Bread Group - Freedom from Torture

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Bread Group - Freedom from Torture
Forough’s Lavash bread
Ramesh’s Khamira bread
Camille’s Mugaati bread
Lavash is a savoury flatbread that puffs up during cooking and
then deflates. Eat them like you would naan bread or tortilla.
Khamira bread are like small doughnuts. They can either be
rolled in sugar or served with chutney as a savoury snack.
The recipe makes enough to share - about 75 small doughnuts!
Mugaati is a bread for special occasions and is very rich.
Enjoy warm with jam. Makes 8 large rolls or 16 smaller ones.
50
2 cups (2
ast
n dried ye
o
o
1 teasp
lt
n sa
1 teaspoo
)
ter (30˚C
n sugar
o
o
warm wa
½ teasp
l)
m
5
7
-3
0
s (25
1-1.5 cup
ix.
wl and m
ts in a bo
n
ie
d
re
g
water.
all dry in
25ml) of
(1
p
u
• Place
c
½
add
well and
• Make a
spoon.
r into the
h a large
f the wate sticky.
o
r
e
d
in
• Mix wit
a
le
the rem
d is a litt
ally, add
gether an
to
s
• Gradu
e
m
o
til it c
place.
dough un
in a warm
e
rule of
d
si
a
t
is a good
and se
r
u
r
o
e
h
v
o
e
C
n
•
w times.
les (o
ugh doub
nch it a fe
o
u
d
p
e
d
n
th
a
e
r
n
cove
• Onc
(size of a
move the
small ball
ing
a
p
e
p
thumb), re
k
o
h
ta
c
d
tes an
overed
u
c
r
in
u
m
o
0
fl
1
a
r
n
• Wait fo ugh and place it o
o
d
f
o
)
g
g
e
heat a
ernatively
lt
a
r
o
e
v
board.
o
t on the st
flat skille
a
t
in
a
e
H
•
a rolling p
g pan.
roll with
d
n
a
large fryin
it
r
flour ove
le a little
thick.
• Sprink
bout 2mm
a
is
an.
it
l
ti
.
un
r frying p
other side
t skillet o
o
h
e
th
cook the
n
d
o
n
e
a
c
r
la
e
P
v
•
, turn it o
cool.
lly puffed
fu
e
c
n
O
ke racks to
a
•
c
n
o
sh
va
ere is no
cooked la
• Place
let and th
il
sk
e
dough
th
m rolled
stick to
o
t
fr
o
n
r
u
o
ld
u
fl
h sho
off excess
The doug
will burn.
rst. Shake
fi
it
il
o
n a skillet
o
ft
le
r
need to
u
o
oking as fl
before co
n
Preparatio
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111 Isledon Road, London N7 7JW
Registered Charity Nos. 1000340/SC039632
Bread group leaflet 25.06.14 amended page sizes.indd 1
Ingredients
½ cup (100g) of
sugar
1 teaspoon yeast
1 litre warm wat
er or milk (30˚C)
7 cups (900g) plai
n flour
½ cup (125ml) oi
l or melted butt
er
1 teaspoon caraw
ay seeds
½ teaspoon baki
ng powder
1 egg
½ teaspoon grou
nd cardamom (c
rushed and husk
removed)
Vegetable oil for
deep-frying.
Preparation
• We mix yeas
t with the water
/milk first then
everything toge
add
ther to make th
e dough.
• We leave that
for half an hour
in a warm place
rise. Then we ro
to
ll out the dough
1 cm thick and cu
it into small, wal
t
nut-sized pieces
.
• We then deep
fry it in vegetabl
e oil (185˚C) and
cook it until gold
en brown. Keep
a close eye on th
while frying!
em
• Remove with
a slotted spoon
and drain them
excess oil on kitc
of
hen paper before
serving.
ts
Ingrediens of dried yeast
n
2 teaspoo
gar
ons of su
o
p
s
le
b
2 ta
n of salt
1 teaspoo
table oil
ter/vege
t
u
b
1 Egg
d
e
lt
0ml) me
our
1 cup (25
50g) of fl
-5
5
2
(5
s
p
u
r (30˚C)
4¼-4½ c
arm wate
w
f
o
l)
m
0
1 cup (25
d
hen knea
an bowl t
le
It
c
y.
