access
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


spending Wii Points in the Wii Shop
user-to-user communication
Wii News Channel.
Restricting the features:

Recommended restriction setting is Yes.
The Internet Channel – Allows the use of the Wiii to browse the Internet. We would not
recommended this for young children. Do they really need it from their Wii?

Suggested restriction setting is Yes.
The Wii Shop Channel – This is where Wii users can purchase Wii points with their credit
card, and then use those points to buy downloadable games (old Nintendo games, Wii
games, etc) or applications like Netflix *.

Recommended restriction setting is Yes.
User-to-user communication – Pretty much exactly what it sounds like. Restricting this
is a good idea as the Wii allows your children to chat with other Wii owners (strangers) via
text or voice. This is not safe for young children.

Recommended restriction setting - No
The News Channel
Note: Some features will not appear until the Wii Console is connected to the Internet.
14. Once all selections are made, select Confirm.
15. Select Settings Complete to save the changes.
*
Note: The Netflix app is not disabled or filtered by any of these Parental Controls. The
restrictions you set on game ratings do not affect the content which can be streamed on Netflix.
Netflix has separate parental controls for this, which you can access through your Netflix
account.
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


Go to Netflix.com, log in, and then click on the link in the top right corner called Your
Account & Help.
Scroll down to the Preferences box and click on the link called Change Parental
Control Setting.
From here you can select the restrictions that best suit your family.
XBox 360 - Parental Controls
Due to Xbox’s success it attracts cyberbullying, sexting,
grooming, and inappropriate communication.
XBox is great but it is also used by people who would like
to harm your children. So its important to activate Xbox’s
Family Setting safety controls to keep them safe.
There are 2 key things a parent needs to do when allowing their children to use an XBox.
a) Make sure their child doesn’t post any Information online which could result in
them being traced or found.
b) Take responsibility for their child’s safety by setting the Xbox Family Setting
safety controls.
1. On the main dashboard, go to the tab called My
Xbox
2. Then scroll over to the box called System
Settings
3. Click on Family Settings
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4. Click on Console Controls
Each category is explained in detail below. Do each
one in turn.
Console Controls & Game Ratings
Choose the game rating
5. Recommended Setting for children is G or PG
Console Controls Video Ratings
For DVDs
6. Recommended Setting for children is G or PG
Unrated DVDs (family DVDs are not rated)
7. Recommended setting for children is Allowed
Console Controls XBOX Live access - allow or block
altogether.
Blocking prevents your child from using ANY Xbox Live
feature, i.e. online gaming, Netflix, Zune, and chatting
with friends.
8. Safest setting for very young children is Blocked,
however this may be too restrictive for older
children. Suggest Allowed but only with parental
supervision.
Console Controls XBOX Live Membership
Creation allows you to block or allow people from
creating new memberships on the console.
Console Controls Restricted Content
9. If you are unlikely to change previous settings:
Recommended setting Hide Restricted Content
If you want easy access to change settings using
password
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Recommended setting Show All Content
Console Controls Family Timer
Set weekly and daily time limits for children logging
into their Xbox accounts.
10. Highly recommended – research has shown
excessive gaming does change children’s
behaviour.
Console Controls Set Pass Code
11. Set a password – very important
Use a password you will remember but the children
can’t guess.
Select Done button and Yes, save changes
Its all done!
Note: If you set a family timer, you should immediately see a pop-up which shows a
countdown.
Note: You can test the family settings by running a game that exceeds the rating you
specified. If the game is rated higher than you allowed you’ll see a pop-up asking for the
pass code.
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You Tube Safety Mode
YouTube does a fairly good job of removing inappropriate
content on the site. But with the millions of videos being
uploaded and viewed every day there are risks.
YouTube's Safety Mode is an added safeguard to filter
out videos that some parents may consider inappropriate
for their children.
YouTube Safety Mode is a simple process; if it’s not done right it can easily be undone.
1. Go to the computer that your kids use and visit YouTube.com.
2. Clicking the Sign In button in the top right corner.
3. You need to have a Google Account in order to do this. A Google Account is easy
to set up and can be done using your normal email address.
Once this is set up you can use it for any Google Accounts.
Note - Make sure you do not click the option to ask Google to remember your log
in and password, otherwise you children will be able to use it.
4. Scroll to the bottom of the homepage and look for Safety Off
5. Click On and Save and lock safety mode on this browser
Doing this will ensure that, even if you’re logged out, Safety Mode will stay on
Note: Safety Mode only stays locked on one web browser on that particular computer
user account. You will need to repeat this for each child’s account.
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Use YouTube’s privacy settings
Stop Cyberbullying on YouTube.
You can prevent people from embedding your video on other websites by disabling video embedding
and you can disable commenting. It is the commenting which allows the majority of cyber bullying to
take place. Turn this off and you have gone a long way to preventing it.,
You can choose from one of the three privacy settings:
Public – Anyone can search for and view your video
Unlisted – Only those people with a link to your video can watch it
Private – You choose who can view the video
You must first of all have an account. If not create one.

Open your Account

Upload your Video

Click on Basic Tab and choose Private

Click on Advanced Tab and remove ticks from Comments and Embedding

Choose via Syndication whether you wish the Video to be able through Mobile and TV.
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Google Chrome Family Safety
Thank you to Yoursphere.com for this article
You can use WebFilter Pro.
To download it for Chrome go to https://chrome.google.com/webstore.
In a nutshell, WebFilter Pro can make web browsing safer by restricting access to:
pornography





adult social networks
violent content
online gaming websites
gambling websites
drug related websites
any site that threatens your computer’s security (scams, malware, spyware, viruses, etc)
Chrome Set Up Process
Once you’ve installed WebFilter Pro from
link, simply click on the icon in the top right
corner of your browser.
this
1. Choose Settings and click the box called Enable Password Protection.
2. On the drop down, click Sign Up and
follow the steps to register your email
address. The whole point of this process is to
password protect your settings so you and
only you can change them in the future.
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3. After you’ve checked your
email and clicked the
activation link, go back to the
Settings page and begin
adding a check mark to
anything you want blocked on
your Chrome browser.
4. The restrictions do a very
good job of blocking exactly what
they need to block. On top of these
settings, you also have the option of
blocking (or allowing) specific
websites as you or your child come
across them. All you have to do is
click the little icon in the top right
corner and make your selection.
5. When you’re done, the last thing you
need to do is switch WebFilter Pro to
Kids mode under Settings. Doing this
will password protect all the changes
you’ve made to the block list, as well as
the basic settings.
Firefox family safety
https://addons.mozilla.org/enUS/firefox/addon/webfilter/
Firefox’s version of WebFilter Pro has all the
good parts that come with the Chrome
version, except the password protection,
which is a pretty big flaw. Once you’ve
installed WebFilter Pro from all you have to
do is click the little icon and select Change
Security Policy.
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Change Security Policy will bring you to the same Settings page that you encountered on
Chrome. Again, the only thing missing here is the ability to password protect
your settings.
Yahoo Safe Search
NOTE: You need to be signed into your Yahoo account in order for these settings to be
saved.
1. Go to Yahoo.com and search for anything.
2. On the page with your search results, click the green shield that is located in the
upper right hand corner (shown below).
3. That should take you to a page titled Search Preferences.
4. Go down to the section titled Safe Search (outlined in red in the screenshot
below) and click the blue edit button that is on the right hand side.
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From there you will be taken to a page with settings for Safe Search. You can set it up
so that it blocks all adult content such as videos, pictures, links, etc.
If you want to lock the Safe Search settings you can click the check-box labelled
SafeSearch lock which is directly below the Safe Search Filter options. When you’re
done click save.
5. Click Finished on the Search Preferences page.
Bing Safe Search
(Bing isn’t the best option for families since you can’t lock SafeSearch).

Go to www.bing.com and you’ll see the homepage.

Click the gear icon in the upper right hand corner (Outlined in red in the
screenshot below).
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
Clicking the gear icon will take you to Preferences page and from there you can
set up your search filters.

When you’re done setting up Safe Search click the yellow Save button in the
upper right hand corner.
Unfortunately, you cannot save your Safe Search settings for Bing since the settings
aren’t tied in any way to your user account.
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Router Security & Parental Controls
Options are:

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
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

BT Home Hub
Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router with SpeedBooster 802.11g
Linksys E2000 Advanced Wireless-N Router
Netgear Wireless-N 300 Router with DSL Modem
Cisco Linksys X3000 review
ZyXEL P-334WT Broadband Wireless Router
VigorPro 5510 UTM Firewall with Anti-Virus & Anti-Spam
Reason to Block
Example
Unsuitable
Adult material for children
Undesirable
Time wasting sites for employees
Dangerous
Malware or virus-ridden web sites
Fraudulent
Confidiential data leaving your network
Routers can be programmed to restrict access times – this way you can determine how
much time and between what times - your child can access the internet.
No kid however internet savy can get round it as the programming is on the router not
the PC. You can have one administrator account with access to everything.
You can set the controls for PC’s, laptops and gaming machines. Mobiles, i-PAD’s and
tablets normally have their own GPRS (Internet) connection, but some do run through
the house router.
Details on the routers are in the Training Guide. If you need help, again we suggest you
go to your local IT supplier. Eye PAT can put you in contact with a company who can
help you if you don’t have your own contact. Email [email protected]
When setting up any kind of filtering software, it is a good idea to talk to your children,
about what they want to use on the internet and why. Explain to them why you are
using the filters. Remember a child can always visit a friend’s computer which may not
have the same filters, so education needs to play a key part in their protection.
Eye PAT does however strongly encourage the use of filters, both for time, so children
cannot use their laptops or PCs at night unsupervised, and more importantly cannot be
watched if they have inadvertently left their webcam online.
Do be aware there is a potential risk of children overriding this as they can use the hard
reset (which is a pin into a pin hole) and there are lists of the default passwords for all
routers circulating on google.
There is also package out there called Routerpassview which will actually retrieve the
password which has been set up for the router, from the config. backup file which has
been stored on the machine.
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Bear in mind, there is no such thing as total security as shown when Gary McKinnon
hacked into over 90 US Military computer systems! All you can do is the best you can.
Netgear
NETGEAR Wireless-N 300 Router (WNR2000)
Netgear is working with Open DNS to use filtering technology in their router. There are
no additional fees or subscriptions required.
NETGEAR’s Live Parental Controls enable parents and businesses to restrict access to
unsafe websites and filter inappropriate content. Rather than install and manage
parental control software applications on individual computers and other Internetconnected devices, customers set the rules on the router, which can be managed
remotely. Therefore, these powerful network-based parental controls not only protect
personal computers but also mobile wireless devices such as the PSP™ and iPod Touch™,
and gaming consoles such as the Wii™, when connected to the wireless home network.
Additionally, the Live Parental Controls go beyond blocking inappropriate content to
include anti-phishing protection, complementing the customer’s existing Internet
security software to prevent phishing scams.
Live Parental Controls enable customers to set up filters to block content according to
more than 50 categories, including social networking sites, pornography, violence and
others. Additionally, these settings can be specified on a per-user, per-time basis. That
is, certain sites or content can be blocked for certain people at certain times of the day.
For example, a parent can block social networking sites on their child’s computer during
the day and then free it up for use in the evening when their homework has been
completed.
Live Parental Controls are immediately available on new NETGEAR Wireless-N 300
Routers (WNR2000). Installation is made simple by following the instructions on the
Smart Wizard installation CD included with the product. Customers can also visit
http://www.netgear.com/lpc for an installation tutorial and additional product
information. NETGEAR’s Wireless-N 300 Router is backed by a one-year warranty and
24/7 technical support.
Shop around as costs vary, however internet sites sell it for between £40 and £75.
Additional product information and photos can be found at
http://www.netgear.com/Products/RoutersandGateways/WirelessNRoutersan
dGateways/WNR2000.aspx.
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BT
BT do provide Parental Control software. Always check for their latest information on
www.bt.com. Just type Parental Controls into the BT Search Box.
These are the main features of BT Family Protection and what each of them allows you to do.
Web blocking



Select the categories of websites that will be blocked or allowed for each user
Create a list of custom keywords to block
Set the filtering of YouTube videos
Instant messaging


Select which instant messaging applications you allow
Log instant message conversations that your children have through MSN Instant
Messenger, AIM (AOL Instant Messenger), Yahoo! Instant Messenger and ICQ
Instant Messenger applications
Time limits


Set limits on how long a child is allowed online each day
Set a daily schedule that specifies what time of day a child is allowed to be online
Email blocking

Filter email so your children can only exchange emails with addresses that you
approve
Social networking


Monitor inappropriate and vulgar words posted on social networking sites, blogs,
forums and other sites
Enter private information that you wouldn't want posted online and get alerts if
this information makes it on to the internet
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Program blocking


Take control of applications, file transfer protocols, and communication protocols
that use the internet such as instant messengers, email, FTP, and peer-to-peer
file sharing
Add custom programs that BT Family Protection will either block completely, or
monitor their usage
Usage reporting

See what websites were visited and blocked, instant messenger conversations,
and any programs that have been used online
Instant alerts

Select a sensitivity level and be notified instantly by email, text message, or
phone when a user tries to access banned websites
DrayTek
DrayTek's Web Content Filtering (WCF) facilities enable you to
protect your network and your users from web content
according to your preferences.
As DrayTek WCF is performed by your router - your point of
entry to the Internet - it is far more difficult to circumvent
than software solutions installed on each client/PC and applies
to guest PCs too (laptops etc.). Blocking/filtering can be
selective for certain users or groups too, so that, for example,
managers can have less filtering imposed than other users
and time schedules can apply these content filtering for
specific time periods only.
Staff Internet Abuse - A real cost to your business
The Internet provides your business with an effective, useful and often essential facility.
Your staff can use it to find quick answers, liaise with customers, send and receive
emails and many other productive tasks. Unfortunately, the Internet also provides the
opportunity for mis-use. DrayTek products can help you restrict, control and monitor
staff Internet usage.
Staff using your Internet facility for time-wasteful activities are costing you. Even more
importantly these activities can put your businesses computers and network at risk. A
recent survey of 10,000 employees indicated that 44% admitted to spending time on the
Internet for personal use, for up to 2.1 hours per day.
Most staff are responsible and prudent with their Internet use and we always
recommend a suitable AUP (Acceptable Use Policy) to be in place so that staff or any
users of your systems know what they are and aren't permitted to use the computers
for. This AUP can be re-inforced by DrayTek routers which can block specific content
(either at certain times only or all times) and also block potentially harmful file/code
types from being installed by rogue web sites. There are some staff who will make
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severe abuse of the Internet facilities - spending literally hours on personal matters or
social networking sites.
Top 5 Personal Internet Uses for Employees

Personal Email: Hotmail, Gmail, Yahoo etc.