a
g
in
in
r
together
til it is sp
erything
tes or un
u
in
m
5
• Mix ev
h for 10-1
the doug
y.
uite stick
will be q
rise until
and let it
s
e
t
u
in
r 45-60 m
rest it fo
• Then
in size.
doubled
apes you
ke the sh
a
the
m
d
n
a
tray
ur to stop en
g
o
fl
in
k
e
a
m
b
o
e
s
v
e th
h, adding ds. Put it in the o
• Greas
the doug
n
a
m
h
o
r
.
fr
u
n
t
o
w
n
y
ro
wa
g to
golden b
m stickin
tes until
u
in
dough fro
m
5
for 30-4
at 180˚C
ion
Preparat
Registered charity nos. 1000340/SC039632
ts
Ingredieng) plain flour
“
“
Do you have a message of support for the Bread Group?
Please write it here and send it back with your donation.
And if you have a recipe you think they’d like to try,
please include that too. They’d love to hear from you.
All pictures taken at the Bread Group,
London centre.
30/06/2014 15:11
“
You give Camille a family.
“
Camille, 29, Uganda
When I got to my room I just cried,
and cried and cried. I just kept thinking
about being sent back to that torture.
I cried for everything I went through,
and I cried for two days. I didn’t even
notice the weekend go by. Every time
I shut my eyes I got flashbacks. My
headaches got really, really bad. I felt
I couldn’t take it anymore. I started
taking pain killers…
The next thing I remember is being in
hospital. They kept asking me why I did it,
I couldn’t explain, I was ashamed.
Bread group leaflet 25.06.14 amended page sizes.indd 2
Even through the torture, I’ve always
tried to be strong.
Back home, they are looking for me.
Living like this is unexplainable. You
feel worthless, hopeless, empty. You put
everything – your whole life – on hold.
You don’t feel like a human being.
The Bread Group is important – it’s like
a family to me. It’s only at the Bread
Group where I can be completely myself
and talk about my worries. It’s like
taking a 60lb weight off my shoulders.
Everyone listens, we talk about how
we cope and we take advice from each
other. They give me the strength to
carry on.
“
When I found out I couldn’t work, it was
like the sky had come down on top of
me. I came here to be protected, out
of pure desperation, and now I might be
thrown out.
Nasih, 42, Eritrea
When I was captured and forced to live
as a child soldier, I was fed with hard stale
bread. I have problems with my jaw now
that makes it difficult to chew food.
The Bread Group was an opportunity to
face up to my past. At first I couldn’t bake.
But after watching the others, and talking
with the group, I found I was able to.
After I fled I wouldn’t go near bread.
Even hearing the word made me feel
a pain in my jaw. It reminded me of the
things I had been forced to see, to do.
It has helped me open up and talk about
what happened to me, and realise that
I can have a future. Now I am volunteering
in a school and studying at university
to be a teacher.
Not being allowed to work has really
depressed me. It makes me feel like
a reject. I want to help myself and
my family, they are my responsibility,
but here I can’t do anything.
If someone enjoys your baking it’s
nice, it makes you feel happy. It’s
an accomplishment.
“
Where I am from, this is an important skill.
When you become a baker, it means you
can provide for your family.
I’m getting better at baking, we can take
some home and the rest we share with staff
and other survivors in the waiting area at the
centre. It gives me something to work for.
Forough, 56, Iran
I use my mum’s recipe. I called her and
asked her how to make it. I had never
baked before I joined the Bread Group.
It makes my mum happy that I can still
eat her bread. It makes me feel like
I am home.
This group is my family now.
“
Camille and her new friends rely on us
being here every week, and we rely on
you to make it happen. You give them
the one thing that keeps them going
from week to week – each other.
Joseph, 36, Ghana
“
In our Bread Group, torture survivors can
begin to find hope and companionship
again. Sharing something as basic as
baking bread with other survivors who
understand what they’ve been through
gives them the space to open up and
relax with each other.
Baking bread is a positive and therapeutic
activity. Here, they have the freedom to
be themselves and talk as much, or as
little, as they want. For Camille, it’s the
closest she can get to home.
“
Camille knows that she faces torture
again or even death if she ever tries
to return home. She may never see
her family again. Haunted by flashbacks
and fear, it’s next to impossible to find
people she feels she can trust.
“
30/06/2014 15:11

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