Intant Messaging: MSN, AOL, Yahoo etc.

Social Networking: Facebook, MySpace etc.

Buying: Using Amazon, Ebay etc.

Multimedia : YouTube, iPlayer etc.
It's easy to let a 'quick visit' become a prolonged stay without realising and losing track
of time. All of the above activities can be immensely time consuming and addictive.
What doesn't quite make the list but could be even more serious in its consequences is
adult or illegal material being accessed in the workplace, as well as the higher likelyhood
tht such sites are infected with malware which will then get onto your business network.
There is also the potential to 'innocently' download software and install it on local PCs,
unwittingly introducing spyware or trojans onto your network.
Introducing DrayTek Web Content Filtering
DrayTek Web Filtering allows you to block web content in three main ways:
1. By matching keyword / specific sites
2. By web site category (Subject to Subscription)
3. By digital content type
4. IP Filtering (Actually part of the firewall, along with many other security
features.)
Features 1,3 and 4 above are included with the router. Feature 2 is included but requires
an annual subscription to the external server which keeps a real-time contstantly
updated database of web sites. More details of that later.
1. Keyword Matching
In Keyword Matching you can specify a list of either banned (blacklist)) or permitted
sites (whitelist). The DrayTek method is 'object' oriented, which means that you create
lists of keywords or sites, can then group them and then apply them into specific user
groups or time periods
Using a blacklist, all sites would be accessible by your users except those that match the
keywords you specify. This would be useful, for example where there are specific sites
known to be causing distuption or timewasting in your organsiation such as social
networking or webmail. The example below would allow access to all sites except the
ones listed:
Their website is www.draytek.co.uk. Search the site for “Parental Controls”.
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Social Networking - Privacy and Parental Settings
Friends, Contacts or Strangers
The key issue for protection from cyberbullying and grooming is who your friends are,
who are contacts and acquaintances and who are strangers. There are many ways to
define the differences but these may help.
Friend
Contact
Stranger
•Share private photos
•Share secrets
•Enjoy being with them
•Meet or talk regularly
•Talk freely about happy,
funny or sad events in your
life.
•Someone you trust
•Someone whose values you
generally agree with or
accept.
•Know their name and what
they look like but probably
not much about their
personal life
•Talk primarily online
•Don't spend face-to-face
leisure time with them
•Talk generally but not about
personal matters
•Perhaps someone in your
school year, work or social
activities who you don't
'hang out' with.
•Someone whose values you
are uncertain about.
•Don't know outside social
media
•Never meet up with on
purpose in real life
•Know little or nothing about
them
•Perhaps friend of someone
you know.
•Someone whose values you
don't know.
Most systems have privacy controls to protect you from individuals outside your
accepted friends list, however they work on the basis that you are willing to share all
your information with those you accept as they are your friends.
We need to get the message out that having many friends on say a Facebook page is not
a popularity contest. Popularity is about having real friends, not contacts, acquaintances,
strangers or hangers on.
Business people using social media have lots of contacts because they want to use social
media to promote their business. It is a form of marketing and in this situation its fine,
as long as they treat their social media as a business tool.
Individuals who want to use social media to publish personal information should just link
with their real friends and family or they are leaving themselves open to abuse.
If you would not leave the front door unlocked and allow total strangers to rifle through
your home, your family albums, your private documents why would you allow them to
do so on social media?
In Facebook language a Friend is really a contact. Calling them friends can lull you into
a false sense of security. Look at your list of ‘friends’. Would you really share all your
personal information with these people if you met them face to face?
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If you have over a hundred “friends” on Facebook you can work on the basis that:
10% like you
80% dont
care either
way
10% don't
like you
Facebook has no safety provisions for those under 13 as they should not be on there. It
treats under 18’s as minors and by default sets everything to “friends of friends”. This is
some protection, but once they reach 18 these settings can be opened up. If however
they have lied about their age to join when under 13, these could be opened up much
earlier.
Facebook - Privacy Settings
Dictionary of Terms:





Posting - writing something into either your wall or a friends wall. Now called
timeline.
Chat - instant private chat which does not appear on the wall. You can chat to
many people at the same time
Account Settings - where you change your email address or password
Privacy Settings - where you change what different people can see
Friend - contacts whom you have accepted to see all your information
as with all the sites has privacy settings to restrict who can see your
site. You can choose between




Everyone
Friends of friends
Only Friends
Customise
Within customise you can choose Specific People or Only Me.
It calls contacts ‘friends’ even though you may never has spoken to them in your life. It
cannot and does not differentiate between real friends, acquaintances and contacts.
The simplest safe option is to change all the privacy settings to Only Friends. This will
only allow ‘friends’ you have accepted to see the information.
Facebook default for profiles is now more restricted that it used to be. However, this
changes regularly and you need to check on sign up and then on monthly intervals to
make sure your settings are OK.
It is recommended you change all the settings to Friends Only or in some
circumstances Only Me. For Photographs see section below.
Advertising your date of birth is not good, it is the first and sometimes the only question
used to confirm your identity. Identity theft is rife from social networking sites, and
criminals are now working out the answers to the “Forgot your Password Personal
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Questions” from information people are posting on their social networking sites. Don’t be
caught, put your safeguards in place.
Changing your Privacy Settings

In the top navigation bar select Account then Privacy settings.
Note – If the child is aged 13 to 18 and if they have told the truth about their
age, Facebook will apply the child settings, which basically mean that no one can
see their profile unless they are a friend. However Facebook only works out the
person’s age from the date of birth they have given. Children under 13 cannot set
up an account unless they lie about their date of birth.
Facebook makes these recommendations. For children we would suggest much
stricter controls.
Facebook’s Recommended Settings
Facebook updates its privacy setting from time to time. It has gone a long way in trying
to simplify them which is good. However, whenever Facebook update their settings, you
need to go back into yours to check they have not reverted to the default settings.
Facebook have 3 basic settings:



Public - open to everyone - great for business, not suitable for private
Friends - restricted to those people you have accepted as Friends (perhaps not to
be mixed up with real friends!)
Custom - gives you lots of control and a must for children
However within Facebook you can now apply a classification to your friends so those you
don’t really know you can change to acquaintances. The only problem with this is that
they have to be done individually so if you have hundreds of friends it could take some
time.
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Within Facebook you can go through each different setting applying different levels of
privacy.
Eye PAT Recommended Settings
You can change these settings quickly by clicking on the Options on the Left. We
recommend Friends Only for children under 16. For teenagers between 16 and 18 we
recommend either Friends Only or Friends of Friends, depending on the maturity and
responsibility of the young person.
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How you Connect
Timeline and Tagging
This is what appears on your Facebook Page - it is now called your timeline and how you
can be tagged in photographs. It is especially important for children in care that the
tagging option is restricted.
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Within Custom you can choose:
Apps, Games and Websites
When you play games or use Facebook apps, it publishes and share information taken
from your profile. You can change or restrict what each app or game can do. However
with some games, in order to play the game, you have to post information on your
profile, so your ‘friends’ can help you complete the tasks. All the Ville games are of this
type, Chefville, Farmville, Castleville etc.
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Limiting the older stuff
Blocking People and Invitations
Unfortunately some people misuse Facebook, or misuse it in a specific way. If you have
a particular person who annoys you by repeatedly sending you invitations to play games
or attend events, you can use this option to block them.
Photo Albums
Perhaps the section you need to be most careful about is photographs. Remember
photographs can be taken from your web site and distributed. Perhaps you may not
wish your work colleagues or acquaintances to see certain pictures.
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Most of these options are fairly obvious, however the privacy settings for photo’s are
more hidden.

Click on Edit album privacy. It is the padlock beside the photograph.
Under Privacy chose who you would like to see the albums.
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Is someone logging onto your Facebook account without you knowing?
This is covered by Account Security. We would suggest you switch this one on. It will
let you know if anyone accesses your Facebook account from a new computer or mobile.
It could alert you to bullying before it even gets going and you can immediately change
the password.
Password - Changing your Facebook password
Never give your password to, or allow anyone to see you logging onto your Facebook
account. Once they have your password they can do anything to your account and you
can’t do anything about it, other than change your password, as long as they haven’t
already changed it and blocked you out. If so contact Facebook directly.
If you think someone has hacked into your Facebook account either by guessing or
seeing your password, you need to change it. This is especially important for children as
they will often allow their friends to see them typing in their passwords and then this
information can be passed on. One of the most common forms of cyber bullying is to
hack into someone’s account and start sending out nasty or untrue messages.

Click on the downward arrow by Home and select Account Settings

Click on the General Account Settings

Type in your old password

Type in your new password

Type in your new password again. Don’t cut and paste. The purpose of typing it in
twice is to make sure you have it right.
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Bebo – www.bebo.co.uk
At the top of this screen, you need to click on the Browse button, which will then display
some more buttons on the black bar beside the Bebo logo.
To check or change any settings, click on Account and then the Settings option.
You should now be in the Account Details section.
At the bottom of this page you can Deactivate your account. Please note, deactivate
does not mean delete, it simply makes it so it is not active.
Privacy Settings
The option to change your privacy settings sits under your name
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
Click on Privacy

For a young or vulnerable person we would suggest these settings.
Contact Details
Your contact details are under Edit Profile, then select Contact Details
One key thing to note here is that anything you have entered in your contact details is
available to anyone you have accepted as a friend.
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To change the password
If you need to change the password for any reason:

Click on the Settings

Click on the Account Settings

Click on Change Password
You are then asked to click on your email address and Bebo will send you a message
containing a link that will let you reset your password.
Deleting a person from my friend's list?
To delete a member from your friend’s list follow these instructions:

Click the Friends tab located on the top menu bar.

Find the contact you wish to delete.
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
Click on the red cross next to their profile photo. This is a delete option.

Click the Delete button to confirm your selection.
Deleting a member from your friend’s list will immediately delete your information from
that member’s friend's list and address book as well as your own.
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MySpace - www.myspace.com
Privacy options
Once you have logged in:


Click on My Stuff at the top of the page
Click on the Privacy Settings
Change your settings. For young people always lock down the settings as tightly
as possible.
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Editing the Profile
MySpace does allow members to enter quite comprehensive information about
themselves.

Click on My Stuff and Edit Profile

Choose each section to update your profile. Remember you are publishing this
info on line so be careful what you give away.
For example these are Details sections.
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Under Details it is personal. For example under Marital Status you have the option to
list Swinger!
Go through each setting in turn checking the information. For children under 16 this
should be kept to a minimum and you need to ensure that none of the information
makes the child/young person traceable.
To change the password
If you need to change the password for any reason, take the following steps:

Click on My Stuff and select either Account Settings or Private Settings. they
both end up on the same screen.

Enter the current password, then the new password and verify it

Enter the current password, then the new password
When finished, click on the Save Changes button.
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MSN (Windows Live Messenger)
This is an extremely popular instant chat option, especially amongst secondary school
children. It can be used with or without microphones and video cameras. Many children
and students use it to help with their study and homework as they can easily ask friends
on line for help. Business colleagues use it as a form of instant communication. Children
use it to chat to their friends and it is a good and cheap way for them to keep in contact.
Once you sign in, it pops up and tells you if any of your friends are on line.
There are a few key points however worth remembering. Without tying it up with
Windows Live Family Safety, the only safety option available is to block or delete
contacts. See section below for additional controls.
To block or delete someone

Right mouse click over their name and then choose Delete Contact.
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Anyone can create an account and they could pretend to be someone else. A good
suggestion is to teach your child to request that the first time they are contacted by
someone, to ask them to either switch on their web cam so they can see them (be aware
though that anyone at the other end could be doing anything!) or to ring them on either
their mobile or landline so they can check if it is the person they think it is. Another
really easy way is to ask a question only they could answer. If they refuse, block them.
Teach your children to under no circumstances let their friends have their passwords, or
let anyone see them typing it in. It can be considered great fun (or malicious) to log in
as someone else and send out messages pretending to be them. This can cause great
distress. Teach your children to let you know if they think this is happening to one of
their friends and you can contact their parents.
Note:
MSN can be used for bullying and threats very easily. If this happens take a
screen print of the offending messages (Press the Print Screen key on the
keyboard) and then paste it (Edit/Paste) into a Word or PowerPoint document
and save it. You can then take this into the school as evidence.
Changing your MSN Password
To change the password for your Microsoft account
1. Go to the Account overview page and sign in with your Microsoft account.
2. Under Account information, click Change next to Password.
3. Enter your old password, enter a new password, and then confirm your new
password. Use the password strength meter to make sure that your new
password is strong, so that it’s harder for other people to guess.
4. Consider selecting the checkbox to make your password expire every 72 days.
Changing your password frequently helps protect your personal information.
5. Click Save.
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Skype
Profile Settings
To edit or change details on your profile, click on the File menu in Skype and select the
Edit Profile option.
Important things to be aware of:

Public parts of your Skype profile can be seen by all other Skype users

Do not put details in your profile that you do not want to be publicly available

You do not have to fill in your profile if you do not want to
You can change your profile at any time.
Privacy Settings
To get to the Privacy Settings in Skype you must log in via the link from your Desktop or
from your Programs, you do not appear to be able to log in from the website.

In Skype, from the menu bar, click Skype > Privacy.
The Privacy Settings panel is displayed.
Control who is allowed to make Skype-to-Skype calls to you

Under Allow calls from, choose anyone or people in my Contact list only.
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Control who is allowed to send you video and share their screen with you

Under Automatically receive video and screen sharing from, choose anyone,
people in my Contact list only, or no one.
Control who can send you instant messages

Under Allow IMs from, choose anyone or people in my Contact list only.
Removing the Share Profile with Advertisers option

If you don’t want to share your profile details with advertisers,
uncheck Allow Microsoft targeted ads, including use of Skype profile
and gender.
Skype Button on Website
For Business People if you add a Skype button to your website, check Allow my online
status to be shown on the web so that anyone on the internet can contact you via
Skype.
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To manage your conversation history
You can choose how long to keep your conversation history for, or delete it altogether.
To change your history settings:


In Skype, from the menu bar, click Skype > Privacy
Below Keep history for, click on the drop-down list and select the amount of
time you’d like your history to be saved for
Choose from forever, 3 months, 1 month, 2 weeks or no history at all.
To delete your conversation history, click Clear history. This removes your
entire history, including instant messages, calls, voice messages, text
messages, sent and received files. If you delete your conversation history, you
cannot recover it.


To block a contact

In Skype, on the Contacts tab, right-click on the contact you wish to block and
select Block This Person

Check Remove from your Contact list.

To report a nuisance contact to Skype, check Report abuse.
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
Click Block. The contact is removed from your contact list and won’t be able
to contact you again.
To unblock a contact



In Skype, from the menu bar click Skype > Privacy…
Click Blocked contacts.
In the Blocked people box, click the contact you wish to unblock and
click Unblock this person.
The contact is added back to your contact list and can contact you.
For children you should change all these settings to only people in my Contacts list
and closely monitor their contacts.
Accepting a Friend
When someone asks to be your Contact you have the option to Accept, Ignore or
Block. If you have your Privacy Settings set to Anyone you are likely to receive
contacts from random strangers. To stop this, change the settings to Contact List only.
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As with all social networking applications, it is advisable to check who you are saying yes
to. Speak to the person by phone or in person, or if that is not possible send them an email. Unfortunately people do lie and pretend to be other people.
With children and young people this is especially important.
To change the password
If you need to change the password in Skype for any reason, take the following steps
once you have logged in:

Click on the Skype Menu at the top of the screen and select the Change
Password option
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
Enter the current password

Enter the new password

Re-enter the new password to confirm
Click on the Apply button
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Tracking & Monitoring Software
Again there are many products out there. EyePAT is not affiliated to any of these
companies and we only recommend on merit.
You can always find a list of software available through Google or consumer magazines
such as Which can be a productive source.
As most systems are now international and it is common to make purchases on your
credit card in foreign currency there are no restrictions to the source of the protection
software.
uKnowKids Software Review
Many thanks to Yoursphere.com for providing this information
uKnowKidsis a new web-based monitoring system for your child’s Smartphone and social
network accounts. The testing team used the “Premier” subscription which provides
comprehensive monitoring on Facebook, Twitter and MySpace, as well as Androidpowered Smartphones and Blackberry devices. Subscription prices vary depending on
how many children you want to monitor, extra features and technical support.
Setup -
The Team tested the uKnowKids monitoring system with a Facebook profile, Twitter
account, and Android-powered Smartphone. Syncing the social networks requires, the
parent, to know their child’s usernames and passwords. Inputting this information is all
you need to sync Facebook and MySpace to uKnowKids. For Twitter and
Android/Blackberry Smartphones, however, you will need to install an application called
FamilyConnect. FamilyConnect establishes a link between the Smartphone and/or Twitter
account and the uKnowKids software. We delve a little more into this syncing process
later in the review, but we’re fairly confident that parents won’t encounter any problems
with this initial setup.
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When you enter your child’s info during the setup process (name and birth date)
uKnowKids does a great job of detecting any other social networks that they may be a
part of. That said, with the exception of Facebook, Twitter and MySpace, monitoring
these other networks through the uKnowKids software isn’t an option.
Monitoring -
uKnow’s monitoring capabilities are where the software really
shines. Once accounts and phones are synced up, parents can
view private messages, news feeds, texts and phone call
history to see who their child is friends with and who they’re
talking to. No need to worry if your child normally accesses
Facebook, Twitter or MySpace from a mobile device –
uKnowKids monitors their profile, regardless of the device they
access it on.
Depending on how you filter the information using the
Notifications toolbar (shown here on the right), parents can
view communication exchanges that uKnow deems suspicious
or inappropriate.
Furthermore, not only can parents view “possible adult contact” when there is
communication with someone who has publically indicated that they are over 18, but
uKnow gives parents the ability to monitor a specific contact as well as a full exchange of
communication between their child and that contact.
Communication trends are displayed on the dashboard as well. And though these trends
are a better representation of the most active users in the social networks that you’re
tracking, it’s still a great way to see who your child’s Facebook or Twitter friends are, the
type of conversations that they’re having, and ultimately, the conversations that your
child is exposed to.
In the end, all of this information allows parents to have a fully-prepared conversation
with their child about their online posts, the people they consider “friends”, or perhaps a
specific exchange of text messages.
For the parents who don’t have time to log in every day, uKnow sends out a daily
comprehensive overview of what their child or teen did that day.
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Family Locator (GPS tracking)
The GPS locator is just another layer of monitoring that uKnow offers parents. Granted
you have the FamilyConnect app installed on your child’s smartphone and their GPS
turned on, uKnow can track your child’s last known physical location. From what we
could tell, uKnow updates Family Locator several times a day.
Syncing
uKnowKids is, in a lot of ways, a very reliable monitoring system that can assist parents
in their daily conversations with their child. However, there is one compromising
imperfection that we feel parents should know about, and it has to do with the
FamilyConnect app that was mentioned earlier. On Twitter and Smartphones, this app
can very easily be uninstalled by your child. On a Smartphone, FamilyConnect is treated
like any other app, right there on the phone’s interface or application list. On Twitter,
you can see what it looks like in the screenshot below.
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The team uninstalled the apps on both Twitter and the Smartphone hoping to receive
some sort of email notification from uKnow, but we received nothing, even 24 hours
later.
Please note: Hiding the FamilyConnect app on Twitter or the Smartphone would make
uKnowKids a spyware monitoring system, which it is not. That said, our review isn’t
meant to imply that the folks at uKnow should make the apps invisible to your child. Our
intention is only to make it clear to parents who read this review that, like with all
monitoring software, a consistent dialogue with your children is absolutely necessary
when using uKnowKids. If you notice that monitoring of their Twitter account of
Smartphone has stopped, you can directly address the matter with your child.
Screen Retriever Review and Installation
Many thanks to Yoursphere.com for providing this information
ScreenRetriever,is a monitoring program which allows parents to record and remotely
view their children’s computer screen in real time. The program lets you “check-in” on
your children from time to time without having to be right over their shoulder.
Yoursphere found ScreenRetriever to be a well-rounded program; it does what it claims
to do and they didn’t encounter any bugs or problems. A couple of things to note,
though:


The software needs to be installed on your computer and your child’s computer.
The software only works when your computer and your child’s computer are on
the same computer network (router).
During their testing with ScreenRetriever, they came across a few aspects of the setup
process that some parents might find tricky, so below is a how-to guide.
Installation
1. Go to www.screenretriever.com and click on the Free Trial button
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2. On the Free Trial page enter your email address in order to download the
program. After you click the Submit button the program will download
automatically.
3. Once the program is downloaded open it up and it will ask you to create a
password and enter an email address. This password is for you to know, not your
child. It grants access to the entire ScreenRetriever Control Panel. If your child
knows the password, they can disable the program on their computer.
4. ScreenRetriever will then ask if you want to “view” this computer from other
computers on your wireless network. Before you proceed, know that
ScreenRetriever needs to be installed on YOUR computer and YOUR CHILD’s
computer in order for it to work properly.
So…
When installing on your computer, choose No.
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When installing on your child’s computer, choose Yes.
5. The same goes for the next pop up.
On your computer, choose Don’t allow viewing of this computer
On your child’s computer, choose one of the first two Allow viewing of this
computer
6. The next pop up asks if you would like to record the computer’s activity. Whether
you’re installing on your computer or your child’s, they recommend choosing no
for now. You can always choose to record after ScreenRetriever has been
installed on both computers. (guide below)
Now that you’re done with the installation, and assuming you’ve followed the same steps
on your child’s computer, you need to know about the Control Panel.
Control Panel
To start the remote viewing of your child’s computer click the Screen Retriever
Control Panel icon on your desktop. Here, you can control all available functions,
including screen recording and live viewing.
Live Viewing
1. Click the Allow/Disallow viewing on this computer button that is
outlined in red below.
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This will take you to a menu where you can choose the computer(s) you
want to view. Remember, you can only view computers that are on the same
wireless network as your computer and have the software installed on them. This is
the only way the ScreenRetriever software works.
2. Click the Add button on the lower left-hand corner of the menu.
3. On the next screen, choose the computer you wish to add. Then click the
View button which is on the lower left-hand corner of the menu.
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There should now be a small window that shows you exactly what your
child is doing on their computer. You can choose to make the window
larger or smaller by using the S and L buttons that are on the upper left
hand corner of the window.
Recording
1. If you wish to record your child’s computer activity to view at a later date,
you will need to go on your child’s computer, open the ScreenRetriever
Control Panel there, and click the Start/Stop recording this computer
button which is highlighted in yellow in the screenshot below.
2. This will take you to a menu that allows you to start, pause, and stop
recording. To stop recording, either you can go back to your child’s
computer and click the Stop button (shown below), or you can wait for
the memory limit you set to be reached (also shown below).
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To view the recording, you will need to go back to your computer, open up the Control
Panel and choose the Play recordings button.
Though set up can be lengthy, ScreenRetriever is a great way to keep an eye on your
child’s online activities. Issue with webcams can be avoided altogether if your child
knows you can tune in whenever you want—an approach you might find useful if your
son or daughter is fond of video-chatting sites TinyChat or Stickam.
Facebook Monitoring Solutions for Parents
With thanks to Yoursphere.com for this article
ZoneAlarm Social Guard – Software program
We have not tested this product but assume that as it is PC based not mobile then it
should work. Please let us know if this is not the case. [email protected]
The Good:
Social Guard is a software program that you must install on your computer. Once you’ve
downloaded it, installed it and synced your child’s account, the software constantly runs
in the background scanning your children’s profiles. (Note: Your child is not limited to
accessing Facebook on that specific computer. Social Guard successfully monitors your
child’s account no matter where or what device they access Facebook from.)
Social Guard’s parental monitoring solution was the most comprehensive one we tested.
Not only does it flag concerning language and tell you why it was flagged, but it checks
for dangerous links, it looks for evidence of cyberbullying, and it even looks at the age
gaps between your child and the people they’re talking to [note from EyePAT - only
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problem here is who tells the truth about their age on Facebook!]. Like the other
products in this review, email notifications are sent to you when concerning language is
detected. In addition, you can add specific words that you want the software to flag.
The Bad:
This package is unable to get around the Facebook password requirement. So yes,
during set up, Social Guard requires you to enter your child’s Facebook email and
password in order to sync it with the program. On the other hand, if your child changes
their Facebook password or deletes their account, you will be sent a notification.
It’s also worth noting that, since Social Guard is a software program and not web-based,
you can only access it from the computer you installed it on.
Mamabear Parental Monitoring App Review
http://mamabearapp.com
Thank you to Yoursphere.com for this article
We have not tested this product but assume that as it is PC based not mobile then it
should work. Please let us know if this is not the case. [email protected]
Computers, smartphones, satellites and
massive data networks have made this
process easier and more convenient (and
some cases more challenging) than we
could have ever imagined.
Traditional parenting techniques, like having an open dialogue with your children,
meeting their friends’ parents and knowing who their teachers and coaches are should
never fall by the wayside, but as parents in the 21 st century we also have a responsibility
to adapt to the ever-changing world of technology.
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Mamabear attempts to make this adaptation just a little bit easier for you and your
children.
Setup
You can download the app by searching for Mamabear in the App Store. The initial
download and set up needs to take place on your iPhone (or iPad), not your child’s.
The application will require you to set up a parent account and username/password for
your child’s account.
Next, you’ll want to download the app again, but this time on your child’s iPhone. As
soon as you input their username and password, a link is created between the app on
your iPhone and the app on theirs.
If you’ve disabled location tracking on their iPhone for you will need to turn it back on in
order for Mamabear to work properly. That being said, however, you can still leave the
Camera’s location services turned off. See the image below.
GPS Tracking
The monitoring feature of Mamabear allows you to see where your child is at any given
time by using the GPS tracker on their iPhone—the same technology that gives you turnby-turn navigation on your typical smartphone. What’s really neat is you can set up
alerts that let you know when your child has reached a specific location, or if they leave
a specific location before a predetermined time. Aside from the tremendous safety
advantages of this feature, setting alerts can be a great way to make sure your older
teens aren’t playing hooky from school or soccer practice.
Though this feature worked really well during our testing, delivering real-time, accurate
location alerts, we found ourselves wanting a way to set a radius around the designated
address as a way to limit the number of alerts we were getting. As it stands, Mamabear
sends you an alert every time your child ventures out of the exact designated address.
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Facebook and Speeding Alerts (teens)
If your teen uses Facebook, Mamabear can track their activity. Just like the GPS locator,
you can set alerts for when they add new friends, use inappropriate language, and when
their account shows signs of them being the target of bullying. This tool worked very
well during our testing, making it one of the more impressive features of Mamabear.
As an added bonus, Mamabear utilizes the iPhone’s accelerometer to let you know if your
teen is in a speeding car, which, by all means and purposes is a very useful feature, but
kind of makes me question the intended audience of the app itself. Everything from
design to functionality makes Mamabear seem like it’s targeted toward parents with
younger children, making this feature seem like something they shoehorned in to attract
a wider audience.
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Emergency Contact Shortcuts
The emergency features of Mamabear are less robust but no less functional. Mamabear
displays three buttons on the child’s phone: “Come Get Me”, “Call for Help”, which sends
an emergency alert to all guardians, and “Call Mama”, a phone call shortcut to mum.
These three buttons are really the only thing your child has access to on their version of
the Mamabear application; the rest of the features work quietly in the background on the
parent’s side.
Configuring and using this part of the application is very easy, allowing even a panicked
child to easily get the help and assistance they need as fast as possible. The phone
numbers that are assigned to the buttons are setup when the application is initially
downloaded on the parent’s phone, so no extra work is needed.
You can try Mamabear free for 30 days, so test it out for yourself to see if it’s right for
your family!
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Kid Safe Search Engines
Google is a search engine, as is Yahoo, Bing etc. etc.
There are some search engines specifically designed for children. They filter out sites
which some parents and teachers might find inappropriate for children. This usually
includes sites which deal with explicit sexual matters, porn sites, violence, hate speech,
gambling and drug use.
Bing appears to have built in some security settings. Test them out using words which
you think may bring up inappropriate sites. For those of you who have attended an Eye
PAT awareness session, use the word you learnt during the session. It is a good test.
Microsoft and CEOP create child-friendly version of IE9
By James Trew
posted Feb 7th 2012
https://www.thinkuknow.co.uk/parents/ie9/
To protect very young minds from the perils of the internet Microsoft teamed up with
CEOP (Child Exploitation and Online Protection Center) to create a special kid-friendly
version of its IE9 browser.
Access to key CEOP pages are baked right in, and there are dedicated tabs for the
thinkuknow.co.uk information site and, of course, Bing.
Additional security comes via a Jump List that lets parents and carers set the age group
of their child and prevents them from seeing unsuitable content. It's only available on
Windows 7, and you'll need to prevent your curious children from using any other
browser, but at least it's extra peace of mind at no extra cost.
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SafeSearch for Kids is the child friendly search engine
where safe search is always 'on', powered by Google.
The safe browsing feature allows your kids to safely
surf the web with a much lower risk of accidentally
seeing illicit material.
http://www.askkids.com/
Ask Jeeves For Kids
http://www.ajkids.com/
KidsClick!
http://www.kidsclick.org/
Yahooligans
http://www.yahooligans.com/ (For chidren aged 7-12)
CBBC
http://www.bbc.co.uk/cbbc/find/
Ranger Browser – A Safe Browser for a Child’s iPhone, iPad or
Android
You can download all versions of the Ranger Browser app, from http://www.mobsafety.com/.
Note : This product has been tested and recommended by Yoursphere in the USA.
Yoursphere are a reputable and recognised organisation. They wrote these instructions.
Whatever a child is viewing on that iPad or Android phone should be
safe and age-appropriate.
Kids now often know more than their parents when it comes to
technology, but we still need to parent online in the same way we do
offline.
The only way to ensure a safe and age-appropriate experience is by placing
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predetermined limits and filters on these devices.
Ranger Browser is a free app available in the Apple App Store and Android Marketplace
(for some Android devices). The app replaces the standard mobile web browser (i.e.
Safari on the iPhone or iPod) and packs much better safety features and monitoring
tools. Up front, Ranger Browser:




Keeps a record of all visited websites so parents can view them later
Has five different levels of filtering
Offers both a white list and black list function that allows parents to allow/block
specific websites
Plus, the ability to set time limits on Internet access
Yoursphere tested Ranger Browser on a third generation iPod Touch and found that the
application does what it claims to do. Installation and setting up the parent account was
all very straightforward and simple, but here are some written instructions which may
help.
1. Download the app and register as a parent. You can
download all versions of the app at the Mobsafety
website.
2. Make it the default browser on whatever device it’s on.
On an Android, the quickest way to do this is by opening the Ranger Browser
app > Settings > Set as default browser.
If a popup box shows up listing the browsers on the device, check the “Use this
action by default” box and then choose Ranger Browser.
To set the default browser on an iPhone, iPod Touch or iPad, you’ll need to disable
the Safari app through the Restrictions menu, which you can learn to do here.
Then, simply put the Ranger Browser app icon in its place.
Step 3 – Once you’ve done that, head back to www.mobsafety.com and log in with the
username and password that you set up in step 1. From here, you can access your
child’s browsing history and set filters and time limits.
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You can also customize each predetermined setting as you see fit. To test the application we set the
content filtering to “Medium” and visited several non-child friendly sites. All were blocked as seen
below.
What really amazed our team was how the parent dashboard is updated in real time, so
you can see what your child is viewing as they’re viewing it on their smartphone or
tablet.
The Time Limit function also worked very well, although it would be nice to have a slider
that allows you to set more specific time limits. Currently, you can only choose hours
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and not minutes, so if bedtime is at 9:30, you can only set the Internet access to cut off
at 9 or 10.
Overall, the application works wonderfully, and we didn’t encounter any bugs or crashes
while testing. If your children use a smartphone or tablet and you’re interested in
keeping them safe on the web, Ranger Browser is definitely worth looking into. And best
of all, it’s free!
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Windows Live Family Safety
Note – Windows Live Family Safety is very comprehensive and will provide internet
protection and also monitor usage of MSN for free. However, you may find it quite
complicated to use and be aware it is linked with MSN which has a reputation as an
insecure chat site – with hacking software freely available on the internet.
It is not internet based like Facebook. You have to download it onto your PC.
This software is free and it allows you set up child safety settings to help keep your
children safe online by:



protecting them from online content that you don't want them to see,
managing who they can exchange e-mail and instant messages with
keeping track of what websites your children are visiting.
To enforce most child safety settings on a computer, you must download and install the
Family Safety Filter.
Notes

If you want each family member to have their own safety settings, or if you want
to manage who your children can add to their contact lists, you need to create an
account for each family member.

If you want all your family members to have the same safety settings, and you
don't want to use contact management, you don't need to create any secondary
accounts.

After Family Safety is set up on the Family Safety website, and the Family Safety
Filter is installed on a computer, parents and children must sign in to the Family
Safety Filter to access the Internet on that computer.

Note – depending on the sequence of events you follow, the dialogue boxes you
see may differ slightly from the illustration. The process should however be
relatively easy to follow:
These are the latest instructions at the time of writing this Training Guide October 2012).
They are taken from http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windowsvista/Protecting-your-kids-with-Family-Safety#section_1.
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If you have issues it might be a good idea to check the website to see if the instructions
have changed, due to changes from Microsoft.
Protecting your kids with Family Safety
Keeping your kids safe online can be complicated, but Windows Live Family Safety helps
make it easier for you. Family Safety provides a website and a free program that you
install on the computers your kids use, so you can give them some independence but
still keep tabs on their computer activities. Family Safety can also help keep your kids off
websites you don’t want them looking at, and only let them talk to the people you're
okay with them talking to.
How Family Safety works
Just like on a sports team, the different players in Family Safety and Windows make up a
team that works together. The players are:

The Family Safety Filter. Software you install and set up on each computer
your kids use. It monitors your kids using safety settings you select.

The Family Safety website. Where you choose and manage all the settings for
each family member and view their activity reports. You can create settings on
the website once and then they'll apply to every computer you’ve installed the
Family Safety Filter on.

Windows Parental Controls. A feature in Windows that’s turned on when you
use Family Safety. You can use Windows Parental Controls to set up more safety
settings for your kids' computers. For more information on setting up Windows
Parental Controls and Family Safety, watch their video about using Parental
Controls. http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=160476
Set up the Family Safety Filter
To monitor your children’s online activity, you need to install and set up the Family
Safety Filter on each computer they use.
Step 1: See if Family Safety is already installed on
your computer
If you have Windows 7, Family Safety might already be
installed on your computer. To set it up




click
click
click
click
the Start button
,
All Programs
Windows Live
Windows Live Family Safety.
If Family Safety is already installed on your computer you
can find it on the Start menu.
If it is not there it isn’t installed on your computer.
If Family Safety isn't installed on your computer:



Google Windows Life Family Safety download
click Download
follow the on-screen instructions to download and
install Family Safety.
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Step 2: Sign in to the Family Safety Filter with your Windows Live ID


Enter the Windows Live ID of the parent you want to be the primary parent
then click Sign in.
To set up the Family Safety Filter and to use the Family Safety website, you’ll need a
Microsoft Account (see below). If you don’t have a Microsoft Account:

click Sign up.
What is a Microsoft account?
"Microsoft account" is the new name for what used to be called a "Windows Live ID."
Your Microsoft account is the combination of an email address and a password that you
use to sign in to services like Hotmail, Messenger, SkyDrive, Windows Phone, Xbox LIVE,
or Outlook.com. If you use an email address and password to sign in to these or other
services, you already have a Microsoft account—but you can also sign up for a new one
at any time.
Over time, all Microsoft services will be switching from the old name to the new one. You
might continue to see mentions of "Windows Live ID" instead of "Microsoft account" for a
while—for example, on xbox.com or windowsphone.com—but the names mean the same
thing, and the services will be updated soon.
Note
When you set up Family Safety for the first time, you'll be asked to sign in with a
parent's Microsoft account. This parent will be the primary parent in Family Safety, and
is the only family member who can remove the family from Family Safety. Be sure to use
the Microsoft account of the parent you want to be the primary parent because you
won’t be able to change it later.
Step 3: Select who you want to monitor


Select the check box next to the Windows account of each family member you
want to monitor on that computer
click Next or Save.
If you want to monitor someone who
doesn’t have a Windows account,
click



Create a
new Windows account,
enter their name
then click Create account.
Family Safety works best when every
member of your family has their
own Windows account and safety
settings. If everyone in your family
uses the same Windows account,
you’ll all use the same Family Safety
settings and you won’t be able to get
reports of which website each child is
looking at. To make sure all of your
kids have their own settings, add
a Windows account for each person.
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If you have guest accounts on your computer, you should turn them off because kids can
also use them to bypass safety settings. For more information, see Turn the guest
account on or off.
You can choose which Windows accounts you want to monitor.
Step 4: Match your existing Family Safety members to their Windows accounts
If you haven't used Family Safety before, you can skip this step.
If you already use Family
Safety, you’ll see a screen
where you need to match
each Windows account to a
name on the Family Safety
members list, and then
click Save. If a Windows
account doesn't have a
matching Family Safety name,
click the option to add it.
You’ll recognize the people
listed on the Family Safety
members list as the people in
your family who already use
Family Safety.
When you match them to
their Windows accounts, you're
verifying for Family Safety that
each person is matched to their own correct settings. For example, if your child's name
is Ben, he might have a Windows account named Ben, and be listed in the Family Safety
members list as Ben Miller.
If there’s a Windows account on the computer for someone that hasn’t used Family
Safety before, you’ll see them at the bottom of the list, Add (name). When you choose
this option, Family Safety creates a new Family Safety membership for them with
their Windows account name.
You can match your existing Family Safety settings to your Windows accounts.
Step 5: Add passwords
If you don't have passwords for Windows administrator accounts or accounts you're not
monitoring with Family Safety, you'll see the Add passwords screen.

Click Add passwords.
It’s important that all of your Windows accounts have passwords. If you have an
unmonitored account without a password, your kids could log on to that account and
bypass their Family Safety settings. Then they may be able to see websites you don’t
want them to see, and you won't be able to see reports of their online activity.
Step 6: Verify your setup

Click Next and you’ll see the Windows accounts that Family Safety is now
monitoring on the computer.
See the Windows accounts that are monitored by Family Safety and what their settings
are.
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Customize your family’s settings
By setting up the Family Safety Filter you’ve got a good start on protecting your kids,
but going to the Family Safety website to tweak their settings gives you all the bells and
whistles. With the Family Safety Filter set up for the first time, your children will be
monitored with basic web filtering (Family Safety will only block adult content), and
activity reporting will be turned on.
To make it harder for your kids to see the things you don’t want them to see, you can go
to the Family Safety website and change their settings, starting with the web filtering
level. For younger kids, we recommend setting the web filtering level to strict so that
little ones can only see websites that are child-friendly.
1. On any computer, sign in to the Family Safety website with a parent’s Windows Live
ID.
2. Click Edit settings under the name of the child you want to adjust settings for.
3. On your child’s settings page, you can see an overview of their current settings,
choose the one you wish to adjust.
Use the Family summary page to see all of your family members, edit their settings,
view their activity reports, and see if they have requests.
Set up web filtering
Busy parents don’t always have time to go surf the web and check out all the websites
their kids might see. To make things easier, the Family Safety team reviews thousands
of websites and assigns them to categories. The web filtering level you choose for your
kids determines which of these categories they can view.
If you want to pick your own categories instead of using the preset levels, you can
choose Custom. You’ll see a list of all the categories, and then you can choose what’s
right for your kids. Under Web filtering, you can also make a list of blocked websites or
allowed websites that will override the categories and filtering levels.
1. Click Web filtering, make sure Turn on web filtering is selected, and then select a
web filtering level:
 Select Strict to block all websites that aren't child friendly or on the allow list.
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Select Basic to allow websites except those with adult content and anonymizer
websites.
 Select Custom to allow and block website categories manually. To allow a
website category, select it. To block a website category, clear its check box.
2. Click Save.

Turn on and customize web filtering for your child, and be sure to save your changes.
Allow or block a website
If you want your child to use the strict filtering level so they only see child-friendly
websites, but you’d also like to let them see a certain website that's blocked, you can
add the website to their allow list. Or, if you want to block a website that's allowed by
their web filtering level, you can add it to their block list.
1. Under Allow or block a website, type or paste into the box the web address of the
website that you want to allow or block.
2. Select an option from the list, click Add, and then click Allow or Block.
3. Click Save.
Allow or block specific websites for one child, all of your children, or your entire family.
Manage your child's contact list
You can choose who your kids can communicate with on Windows Live Hotmail,Windows Live
Messenger, and Windows Live Spaces by managing their contacts. When your kids
use Windows Live, they’ll only be able to talk with people you add to their contact list.
They won't be able to talk to anyone who's not on their contact list.
Manage your child's contact list on Windows Live
1. Click Contact management, and then click add your child's Windows Live ID.
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2. If your child has a Windows Live ID, click Sign in, and then sign in with their ID.
-orIf your child doesn’t have a Windows Live ID, click create an ID, and then follow the
instructions to create a new one for your child.
3. Select the Windows Live programs and services you want to allow your child to use.
If you don’t select Hotmail, Messenger, or Spaces, your child won’t be able to
communicate with any of their contacts in Windows Live using these services.
4. Family Safety automatically adds a child's parents to their contact list. To allow
your child to communicate with someone else, enter their name and e-mail
address, and then click Add.
5. To allow only parents to add or remove contacts, clear the Allow child to manage
their own contact list check box.
-orTo allow your child to add or remove their own contacts, select the Allow child to
manage their own contact list check box.
You’ll be able to see your child's contact list, but you won’t have to receive
requests from them for additional contacts.
6. Click Save.
.
What will my kids see?
“The website I want to see is blocked!"
Once you’ve got Family Safety set up, when your child
logs on to their Windows account to use the computer
for their homework, and they try to go a website that’s
blocked, they’ll see a page like this:
Instead of a website with inappropriate content,
your child will see this page where they can ask
permission to see the website.
If you’re at work when your child gets blocked from a website, they can e-mail you a
request to see the blocked website. You can open the Family Safety website from the email to approve or deny the request right away. Once you’re done, let your child know
the website they wanted to see is now unblocked, so they won’t have any excuses for
unfinished homework when you get home.
Here's how to view and respond to requests
1. On any computer, sign in to the Family Safety website with your Windows Live ID.
2. On the Family summary page, under Requests, click (number) requests.
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3. To show any comments your child added, click the arrow next to the web
address.
4. Click the arrow next to Select a response, and then click Approve for this account
only, Approve for all accounts, or Deny.
5. When you're done responding to requests, click Save.
You can review your children’s requests and approve or deny them.
What websites can I see?
The Family Safety Kids' Sites website is a great place for young children to start on the
web. The website has links to the most popular of the more than 8,000 websites
Microsoft has categorized as child-friendly. There’s also a Search these sites box where kids
can search only those websites that are child-friendly instead of the whole Internet. To
make it easier for your kids to find child-friendly websites, you can set your web
browser’s home page to the Family Safety Kids' Sites website.
Change your child's home page to the Kids' Sites website in Internet Explorer
1. On each computer your child uses, log on to their Windows account.
2. Open Windows Internet Explorer, and then go to the Family Safety Kids' Sites website.
3. In Internet Explorer, click Tools, and then click Internet Options.
4. On the General tab, under Home page, click Use current, and then click OK.
Check out what your kids have
been up to on their computer
With activity reporting turned
on, you can monitor what your
kids are doing online and on
their computers. The Family
Safety Filter keeps track of what
they do and save the information
on the Family Safety website for
you to look at.
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Turn on activity reporting
1. On any computer, sign in to the Family Safety website with your Windows Live ID.
2. On the Family summary page, click View activity report next to the name of the child
you want to turn activity reporting on for.
3. Select Turn on activity reporting.
4. Click Save.
Once you’ve been using Family Safety for awhile with activity reporting turned on, you
can use the Family Safety website to look at reports of what your kids have been doing
online. There’s information on the websites they’ve gone to or tried to go to, how much
time they’ve spent on the computer, what games they’ve played, and more.
1. On any computer, sign in to the Family Safety website with your Windows Live ID.
2. To view reports of your child's web activity, do one of the following:
 To see a list of websites that your child has visited or tried to visit since activity
reporting was turned on, click Web activity.



To filter the list of websites shown, select the computer, Windows account, and
date range you want, and then click Show activity.
To sort the list of reported websites by a particular column, click the column
header. To show only the websites that were blocked, click Show blocked activity
only.
If you don't see any activity listed, try entering a larger date range, and then
click Show activity.
To see a list of websites
accessed by non-browser
programs, such as autoupdater programs,
click Other Internet
activity.
1. To view reports of your child's computer activity, do one of the following:
 To see a list of times your child used the computer, click Computer activity,
and then expand Sessions.

To see which programs your child used, click Computer activity, and then

expand Programs.
If you don't see any activity listed, try entering a larger date range, and then
click Show activity.

To see which files your child downloaded, click Computer activity, and then
expand File downloads.

To see which games your child played, click Computer activity, and then
expand Games.
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See what programs your child used, and how long they were on the computer.
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What to do to stop abuse?
It obviously depends on the circumstances, however for serious offences including
abuse, consistent or threatening bullying or grooming:

Teach your children to protect their friends and report what has happened.

Alert the school head, social services or the police.

Go to the Eye PAT web site www.eyepat.org and look at the Help page. It contains
lots of useful links.

Use the CEOP Report Abuse button. It’s on the government Child Exploitation and
On Line Protection web site. http://www.ceop.gov.uk/

Report the person to the chat site

A child who is bullied can contact www.cybermentors.org.uk or
www.bulliesout.com for support and guidance

Go online to www.childnetinternational.org.uk

You can also contact Childline (0800 1111). Children will be counselled, adults will
be given advice on what to do.
For less serious offences – say someone accessing your child’s MSN and sending out
messages

Change the password for MSN – or get a friend to do it if you are away and don’t
have internet access.

Send a message out to all your child’s friends telling them their account has been
hacked and to ignore any messages they have received.

Get your children to tell you if a friend starts sending strange messages. Get your
child to ring them or you ring their parents. Encourage your friends to ask their
children to do the same. Let the school know.
For less serious offences – say someone setting up a hoax or FAKE chat room account.

Try to access the account, through any invite, and post a notice on the wall to say it
is a fake account.

Block that account from accessing any parts of your account.

Contact anyone who has accepted a friends request and advise them that it is a
hoax account.

Contact the chat room site and ask for the account to be removed – it could take
some days.

Monitor it until it is removed.
Remember it could be a child doing it for a laugh, or it could be a paedophile
trying to get the children to disclose personal information.
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Homework Sites
The internet is fantastic for homework research. Here is a list of sites we have gathered
which may help. Due to the time we live in, we have to state that whilst we have looked
at all these sites we cannot be held responsible for their content. These were all sites
which have been suggested to us as being particularly good.
Super Maths World, http://www.supermathsworld.com/
Online resources for teachers - http://www.echalk.co.uk/ (this requires payment)
https://www.samlearning.com/ (this also requires subscription by school)
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/bitesize/ free from BBC,
http://www.wjec.co.uk/index.php?nav=105 for past exam papers
www.froguts.com – dissect a frog without having to touch it!
www.wikipedia.com – answers for anything, however anyone can post. Make sure you
verify the answers if the results are crucial.
www.homeworkelephant.co.uk – homework help in all subjects – can even leave a
questions of expert answers.
The following is a list of sites suggested to us from Marlwood School Site. At the time of
writing we checked all the sites listed and these were still live sites. Web sites do
however frequently close. We obviously cannot be held responsible for the accuracy of
any information on the sites.
Art and Design Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.nga.co.uk
All
(interactive)
www.npg.org.uk
www.nationalgallery.org.uk
Business Education Website Address
Key
Stage
www.businesstudiesonline.co.uk
4&5
www.tutor2u.net
5
www.bized.co.uk
4&5
www.spideybiz.co.uk
4&5
www.s-cool.co.uk
4&5
www.bbc.co.uk
4&5
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D & T Website Address
Key
Stage
www.engagerevision.co.uk - subscription site
4
www.technologystudent.com
3/4
www.s-cool.co.uk
4
www.bbc.co.uk/bitesize
3/4
www.nutrition.org.uk
4
www.foodafactoflife.org.uk
4
www.food.gov.uk
4
English Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/english
3
www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/english/reading/index.shtml
3
http://www.edufind.com/index.php
3
http://www.cgpbooks.co.uk/pages/home.asp (sells books but has
some online data)
3&4
Geography Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.bbc.co.uk/gcsebitesize/geography
4
www.internetgeographer.co.uk (some pages missing some ok)
4
www.s-cool.co.uk
4
www.revisioncentre.co.uk/gcse/geography
4
www.geographypages.co.uk/revision.htm
Mathematics Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.bbc.co.uk/schools/ks3bitesize/maths
3
www.mymaths.co.uk (subscription site)
3
www.channel4.com/learning/microsites/M/mathszone/index.shtml (scroll
down for this one – mathszone is on lower part of page)
3
www.waldomaths.com
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Music Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.bbc.co.uk/gcsebitesize/music
4
www.tonalcentre.org
5
French Website Addresses
Key
Stage
www.linguascope.com (subscription site)
http://www.reallyusefulfrench.co.uk/
http://www.wildfrench.co.uk/
http://www.atantot.com/
http://www.quia.com/
http://www.espanol-extra.co.uk/
http://www.linguacentral.co.uk/
http://www.zut.org.uk/index.html (subscription site)
http://www.frenchinaclick.com/ (subscription site)
http://www.sunderlandschools.org/mfl-sunderland/
http://www.alienlanguage.co.uk/alienlanguage/index.htm
GERMAN
http://www.klar.co.uk/ (subscription site)
KS4
http://www.languageskills.co.uk/index.html (subscription site)
http://www.yjc.org.uk/
http://www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/german/
http://www.gcse.com/german/speaking.htm
http://www.revisioncentre.co.uk/index.html
http://www.s-cool.co.uk/gcse/german.html
PE Website Address
Key
Stage
www.teachpe.com
4&5
www.bbc.co.uk/schools/gcsebitesize/pe
4
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Psychology Website Address
Key
Stage
www.bps.org.uk
5
www.s-cool.co.uk
5
www.psycport.com
5
www.psychlotron.org.uk
5
Science Website Address
Key
Stage
www.bbc.co.uk/gcsebitesize/science
3
http://www.docbrown.info/
3
http://lgfl.skoool.co.uk/keystage3.aspx?id=80
3
www.scibermonky.org
3
http://www.dbeducation.co.uk/ (subscription site)
3
Chemistry
http://www.webelements.com/
http://www.docbrown.info/
http://www.chemguide.co.uk/
4
http://antoine.frostburg.edu/chem/senese/101/index.shtml
5
http://www.chem.qmul.ac.uk/iupac/
http://www.le.ac.uk/spectraschool/
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Internet Cookies – What They Are and How to Block
Them
Thank you to Yoursphere.com for this article
If you’re like most parents, the first time you heard of Internet cookies you probably
wondered to yourself, ‘what the heck are cookies?
Well, simply put, cookies are small, often encrypted (protected) text-only files that
reside on your web browser or computer’s memory.
In a nutshell, cookies are used to make your web-browsing experience a little more
convenient by remembering things like where you left off, addresses, account numbers,
username and encrypted passwords, and other specific preferences. But cookies can also
be used to track specific web analytics or a user’s navigation through a particular
website.
There are two different types of cookies, first-party and third-party, each serving their own
purpose.
First-party cookies are cookies issued by the website you’re actually visiting. These cookies
serve the function mentioned above: saving usernames, language preferences, and
other specific preferences to make your browsing experience more convenient.
Take Amazon.com as an example. As you’re browsing the site, you can add things to
your cart and continue shopping. This works because Amazon places a temporary cookie
on your web browser so it remembers what’s in your cart. Without it, the cart will be
empty as soon as you navigate to a new page within Amazon.
First-party cookies, for the most part, are harmless as they typically do not contain any
personal information about the user.
Third-party cookies, on the other hand, are issued by an entity like an ad network or a
marketing firm. These companies can place third-party cookies on online advertisements
as a way to track and analyze your personal interests or browsing habits. This
information allows ad networks to deliver more relevant ads to the user.
As you can imagine, this is where things can get hairy with user consent, ‘do not track’
regulations and online privacy concerns. The WSJ put together a really nice video that
explains exactly how this works.
Like I touched on in the How to Easily Block Ads on Your Child’s Computer article, it might not
sit well with you that marketing firms are using cookies to track your child’s web
browsing preferences. If that’s the case, you can follow
these steps to disable cookies on their/your family’s web
browser.
Internet Explorer


Open Internet Explorer.
Click the Tools icon in the top right corner and
select Internet Options from the menu.
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
In the Internet Options box that pops up, click the
Privacy tab and then click the button called
Advanced.

This will bring up the Advanced Privacy Settings
box. Check the box that says Override automatic
cookie handling. Then select the types of cookies
you want to allow or block. My suggestion is to
allow first-party and block third-party.

Hit OK when you’re done, and then hit Apply on the Internet Options box to
make the changes official.
Firefox



Open Firefox
Click the Firefox tab in the top left
corner. Scroll over Options and then
select Options from the menu.
The Options window will display. Click
the Privacy tab.
Here, you’ll need to do a few things.


First, check the box that says Tell websites I do not want to be tracked.
Then, under the History section, select Use custom settings for history from
the drop down menu. This will allow you to customize your settings for cookies
and web browsing history.
Here are the settings that Yoursphere.com recommend.
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Safari


Open Safari
Click the Tools icon in the top right corner and click
Preferences.
From here, click the Privacy tab and select the Block cookies from third-parties and
advertisers radio button.
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Chrome


Open Chrome
Click the wrench icon in the top right and select
Options.


Click on Under the Hood on the left navigation panel.
In the Privacy section, click the Content settings button.

The Content Settings menu will appear. Here you’ll want to make sure that your
settings match the screenshot below, at minimum.
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Text and MSN abbreviations
Word or Phrase
Abbreviation(s)
Account
acc
Address
addy
At the moment
atm
Be right back
brb
Be back later
bbl
Be back soon
bbs
Because
cuz, bcuz, bcz, bcos, bc, cos, coz or bcoz
Best friend or Boy friend
bf or b/f
Best friend(s) for life
bffl
Best friend(s) forever
bff
By the way
btw
Can't be assed
cba
Comment me back
cmb (usually used for social networking
sites)
Definitely
def
Don't worry
dw
Forever
4eva or 4evr
For your information
fyi
Friend
frend or frnd
Got to go
g2g or gtg
Have a nice day
H.A.N.D.
Hold on
hld on or h/o
Homework
hw, hwk or hmwk
How are you
hru
I don't care
idc
I don't know
idk
I do what I want
idwiw
I love you
ily, luv u, ilu, or luv ya
If I recall correctly or If I remember
correctly
iirc
In my opinion
imo
In my humble opinion
imho
Jokes
jks
Just for laughs
jfl
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Word or Phrase
Abbreviation(s)
Just joking – only joking
Jj - oj
Just kidding
jk
Just to let you know
jtlyk or j2luk
Know
kno or noe
Kiss my teeth
kmt
Kiss my ass
kma
Laugh out loud or lots of laughs
lol
Lots of love
lol
Laughing my ass off
lmao
Laughing my fucking ass off
lmfao
Laughing quietly to myself
lqtm
Message (as in a text message)
msg
Never mind
nm or nvm (depending on context used)
No problem
np
No thank you
no tnk u, nty, no ty
Nothing much
nm
Obviously
ovvi or obv
Of course
ov cors or ofc
Oh My God
omg or (comically) zomg
Parents over shoulder
pos
Please
plz or plez
Probably
probz, prbly, prolly, or prob
Love
<3 or luv
Peace
pce, pece, or \/ (V sign)
Right
rite
Rolling on the floor laughing (out loud)
rofl(ol)
Rolling on (the) floor laughing my ass off
roflmao or rotflmao
See you/see you later
cya, cu, or cya/cu l8er/l8a
Shut the fuck up
stfu
Something
sth, s/t, or sumthin
Son of a bitch
sob
Sorry
sry, "soz", or "sori"
Talk to you later
ttyl
Tata for now
ttfn
says
ses or sez
Text
txt
Text back
txt bck or tb
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Word or Phrase
Abbreviation(s)
Thanks
Thnx, thanx, thx, or fnx
Thank you
ty or "thnk u"
Thank you very much
tyvm
Tomorrow
tom, 2moz, 2moro, 2mrw or 2mara
To be honest
tbh
Welcome Back
wb
What
Wa, wat, wut, wht, or wha
Whatever
w/e or wateva, watevs
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Dictionary of terms used in chat rooms
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
!
Indicates, " have a comment"
CYA
1. See Ya. 2. Cover Your Ass.
$0.02
Throwing in your two cents' worth.
CYAL8R
See You All Later.
?
Indicates, "I have a question"
DIIK
Damned If I Know.
<arching
eyebrows>
Indicates the speaker arches eyebrows
DIKU?
Do I Know You?
<chuckle>
Indicates the speaker chuckles
DIY
Do It Yourself .
<frown>
Indicates the speaker is frowning
DK
Don’t Know
<g>
Grin
DLTBBB
Don't Let The Bed Bugs Bite.
<grin>
Indicates the speaker is grinning
dotgov
A government official (from the .gov ending of
government domain names).
<smile>
Indicates the one writing the message is
smiling
DTRT
Do The Right Thing
<smirk>
Indicates the one writing the message is
smirking
DWIMC
Do What I Mean, Correctly.
<wink>
Indicates the one writing the message is
winking
DWIMNWIS
Do What I Mean, Not What I Say.
501
An excuse that's full of holes.
ESAD
Eat Sh** And Die
AAMOF
As A Matter Of Fact
ETLA
Extended Three Letter Acronym.
ADN
Any Day Now
F2F
Face To Face
AFAIC
As Far As I'm Concerned.
FCFS
First Come, First Served
AFAIK
As Far As I Know
FISH
First In, Still Here.
AFAIR
As Far As I Remember
FITB
Fill In The Blank
AFJ
April Fool’s Joke
FOAD
F*** off and die
AFK
Away From the Keyboard
FOAF
Friend Of A Friend
AISI
As I See It.
FS
For Sale
ANFAWFOS
And Now For A Word From Our Sponsor.
FTASB
Faster Than A Speeding Bullet.
ANFSCD
And Now For Something Completely
Different …
FTF
Face to Face.
A-OLs
Administrators On-Line. Administrators who
police on-line services.
FTL
Faster Than Light.
AS
Another Subject.
FUBAR
Fouled Up Beyond All Repair
ASAP
As Soon As Possible
FUBB
Fouled Up Beyond Belief.
ATSL
Along The Same Line.
FUD
Fear, Uncertainty and Doubt
AWC
After While, Crocodile
FURTB
Full Up Ready To Burst - describing hard drive.
AWGTHTGTATA
Are We Going To Have To Go Through All
This Again?.
FWIW
For What It’s Worth
AWGTHTGTWTA?
Are We Going To Have To Go Through With
This Again?
FYA
For Your Amusement
AYOR
At Your Own Risk.
FYI
For Your Information
B4N
Bye For Now
GA
Go Ahead
BAK
Back At Keyboard
GAL
Get A Life
BBFN
Bye Bye For Now
GD&R
Grinning, Ducking and Running
BBIAB
Be Back In A Bit.
GD&RF
Grinning, Ducking, and Running Fast.
BBIAF
Be Back In A Few (minutes)
GD&WVVF
Grinning, Ducking, and Walking Very, Very
Fast
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Word
Definition
Word
Definition
BBL
Be Back Later
GDW
Grin, Duck and Weave.
BBR
Burnt Beyond Repair.
GF
Girl Friend.
BCNU
Be seein’ you
GFN
Gone For Now.
BEG
Big Evil Grin.
GFR
Grim File Reaper.
BF
Boy Friend.
GIWIST
Gee, I Wish I’d Said That
BFN
Bye For Now.
GLGH
Good Luck and Good Hunting.
BION
Believe it or not.
GMTA
Great Minds Think Alike
BOT
Back On Topic.
GOWI
Get On With It.
BRB
Be Right Back
GTSY
Great To See You.
BRS
Big Red Switch.
H&K
Hugs and Kisses.
BTA
But Then Again
HAK
Hugs And Kisses.
BTAIM
Be That As It May.
HHIS
Hanging Head In Shame.
BTHOM
Beats The Hell Outta Me.
HHO 1/2 K
Ha, Ha, Only Half Kidding.
BTOBD
Be There Or Be Dead.
HHOJ
Ha Ha Only Joking
BTW
By The Way
HHOK
Ha Ha Only Kidding
BWL
Bursting With Laughter.
HHOS
Ha Ha Only Serious
BWQ
Buzz Word Quotient.
HHTYAY
Happy Holidays to You and Yours.
BYE?
"Are you ready to say goodbye?" If so, the
other person replies "BYE"
HOYEW
Hanging On Your Every Word
BYKT
But You Knew That
HSIK
How Should I Know.
BYOB
Bring Your Own Bottle
HTH
Hope That Helps!
BYOM
Bring Your Own Mac
IAAA
I Am An Accountant.
C&G
Chuckle and Grin.
IAAL
I Am A Lawyer.
CADET
Can't Add, Doesn't Even Try.
IAE
In Any Event.
CID
Crying In Disgrace.
IANAA
I Am Not An Accountant.
CMIIW
Correct Me If I’m Wrong
IANAL
I Am Not A Lawyer (but ) A disclaimer which is
usually followed by a legal opinion
CO
1. Conference. 2. Company.
IAW
In Accordance With
CSG
Chuckle, Snicker, Grin.
IBTD
I Beg To Differ.
CU
See You
IC
I See
CU2
See You, Too.
IIABDFI
If It Ain't Broke, Don't Fix It.
CUL
See you later
IIRC
If I Remember Correctly
CUL8R
See You Later
IIWM
If It Were Me . . . (or) If It Were Mine . . . .
CULA
See You Later, Alligator
IJWTK
I Just Want To Know
CWYL
Chat With You Later.
IJWTS
I Just Want To Say
IKWUM
I Know What You Mean
NIMBY
Not In My Back Yard.
IMA
I Might Add
NINO
1. Nothing In, Nothing Out. 2. No Input, No
Output.
IMAO
In My Arrogant Opinion
NOYB
None Of Your Business.
IMCO
In My Considered Opinion
NP
No Problem.
IME
In My Experience
NQA
No Questions Asked.
IMHO
In My Humble Opinion
NTIM
Not That It Matters.
IMNSHO
In My Not So Humble Opinion
NTIMM
Not That It Matters Much.
IMO
In My Opinion
NTW
Not To Worry.
IMPOV
In My Point Of View.
NTYMI
Now That You Mention It.
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Word
Definition
Word
Definition
INPO
In No Particular Order
O
Over (completion of communication)
IOW
In Other Words
OATUS
On A Totally Unrelated Subject.
IRL
1. In Real Life (chat). 2. Industrial Robot
Language. A high-level language used for
the programming of industrial robots.
OAUS
On An Unrelated Subject.
ISS
I’m So Sure
OBO
Or Best Offer
ISSYGTI
I’m So Sure You Get The Idea!
OBTW
Oh, By The Way
ISWIM
If (you) See What I Mean
OIC
Oh, I See
ITFA
In The Final Analysis.
ONNA
Oh No, Not Again.
ITSFWI
If The Shoe Fits, Wear It.
ONNTA
Oh No, Not This Again.
IWALU
I Will Always Love You.
OO
Over and Out (end of communication)
IWBNI
It Would Be Nice If
OOTC
Obligatory On-Topic Comment.
IYFEG
Insert Your Favorite Ethnic Group (for
ethnic jokes)
OTF
On the Floor (laughing)
IYSWIM
If You See What I Mean
OTFL
On the Floor Laughing
JAM
Just A Minute
OTL
Out To Lunch.
JAS
Just A Second.
OTOH
On The Other Hand
JIC
Just In Case
OTOOH
On The Other Other Hand.
JMO
Just My Opinion.
OTT
Over The Top; too much
JSNM
Just Stark Naked Magic.
OTTH
On The Third Hand.
JTLYK
Just To Let You Know .
OTTOMH
Off The Top Of My Head.
k
Okay
OWTTE
Or Words To That Effect.
KHYF
Know How You Feel.
PABG
Packing a Big Gun.
KIBO
Knowledge In, Bullshit Out
PDS
Please Don't Shout. (Shouting in chat mode is
typing all in capital letters, which is considered
rude.) Example: PLEASE DON'T SHOUT.
KISS
Keep It Simple, Stupid.
PLOKTA
Press Lots Of Keys To Abort.
KIT
Keep In Touch.
PMBI
Pardon My Butting In.
KMA
Kiss My Ass.
PMF
1. Pardon My French. 2. Pure Freaking Magic.
KWIM
Know What I Mean?
PMFBI
Pardon Me For Butting In
KYFC
Keep Your Fingers Crossed
PMFJI
Pardon Me For Jumping In
L
Laugh
PMIGBOM
Put Mind In Gear, Before Opening Mouth.
L8R
Later
PMJI
Pardon My Jumping In
LABATYD or
LAB&TYD
Life's A Bitch And Then You Die.
PNCAH
Please, No Cursing Allowed Here
LJBF
Let’s Just Be Friends
POSSLQ
Person Of Opposite Sex Sharing Living
Quarters.
LLTA
Lots and Lots of Thunderous Applause.
ppl
People
LMAO
Laughing My Ass Off.
PTMM
Please Tell Me More
LMHO
Laughing My Head Off .
R U THERE?
Are you there?
LOL
Laughing Out Loud
RAEBNC
Read And Enjoyed, But No Comment.
LSHMBA
Laughing So Hard My Belly Aches
re
1 Hello again; regreet 2 In regard to
LSHMBH
Laughing So Hard My Belly Hurts.
rehi
Hi again
LTHTT
Laughing Too Hard To Type
RHIP
Rank Has Its Privileges.
LTNS
Long Time No See
RL
Real Life (an abbreviation used in MUDs and
chat)
LTNT
Long Time, No Type.
RLCO
Real Life Conference.
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Word
Definition
Word
Definition
LTS
Laughing to Self.
ROFL
Rolling On Floor Laughing.
LUWAMH
Love You With All My Heart.
ROFLASTC
Rolling On Floor Laughing And Scaring The Cat.
LY
Love You.
ROFLGO
Rolling On Floor Laughing Guts Out.
MLA
Multiple Letter Acronym.
ROFLMAO
Roll On Floor Laughing My Arse Off.
MOF
Matter Of Fact.
ROTF
Rolling On The Floor
MOTAS
Member Of The Appropriate Sex
ROTFL
Rolling On The Floor Laughing
MOTD
Message of the day
ROTFLAHMS
Rolling On The Floor Laughing And Holding My
Sides.
MOTOS
Member Of The Opposite Sex
ROTFLOL
Rolling On The Floor Laughing Out Loud
MOTSS
Member Of The Same Sex
RRQ
Return Receipt Request.
MTF
more to follow
RSN
Real Soon Now
MTFBWY
May The Force Be With You.
RSVP
Respondez S'il Vous Plait French for "please
reply"; a notation often found on invitations
MYOB
1. Mind Your Own Business (chat). 2. A
small business accounting package from
Best!Ware.
RTBM
Read The Bloody Manual
NAVY
Never Again Volunteer Yourself.
RTFAQ
Read The Frequently Asked Questions
NBD
No Big Deal.
RTFF
Read The Freaking FAQ.
NFW
No Friggin' Way!.
RTFM
Read The F------ Manual. A gentle suggestion
to users who ask questions they could have
answered themselves
NHOH
Never Heard Of Him/Her
RTM
Read The Manual
NIH
Not Invented Here.
RTSM
Read The Silly Manual.
RTWFQ
Read The Whole Friggin' Question.
TPTB
The Powers That Be
RYFM
Read Your Friendly Manual
TRDMC
Tears Running Down My Cheeks.
RYS
Read Your Screen.
TSR
Totally Stupid Rules.
S
Smile
TTBOMK
To The Best Of My Knowledge
SAPFU
Surpassing All Previous Foul Ups.
TTFN
Ta Ta For Now
SCNR
Sorry, Could Not Resist.
TTKSF
Trying To Keep a Straight Face
SEC
Wait a second
TTUL
Talk To You Later.
SETE
Smiling Ear To Ear.
TTYAWFN
Talk To You A While From Now.
SFLA
Stupid Four Letter Acronym.
TTYL
Talk To You Later
SICS
Sitting In Chair Snickering.
TYCLO
Turn Your CAPS LOCK Off (Quit Shouting).
SLM
See Last Mail.
TYVM
Thank You Very Much
SMOP
Small Matter of Programming.
UOK
Are You OK?
SNAFU
Situation Normal: All Fouled Up
WAEF
When All Else Fails.
SO
Significant Other
WB
Welcome Back
SOL
SH** Out Of Luck
WDYMBT
What Do You Mean By That?.
SOS
1. Same Old Stuff. 2. Help!.
WDYT
What Do You Think?
SOW
Speaking Of Which.
WIBAMU
Well, I'll Be A Monkey's Uncle.
SUFID
Screwing Up Face In Disgust.
WIBNI
Wouldn’t It Be Nice If
SWIM
See What I Mean?
WMMOWS
Wash My Mouth Out With Soap.
SWL
Screaming With Laughter.
WNOHGB
Where No One Has Gone Before.
SYS
See You Soon.
WOA
Work Of Art.
TAF
That's All, Folks!.
WOTAM
Waste Of Time And Money.
TAFN
That’s All For Now
WRT
With Regard To, or With Respect To
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Word
Definition
Word
Definition
TANJ
There Ain’t No Justice
WT
Without Thinking.
TANSTAAFL
There Ain’t No Such Thing As A Free Lunch
WTB
Want To Buy
TARFU
Things Are Really Fouled Up.
WTF
What The F***?
TBYB
Try Before You Buy.
WTG
Way To Go!
TDM
Too Darn Many.
WTGP
Want To Go Private?
TFS
Three Finger Salute (Ctl-Alt-Del).
WTH
What the hell?
TFTHAOT
Thanx For The Help Ahead Of Time.
WTTM
Without Thinking Too Much.
TFTT
Thanks For The Thought.
WYGISWYPF
What You Get Is What You Pay For
TGAL
Think Globally, Act Locally.
XOXOXO
Kisses and hugs
THX
Thanks
YABA
Yet Another Bloody Acronym
TIA
Thanks In Advance
YAOTM
Yet Another Off-Topic Message.
TIC
Tongue In Cheek
YAUN
Yet Another Unix Nerd
TINWIS
That Is Not What I Said.
YGLT
You're Gonna Love This ....
TNSTAAFL
There's No Such Thing As A Free Lunch.
YGTI
You Get The Idea?
TNTL
Trying Not To Laugh
YGWYPF
You Get What You Pay For
TNX
Thanks
YIU
Yes, I Understand
TNXE6
Thanks A Million ("E6" means 10 to the 6th
power = a million)
YIWGP
Yes, I Will Go Private
TOBAL
There Oughta Be A Law.
YKYARW
You Know You're A Redneck When . . ..
TOBG
This Oughta Be Good.
YMMV
Your Mileage May Vary (or your experience
could be different)
TOY
Thinking Of You.
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A Dictionary of Sexting terms
Our apologies if you find some of these offensive. Unfortunately this is the nature of the
subject. It is important that you know what your children may know.
8
Oral sex
9
Parent Alert
1337
Elite
143
I love you
182
I hate you
459
I love you
1174
Nude club
420
Marijuana
ADR
Address
ASL
Age/Sex/Location
banana
Penis
CD9, Code 9
parents are around
DUMDo
You Masturbate?
DUSL
Do You Scream Loud?
FB
F*** Buddy
FMLTWIA
F*** Me Like The Whore I Am
FOL
Fond of Leather
GNOC
Get Naked On Cam
GYPO
Get Your Pants Off
IAYM
I Am Your Master
IF/IB
In the Front -or- In the Back
IIT
Is It Tight?
ILF/MD
Love Female/Male Dominance
IMEZRU
I Am Easy, Are You?
IWSN
I Want Sex Now
J/O
Jerking Off
KFY or K4Y Kiss For You
kitty
Vagina
KPC
Keeping Parents Clueless
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LMIRL
Let's Meet In Real Life
MOOS
Member Of The Opposite Sex
MOSS
Member(s) Of The Same Sex
MorF
Male or Female
MOS
Mom Over Shoulder
MPFB
My Personal Fuck Buddy
NALOPKT
Not A Lot Of People Know That
NIFOC
Nude In Front Of The Computer
NMU
Not Much, You?
P911
Parent Alert
PAL
Parents Are Listening
PAW
Parents Are Watching
PIR
Parent In Room
POS
Parent Over Shoulder -or- Piece Of Shit
PRON
Porn
Q2C
Quick To Cum
RU/18
Are You Over 18?
RUH
Are You Horny?
S2R
Send To Receive
SorG
Straight or Gay
TDTM
Talk Dirty To Me
WYCM
Will You Call Me?
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List of popular social networking websites
According to Wikepedia (Sept, 2012) this is a list of all the social networking sites. It is
worth remembering that this list may be out of date as new sites are being set up all the
time.
Please note the list is not exhaustive, and is limited to some notable, well-known
sites.
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
w3leaf.com
Safe social network
02012-06-011 June
2012
43 Things
Goal setting and achievement
02005-01-011 January
2005
Academia.edu
Social networking site for
academics/researchers
02008-09-01September
2008
Advogato
Free and open source software developers
01999-01-011999
aNobii
Books
02006-01-012006
AsianAvenue
A social network for the Asian American
community
01997-01-011997
aSmallWorld
European jet set and social elite world-wide
02004-03-01March
2004
550,000[12]
Athlinks
Running, Swimming
02001-01-012001
139,458[14]
Audimated.com
Independent music
02010-01-012010
Badoo
General, Meet new people & dating, Popular
02006-01-012006
in Europe and Latin America
159,000,000[17]
Bebo
General
02005-07-01July 2005
117,000,000[19]
BIGADDA
Indian Social Networking Site
02007-08-01August
2007
3,000,000[21]
Biip.no
Norwegian community
02005-06-011 June
2005
430,000[23]
BlackPlanet
Black Americans
01999-09-011
September 1999
Blauk
Anyone who wants to tell something about a
02010-01-012010
stranger or acquaintance.
Blogster
Blogging community
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
Registered users
20,000[2]
3,000,000[4]
211,000[6]
13,575[8]
20,000,000[25]
02005-11-2424
November 2005
173
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
85,579[28]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Bolt.com
General
01996-01-011996
Busuu
Language learning community
(headquartered in Madrid, Spain)
02008-05-1616 May
2008
12,000,000[31]
Buzznet
Music and pop-culture
02005-01-012005
10,000,000[33]
CafeMom
Mothers
02006-12-01December
2006
1,250,000[35]
Care2
Green living and social activism
01998-01-011998
9,961,947[37]
CaringBridge
Not for profit providing free websites that
connect family and friends during a serious
health event, care and recovery.[39]
Cellufun
Mobile social game network[43]
02007-01-012007
3,000,000[44]
Classmates.com
School, college, work and the military
01995-01-011995
50,000,000[46]
Cloob
General. Popular in Iran
02004-01-012004
CouchSurfing
Worldwide network for making connections
between travelers and the communities they 02003-01-012003
visit.
CozyCot
East Asian and Southeast Asian women
02001-01-012001
150,000[52]
Cross.tv
Faith Based social network for Christian
believers from around the world
02008-01-012008
450,000[54]
Crunchyroll
Anime and forums.
02006-01-012006
Cyworld
General. Popular in South Korea.
01999-01-011999
DailyBooth
Photo-blogging site where users upload a
photo every day
02009-02-1313
February 2009
DailyStrength
Medical & emotional support community Physical health, Mental health, Support
groups
02007-11-044
November 2007
delicious
Social bookmarking allowing users to locate
and save websites that match their own
interests
02003-09-01September
2003
deviantART
Art community
02000-08-077 August
2000
Diaspora*
Decentralized, privacy aware, general (open
source)
02010-11-01November
2010
Disaboom
People with disabilities (Amputee, cerebral
palsy, MS, and other disabilities)
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
174
Registered users
9,500,000[40]
2,967,421[50]
24,000,000[57]
8,822,921[61]
22,000,000[63]
370,000+[n 1][65]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Dol2day
Politic community, Social network, Internet
radio (German-speaking countries)
DontStayIn
Clubbing (primarily UK)
Draugiem.lv
General (primarily LV, LT, HU)
douban
Chinese Web 2.0 website providing user
review and recommendation services for
movies, books, and music.
02005-01-012005
46,850,000[73]
Advogato
Free and open source software developers
01999-01-011999
13,575[75]
DXY.cn
Chinese online community for physicians,
health care professionals, pharmacies and
facilities
02000-01-012000[77]
Elftown
Community and wiki around Fantasy and scifi.
Elixio
Business executives jet set and global elite.
English, baby!
Students and teachers of English as a second
02000-01-012000
language
Epernicus
For research scientists
Eons.com
For baby boomers and mature internet users
age 40 and beyond.
eToro
Social Investing, Finance
Experience Project
Life experiences
Exploroo
Travel Social Networking.
Facebook
General: Photos, Videos, Blogs, Apps.
Faceparty
General. Popular UK.
Faces.com
Adult Social Network, Mainly UK & USA
02011-01-012011
Fetlife
People who are into BDSM
02008-01-01January
2008
FilmAffinity
Movies and TV Series
02002-01-012002
Filmow
Movies and TV Series
02009-01-012009
FledgeWing
Entrepreneural community targeted towards
worldwide university students
Flixster
Movies
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
Date launched
Registered users
40,200[68]
2,600,466[71]
2,000,000[78]
185,000[80]
02007-07-01July 2007
80,000[82]
1,600,000[84]
02007-05-01May 2007
02004-02-01February
2004
2,500,000
908,000,000+[91]
200,000[93]
02007-01-012007
175
700,000[95]
1,200,000[97]
250,000[99]
63,000,000[103]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Registered users
Flickr
Photo sharing, commenting, photography
related networking, worldwide
02004-02-01February
2004
32,000,000[105]
Focus.com
Business to Business, worldwide
02005-01-012005
Fotki
Photo sharing, video hosting, photo contests,
journals, forums, flexible privacy protection, 01998-10-01October
friend's feed, audio comments and unlimited 1998
custom design integration.
Fotolog
Photoblogging. Popular in South America and
02002-01-012002
Spain
20,000,000[110]
Foursquare
Location based mobile social network
02009-01-012009
20,000,000[112]
Friendica
Distributed, federated, privacy aware, open
source, general
Friends Reunited
UK based. School, college, work, sport and
streets
02000-07-01July 2000
19,000,000[115]
Friendster
General. Popular in Southeast Asia. No
longer popular in the western world
02002-01-012002
90,000,000[117]
Frühstückstreff
General
02001-07-01July 2001
Fubar
dating, an "online bar" for 18 and older
02007-10-01October
2007
Fuelmyblog
Blogging community
02007-07-01July 2007
FullCircle
Geosocial networking and location-based
services portal for mobile devices
02009-04-01April 2009
Gaia Online
Anime and games. Popular in USA, Canada
and Europe. Moderately popular around
Asia.
GamerDNA
Computer and video games
02006-09-2121
September 2006
Gapyear.com
Travel social network
01998-07-01July 1998
Gather.com
Article, picture, and video sharing, as well as
group discussions
Gays.com
Social network for LGBT community, Guide
for LGBT bars, restaurants, clubs, shopping
02008-05-1616 May
2008
Geni.com
Families, genealogy
02007-01-1616 January
2007
15,000,000[134]
GetGlue
Social network for entertainment
02008-10-2828 October
2008
2,000,000[136]
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
176
850,000[107]
1,632,565
14,800
1,200,000[120]
50,000[122]
23,523,663[125]
310,000[127]
465,000[130]
100,000[132]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Registered users
Gogoyoko
Fair play in Music - Social networking site for
musicians and music lovers
Goodreads
Library cataloging, book lovers
02006-12-01December
2006
10,000,000[139]
Goodwizz
Social network with matchmaking and
personality games to find new contacts.
Global, based in France.
02010-10-01October
2010
110,000[141][142]
Google+
General
02011-06-2828 June
2011
250,000,000[144]
GovLoop
For people in and around government
Grono.net
Poland
Habbo
General for teens. Over 31 communities
worldwide. Chat room and user profiles.
hi5
General. Popular in Nepal, Mongolia,
Thailand, Romania, Jamaica, Central Africa,
02003-01-012003
Portugal and Latin America. Not very popular
in the USA.
Hospitality Club
Hospitality
Hotlist
Geo-Social Aggregator rooted in the concept
of knowing where users' friends are, were,
and will be.
HR.com
Social networking site for Human Resources
professionals
01999-01-011999
Hub Culture
Global influencers focused on worth creation
02002-11-01November
2002
20,000[160]
Hyves
General, mostly popular in the Netherlands.
02004-09-01September
2004
10,097,000[162]
Ibibo
Talent based social networking site that
allows to promote one's self and also
discover new talent. Most popular in India.
Identi.ca
Twitter-like service popular with hackers and
software freedom advocates.
Indaba Music
Online collaboration for musicians, remix
contests, and networking.
350,000[167]
IRC-Galleria
Finland
505,000[169]
italki.com
Language learning social network. 100+
languages.
500,000[171]
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
2,000,000
02000-08-01August
2000
268,000,000
80,000,000[152]
328,629[154]
177
80,000[156]
194,000[158]
3,500,000[164]
395,695[citation
needed]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Itsmy
Mobile community worldwide, blogging,
friends, personal TV-shows
iWiW
Hungary
02002-04-1414 April
2002
Jaiku
General. Microblogging. Owned by Google
02006-02-01February
2006
Jiepang
Location based mobile social network. In
Chinese language
02010-01-012010
3,000,000[178]
Kaixin001
General. In Simplified Chinese; caters for
mainland China users
Kiwibox
General.
01999-01-011999
2,400,000[181]
Lafango
Talent-Focused media sharing site
LAGbook
African-based Social Networking Site.
Popular in Germany, Denmark, France,
China, Hong Kong, Australia, Israel, Pakistan,
02010-04-1717 April
Turkey, United Kingdom, United States,
2010
Indonesia, Bangladesh, Malaysia, Philippines,
Canada, India, Romania, Mexico and
especially Nigeria.[184][185]
310,000
LaiBhaari
Marathi social networking
02010-01-012010
250,000
Last.fm
Music
02002-01-012002
30,000,000[189]
LibraryThing
Book lovers
02005-08-2929 August
2005
1,300,000[191]
Lifeknot
Shared interests, hobbies
LinkedIn
Business and professional networking
02003-05-01May 2003
160,000,000[194]
LinkExpats
Social networking website for expatriates.
100+ countries.
Listography
Lists. Autobiography
LiveJournal
Blogging. Popular in Russia and among the
Russian-speaking diaspora abroad.
Livemocha
Online language learning
Makeoutclub
General
MEETin
General
Meetup (website)
General. Used to plan offline meetings for
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
Date launched
Registered users
2,500,000[173]
01999-04-1515 April
1999
4,000,000[175]
17,564,977[198]
5,000,000[200]
01999-08-099 August
1999
178
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Registered users
people interested in various activities
Meettheboss
Business and Finance community,
worldwide.
MillatFacebook
General, Created in Response to Facebook
[206]
02010-05-01May 2010
mixi
Japan
02000-10-2525 October
2000
MocoSpace
mobile community, worldwide
2005
MOG
Music
MouthShut.com
Social Network, social media, consumer
reviews
Mubi
Auteur cinema
MyHeritage
family-oriented social network service
30,000,000 [216]
MyLife
Locating friends and family, keeping in touch
(formerly Reunion.com)
51,000,000[218]
My Opera
Blogging, mobile blogging, photo sharing,
connecting with friends, Opera Link and
Opera Unite. Global
Myspace
General
Nasza-klasa.pl
School, college and friends. Popular in
Poland
11,000,000[224]
Netlog
General. Popular in Europe, Turkey, the Arab
World and Canada's Québec province.
Formerly known as Facebox and
Redbox.[226]
95,000,000[227]
Nexopia
Canada
NGO Post
Non-Profit news sharing and networking,
mainly in India
Ning
Users create their own social websites and
social networks
Odnoklassniki
Connect with old classmates. Popular in
Russia and former Soviet republics
Open Diary
First online blogging community, founded in
01998-01-011998
1998
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
461,200[207]
24,323,160[209]
3,000,000[211]
200,000
7,300,000[220]
02003-08-01August
2003
30,000,000
1,400,000[229]
179
15,000[232]
02005-01-012005
(Networks 2007)
45,000,000[235]
5,000,000[237]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Orkut
General. Owned by Google Inc. Popular in
India and Brazil.[239]
02004-01-2222 January
2004
OUTeverywhere
Gay/LGBTQ Community
Passportstamp
Travel
PatientsLikeMe
Online community for patients with lifechanging illnesses to find other patients like
them, share their data with others, and learn 02006-01-012006
more about their condition to improve their
outcome.
Partyflock
Dutch virtual community for people
interested in house music and other
electronic dance music
Pingsta
Collaborative platform for the world's
Internetwork Experts
Pinterest
Online pinboard for organizing and sharing
things you love
Plaxo
Aggregator
PureVolume
Connecting indie music bands and listeners,
02003-01-012003
through music sharing and social networking
Playfire
Computer and video games
Playlist.com
General, Music
Plurk
Micro-blogging, RSS, updates. Very popular
in Taiwan
Qapacity
A a business-oriented social networking site
and a business directory
Quechup
General, friendship, dating
Qzone
General. In Simplified Chinese; caters for
mainland China users
Raptr
Video games
Ravelry
Knitting and crochet
Renren
Significant site in China. Was known as 校内
(Xiaonei) until August 2009.
ReverbNation.com
Social network for musician and bands
500,000[264]
Ryze
Business
500,000[266]
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
Registered users
100,000,000[240]
109,587[244]
02001-11-1010
November 2001
321,125
02011-01-012011
50,000,000[249]
02012-01-01
02007-01-012007
480,000,000
1,814,460[260]
180
160,000,000[262]
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
ScienceStage
Science-oriented multimedia platform and
network for scientists
ShareTheMusic
Music Community. Sharing and listening to
music for free and legally
Shelfari
Books
02006-10-1111 October
2006
Sina Weibo
Social microblogging site in Mainland China.
02009-08-1414 August
2009
Skoob
Collaborative social network for Brazilian
readers
02009-01-012009
Skyrock
Social Network in French-speaking world
SocialVibe
Social Network for Charity
Sonico.com
General. Popular in Latin America and
Spanish and Portuguese speaking regions.
SoundCloud
Repository of original music pieces and
networking.
Spaces
Russian Social Network targeted to mobile
phone users
Stickam
Live video streaming and chat.
StudiVZ
University students, mostly in the Germanspeaking countries. School students and
those out of education sign up via its partner
sites schülerVZ and meinVZ.
Students Circle
Network
A Social Network connecting students,
02010-12-01December
teachers and institutions to course
2010
resources, study groups and learning spaces.
StumbleUpon
Stumble through websites that match users'
selected interests
Tagged
General.
Talkbiznow
Business networking
Taltopia
Online artistic community
Taringa!
General (primarily Argentina)
TeachStreet
Education / Learning / Teaching - More than
400 subjects
TermWiki
Learning / Languages / Translation - 1.2m
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
Date launched
Registered users
300,000,000[271]
420,000[273]
22,000,000[275]
435,000
50,000,000[278][279]
10,000,000[281]
9,000,000[284]
17,000,000[286]
20,000,000[289]
October 2004
100,000,000[291]
11,000,000[295]
181
02010-05-01May 2010
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Registered users
terms in more than 1300 subjects
The Sphere
A Private Online Social Luxury Network with
Exclusive Personalized Services
02008-12-01December
2008
TravBuddy.com
Travel
02005-01-012005
1,588,000[301]
Travellerspoint
Travel
02002-01-012002
310,000[303]
tribe.net
General
Trombi.com
French subsidiary of Classmates.com
Tuenti
Spanish-based university and High School
social network.
Twitter
General. Micro-blogging, RSS, updates
02006-07-1515 July
2006
500,000,000[310]
Vkontakte
General, including music upload, listening
and search. Popular in Russia and former
Soviet republics.
02006-09-01September
2006
123,612,100[313]
Vampirefreaks.com Gothic and industrial subculture
Viadeo
Global Social Networking and Campus
Networking available in English, French,
German, Spanish, Italian and Portuguese
Virb
Social network that focuses heavily on
artists, including musicians and
photographers
Vox
Blogging
Wakoopa
For computer fans that want to discover new
software and games
Wattpad
For readers and authors to interact & e-book
sharing
WAYN
Travel and lifestyle
WeeWorld
Teenagers - 10 to 17
Wellwer
Community without borders, where sharing
is everything.
WeOurFamily
General with emphasis on privacy and
security
Wepolls.com
Social polling network
Wer-kennt-wen
General
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
1,300[299]
4,400,000[306]
12,000,000[308]
01999-01-011999
1,931,049[315]
35,000,000[317]
02007-01-012007
100,000
02003-05-01May 2003
10,000,000[323]
30,000,000[325]
182
02011-09-01
September 2011
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Name
Description/Focus
Date launched
Registered users
weRead
Books
02007-06-01June 2007
4,000,000
Wiser.org
Online community space for the social justice
02007-04-01April 2007
and environmental movement[332]
71,600[333]
Wooxie
Blogging and micro-blogging
WriteAPrisoner.com Site networking inmates, friends, family
02000-09-01September
2000
Xanga
Blogs and "metro" areas
Unknown
XING
Business (primarily Europe (Germany,
Austria, Switzerland))
Xt3
Catholic social networking, created after
World Youth Day 2008
Yammer
Social networking for office colleagues
Yelp, Inc.
Local Business Review and Talk
Zoo.gr
Greek Web Meeting point
Zooppa
Online Community for Creative Talent (host
of brand sponsored advertising contests)
66,000[336]
27,000,000[338]
11,100,000[340]
02008-01-012008
02004-01-012004
890,000[345]
60,000[347]
*sourced from www.wikipedia.org
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
183
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Some Internet Chat and Drug Lingo
Lingo to warn of Parental Monitoring
POS
Parent Over Shoulder
PAW
Parents Are Watching
PIR
Parent In Room
PAL
Parents Are Listening
P911
Parent Alert
KPC
Keeping Parents Clueless
Internet lingo of social or sexual nature
WYCM
Will You Call Me?
HAK
Hugs And Kisses
ASL
Age/Sex/Location
ILU or ILY
I Love You
MorF
Male or Female
KOTL
Kiss On The Lips
KFY
Kiss For You
SMIM
Send Me an Instant Message
MOOS
Member(s) Of the Opposite Sex
SMEM
Send Me an E-Mail
ADR
Address
WUF
Where Are You From?
LMIRL
Let's Meet In Real Life
WYRN
What's Your Real Name?
Similar to Internet lingo, drug nomenclature can be cryptic. Parents can monitor for drug
use by learning popular drug lingo and asking questions. A few examples of popular drug
lingo are listed below; a database containing more than 2,300 street terms is also
available.
Marijuana Lingo
Pot–Grass–Dope–Weed–Bud–Mary Jane–Ganja–Whacky Backy
Alternative names for Marijuana
Kind Bud
An expensive and potent strain of marijuana
Blunt
Marijuana rolled into a Philly Blunt or similar type of cigar
Bong
A large water filtered pipe for smoking marijuana
Prescription Drug
Pharming
Raiding medical cabinets to trade and consume prescription drugs to get high
Robotripping
Drinking cough medicine to get high (comes from the brand name Robitussin)
Lean
Drinking prescription cough syrup mixed with painkillers and soda
O
Oxycontin
Tweaking
High on amphetamines
Blue Boogers
Snorting Adderall or Ritalin
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
184
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Emoticons
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
=^D
Big grin
8-o
Shocked
8
Infinity
=^*
Kisses
8-O
Astonished
8-#
Death
:(
Sad
8-P
Yuck!
\_/
Empty glass
:.(
Crying
8-]
Wow!
~/
Full glass
:|
Bored, sad
8-|
Wide-eyed surprise
]:-)
Happy devil
}: [
Angry, frustrated
8 :-)
Wizard
]:->
Devil
8-)
Wide-eyed, or wearing glasses
8-[
Frayed nerves; overwrought
][
Back to back
:-D
Laughing
:'
Crying
^5
High five
:-(
Frown
:'(
Crying
`:-)
Raised eyebrow
(-:
Left-handed smile, or smiley from
the southern hemisphere
:'-(
Crying
d :-o
Hats off to you!
>:)
Little devil
:'-)
Tears of happiness
{}
No comment
:-{)
Smile with moustache
:*)
Clowning
|(
Sleepy (on late night email
message)
:-{)}
Smile with moustache and beard
:+(
Got punched in the nose
|-(
Sleepy, struggling to stay awake,
or sleeping badly
:-/
Wry face
:,(
Crying
|-<>
Puckered up for a kiss
:-#
My lips are sealed; or someone
wearing braces
:-
Male
|-D
Big laugh
:[email protected]
Screaming
:-'|
Sniffles
|-O
Yawn
>:-<
Angry
:-*
Kiss
|-{
Good grief!
:/)
Not funny
:-,
Smirk
|-|
Asleep
()
Hugging
:-6
Exhausted
|I
Asleep
((()))
Lots of hugging (initials or a name
can be put in the middle of the
one being hugged)
:-9
Licking lips
|^o
Snoring
*
Kiss
:-<
Very sad
[]
Hug
+<:-|
Monk or nun
:-><
Puckered up to kiss
[[ ]]
Hug Insert a name in the
brackets of the one who is being
hugged, as: [[Marcia]]
:**:
Returning kiss
:->
Smile of happiness or
sarcasm
}-)
Wry smile
:-&
Tongue-tied
:-C
Astonished
}{
Face to face
:-?
Licking lips, or tongue in cheek
:-I
Pondering, or impartial
~ :-(
Steaming mad
:( )
Loudmouth, talks all the time; or
shouting
:-M
Speak no evil
~:-(
Flame message
^^^
Giggles
:-P
Sticking out tongue
~~:-(
Especially hot flame message
{{ }}
Hug; the one whose name is in
the brackets is being hugged
Example: {{MJ}}
:-Q~
Smoking
~:-\
Elvis
P*
French kiss
:-V
Shouting
~:\
Elvis
%(|:-)
Propeller-head
:-Y
Aside comment
( 8(|)
Homer
:-)
Classic smiley
:-]
Smiling blockhead; also
sarcasm
7:)
Ronald Reagan
;-)
Winkey
:-[
Unsmiling blockhead; also
criticism
7:^)
Ronald Reagan
=O
Surprised
:-c
Very unhappy
>-<
Furious
:-O
Open-mouthed, surprised
:-d~
Heavy smoker
?(
Black eye
-)
Tongue in cheek
:-e
Disappointed
?-(
Black eye
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
185
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
;P
Wink with a raspberry
:-f
Sticking out tongue
@==
Atomic bomb
>=^ P
Yuck
:-i
Wry smile or half-smile
@>--->---
A long-stemmed rose
:-Q
Tongue hanging out in disgust, or
a smoker
:-j
One-sided smile
@}->--
Rose
:P
Sticking out tongue
:-k
Puzzlement
B:-)
Sunglasses on head
Q:-)
College graduate
:-l
One-sided smile
M-)
See no evil
:-X
My lips are sealed; or a kiss
:-o
Surprised look, or yawn
M-), :X, :-M
See no evil, hear no evil, speak
no evil
8)
Wide-eyed, or wearing glasses
:-p
Sticking tongue out
M:-)
A salute
:[
Bored, sad
:-p~
Heavy smoker
O8-)
Starry-eyed angel
:*
Kiss
:-r
Sticking tongue out
O 8-)
Starry-eyed angel
:)
Smile
:-s
What?!
O:-)
Angel
;)
Wink
:-t
Unsmiley
O :-)
Angel
=X
My lips are sealed
:-x
Kiss, or My lips are sealed
O+
Female
:-J
Tongue in cheek
:-{}
Blowing a kiss
O->
Male
!-(
Black eye
:-|
Indifferent, bored or
disgusted
X-(
Just died
!-)
Proud of black eye
:-| :-|
Deja vu
[:-)
Wearing a Walkman
#-)
Wiped out, partied all night
:-||
Very angry
[:-]
Square head
#:-o
Shocked
:-}
Mischievous smile
[:-|
Frankenstein
$-)
Won the lottery, or money on the
brain
:-~|
A cold
[:]
Robot
%*}
Inebriated
:/i
No smoking
[:|
Frankenstein
%+{
Got beat up
:>
What?
[:|]
Robot
%-)
Dazed or silly
:@
What?
~=
Lit candle, indicating a flame
(inflammatory message)
%-(
Confused
:C
Astonished
~==
Begins a flame (inflammatory
message)
%-6
Brain-dead
:X
Hear no evil
~:o
Baby
%-|
Worked all night
:^D
Happy, approving
~~:[
Net flame
%-{
Ironic
:`-(
Shedding a tear
~~~~8}
Snake
%-}
Humorous or ironic
:x
Kiss
~~~~~8}
Snake
%\
Hangover
:e
Disappointed
IOHO
In Our Humble Opinion
')
Winky
:~-(
Crying
///\
Laughter
'-)
Winky
:-~)
A cold
( <> .. <> )
alienated
(( )):**
Hugs and kisses
:{
Having a hard time
5:-)
Elvis
(:&
Angry
:~)
A cold
>-
Female
(:-
Unsmiley
:~/
Confused
[email protected]>--->--
A dozen roses
(:-&
Angry
;(
Crying
2B|^2B
To be or not to be
(:-(
Unsmiley
;-(
Angry, or got a black eye
>->
Winking devil
(:-)
Smiley variation
;-D
Winking and laughing
>>:-<<
Furious
(:-*
Kiss
<:>
Devilish expression
+O:-)
The Pope
(:-\
Very sad
<:->
Devilish expression
-=
Snuffed candle to end a flame
message
(::()::)
Bandaid, meaning comfort
<:-(
Dunce
-=#:-)
Wizard
(:|
Egghead
<:-)
Innocently asking dumb
question
0:-)
Angel
*-)
Shot to death
<:-|
Dunce
>:-)
Mischievous devil
*<|:-)
Santa Claus, or a clown
<:|
Dunce
>:-<
Mad
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
186
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]
Using the Internet Safely
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
Word
Definition
*<:-)
Santa Claus
=):-)=
Abraham Lincoln
>:->
Very mischievous devil
+:-)
Priest
=:-)
Punk, or hosehead
>-)
Devilish wink
+<:-)
Religious leader
=====:}
Snake
>:-(
Annoyed
© Eye PAT Community Interest Company
Version 3 2012-2013
187
www.eyepat.org
[email protected]

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